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A New Jersey lawmaker suggests the government turned ticks and insects into bioweapons to spread disease and possibly released them

The US House of Representatives has called for an investigation into whether the spread of Lyme disease had its roots in a Pentagon experiment in weaponising ticks.

The House approved an amendment proposed by a Republican congressman from New Jersey, Chris Smith, instructing the defence department’s inspector general to conduct a review of whether the US “experimented with ticks and … insects regarding use as a biological weapon between the years of 1950 and 1975”.

…”Smith said the amendment was inspired by “a number of books and articles suggesting that significant research had been done at US government facilities including Fort Detrick, Maryland, and Plum Island, New York, to turn ticks and … insects into bioweapons”.

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https://doi.org/10.3928/01477447-20190627-01 Abstract

Periprosthetic infections occur in approximately 0.8% to 1.9% of all total knee arthroplasties (TKAs). Even with these low rates, it is rare to find a zoonotic bacterium causing a periprosthetic infection. In this case report, the authors identify the second documented case of a total joint infection with Francisella tularensis in the world and the first in the United States. A 58-year-old man underwent a left TKA in 1994 and a right TKA in 1997 for severe primary bilateral knee osteoarthrosis. In 2015, he underwent polyethylene exchange for polyethylene wear. Subsequently, he developed repeated effusion without fever or constitutional signs of infection. One aspiration was sent for culture and grew F tularensis. He was treated with doxycycline for chronic suppression and currently has no signs of infection. Total joint implantation rates are expected to rise, with 3.5 million procedures projected to be performed annually by the year 2030 vs 450,000 procedures performed in 2005. With the increased number of operations, it is likely that zoonotic infections will increase as well. Thus, rare zoonotic bacterial infections as well as chronic outdoor exposure in the presence of persistent joint swelling should be considered when obtaining a patient history. [Orthopedics. 2019; 4x(x):xx–xx.]

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[CanLyme note: Very important in the article is recognition by the Infectious Disease physician author is that there is no good definition for Lyme disease, no good tests, and no biomarkers for B. burgdorferi or for (PTLDS (post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome). If we simply continue continue down the dark path lead by the CDC and IDSA we will continue to ignore untold thousands of people in all countries who follow the dreadful CDC/IDSA diagnostic protocol for diagnosis and treatment. Coinfections are also a confounder of diagnosis and treatment as is the wide diversity within the genus Borrelia.]

July 4th, 2019

An article appeared in this week’s New York Times, “My Son Got Lyme Disease. He’s Totally Fine. Horror stories about lingering Lyme disease proliferate, but the illness is easily treated.” While I am delighted that author Apoorva Mandavilli’s son had a good outcome, I feel a need to respond to aspects of the story that I, a Board Certified Infectious Diseases physician who lives in a Lyme endemic area and has had Lyme, found misleading and disturbing.

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“As we discovered in the few weeks of his diagnosis and treatment, many people view Lyme — wrongly — as a debilitating, chronic illness instead of what it is: An easily treated infection with no long-term consequences for children, or even the vast majority of adults.”

To which I say to Ms. Mandavilli: How fortunate for you and your family that your son responded well to a short course of antibiotics. But HOW DARE YOU presume that because your child lucked out in this case, Lyme is therefore an “easily treated infection with no long-term consequences for children”?

Long-term consequences

Back in the mid-2000s, my then-teenage daughter spent three years in a wheelchair due to Lyme disease. Believe me, the “long-term consequences” lasted far beyond those three years. And I know of many children—and adults—who are wheelchair/bedbound for much longer than that. Some eventually recover and some don’t.” …….

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“Evidence of a Powassan virus infection affecting the spinal cord has, until now, only been seen in mouse studies. But a new article describes the first known case of a 62-year-old man from Canada who developed a polio-like illness caused by the Powassan virus (POWV).”

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Celine Moreau, CTV London 
Published Thursday, June 27, 2019 3:34PM EDT 

A rare tick has been found in London, and it has gotten the conversation going when it comes to ticks and tick-borne illnesses.

The Lone Star tick is native to the southern United States and Mexico, and it’s a tick that has made its way to London and the Oakridge Animal Clinic.

“We had a client bring in a tick they found on their cat, a cat that had no travel history and is local to the Medway Creek area, and the owner brought in the tick and it was still alive when they brought it in,” says Dr. Gillian Egli, veterinarian and owner of Oakridge Animal Clinic.

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June 27th, 2019

DONNA LUGAR

I participated in a “Tick Talk” in Bedford with Lisa Ali Learning of AtlanTick on June 25. One takeaway from that meeting, for me anyway, is that we are not doing enough to ensure Nova Scotians are adequately aware of the risks associated with tick bites. One family, new to the country, had never even heard of ticks before one recently attached to their child.

Although there has been a steady increase in awareness initiatives over the past few years, we need to continue to do more to reduce the number of new cases of Lyme and tick-borne diseases. One way to do this is through more “in your face” awareness, such as signage, print media and radio/TV alerts. Nova Scotians need to reach out to all three levels of government to request that more is done.

Nova Scotians need to know that any tick that bites them could potentially …

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The IDSA has presented their draft guidelines which with a brief scan appear not much different then their old controversial poorly evidenced guidelines.  Much of the same old players and 3 token patients. Typical unequal representation.

Public comments close August 10th.

Take your time, make notes before you enter their controlled comment format process as you have to submit all your comments in one sitting.  Here are their instructions…

Instructions

In this form, you are given 20 opportunities to enter your comments on the guideline. Please note that you will need to complete your review in one sitting as your work in progress cannot be saved. Once you hit the “Save and Next” button at the end, your responses will be recorded and saved. If at the end you have additional comments, please click “Enter Additional Comments” and complete the survey again.

For each comment, you must select which section of the guideline your comment relates to:

  • General comments on entire draft
  • Introduction & methods
  • Tick bites prevention and prophylaxis of Lyme disease
  • Early localized Lyme disease (erythema migrans)
  • Neurologic Lyme disease
  • Lyme carditis
  • Lyme arthritis
  • Prolonged symptoms following treatment of Lyme disease
  • Cutaneous manifestations of Eurasian Lyme disease
  • Lyme disease coinfections
  • Supplement Materials
For each comment, you must be specific (section, page number, line and/or table number, comment).
Any questions marked with an asterisk (*) require an answer in order to progress through the comment form.
You must click “Save and Next” at the bottom of each page or your responses will not be saved.
If you have any questions about the comment form, please contact IDSA at PracticeGuidelines@idsociety.org.”

————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Here are the guidelines https://view.protectedpdf.com/ad6GFZ 

Their website to submit comments https://www.idsociety.org/lymepubliccomments

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[CanLyme Note: It is nice to hear that the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) may be actually taking this seriously finally. Mothers in Ontario and at many other children’s hospitals across Canada were accused of having Munchausen by Proxy simply because they fought for their children’s rights after a negative test for Lyme disease or misdiagnosis of some other condition. A negative test via the current Canadian protocol means absolutely nothing, as the testing protocol in no way rules out Lyme disease contrary to what alleged experts have been telling us for years. The children only got their life back after the mothers fought back and more often than not paid out of pocket needlessly for treatment that the Canadian health care system still to this day refuses based upon no good science whatsoever. Unnecessary deaths and a lifetime of disability has been the result, all under the management of the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease of Canada (AMMI). Tehir polich more often than not misses the diagnosis then PHAC and AMMI fear monger about antibiotic resistance as a reason not to treat effectively. Yet, they offer a 1 or 2 pill only “prevention” dose to people who have had a known tick attachment that the ‘non-tick trained doctor’ is supposed to identify as far as the species of tick, and have the crystal ball knowledge of where Lyme endemic areas in Canada for a disease spread randomly by migratory birds. There is zero chance that a doctor has sufficient knowledge to make that call. Offering only 1 or 2 pills to treat a potential infection will increase antibiotic resistance as it educates our entire microbiome of organisms to a taste of the antibiotic to pass on to their offspring. That is what drives resistance… not treating effectively.]

Joanne Schnurr, CTV Ottawa
Published Wednesday, June 26, 2019 

An Ottawa mother is warning parents to check their kids carefully for ticks after her toddler was diagnosed with Lyme disease over the weekend.

Jenny Willis believes her 2-year-old got bitten while playing in a backyard.

Willis knows more about deer ticks than she cares to; Lyme disease attacked her husband’s heart 3 years ago.  Now her daughter contracted it, confirming current research by CHEO that Lyme cases among kids is significantly on the rise.

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June 24th, 2019

“Lavigne says she wrote all of the songs sitting in her bed or on the couch while the effects of Lyme disease made her body feel like it was shutting down.

“I felt like I was drowning. Like I was going under water and I just needed to come up for air,” she said last year in a statement.”

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