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Photo credit: Fabrique de Bouchons

Enter what was once a cork factory dating back to 1845, and you’ll embark on a journey in uncorking a top selection of French wines and in feasting on gourmet cuisine to match. Chef Fabien Sam opened his first restaurant Fabrique de Bouchons following stints at Chateaubriand and Cru, among other respected establishments.

Vegetarian plate. Photo credit: Fabrique de Bouchons

Located in the bustling Batignolles neighborhood in Paris’s 17th district, Fabrique de Bouchons welcomes diners with its intimate space and inviting terrace. Chef Sam’s unique gastronomic dishes using seasonal market produce have put his name on the Paris food map. Not only does he know how to well-balance a plate, but each dish is also decoratively dressed.

Asparagus dish. Photo credit: Fabrique de Bouchons

A taste of his daily changing lunch and dinner menus might include an artful composition of monkfish with pink curry, kumquats with lime kefir and carrots with oriental spices. His vegetarian dishes are plentiful too, skillfully combining a multitude of tastes to create seasonal delicacies. Chef Sam also excels at desserts. Take his rose chocolate tart with raspberry and beetroot-raspberry sorbet – the perfect ending to a meal. (Another stand-out dessert is the “rouleau de pomme confite au caramel” served with ice cream flavored with tonka beans and hazelnuts.)

Chef Fabien Sam. Photo credit: Fabrique de Bouchons

This restaurant is very popular in the neighborhood, and fills up with a lively local crowd. In case you can’t score a table at Fabrique de Bouchons, head next door to Chef Fabien Sam’s second restaurant, Kalypso Comptoir Marin, where fusion seafood plates take inspiration from around the world.

A pork dish. Photo credit: Fabrique de Bouchons

Fabrique de Bouchons
17 Rue Brochant, 75017
Tel: +33 (0)1 58 59 06 47
Open Tuesday-Friday Noon-2:00 / 7:30-10:00. Saturday 7:30-10:00. Closed Sunday and Monday.
The lunch menu is priced at 20 euros for appetizer and main course, or main and dessert; 23 euros for appetizer, main, and dessert.

Summer menu. Photo credit: Fabrique de Bouchons

The post Fabrique de Bouchons: Where to Eat in the 17th arrondissement appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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The rooftop view from Au Top. Courtesy of Au Top

This spring, Paris’s Haut Marais neighborhood is looking up. The man responsible for Café La Perle, everyone’s favorite local haunt, has recently set his sights higher, all the way to Au Top. This discreet address overlooking Paris’s rooftops combines Jean Philippe’s passion for city life with the tranquility that only nature can provide.

The team at Au Top. Photo credit: Lisa Klein Michel

Set on the 7th floor of a building on Rue Vieille du Temple, Au Top is accessible via a private elevator and staircase just steps away from La Perle, featuring a spacious terrace inviting the outside in. Come summertime, this al fresco restaurant allows for long leisurely brunches bathed in sunlight, and dinners illuminated by the golden hues of Paris’s ever-changing sky.

Delicious mediterranean cuisine at Au Top. Photo: Lisa Klein Michel

The seasonal Mediterranean inspired menu is certain to please every palate. In chefs Christophe Rousseau and Loïc Clee’s open kitchen, grilling takes precedence. A vast selection of wines and cocktails will complement. Starting with a selection of oysters from the Île d’Oléron, family-style shared plates include grilled angus beef tenderloin, royal sea bream and smoked tuna. Plenty of vegetables, including artichokes roasted with olive oil and fleur de sel, will satisfy the vegans. Don’t forget the grilled bread! Sunday night’s homemade gluten-free couscous is made with quinoa semolina, the veggie option brimming with truffles. End the meal with a dessert of roasted pineapple.

Roasted pineapple dessert at Au Top. Photo: Lisa Klein Michel

Take a seat for dinner with a view or enjoy the plentiful weekend brunch, but remember to book ahead.

Restaurant Au Top, 
93 Rue Vieille du Temple 75003
. Tel: +33 (0)1 43 56 50 50. Appetizers from 9 euros, main plates priced from 22 euros. Open Monday to Friday 6pm-1am, Saturday and Sunday 9am-11:30pm, reservations necessary.

View of the Marais from Au Top Restaurant Au Top. Photo: Lisa Klein Michel

The post Restaurant Au Top: Rooftop Views of the Marais District appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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Vins des Pyrénées. Photo: Yann Deret

This Parisian institution dating back to 1905 originated as a wine bar specializing in wines from the Pyrénées. It was first brought to life by a Catalan engineer whose claim to fame was inventing a device that prevented wine from oxidizing. Centrally situated in the Marais district, and just a few doors away from artist Paul Cézanne’s studio and the home of Charles Baudelaire, Vins des Pyrénées was a regular haunt for Jim Morrison, another notorious neighbor.

This historic wine bar cum brasserie fell out of fashion in the years that followed, as more trendy eateries took the spotlight. It was in 2017 that skilled actor turned restauranteur Florian Cadiou infused new life into an old favorite, putting Vins des Pyrénées back on center stage.

Vins des Pyrénées. Photo: Yann Deret

While the sleek interior pays homage to decades past, featuring a wooden bar and banquet seating, it’s the revitalized menu that takes the diner on a journey reminiscent of the golden era of Parisian bistros combined with present day gastronomic appeal. Devised by chef Jimmy Reffet, the cuisine is a take on classic French comfort food, with dishes including foie gras, roast lamb croquettes, and marinated leeks with crushed hazelnuts– just to start. Classic mains with a modern twist include croque-monsieur with truffled gouda and stuffed calamari, the latter of which was cooked to perfection. Dessert at Vins des Pyrénées is not to be missed, with crème brûlée and lemon meringue tart among the French signatures.

Croquettes d’agneau served at Vins des Pyrénées.

Following a menu paired with French wines (no longer limited to the Pyrénées), indulge in a creative libation at the discreet speakeasy, just up the stairs from the restaurant. Bar Le 1905 with its pre-war ambiance made up of dark hues, cozy leather couches, and an inviting wooden bar, even includes a heated terrace. Bartender Adele Fardeau, (ex-Mandarin Oriental) concocts a menu of eight cocktails, including the Zelda – vodka, Chambord, cranberry juice, homemade hibiscus syrup, lime, ginger beer and egg white. How’s that for a nightcap?

Since its resurrection, Vins des Pyrénées has once again become a celebrated neighborhood haunt, attracting a new breed of writers, artists and musicians of the quartier.

25 rue Beautrellis, 4th. Tel: +33 (0)1-42-72-64-94. Open daily 7AM–2AM
Lunch menus 17€ /22€, a la carte around 35€. Cocktails starting at 12€
http://www.vinsdespyrenees.com

Vins des Pyrénées, the Zelda cocktail at Le Bar 1905. Photo: Yann Deret The fumoir at Vins des Pyrénées. Photo: Yann Deret

The post The Renaissance of Vins des Pyrénées: A Chic Marais Restaurant & Speakeasy Bar appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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Bonjour Paris by Bonjour Paris Editors - 6M ago
The to-die-for tofu dish at Double Dragon. Photo: Bonjour Paris

It’s no secret that the cool kids of Paris flock to the 11th arrondissement for hip eats. Some of the city’s most talented young chefs are cooking up creative dishes in this eastern corner of Paris— the restaurant decor as cool as the affordable menus.

One of the tastiest tables we’ve tried recently is Double Dragon, located on the same stretch of Rue Saint-Maur as the buzzworthy Atelier des Lumières. (Housed in a former foundry, this digital arts space immerses visitors in a high-tech visual world— a sensory experience of the works by great artists like Klimt.)

The Levha sisters (Tatiana and Katia), also behind the popular bistro Le Servan, opened Double Dragon in summer 2018 and it’s been packed ever since. On the menu— inspired by the cuisine from the sisters’ childhood growing up in the Philippines and Thailand— is a melange of Asian and French flavors, accented with lots of spice. The menu is so enticing, in fact, that it’s best to order a bunch of dishes to share.

Pork ravioli dipped in homemade sriracha sauce, spring rolls stuffed with paleron de bœuf, delicious caramelized joues de porc, Tom Yam soup with foie gras, crispy fried chicken accented with Tamarin, sesame green beans, fish ceviche, a divine stuffed tofu with Comté cheese… All priced between 7 and 16 euros.

Get there early to avoid waiting in line (no reservations).

52, rue Saint-Maur, 11th arrondissement, Tel: +33 (0)1 71 32 41 95. Open from 12 noon to 14h30 and from 19h30 to 22h30, closed Mondays and Tuesdays.

The post Where to Eat Now in Paris: Double Dragon appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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Bonjour Paris by Bonjour Paris Editors - 9M ago

The countdown to the launch of our new French foodie bible, Taste of France, has begun – and it’s set to be the best thing since sliced baguette!

Our team of elite gourmands has certainly put in the time, miles… and extra pounds. Armed with an insatiable appetite (and elasticated waistbands) our ravenous bunch spent months feverishly chomping and quaffing their way through La Belle France to unearth the country’s finest terroir, top bistros, gourmet hideouts and producers off the beaten path so you can get straight to business on your next jolly.

Feeling peckish yet? Taste of France is packed to the gills with mouth-watering regional guides, handpicked gastro destinations, wine trails and exclusive interviews with such trailblazers as lean cuisine pioneer Michel Guérard, celebrity baker (and all-round gas) Éric Lanlard, deft food stylist and writer Béatrice Peltre and master boulanger Éric Kayser.

Hungry for more? We’ve picked the brains – and plates – of a host of culinary mavericks including James Martin, Trish Deseine, David Lebovitz, Michel Roux Snr and Clotilde Dusoulier to whip up a free bite-size recipe supplement.

We’ve even thrown in our go-to vegan haunts and favourite veggie joints for the herbivores amongst you – and plenty more indulgent surprises along the way.

Tempted? To sweeten the deal, we’re offering 25 per cent off all pre-orders before October 8.

Your French foodie spree starts here…

Click here to secure your copy now.

The post We’re Launching Taste of France Magazine appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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Terminus Nord. Photo: Ani Moriarty
Travel by train in France is a salt and pepper affair where time in between connections and departures always prompts travelers to grab a bite to eat, or look for an oasis in which to dine well.

The spectrum runs from romantic affair to pragmatic necessity.

However you find yourself at Paris’s Gare du Nord, the oldest of six main terminals, you’ll be refreshed by the new shine of renovations in a station that deserved – and required – a serious facelift.

Inside L’Etoile du Nord. Photo: Ani Moriarty

I’ve been through Paris Nord countless times. In pre-renovation years, I, not unlike countless others, quickly grew tired of the cafe and fast food sandwiches handed out readily for a quick snack.

Seeking to broaden my horizons, when looking outside the windows, directly across the street seemed very inviting. Café tables lined the sidewalk under extended red awnings for rain or shine. Tables that ran a long stretch right up to the corner had a ceaseless flow of guests coming and going. A favorite past-time, people watching, was instantaneously available with sitting down. Off I went.

Brasserie Terminus Nord. Photo: Ani Moriarty

Out comes the white aproned waiter, out comes the grand crème, SVP (s’il vous plait), with euro change thrown on the table. There I was, left to be in my own world of contemplation and putting order to the day, in the absolute midst of a bustling crowd.

A ‘gastronomique brasserie’, Terminus Nord is a classic long-standing Parisian restaurant, circa 1925. It is a favorite of locals, businessmen and seasoned travelers, whether groups or solo: a crossroads for friends arriving for a meal together before boarding trains to Bruxelles, Amsterdam, the UK via the Eurostar — and destinations further afield in France.

Come to find, this is how, more often than not, I suss out a restaurant because truth be told, I love to dine finely though not extravagantly.

I’ve been a solo, female traveler since the dawn of time. There’s nothing I love more than dining with moi. Finding a favorite haunt in frequently visited gares or towns, makes me feel at home. And home is where I want to be – wherever I find it.

Terminus Nord. Photo: Ani Moriarty

Though worlds of possibilities exist in Paris, there’s a middle-of-the-road experience that fits me perfectly. A well-set table, fine linens and fresh flowers, tables arranged for the benefit of guests’ preferences, and fine etiquette to mirror fine food. All of this, wrapped in an ambiance of casual elegance, quietude and privacy that begets a meal worth returning for, over and over again. Which I do.

Terminus Nord. Photo: Ani Moriarty

This being said, as a part of Phase One of in-house renovations of the train station, one can now as well dine inside the terminal at Thierry Marx’s L’Etoile du Nord or North Star.

L’Etoile du Nord by chef Thierry Marx. Photo: Ani Moriarty

Either way, give yourself enough time between trains to savor a true Parisian dining experience, in an atmosphere of your choice. Reservations, slideshows and menu options for both restaurants are available online.

Terminus Nord, 23 Rue de Dunkerque, 75010 Paris, Tel: +33 (0)1 42 85 05 15, website: www.terminusnord.com

L’Etoile du Nord par Thierry Marx, 18 Rue de Dunkerque, 75010 Paris, Tel: +33 (0)1 40 36 54 36, website: www.letoiledunord.fr

Thierry Marx’s L’Etoile du Nord. Photo: Ani Moriarty

The post Solo Travel, Train Stations, and Dining at the Gare du Nord in Paris appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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Le Loir dans La Théière

In the heart of Paris’s historic Marais neighborhood on one of the city’s most charming streets Rue des Rosiers, sits a café inspired by the fairytale Alice in Wonderland. The dormouse from this famed children’s story comes to life in what feels like a Mad Hatter’s Tea Party once you enter the door of Le Loir dans La Théière. In the middle of this whimsical tea café cum restaurant translated to “The Dormouse in The Teapot,” the story of Alice in Wonderland is told through a playful wall illustration. The remaining walls are covered in vintage posters from art and fashion exhibitions.

Since 1996, Paul Boccia and his family run this bohemian eatery where stories are told from another era. With plenty a cozy couch to sink into and wooden tables and chairs to make you feel at home, prepare for a freshly cooked meal of seasonal produce. The daily specials at Le Loir dans La Théière are prepared by the owner himself, while his son Thomas ensures that you are both comfortable and well nourished.

Le Loir dans La Théière

What takes the cake at Le Loir dans La Théière is the cake itself. The two pâtissiers are true masters at their craft!Save room for one of their heavenly desserts, including the famous lemon meringue and chocolate fondant. With a dozen homemade cakes to choose from, you’ll have plenty of options to satisfy your sweet tooth.

Le Loir dans La Théière

Weekend brunch is one of the best in Paris, just be sure to arrive before noon as the secret is out. Open every day from 9am to 7:30pm, this fabled spot lives up to its reputation as one of the Marais’s most hip haunts.

Le Loir dans La Théière

3 Rue des Rosiers, 75004 Paris

Hours: Monday to Sunday 9am-7:30pm

Phone: 01 42 72 90 61

The post Le Loir dans La Théière: Where to Eat in the Marais District appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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le M64 restaurant at Intercontinental Paris Marceau

It’s no secret that the Champs-Élysées, arguably the most famous avenue in the world, has been taken over by international brands and box stores that aren’t necessarily Parisian (of course there are a few exceptions!) But sometimes it’s a challenge to find an authentic place to eat in the area.

Where do Parisians reserve for lunch? We’ll let you in on a little secret, an address we recently discovered: The Intercontinental Paris Marceau is an intimate, family-owned hotel in the heart of the Golden Triangle. (The location on avenue Marceau puts you just a stone’s throw from the prestigious Avenue George V and the Avenue des Champs-Élysées).

le M64 restaurant at Intercontinental Paris Marceau

Recently, the Bansard family revamped their restaurant called le M64, named for the hotel’s address on avenue Marceau. A highlight is the lovely, leafy terrace for eating al fresco. It’s a quiet place, away from the urban hubbub, and you’ll see business meals alongside lingering, leisurely lunches.

The Bansards also recruited a new chef, Cedric Douchin, who has overhauled the menu based on seasonal products. Starters might include the soft boiled egg with wild asparagus and parmesan, followed by pan-fried sea cod served with multi-colored carrots, or a rib-eye steak with potato purée. Desserts are just as tantalizing. Try the truffled brie cheese, or go for the lemon meringue pie or the peanut-butter and Guanaja chocolate treat. There’s also the classic Café Gourmand, pairing an assortment of sweet delights with an espresso.

le M64 restaurant at Intercontinental Paris Marceau

Le M64 also proposes a fixed-price daily lunch menu, priced at 39 EUR for a starter and main dish, or main dish and cheese or dessert; or 45 EUR for a starter, main dish and cheese or dessert.

le M64 restaurant at Intercontinental Paris Marceau

Looking to book a room? The 55 guest rooms were elegantly designed by Bruno Borrione, a member of Philippe Starck’s team for 20 years. The best rooms are the duo of suites on the top floor which offer Eiffel Tower views.

InterContinental Paris Marceau, 64, avenue Marceau, 8th arrondissement. Tel: +33 (0)1 44 43 36 36.

le M64 restaurant at Intercontinental Paris Marceau

The post le M64 Restaurant: Where to Eat Near the Champs-Élysées appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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Le Petit Baigneur. Photo: Ani Moriarty

Walking through the door of Restaurant Le Petit Baigneur in the 14th arrondissement is a crowded affair. With an old Parisian feel, chairs fumbled around small tables, all closer than close, one has to strain not to be in the neighbor’s conversation.

But that’s ‘French Intimate’ in my book of all things authentically French. One quickly learns the silent etiquette that permeates space in France, so much so that you can rub elbows with strangers, and feel completely private. It’s a well-polished cultural practice.

To back up a bit: In the past, when I was coming and going through Paris, departures were out of Aeroport CDG on the northeast side of the city. For years I’ve habitually returned to a favorite spot in the 7th, and shuttled or métro-ed to the École Militaire stop. But more recently I’ve been exploring the long-haul “air shuttle” flights (to the U.S.) offered by Norwegian Airlines, which flies in and out of Orly, on the opposite side of Paris. This brought me searching the 14th for reasonable accommodations and great food.

Le Petit Baigneur. Photo: Ani Moriarty

I opted to hop on a TGV from Rennes at an ungodly hour of the morning to afford a good, long walkabout day. Checking into the hotel before noon, the receptionist recommended three top restaurants in the area.

The winner? Le Petit Baigneur. The reasons? The menu, the price range, the ambiance, and the local tip to get there early as it filled up quick.

It was well worth it.

At the door a few minutes before opening gave me first pick of tables. Choosing the 2-seater tucked in the front corner facing out was the best seat in the house. The restaurant filled by 7:30 pm. Some had reservations (highly recommended), some knew to get there first, and some were turned away. It’s a restaurant of regulars — families with children, couples and singles who clearly know where to go to dine well.

Le Petit Baigneur. Photo: Ani Moriarty

In business for 15 years, the owner runs the front of the house. En fait, she serves the tables. There is a total sense of satisfaction from presentation to last bite in the carefully prepared dishes: fresh-daily 4″ high quiches and dessert tarts laze at the bar when you enter; house-made pâté arrives in the baking dish it was cooked in, and you slice off what you want.

For a three course of starter, main and dessert, you’re in the neighborhood of 30-50 euros. Add wine (including les pichets of fine house wines) and it goes up from there. Lighter fare? A quiche and salad? 17 euros. Their rotating menu includes a few house specialities always available. You can eat big or eat small.

Bon appétit en France!

10 rue de la Sablière, 14th arrondissement. Métro: Pernety (Line 13). Tel: +33 (0)1-45-45-47-12. Dining Hours: 12:00-2:00 pm for lunch and 7:00-10:15 pm for dinner. Closed Sundays. Dress is Casual

Le Petit Baigneur. Photo: Ani Moriarty

The post Le Petit Baigneur: Where to Eat in the 14th Arrondissement appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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Place des Victoires at night by Ted Drake/ Flickr

It’s no secret that people travel to Paris for the food. From small neighborhood bistros to gastronomic temples of haute cuisine, the restaurant choices are mind-boggling. No wonder so many readers write us for recommendations! Here, we’re happy to share some favorite restaurants as selected by our expert team of contributors. These aren’t necessarily the newest, nor the trendiest, but they are tried-and-true favorites. Bon appétit!

Bistrot Victoires

In the center of Place des Victoires stands a regal equestrian statue of Louis XIV. The horse’s head points down Rue Catinat; let it guide you to end of that street and the Bistrot Victoires. Each day this local favorite is bustling with workers from the Banque de France, which guarantees good quality and prices that can’t be beat. My favorite lunch is the Tartine Savoyarde – an open-faced sandwich with melted cheese, potatoes, lardons and onion. A glass of the house red fits perfectly and you won’t find a more authentic, everyday meal in Paris.

6 Rue de la Vrillière, 1st arrondissement 

— Corey Frye is an editor/writer and a sought-after Paris tour guide.

photo: Cafe Bullier Café Bullier

It is a common misconception that people who are not “foodies” don’t care about good food. This is not true! My culinary tastes are simple, but I do have my preferences. My favorite restaurant is Café Bullier. The food (which is unpretentious, traditional French cuisine) is always good; the service is professional, friendly, and kind. A short walk away from the Jardin de Luxembourg, Café Bullier is a comfortable place to spend an afternoon or an evening, enjoying the simple pleasures of la bonne cuisine française in a relaxed, congenial atmosphere.

22 Avenue de l’Observatoire, 14th arrondissement, website: www.cafebullier.com

— Janet Hulstrand is a writer, editor and teacher based in Essoyes, a beautiful little village in the Champagne region.

The eatery at Halle Saint Pierre. Photo: Theadora Brack Halle Saint Pierre

My friend Charlie has a theory about what makes a meal memorable. According to him, it’s not just food or the hype or the number of stars in the guidebooks, but the chemistry of company gathered ’round the table. And, in my book, the view.

Whenever I need a break from the worries of the world, I trek it to Halle Saint-Pierre’s cozy café in Montmartre’s fabric district. Housed in a former 19th-century food market, the museum is similar in spirit to Switzerland’s Collection de l’Art Brut and Baltimore’s American Visionary Art Museum, featuring works by self-taught and outsider artists.

Halle Saint Pierre. Photo: Theadora Brack

This place has everything. Historic building? Check. View? Check. Sacré Coeur’s dome shines in through the huge windows like a giant sugar confection. Blue skies suit the blindingly white basilica, though she also glows after dusk. Affordable? Check.

It’s the perfect place to take a break after hiking up and down the hill or seeing one of the museum’s thought-provoking exhibitions. Art lines the walls in the café, too. Sample the house red and the homemade quiche and gaze up to your heart’s desire.

Or work on your novel. No one’s going kick you out. It’s Paris, after all.

Musée Halle Saint Pierre, 2 rue Ronsard, 18th arrondissement, website: www.hallesaintpierre.org

— Theadora Brack is a Paris-based writer who has a regular column, called “My Life in Paris,” in France Today magazine.

photo: Hostellerie de l’Oie qui fume Hostellerie de l’Oie qui fume

To prolong my stays in Paris (and my finances), I live like a very aging student: baguettes in the Luxembourg Gardens and cafe crèmes standing at the bars of my favorite cafes. It stands to reason then that sadly I won’t be found in a Michelin-starred restaurant in a swanky hotel, so if beautifully set tables and impeccable wine waiters are what you want (and why not?), stop reading now.

My restaurant, L’oie Qui Fume, in Rue de la Huchette is slap bang in the much derided ‘Little Athens’ tourist area in St Michel.

I was there two years ago when three course menus were 10 and 15 euros. My son and his new wife were there in October when I think they had added a euro to the basic menus. Starters are varied: salads, escargots, onion soup; main courses include steak, tartiflette, bœuf bourguignon, and mussels. Desserts or cheese to follow.

The restaurant is cozy and crowded enough to overhear the next table’s conversations–often more interesting than your own. The covered terrace on the pavement has heaters for colder evenings and red checked table cloths. The owner and staff are friendly. The food is good and excellent value.

The restaurant is what it is: cheap and cheerful but a notch above the others on Rue de la Huchette. Only one word of advice– don’t go in evening dress…

59 quai de la Tournelle, 5th arrondissement, website: www.facebook.com/oiequifume

— Marilyn Brouwer is an established freelance writer and regular contributor to Bonjour Paris

Le Grand Véfour Chef Guy Martin. Photo: Jérôme Mondière

When asked about my favorite restaurant I usually reply, “the next one I’m eating at!” It really depends on mood, type of food, atmosphere and budget. But, when the pressure’s on, I have to admit my favorite Paris address is definitely Le Grand Véfour. Guy Martin is at the door to meet and greet guests, old and new. This talented self-taught chef, born and raised in his beloved Savoie region, has been at Véfour since 1991 where he once notched three Michelin stars and now, strangely, only has two. Some mistake surely?

Not only the exquisite food, traditional dishes with Martin’s exciting modern twists, the historic atmosphere is enchanting – my favorite table has a discreet golden plaque dedicated to Maria Callas – “from this table the diva could see everyone, and not be seen,” according to Mâitre d’Hotel Flavien Develet. You may prefer Napoleon & Josephine’s, Victor Hugo’s, Balzac’s, Colette or Jacques Brel’s.

17 Rue de Beaujolais, 1st arrondissement, website: www.grand-vefour.com

— Margaret Kemp is a regular contributor to Bonjour Paris and Financial Times How to Spend It.

Le Mouffetard Le Mouffetard

Bonjour, Croque Madame! The sunny yellow yolk of Le Mouffetard’s traditional tartine greets me from my plate. Le Mouffetard opens early– 7:30! — so this quintessential Paris café is a good alternative to a hotel breakfast. Enjoyed by locals and travelers alike, the onion soup, the confit de canard and the cassolettes never disappoint. If traveling alone, you will be comfortable here. From the outdoor tables you can take in the street theater of this steep cobbled market. Le Mouffetard is Juliette Binoche’s hangout in Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Bleu, part of his famed Three Colors Trilogy.

116 rue Mouffetard, 5th arrondissement, website: www.lemouffetardrestaurant.fr

Hazel Smith experienced an epiphany at the Musée d’Orsay, and is now a mature student of art history at the University of Toronto.

Le Reminet Le Reminet

Just in the shadow of Notre Dame, Le Reminet is elegant, friendly, and the only place I can think of where you can get a three-course lunch of innovative French cuisine on white tablecloths with the world reflected in gilded mirrors—all for 16 euros. Reservations are smart, as the restaurant is small (and popular!). Dinner is great for a romantic candlelit evening, but more of a splurge than the can’t-be-beat lunch (available Monday-Friday), although Le Reminet often has specials on La Fourchette.

3 rue des Grands Degrés, 5th arrondissement, website: www.lereminet.fr

Meredith Mullins is an internationally exhibited fine art photographer and instructor based in Paris.

Les Maquereaux. Photo: Daisy de Plume Les Maquereaux

Les Maquereaux is hands down my fave restaurant in Paris. Who doesn’t want to perch themselves at a gorgeous bar with a crisp glass of Chablis and seafood tapas of ceviche, huîtres or poulpe (prepared dans son bouillon, mais oui)? Did I mention Les Maquereaux is on a péniche, stationed just outside Hotel de Ville?! With a clever open-top / glass roof to protect you from grey days (rain? never, in Paris), and an option to do a tour of the Seine in a mini boat with a captain, it’s the tops!

The mini-boat tour (limited to 6 people), followed by oysters and champagne on Les Maquereaux, is a very reasonable 50 euros. They also have a downstairs, so they have capacity to host wedding / corporate events. Plus, there’s a yoga class followed by a seafood lunch. In 2018, they’re setting up  babysitting services (so parents can eat while their kids play downstairs). NOT shabby!

Quai de l’Hôtel de ville, 4th arrondissement, website: www.lesmaquereaux.com

Daisy de Plume is the founder of THATMuse, a company running “Treasure Hunts at the Museum”, which now has 25 themes across the Louvre, Musée d’Orsay, Streets of Paris, British Museum and Victoria & Albert in London.

courtesy of Pirouette Pirouette

Pirouette is a modern gem located just north of Les Halles. Since its opening in 2012, it has been creating in itself a destination. With an ever changing menu of refined French cuisine, it’s the perfect spot for a girls’ lunch or romantic dinner. Set menus make it reasonable with a 2-course lunch at €20, a three course dinner at €42, or a six-course dinner at €62.

5 Rue Mondétour, 1st arrondissement, website: www.restaurantpirouette.com

— Kasia Dietz is a handbag designer and freelance writer originally from New York.

PNY PNY

My favorite restaurant in Paris may not be your traditional French bistro, but if you’re craving a burger and a beer then PNY is the best place in the city. You’ll probably have to queue with the Parisian bobos to get a table, but once you’re in, it’s worth it. The menu has something for everyone, including I have been told, the best veggie burger in town, as well as homemade desserts, a good selection of craft beers, and a couple of tasty little cocktails for just 6€. The service is always friendly, prices are fair, and I’m happy to report that the portions are big, so you might have to think about splitting that dessert…

Multiple locations, website: www.pny-hamburgers.fr

— Nicola Leigh Stewart is a lifestyle journalist who after living in London and Madrid has finally settled in Paris.

The post Favorite Restaurants in Paris: Our Experts Share Recommendations appeared first on Bonjour Paris.

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