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Community Learning and Development Policy transferred from Education Scotland to the Scottish Government in September 2018. Prior to this transfer, the Strategic Forum for Adult Learning, supported by Scottish Government and Education Scotland had been tasked to “develop a national framework for adult learning that outlines the key priorities in delivering adult learning in Scotland”. As a result, the forum developed the Adult Learning Statement of Ambition.

 The Scottish Government is committed to supporting and developing adult learning.  With this in mind, the new CLD Policy Team has worked with the adult learning sector to refresh this forum to create the Adult Learning Strategic Forum Scotland [ALSFS]. The forum’s revised membership and terms of reference were approved in April 2019. The ALSFS is anticipated to operate until 2023.

 The ALSFS will provide strategic advice to the Scottish Government in support of adult learning policy and in particular on matters of direction, performance and planning. Their current focus is to build on the Statement of Ambition and develop a new Adult Learning Strategy for Scotland to be launched sometime in the spring of 2020.  At the Adult Learning Conference at Newbattle Abbey College on 22nd May, the Minister for Further Education Higher Education and Science: Richard Lochhead, announced that the ALSFS would be chaired by the former principal of West Lothian College Mhairi Harrington.

 The ALSFS will continue to consult across the adult learning sector and more widely with other areas of the education and skills system and significant organisations in the public private and third sectors. The Adult Learning Conference in May provided an opportunity for both discussion groups and workshops on the priorities for adult learning and what should this new adult learning strategy aim to deliver for the people of Scotland. The Minister made it clear in his speech that this strategy must be about more than ambition and characterised by delivery and action

 While consultation is and will be essential, the ALSFS has recognised the sense of urgency in the development of the strategy and that clear direction and focus is also needed. To that end it has tasked several members of the ALSFS to form a working group to take the strategy forward. The members of the working group are:-

 Ray McCowan – Workers Educational Association                       

Jackie Howie – Learning Link Scotland

Emma Whitelock – LEAD Scotland

James King – Scottish Prison Service

Jane Logue – CLD Managers Scotland

Wendy Burton – Scottish Union Learning

Sandra Grieve – Newbattle Abbey College

Bonnie Slade – University of Glasgow

Nicola McAndrew – Scottish Government

Elisha Fisher – Scottish Government

Lindsay MacDonald – Education Scotland

 The group met the day after the Adult Learning Conference and have agreed to meet once a month until the strategy is delivered in the Spring of 2020. Work has begun on a survey aimed at ensuring that learners are fully involved in the consultation process and will have a significant say in the strategy’s development. At the same time they are building on the large amount of work already undertaken to develop the key themes of the strategy.  They are considering how they can promote an intensive week of consultation across the country in the early autumn to get some focus on the development of the strategy. The aim is to deliver the first draft of the strategy and to circulate this out for extended consultation by late autumn 2019.

 The intention is to keep stakeholders across the sector fully informed on how the work of the ALSFS is progressing. This will be achieved through regular updates to the sector following on from each monthly meeting of the ALSFS.

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Education Scotland has now moved to a regional delivery model and will support improvement and capacity building at local, regional and national level. CLD members are now part of Regional Teams. Each Regional team is headed up by a Senior Regional Advisor. There are six teams based on the geographies of the six Regional Collaboratives. The work of ES staff is not just limited to the RICs. All Regional teams except the Northern Team have a CLD presence. Team members will be in touch to make contact and find out about local developments.

Tayside Regional Improvement Team (Dundee, Perth and Kinross and Angus) Senior Regional Advisor (acting) –

CLD presence – Susan Epsworth, Development Officer, CLD Susan.Epsworth@educationscotland.gov.scot

South East Regional Improvement Team (Edinburgh City, Fife, Midlothian, East Lothian, Scottish Borders) Senior Regional Advisor – Alistair Brown

CLD presence – Chris Woodness, Education Officer, CLD (secondment) Vince Moore, Development Officer, CLD Vincent.Moore@educationscotland.gov.scot

South West Regional Improvement Team (Dumfries and Galloway, East Ayshire, South Ayrshire and North Ayshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Carol Copstick

CLD presence – Nicola Sykes, Senior Education Officer

Dehra Macdonald, Development Officer, CLD Dehra.Macdonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Forth Valley and West Lothian Regional Improvement Team (Falkirk, Stirling, Clackmannanshire and West Lothian) Senior Regional Advisor – Jackie Halawi

CLD presence – Lindsay MacDonald, Education Officer, CLD Lindsay.MacDonald@educationscotland.gov.scot

Mandy Watts, Development Officer, CLD Mandy.Watts@educationscotland.gov.scot

West Regional Improvement Team (Glasgow City, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Inverclyde, North Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, South Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire) Senior Regional Advisor – Patricia Watson

CLD presence – John Galt, Education Officer, CLD mailto:John.Galt@educationscotland.gov.scot

Laura Mcintosh, Development Officer, CLD Laura.Mcintosh@educationscotland.gov.scot

Northern Regional Improvement Team (Aberdeen City, Aberdeenshire, Moray, Argyll and Bute, Shetland Islands, Western Isles, Highland, Orkney) Senior Regional Advisor – David Gregory

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Education Scotland by Joan Esson - 1M ago

SCILT – Scotland’s National Centre for Languages – has published a programme of webinars to support professional learning in modern languages.  Practitioners may wish to get together to participate in the live streaming of events, which will include opportunities for online discussion. Alternatively, the recorded version can be used as a stimulus for collegiate discussion, in-service days or as part of individual practitioners’ professional development. Registration will be advertised in the weekly SCILT e-bulletin and on the National Modern Languages Hub prior to these publicised dates.

Glow login will be required.  Recordings will be available to watch again on National ML Hub under the Anytime Learning tab https://glowscotland.sharepoint.com/sites/PLC/modernlanguages/SitePages/Home.aspx

For more information, please visit: https://www.scilt.org.uk/Portals/24/Library/CPD/SCILT%20Webinar%20menu%2020

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Does Developing the Young Workforce (DYW) provide schools with a mechanism to offer a wider range of subject choices in the Senior Phase?

This key question has been discussed in TES articles over the last few months. Here are  some of the key messages, with the emphasis on DYW and it’s potential impact on the curriculum and subject choice:

Subject Choice

“Local authority education bosses have hit back at suggestions that pupils in secondary schools are seeing their options narrow. In recent months there has been a high-profile debate about the number of subjects pupils are able to study in S4, but MSPs were told today that it can be misleading to look at this issue in isolation.”

 “Mark Ratter, who heads up quality improvement and performance at East Renfrewshire Council’s education services, said that, thanks to partnerships with colleges, universities and employers, as well as the Developing the Young Workforce national policy, there was actually now “a far greater choice” in what pupils could study. In one East Renfrewshire secondary school, for example, S5-6 pupils “have a choice of over 130 different courses”.”

“Tony McDaid, South Lanarkshire Council’s executive director of education resources, said you could understand parents comparing how many subjects different schools were offering at S4 and their “natural anxiety” around that. However, they reacted well when they heard that “this is not just about your fourth year, you can do another subject when you move into fifth year”, and that there was a focus on the career a pupil was ultimately heading towards and the qualifications they would gain “across the whole senior phase” from S4-6.”

 Work-based learning

“Angus Council schools and learning director Pauline Stephen said there was “an ongoing challenge” to communicate to pupils’ families the “shifting and different” education system that pupils experience in 2019. Dr Stephen cited new types of qualifications such as Foundation Apprenticeships, which were little known outside education circles and sometimes wrongly viewed as inferior to other qualifications.

“Dr Stephen said that Brechin High, for example, had worked with a local roofing business to open a construction centre at the school, which “allows us to offer qualifications alongside an employer in partnership – it’s been really successful”.”

Developing the Young Workforce

“DYW is a ‘game-changer’ – and it has Curriculum for Education to thank for that”

“It’s a potentially misleading debate, however. The supposed narrowing of the curriculum is concerned with subject choices in the senior phase. Setting aside arguments about the extent to which this is happening, there’s a basic flaw in the reasoning: by looking only at subject choices – largely at National 5 and Higher – it misses what appears to be a widening of the curriculum in other ways.”

 “This fixation with exams and academic subjects – plus ça change – ignores the fact that, in many schools, there is now a much richer range of opportunities. Last week, for example, I visited a secondary with a spaghetti junction of pathways for its senior pupils – where apprenticeships and college courses truly do have “parity of esteem” with university, to use the jargon – and a determination to bend the curriculum to individual aspirations. If that means pupils going to another school for a certain Advanced Higher or spending some of the week in college, or teachers setting up a work placement with an employer they’ve not dealt with before, then the school’s attitude is, so be it.”

 “Developing the Young Workforce may be an equally uninspiring, chosen-by-committee title. But whereas CfE is typically viewed as falling short, the reaction to DYW – a far newer kid on the block – feels very different. Visiting schools, I’ve been struck by how often it’s cited as a positive influence, a driver of cultural change that has gone beyond its initial promise to boost vocational education. For example, one special school depute head said that, while she wasn’t sure those behind DYW were really thinking of her sector, it was a “game-changer”, helping to create work and training opportunities for school-leavers with complex needs.”

Head teachers and the curriculum

“We are free to shape the curriculum,’ say Scottish heads”

“An investigation into whether Scottish headteachers have the freedom to tailor their school’s curriculum to the needs of their pupils has found that “almost all” heads believe they have that power.”

 “It adds that heads were, in most cases, “well supported” by their local authorities and “empowered to work with staff, pupils, parents and wider partners to design learner pathways which best suit the needs of their local community”.

 “It adds: “Most are taking account of Developing the Young Workforce (DYW) to deliver a curriculum which includes an understanding of the world of work and vocational pathways. However, there continues to be a need to increase progress in delivering DYW priorities and ensure that pupils and parents are aware of the range of vocational options and pathways available.”

I have added links to the full articles but free registration  is required for full access:

Pupils’ study choices expanding, not narrowing, say education bosses

Developing the Young Workforce will define Scottish education

We are free to shape the curriculum,’ say Scottish heads

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Here is your opportunity to host a TEDxGlasgow livestream! The livestream will take place on the 14th of June between 9:15am and 3pm and will be hosted on YouTube. We have developed this toolkit as a handy guide with all the information you need to help with your livestream event including information on the tech specs required to host a livestream event; the rules around hosting; your role; the programme for the event and some FAQs.

TEDxGlasgow 2019 Livestream Toolkit

This year our theme is: Connection Whether it’s making them, breaking them, discovering them or searching for them, connections have shaped, and continue to shape, the world we live in. With the rapid advancements in technology, our world is more connected than it has ever been – physically, emotionally, digitally, scientifically and even metaphorically. Or is it?

The team at TEDxGlasgow focus on the TED ethos of sharing ideas, spreading knowledge, and supporting our community to translate this into bold, brave actions. Everything we do is attuned to generating a positive impact.

Gurjit Singh Lalli, shares his perspectives:

“What makes Glasgow unique are the people and their can-do spirit which is intoxicating.  Scotland has growth in both businesses and entrepreneurs who are focused, not only on profit, but making a positive social impact, which aligns to a passion of my own. I aspire for a future where companies compete on the amount of good they do through positive change and social initiatives; the TEDxGlasgow event is a platform that will strive to continue inspiring an atmosphere, both locally and nationally, where this can happen”

Creating a legacy through Ideas Worth Doing

Being involved with TEDxGlasgow offers partners, delegates, speakers and volunteers a unique opportunity to contribute to powerful conversations.  Either at our events or online, our talks have been seen by millions of people, and we’re passionate about supporting actions on ideas that matter.  We asked Pauline Houston, our Head of events shares her thoughts:

“Partnering with the right individuals and businesses can have an incredible impact on your organisation, and we’ve been fortunate to have great people behind our mission and events. I am proud of the fantastic reputation that Scotland has globally from passionate companies, ready to speak up and challenge ideas as they do with us at TEDxGlasgow, and look forward to driving more positive impact from continued collaboration in new ways” 

Researching the Impact of ideas

Our events provide a medium that combines a diverse range of people –  thinkers, doers and innovators coming together, ready to be challenged.  Designing a framework to measure outcomes from an event as unique as TEDxGlasgow has been an exciting experience, as well as an opportunity to hear directly from a wide range of individuals and organisations with amazing stories to share.  Zebunisa Ahmed, our Impact Lead offers her insights:

“Both as a volunteer and through a career in data visualisation, I’m driven by seeing how good ideas can make a difference if given a chance  – be that on an individual basis, organisationally or throughout society. As a team we want to inspire meaningful change, and I believe that good ideas can be vector for positive impact, spreading far beyond the event; it all starts with a conversation.”

The impact team get creative when measuring outcomes from the event and are keen to capture examples of the TEDx Glasgow community taking action, as seen in our impact report. We will continue monitoring how our ideas shared translate into actions with positive outcomes, and invite you to share your examples – the more personal or creative, the more we love hearing from you.

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Secondary pupils from schools in Glasgow, Stirling, Perth and Edinburgh take part in traditional building skills event held at  various locations. The hands-on practical workshops provided 13 to 15 year olds with the chance to discover more about traditional skills apprenticeships, and allowed them to have a go for themselves. They tried their hand at stonemasonry roof slating, joinery and painting and decorating, expertly assisted by current Modern Apprentices in these trades. The event was hugely valuable in raising the profile of the vital skills needed to maintain our unique built heritage.

13 & 14 May

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration outside Edinburgh City Chambers

17 & 18 May

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration at STEM at The Helix

18 & 29 May

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration outside the Scottish Parliament

3 & 4 June

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration outside Glasgow Cathedral Square

20 to 23 June

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration at the Royal Highland Show, Ingliston

19 to 22 August

Edinburgh Traditional Building Festival (part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe)

23 & 24 September

Traditional Building Skills Demonstration at Perth City Centre

The events are organised by the Scottish Traditional Building Forum as part of Construction Scotland’s, Inspiring Construction programme. It is supported by a range of partners including CITB, City of Glasgow College, West College Scotland, Dundee and Angus College, Edinburgh College and Developing the Young Workforce.

The construction industry currently employs 233,600 people, but it’s estimated that 28% of that workforce will need replacing by 2027, creating at least 21,000 vacancies. Attracting more potential employees to our industry to address this imminent skills gap is one of Construction Scotland’s top priorities.

“What better way to encourage young people to consider a career in the traditional skills side of construction than to invite them to give it a go for themselves. With the Scottish Parliament as the backdrop to this event, I hope the school children feel truly inspired to think of construction as a varied and exciting career choice. “Ian Hughes, Partnerships Director at CITB Scotland

“These Traditional Building Skills events are part of our Inspiring Construction programme, which aims to attract more school leavers to the sector by informing young people and their parents, teachers and career advisors about the huge and diverse range of careers available in construction, and importantly, how to access them. From professions like architecture, engineering and surveying to the more traditional trades like joinery and stonemasonry, this industry has something to suit everyone.” Ken Gillespie, Chair of Construction Scotland

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Education Scotland by Peter Murray - 1M ago

An exciting new award which aims to spark greater interest in Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics (STEM) among young people is being launched in Scotland and your organisation / youth group could be part of the Young STEM Leaders Award pilot!

A key strand of the Scottish Government’s Strategy for STEM Education and Training (2017), children and young people will be given the chance to inspire, lead and mentor their peers through the creation and delivery of STEM activities and events within their school, Early Years Centres or local youth / community groups.

The key aim of the Young STEM Leader (YSL) programme will be to facilitate the development of peer STEM role models to inspire more young people to develop an interest in STEM and pursue the study of STEM subjects and relevant future careers. As well as helping the Young STEM Leader (YSL) develop important personal skills that are increasingly in demand from employers, it is hoped that working towards the YSL Award will motivate the Young STEM Leader to continue to progress their STEM studies and eventually embark on a career in STEM.The Scottish government-funded programme is being led by the Scottish Schools Education Research Centre (SSERC) and a range of partners, including Awards Network members YouthLink Scotland and Young Scot. The Awards Network has recently been invited to join the project Steering Group.

The Young STEM Leader Award will be non-formally accredited at curriculum levels 2, 3 and 4, underpinned by a framework that identifies the skills, knowledge and behaviours expected of a Young STEM Leader at each curricular level. SCQF levels 4, 5 and 6 will be formally accredited and certificated.

Every YSL will receive face-to-face and digital training related to the skills, knowledge and behaviours required to be a Young STEM Leader at each level. Those co-ordinating, supporting and assessing the YSLs will also receive training. It is anticipated that the YSL Award will allow easy progression for YSLs to become STEM Ambassadors when they turn 17.

A Scotland-wide pilot of the YSL programme is due to launch in early summer 2019. SSERC is seeking to sign-up a diverse mix of schools, youth and community groups and existing awards / initiatives, to pilot the programme, which will be fully operational across Scotland in 2020. It would be great to see strong youth work sector involvement.

If you would like your organisation / young people to be involved in the YSL Award pilot, please contact YSL Project Manager Graeme Rough at ysl@sserc.scot Tel. 01383 626 070

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Currie Community High is a very forward-thinking school, which underpins all developments with the principles of good curriculum design, effective learning and teaching, and partnerships (HGIOS 4). These partnerships and networks, including social media, have allowed them to drive forward the progression for their students into a positive destination – with 99.2% of school leavers at Currie Community High School going into either FE, HE or employment.

The vision has grown from the establishment of a strategy group in 2016-2017 with representatives from all faculties, including Pupil Support and Support for Learning, who aimed to identify strengths and areas to develop and implement DYW, including discussion with the leadership team. These key areas then influenced their three-year strategy and the opportunities they now offer, as part of their curriculum that develops the young workforce.

They continue to reflect and develop, using data through baseline testing with S1, S3 and S5 (every two/three years), to lead and develop creative and innovative opportunities for students, including :

Senior Phase Roadshow

Road Trip Series

S3 STEM Networking Event

WOW (World of Work) Week

To enhance their curriculum offerings, they are working as an SCQF Ambassador School, raising awareness of different levels of qualifications and how they can influence an individual student’s learning journey. Included in this are  work-based learning opportunities, including Foundation Apprenticeships and work placements. They have created a series of webpages to share information and opportunities with students and parents, while being an effective tool to engage partners.

Each department has conducted an evaluation, through using a revised tool, constructed from the Education Scotland’s CES Learning Resources, to reflect on the teacher/practitioner entitlements. Each department identified two or three areas that need developing as part of their improvement planning. Through their customised CLPL, ’Staff Industry Insight Sessions’, work to meet these development needs, along with industry support and partners such as Scotland’s Enterprising Schools (SES).

Through each year, they work to raise awareness with staff, students, parents and partners on the importance of a curriculum that develops the young workforce.

All of their opportunities embed the Career Education Standards (CES) (3-18) and their own Skills Framework (based on BTC 4: Skills for Learning, Life and Work), giving students the opportunity to become more aware of where their learning, skills and subject choices will lead them on their learning journey.

Once piece of advice that Currie Community High offer:

“manage the workload of staff and members of the strategy group, it is vital that someone has the strategic responsibility for driving DYW forward, however it does not solely sit with them, allowing the sustainable development and longevity of DYW beyond 2021. For this to be sustainable, support from partners for opportunities, including financial support, will allow this to grow and embed for years and students to come!” John Schmidt DYW Lead

Currie Community High have a major focus on skills and careers awareness (CES) which begins from P7 (as part of transitions) to S3, which engages parents, along with plans to expand this throughout the Senior Phase. They are currently reviewing their work placement strategy through utilising the Education Scotland Work Placement Benchmarking tool, based on data and student voice, to provide tailored opportunities for individual pathways. After the successes over the last 3 years, from 2019-20 they are moving forward as a cluster to develop a new ‘Currie Cluster DYW Strategy Group’.

Quotations from young people

S1: ‘I feel inspired to create my own bookstore and read more’

S1: ‘Getting a job or the right person for a job is very competitive’

S2: ‘I learnt about how teamwork is important in real life’

S2: ‘I had a chance to explore different jobs in a calm and free environment’

S3: ‘I learnt about tactics of persuasion and how to trade and invest’

S3: ‘Some parent/carer jobs are high level, which made me think about what I needed to do’

S5/6: ‘I want to go to college and it was great way to see what the different options are for me’

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The National Museum of Scotland and the Scottish Book Trust have produced two resources, available online, which support the First Minister’s Reading Challenge. To access these resources please follow the links below:

Cuir sgeulachd ri chèile san taigh-tasgaidh – This resource can be used at any museum across the UK.

Leugh do shlighe timcheall Taigh-tasgaidh Naiseanta na h-Alba! – This resource is for use at the National Museum of Scotland.

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National Digital Learning Week is back! This year the event will take place Monday 13 until Friday 17 May.

For this year’s even all Early Learning and Childcare Centres and Schools across Scotland are invited to take part in 5 Curriculum focused challenges in: STEM, Social Studies, Expressive Arts, Numeracy and Literacy.

Here’ a 2 minute video that tells you everything you need to know about the event.

National Digital Learning Week 2019 - YouTube

Visit the Glow Blog today and get started. https://bit.ly/2PfR0Go

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