Loading...

Follow We Are Knitters Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid


Winter is over! Now is the time to be thinking about cool projects for spring and summer, so today we’re bringing you a simple, yet pretty, lace stitch. Seafoam stitch is a knitted stitch featuring lace diamonds worked into the fabric using knit stitch and drop stitch.

Materials:

For symmetry, you should cast on a multiple of 10 + 5 stitches. For the sample, we cast on 25 stitches in total.

Rows 1 and 2: knit all stitches.

Row 3:  *knit 5, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 2 times, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 3 times, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 4 times, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 3 times and knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 2 times*. Repeat from * to * until there are 5 stitches left and knit them.

Row 4: knit all stitches, dropping the extra wraps from the needle.

Rows 5 and 6: knit all stitches.

How to knit seafoam stitch I | WE ARE KNITTERS - YouTube

Row 7: *knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 2 times, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 3 times, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 4 times, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 3 times and knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 2 times. Knit 5*. Repeat from * to * until there are 5 stitches left. Knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 2 times, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 3 times, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 4 times, knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 3 times and knit 1 wrapping the yarn around the needle 2 times.

Row 8: knit all stitches, dropping the extra wraps from the needle.

Rows 9 and 10: knit all stitches.

How to knit seafoam stitch II | WE ARE KNITTERS - YouTube

From here, you’ll repeat rows 3 through 10. In the sample, we separated the diamonds by 2 rows, but this is only a suggestion. You can make any variation you like.

Now that you know how to knit seafoam stitch, you can combine them any way you like—make them larger or smaller, or space them further apart between stitches or rows.

We want to see your projects in this fancy stitch on social media using the hashtag #WeAreKnitters.

You are reading the post How to knit seafoam stitch appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 



Crochet is full of surprises. Sometimes with a simple variation of the basic stitches we can create combinations that make for incredibly beautiful textures. That’s what happened with this textured diagonal stitch that we are going to show you in this step-by-step tutorial: half double crochets and front post crossed double crochets and… beautiful texture!


For this tutorial we used a size 7 mm crochet hook  and a skein of our fine wool The Petite Wool.

As always, before beginning, we have a list of the stitches we are going to use:

  • Half double crochet.
  • Double crochet.
  • Front post crossed double crochet: the front post crossed double crochet is worked the same as for double crochet, but with two differences. First, instead of working into the next stitch, you work into one stitch before, in other words, find the stitch before the one you just worked (one stitch to the right and below). Once you find the stitch, instead of inserting the hook into the top of the stitch, as usual, insert the hook around the post (the body of the stitch) as follows: insert the hook from front to back on the right side of the post, and bring it out on the left side of the post from back to front, so that the post is in front of the hook. Yarn over and pull up the yarn behind the post. Continue working double crochet as usual. If you don’t understand now, don’t worry! This tutorial includes a video J
  • Skip stitches: to skip a stitch do not work into the stitch of the previous row


The first thing we are going to do is make a foundation chain with a multiple of 4 chains.


Row 1: Chain two and then work half double crochet into each stitch.


Row 2: Repeat row 1.


Row 3: Chain 2, work 1 half double crochet.  Now *work 1 front post crossed double crochet, skip 1 stitch, y work 3 half double crochets*. Repeat from * to * until there are 2 stitches left. Work 1 front post crossed double crochet, skip 1 stitch, work the last stitch in half double crochet.


Row 4: Repeat row 1.


Row 5: Chain 2, work 3 half double crochets. *Work 1 front post crossed double crochet, skip 1 stitch, work 3 half double crochets*. Repeat from * to * until the end of the row.

Now repeat rows 3 to 6 to make your piece as long as you want

Do you want to see how to do it step-by-step? We made a video for you so you don’t get lost on any rows.

How to crochet front post diagonal stitch | WE ARE KNITTERS - YouTube

We hope you like this quick and easy stitch as much as we like teaching it to you. As always, we would love for you to share your projects with us on social media using the hashtag #weareknitters. Until next time!


You are reading the post How to crochet front post diagonal stitch appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Checkerboard stitch is a very common knitting pattern, so today we are going to show you how to do it with a crochet hook.

The techniques we need to know how to do are very basic: chains and double crochet. You alternate these two techniques, which makes it very easy to do. You’ll be done before you even know it.

You will also need to know how to carry the different colors of yarn up the side of your work. You can see how to do this on our blog “How to carry yarn when crocheting stripes”[P1] .

For this stitch I am going to use a size 8 crochet hook and a few skeins of our Pima Cotton.

I am going to start with a foundation chain of 23 chains. For your project, chain as many stitches as you need, keeping in mind that it should be a multiple of 3 + 2.

Row 1: chain 3, which will count as the first double crochet. Next work 3 double crochets starting in the fifth chain from your hook. *Chain 3 and skip 3 stitches. Now work 3 double crochets*. Repeat from * to * and finish the row with a double crochet.

Row 2: Chain 3 and work one double crochet into the first stitch. *Chain 3 and continue with 3 double crochets worked into the 3 stitches we skipped in the foundation chain, wrapping the chain space created in the first row*. Repeat from * to * until there is 1 stitch left. Finish the row with a double crochet.

Row 3: Chain 3, work a double crochet into the first stitch. *Work 3 double crochets into the 3 double crochets of the first row, wrapping the chain space in the second row. Next, chain 3, and skip the 3 stitches in the second row*. Repeat from * to * until there is 1 stitch left. Finish the row with a double crochet.

Continue repeating rows 2 and 3 until you reach the desired length. The key is to make sure that the chains line up with the double crochets of the previous row.

Grab your crochet hook and start practicing this new stitch. As usual, we want to see your projects tagged on our social networks using #WeAreKnitters.

You are reading the post How to crochet multicolored checkerboard stitch appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 



Now that good weather is here, we want to dust off those wicker baskets that accompany us throughout the spring and summer and that are perfect for taking our knitting projects wherever we go, no matter how big or small they may be. Do you want an easy way to personalize yours while using up scraps from other projects? In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to make a feather pendant with those little bits of cotton that you have left over.


For this step by step, we’ve used several colors of our Pima Cotton yarn—in this case, earth tones.


We will also use a comb or a brush (the more teeth, the better), scissors, and masking tape (or something similar).


We’ll start by calculating the length of our pendant. The total length will be the length of the handle to hang, plus the length of the body of the pendant. Leave about 7 or 8 cm for the handle.


Cut a strand from the ball once you know the length of your pendant. To work comfortably, we recommend holding the strand of the body to the work surface with masking tape both above and below. That way it will not move as we make the knots.


Now let’s calculate the width of the pendant. We recommend that you add 2 or 3 cm to the length of the thread in case you later want to shape the pendent when you finish it.


As you can see, you’re going to have to cut a lot of strands to make the knots, so use a book to help. We’ve rolled the cotton around it several times. This will save time and ensure that all your strands are the same length.


When you finish winding the strands around your book, remove the mini skein you have made and snip it at both ends.


Repeat this process with all the colors you want to use.

How to tie the knots along the body of the pendent

The pendent is formed by a series of knots tied along the central axis, made from that first thread that we cut after we calculated its length.

There are two types of knots that we’ll be making: right and left. To make it easier to see how each one is knotted, we have done the step by step with strands of different colors on both sides of the central axis. Then we will use threads of the same color on both sides to form the feather.

Right Knot


Place two strands on both sides of the central axis, with the ends facing out.


The thread on the left passes below the center axis. Place the right thread over it.


Pass the ends of the left strand over the loop that forms the right strand


Now pass the ends of the right strand below the loop that forms the left strand.


Pull both ends of the strands and … you have the first knot!

Left Knot


Place two strands on both sides of the central axis, with the ends facing out.


The right strand passes below the central axis. Place the left thread above it.


Pass the ends of the right strand over the loop that forms the left strand.


Pass the ends of the left strand below the loop that forms the right strand.


Stretch from both ends and … you have the second knot!


We’ll form the body of the feather by combining these two knots, repeating the right and left knots together.

How to not get lost and know which knot comes next


It’s very easy to lose track of which knot comes next. Which was the last knot I made? And the one before? To avoid this, place the strands that go under the central axis in pairs. When these are already placed, you’ll only have to place the threads that go up and make the knots.


As you can see, it’s easy to build the body of the pen. Another color? Simply change the color of the threads you are knotting.


What if I want to use a different color before one that I have already knotted? Just slide the knots along the central axis to knot the color you want at the point where you want it.


When you’re done, slide the knots back down the center axis and you’re done.


Keep making knots until you get to the bottom of the axis. Now we’re going to teach you how to give the final touches to your pendent.

Combing the Pendent


Yes, yes, you read that correctly. Let’s comb the pendent to separate the strands of cotton. The finer the teeth of your comb, and the closer together they are, the easier this step will be. In the image above, you can see the difference between the combed part (right) and the un-combed part (left).


The pendent should be combed on both the right and wrong sides to ensure that the strands are as separated as possible. Always comb the center out, holding the pendent by the handle.


Now we just have to finish the bottom edge.


To do this, tie a knot and comb the remaining strands.

How to shape the feather


This is the most feared moment: shaping the pen by cutting the ends with scissors. If you are not sure about the shaping, the simplest thing to do is to print a template, place it on top, and cut the strands, following its form.

If you dare to do it without a template: cut the ends in a U shape. Now we’ll make a first cut and then we’ll refine it more.


To make the cut symmetrical, fold the ends that you’ve already cut on top of those that are not and follow the length of these.


After the first cut, refine it a little more until you have the desired shape: sharpen the lower point a bit more and also trim the top part a little bit. At this point, you can use the comb to help trim the strands that are a little longer than the others.


And we have our feather pendent ready to use!

We hope that this step by step is useful and fun. You’ll see that you can make one thousand and one color combinations and even hang several from the same handle of your basket. We hope you’ll share it with us on social media with the hashtag #weareknitters.

You are reading the post What to do with leftover cotton yarn- make a pendent appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


The edges of the fabric, when we’re talking about crochet, are always for many a matter of frustration and improvement. Sometimes the transition from one row to the other is too noticeable if made with chains and we aren’t able to make it completely disguised. Especially if, for example, they are the front pieces of open garments and … they are too noticeable. In this post, we’ll teach you to make mock double crochet, which will solve these dilemmas to give your projects totally perfect edges.


For this step by step, we’ve used 5 mm crochet hook and one skein of Pima Cotton.


The first thing we have to do is make a chain to begin our work.

The first row is worked the same was it is normally, working the turning chains to continue with the double crochet.

After this, don’t work the turning chains, but instead, turn the work and begin the mock double crochet.

Let’s see how!

How to work mock double crochet | WE ARE KNITTERS - YouTube

As you can see in the video, the mock double crochet is very integrated into the rest of the fabric. Remember that you must place on your index finger on the stitch, so that during this first step, it doesn’t move, and the stitch is perfect.


The ends of the work are left clean, and the turns are unnoticeable.

From now on, there are no funny edges in your crochet projects We hope that you like this tutorial and that you share your projects in social media with the hashtag #weareknitters.

You are reading the post How to work mock double crochet appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

You always see other people’s projects made of beautiful, complicated stitches, and you wonder how they do it, while you’re stuck using the same old simple stitch you learned a long time ago…. well, what are you waiting for?! You just need a little patience and time to learn. We are going to show you how to knit some beautiful lace cables to use on your next sweater, or to make a baby blanket for one of your friends, to show off your knitting skills with two needles

To knit this stitch we used:

Things you need to know to get started:

Cast on a multiple of 15 stitches. For this example we cast on 30 stitches so that you can see the design. You can increase the number of stitches depending on the size of the project you want to make.

On odd rows, knit all stitches (including the knit 2 together, and knit 3 together), and on even rows, purl all stitches.

Row 1. *Knit 1, yarn over, SKPO, knit 5, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 2, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 1*. Repeat from * to * until the end of the row.

Row 2 (and remaining even rows). Purl all stitches.

Row 3. **Knit 2, yarn over, SKPO, knit 3, *knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 2*. Repeat from * to * one more time**. Repeat from ** to ** until the end of the row.

Row 5. *knit 3, yarn over, SKPO, knit 1, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 2, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 3*. Repeat from * to * until the end of the row.

Row 7. *Knit 4, yarn over, knit 3 together, yarn over, knit 2, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 4*. Repeat from * to * until the end of the row.

Row 9. *Knit 4, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 2, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 5*. Repeat from * to * until the end of the row.

Row 11. *Knit 3, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 2, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 1, yarn over, SKPO, knit 3*. Repeat from * to * until the end of the row.

Row 13. **Knit *2, knit 2 together, yarn over*. Repeat from * to * one more time. Knit 3, yarn over, SKPO, knit 2 **. Repeat from ** to ** until the end of the row.

Row 15. *Knit 1, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 2, knit 2 together, yarn over, knit 1, yarn over, SKPO, knit 2, yarn over, SKPO. Knit 1*. Repeat from * to * until the end of the row.

Repeat rows 1 to 16 as many times as needed.

As you can see, the pattern is easier than it looks; you just have to get the hang of it. Now… show off your project using this new stitch and keep practicing with us!

Don’t forget to share your creations with #WeAreKnitters on our social networks.

We love to see your work!

You are reading the post How to knit lace cables appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


Any self-respecting crocheter, after finishing each project, is sure to have a healthy stash of left over yarn. Today we suggest you gather up all of your left over cotton yarn hidden in drawers, boxes and bags: we are going to recycle it and show you how to make a practical basket that you can use to decorate your home, to leave your keys, change, and other things when you get home, so they are always handy.


For this step-by-step tutorial we used: a size 8 crochet hook, and a few skeins of our Pima cotton.

Before we begin here is a list of stitches and techniques you should know how to do:

We are going to make this design, but you can create your own design and use up your leftover cotton. Now, let’s get started on this step-by-step tutorial:

Base of the basket


We are going to start our basket by making a magic circle with the color mint.


Now work 6 single crochets into the magic circle.


Round 1: increase 1 in each stitch of the previous round (12 stitches in total).


Round 2: * work 1 single crochet and increase 1*. Repeat from * to * 5 more times (18 stitches in total).


The underlined part in the previous step is the distance between each increase, in the next round your have to work 2 single crochets, in the next 3, and so on, until the last round you work 9 single crochets between increase and increase.

Side of the basket


Round 1: work the entire round in single crochet. You will have a total of 66 stitches at the end of the round.

Repeat round 1, two more times.


Round 4: start the design on the side of the basket: * work 5 single crochets in mint and 1 single crochet in natural *. Repeat from * to * until the end of the round.


Round 5: work 5 single crochets in mint and 2 in natural. Now work * 4 single crochets in mint and 2 in natural *. Repeat from * to * until there are 5 stitches left. Work 4 single crochets in mint and 1 in natural.


Round 6: start working 1 single crochet in natural and 4 single crochets in mint. Now, * work 3 single crochets in natural and 3 single crochets in mint*. Repeat from * to * until the end of the row. Finish by working 3 singles crochets in mint and 1 single crochet in natural.


Round 7: work 2 single crochets in natural and 3 single crochets in mint. Continue working * 4 single crochets in natural and 2 single crochets in mint *. Repeat from * to * until there is 1 stitch left. To finish the round work 1 single crochet in natural.


Round 8: work 3 single crochets in natural and 2 single crochets in mint. Now work * 5 single crochets in natural and 1 single crochet in mint *. Repeat from * to * until there is 1 stitch left. Finish the round with 1 single crochet in natural.


Round 9: begin the round by working 4 single crochets in natural and1 single crochet in mint. Continue the rest of the round in natural.


Round 10: work the whole round in single crochet with natural.


Repeat the previous row 12 more times.


Now we are going to make the handles for the basket so that you can hang it up. To do so: *chain 40, skip 8 stitches and work 25 more single crochet*. Repeat from * to * to make the second handle.


Work two more rounds in single crochet.


Using a tapestry needle, weave in any extra threads so that your basket doesn’t have any loose ends.

That’s it! Your basket is ready! You can use it anywhere and hang it where you are most likely to see it: a hanger or a doorknob.

We hope you liked this step-by-step pattern and that you share your catch-all basket on social media using the #weareknitters.com.

You are reading the post What to do with leftover cotton yarn knick knack basket appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


Now that good weather is arriving, we want to make fun combinations with our cotton yarn in all its colors. Do you like knitting stripes? In today’s post, we’re going to show you an easy way to knit them without leaving a thousand ends to weave in with the color changes.


For this step by step, we’ve used 5mm knitting needles and two skeins of Pima cotton.

Before we start with this step by step, here’s a list of techniques you should know in advance:


Cast on sas many stitches as you need and work the first stripe in whatever color you like.

When you’re ready to change colors, you should start with a right-side row.


Simply begin knitting with the strand from the new skein, working one right side row then one wrong side row, leaving the strands on hold. Now, we’ll show you what to do with it.

Let’s watch!

How to raise the threads when weaving in various colors with two needles | WE ARE KNITTERS - YouTube

Easy, right?


The only thing you have to do is pass the strand you’re not knitting above the one you are going to use to work the row. Just like in the image above. Remember not pull it, so that the edge doesn’t shrink and is uniform.

Once you’re ready to start knitting with the next color, don’t tie the strands. Just take the strand of the color you need and knit the right-side row.


This will weave the ends on the wrong side of the work, going up along the edge.


Stripes are addictive, right? We hope this tutorial is entertaining and useful, and that it will also help you with your colorful and spring projects. We look forward to seeing you share your work on social media using the hashtag #weareknitters

You are reading the post How to raise the threads when weaving in various colors with two needles appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Today we propose an easy way to use up leftover cotton yarn. We bring you an easy pattern to personalize your garments.

We’re going to make a pocket in crochet to add to any basic t-shirt that you already have at home. For this project we used a size 8 crochet hook and our Pima cotton left over from other projects.

Start with a foundation chain of 17 chains + 3 extra to count as the first double crochet.

Row 1: work double crochet into each chain starting in the 16th chain from the knot.

Row 2: turn your work, chain 3, and skip the first stitch, work double crochet into each stitch of the previous row. You should have 17 stitches, counting the 3 stitches of the turning chain.

Repeat row 2 until your pocket measure the desired length. You can change colors to use up your left over yarn and make it more fun and colorful.

To finish we crocheted a row in single crochet and added a shell stitch border. You can see how to do this on our blog post “4 ways to add crochet borders”.

To make the shells, chain 1, and then work a single crochet into the next stitch. *Skip a stitch, work 5 double crochets into the same stitch, skip a stitch, and end with 1 single crochet*. Repeat from * to * until you finish the border.

If you are going to add a border I suggest you choose which one you are going to make before starting because it will determine how many stitches you need for your pocket. For this border, for example, you need to have a multiple of 4 stitches + 1.

The last step is to sew the pocket to your t-shirt and then enjoy saying, “I made it myself”. Don’t forget to share a picture with WAK on our social networks. We can’t wait to see those pockets.

You are reading the post What to do with your leftover pima cotton: decorate your t-shirts appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 


We love making our own knitwear, the sweaters and tops we have a special affection for, over all the other clothes in our closets. Sometimes, knitting can be a bit cumbersome, such as when we’re working increases to shape sleeves, or any special shape, and we have to knit “1 stitch twice” and we ask ourselves: how in the world do I do that? In this post, we’re here to save you and show you how to knit a stitch twice in four different ways.


For this tutorial, we’ve used 8 mm knitting needle and a skein of the Petite Wool.

Before beginning, we encourage you to review this list of techniques we’ll use:


1. Knit into the same stitch twice: one normal and the other through the back loop (crossed).

You can use this type of increase both for knitting and purling. Use it when you have to increase between knit stitches. To make this type of increase, knit the first stitch, then without dropping the stitch from the left needle, knit the stitch again through the back loop, as you would in Crossed stockinette stitch. Now drop the stitch from the left needle. You will have made two stitches from the same stitch. See how in the following video:

How to work the same stitch twice I | WE ARE KNITTERS - YouTube


1. Purl into the same stitch twice: one normal and the other through the back loop (crossed).

This type of stitch is usually used when increasing between two purl stitches. Just like the last increase, you have to work into the same stitch twice before pushing it from the needle. This time, you will first purl as usual, then purl through the back loop. Hit play on the video below to see how it’s done:

How to work the same stitch twice II | WE ARE KNITTERS - YouTube


3. Work the same stitch twice: knit 1 then purl 1.

This increase is used in stitches that change stitches, like ribbing or seed stitch, or when you are going to knit, but then need to purl. As in the previous cases, first knit the stitch as usual, then without dropping the stitch from the left needle, purl the next stitch, as you normally would. Let’s see how in the video:

How to work the same stitch twice III | WE ARE KNITTERS - YouTube


4. Work the same stitch twice: purl 1 then knit 1.

This type of increase is also usually used with patterns that change stitch, as in the previous section, or when you have to purl the next stitch and knit the following one. To make it, purl into the same stitch as usual, then without dropping the stitch from the left needle, knit into it as you normally would. You can see how easy it is in the following video:

How to work the same stitch twice IV | WE ARE KNITTERS - YouTube

Now knitting the same stitch twice doesn’t seem so complicated, right? We hope that this tutorial is helpful to you and that you’ll share your knitting with us on social media using the hashtag #WeAreKnitters. Until next time!

You are reading the post How to work the same stitch twice appeared first on The Blog - US/UK.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview