Loading...

Follow Trezor Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Trezor Blog by Satoshilabs - 6d ago
#FeatureFriday — GPGWhat it can do…

GNU Privacy Guard is a free encryption software that lets you encrypt and decrypt files, as well as verify the source or authenticity of a file or document. Based on the OpenPGP standard created by Philip R. Zimmerman, GPG can be used with the private keys generated by Trezor to enhance your privacy.

Who can use it…

Anyone who wants to keep something private online can use GPG. You can use it to encrypt emails that you send — businesses can have their employees use GPG to ensure that any sensitive corporate details stay private.

You can read more about use cases of GPG in this article.

Why use it…

As Zimmermann said: “PGP empowers people to take their privacy into their own hands.” With GPG you can decide what you want to encrypt or verify. GPG puts the security of your files, documents, and emails in your own hands. Remember: don’t trust — verify.

How to use it…

GPG works with a pair of keys. The private key, kept safely in your Trezor device, can be used to encrypt a file or message that you send; while the public key can be used by the receiver of your message to decrypt what you sent them.

GPG is a way to sign a message so that the receiver can verify it as authentic, or a way of sending an encrypted message securely.

About Us

Created by SatoshiLabs in 2014, the Trezor One is the original and most trusted hardware wallet in the world. It offers unmatched security for cryptocurrencies, password management, and serves as the second factor in Two-Factor Authentication. These features combine with an interface that is easy to use whether you are a security expert or a brand new user.

Trezor Model T is the next-generation hardware wallet, designed with the benefits of the original Trezor in mind, combined with a modern and intuitive interface for improved user experience and security. It features a touchscreen, faster processor, and advanced coin support, as well as all the features of the Trezor One.

#FeatureFriday — GPG was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Interview with Randy Brito from Bitcoin Venezuela: Philosophy Meets Practicality

At the heart of Bitcoin lies a philosophy that can be summed up in one word: decentralization. This idea aims to shift power from a central source to the hands of individuals. Instead of keeping individual privacy and economic freedom in the hands of a centralized organization — for example, a bank — decentralization removes the possibility of interference or regulation by giving people self-sovereignty.

You can read a lot about the philosophy behind Bitcoin and its peer-to-peer network — but how practical is it off paper? When we were recently contacted by Bitcoin Venezuela, we saw just how meaningful this philosophy is, once put into practice.

Randy Brito started the nonprofit organization Bitcoin Venezuela in 2012 as a way to educate people about Bitcoin, at a time when local currency was no longer a reliable source of value and exchange. Bitcoin could make it possible for people to work freelance and get paid in a currency that had value. Bitcoin made it possible for Bitcoin Venezuela and other charities to transfer much needed funds without facing issues connected to wire or cash transfers. Bitcoin also provides people in affected areas with a safer and less volatile storage of value than their national currencies.

We had a chance to ask Randy some questions about his nonprofit work when he contacted us at SatoshiLabs about an opportunity to collaborate. If you want to learn more about what’s happening in Venezuela, you can read this transcript of an interview with Randy, from the podcast Bottomshelf Bitcoin by Josh Humphrey.

How long have you been involved with crypto?

I heard about Bitcoin in April 2011, received my first and only mined mBTC September that year. I founded BitcoinVenezuela.com on October 2012 to teach about Bitcoin in Venezuela, by creating content in Spanish. I also translated Electrum to Spanish. Some people joined Bitcoin Venezuela as collaborators so we started making talks about Bitcoin in Venezuela in universities and meetups. After the 2014 demonstrations in the country, and the detention of Bitcoiners in the country in 2015, our meetups stopped and collaborators started leaving the country or went into hiding.

Randy Brito from Bitcoin Venezuela ⚡️When did you begin to apply crypto to charity work?

On December 2015 I helped local collaborators buy supplies for a kids hospital; in 2016 we started cooking and giving away food one day per month to hundreds of people in the streets of a city of Venezuela. Today we help feed 1600 people daily in one soup kitchen and hundreds others daily across the country in other locations, around 300 more one day per week in our weekly activities when we visit orphanages, elderly center, special care center, and hospitals.

What have been the top 3 challenges to your organization, and how have you dealt with them?

It’s been very difficult to earn the trust of the crypto community so more people donate whatever amount they can. We’ve even run some months with total collected donations of $35-$100 only, throughout a whole month.

Today we receive enough monthly to keep our small food help operations, but we still have to come up with a way to fund and continue putting all this time and effort on the donations collecting part, public relations, logistics, collaborators on the ground, etc; as all this has been and currently is being done without any compensation, which is great that we don’t have to spend any donation on these costs, but it is unsustainable and I think it is unfair to everyone who’s putting full-time or all the spare time they have left from their jobs. So, in my opinion, we haven’t dealt with this yet.

The other difficulty is transparency, due to two things: how to deal with donators’ wish of seeing everything that is being done with the money they’ve sent while protecting all collaborators’ privacy and lives (Venezuela is a very hostile place, both for the insecurity but also because of persecution of those helping others); and how to deal with thousands of needed transactions in tens of different payment methods and even barter, so it is accountable enough for donators to trust we are using the funds the best way possible.

So, there is much we haven’t solved, probably because of the lack of experience on how traditional nonprofits survive or because we are not trying to be as the traditional nonprofits, a decision that has its advantages and disadvantages.

How is cryptocurrency helping you make a difference?

By accepting Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies we’ve been able to collect donations from anywhere in the world, despite not being incorporated as a nonprofit in any country. People send us around $5 USD donations through the Lightning Network regularly, almost daily. We’ve also been able to achieve big improvements for some people’s lives in some locations thanks to private donators who have committed bigger donations in Bitcoin, Ethereum, Zcash, for achieving things like: a whole farm-school reconstruction with new and fixed equipment and machinery, two water wells for an elderly center and a soup kitchen, all the cookware for a soup kitchen, and even medicines and medical supplies. All this without having to go through complicated and costly KYC/AML processes for our donators or our organization, so 100% of the donated funds are used for helping people in Venezuela.

Do you think cryptocurrency is uniquely suited to your organization’s needs?

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies have proven to be the best way for us to accomplish what we’ve done so far, what we do daily. It is showing its potential on helping us scale, if we manage to find a way to deal with the mentioned difficulties.

Why did you decide to contact Trezor to help with this cause?

Due to the need of an easy to use and secure hardware wallet that could be used by other non-profit humanitarian aid organizations which we, Bitcoin Venezuela, would like to collaborate with. We saw in Trezor a tool that experienced people like us could easily teach completely new to the scene people and organizations to use, so these organizations would hopefully help us with the burdens of regulations which we are being asked to comply with, in exchange for us helping them join the movement of cryptocurrencies’ borderless donations.

About Us

Created by SatoshiLabs in 2014, the Trezor One is the original and most trusted hardware wallet in the world. It offers unmatched security for cryptocurrencies, password management, and serves as the second factor in Two-Factor Authentication. These features combine with an interface that is easy to use whether you are a security expert or a brand new user.

Trezor Model T is the next-generation hardware wallet, designed with the benefits of the original Trezor in mind, combined with a modern and intuitive interface for improved user experience and security. It features a touchscreen, faster processor, and advanced coin support, as well as all the features of the Trezor One.

Bitcoin Venezuela: Philosophy Meets Practicality was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
#FeatureFriday — Sign & Verify

Looking for a way to verify your address, or someone else’s? You can use the Sign & Verify tab in Trezor Wallet in just a couple easy steps.

Who can use it…

With the straightforward process of signing and verifying in Trezor Wallet, anyone can use this feature.

It’s simple to fill in the form in Trezor Wallet and then confirm on the screen of the device.

Why use it…

Signing a message is a way for you to prove that you own an address. An exchange could ask you to sign a message so they can verify that you are the correct owner of the address, not a hacker.

You can prove that you own an address, or you can ask someone else to prove that they own their address before you continue with a transaction.

Some companies might use it to verify an address if they plan to use AirDrop.

How to use it…

In Trezor Wallet, you can start by selecting the account with the address you want. Type your message into the box and paste the address into the address box. Click “Sign.”

Next you will need to confirm the signature on your Trezor device. Compare the text in the message box to what is displayed on the screen of your device. If it’s all correct, click “Confirm.” After you confirm it on your Trezor, you’ll see the signature in the third box on your computer screen.

If you want to verify someone else’s message, start by choosing the correct account in Trezor Wallet, then copy and paste the signed message into the message box. Use the address that was used to sign the message, and paste it into the address box, then paste the signature into the signature box. Click “Verify,” and then check your Trezor. If it verified, then you’ll see part of the message on your Trezor’s screen — otherwise you’ll see an error message. Confirm verification once more on your device, and you’re done.

About Us

Created by SatoshiLabs in 2014, the Trezor One is the original and most trusted hardware wallet in the world. It offers unmatched security for cryptocurrencies, password management, and serves as the second factor in Two-Factor Authentication. These features combine with an interface that is easy to use whether you are a security expert or a brand new user.

Trezor Model T is the next-generation hardware wallet, designed with the benefits of the original Trezor in mind, combined with a modern and intuitive interface for improved user experience and security. It features a touchscreen, faster processor, and advanced coin support, as well as all the features of the Trezor One.

#FeatureFriday — Sign & Verify was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Paper wallets — a relic of the past

Once widely popular, paper wallets nowadays hold very few advantages in comparison to modern solutions. Let’s take a look at what paper wallets are, where they came from, and why most people probably shouldn’t use them.

What is a paper wallet?

A paper wallet is a method of storing cryptocurrencies by printing the key pair on a piece of paper. The key pair would usually take the form of two QR codes, one for the private key and one for the public key (the address).

The user would scan the printed public key to load a certain type of cryptocurrency on said address and then “spend” the balance after sweeping or importing the private key later, when necessary.

Paper walletsHistorical context

When paper wallets got popularized in mid-2011, it seemed to be the greatest thing since sliced bread. Until then, most people would leave the individual private keys laying on their hard drives. More cautious users used to make a copy of their wallet.dat (the file which stored the private keys in the original Bitcoin client) but even then, they had to rely on the durability of electronics and make sure the storage was not connected to the internet in any way.

Paper wallets provided a great way to keep the private keys offline and made it simple to transfer these coins to anyone — all without ever touching the Bitcoin blockchain. Everybody can imagine handing somebody a piece of paper, right?

In February 2012, Pieter Wuille published the 32nd Bitcoin Improvement Proposal which drastically changed the process of generating the keys, and the structure of wallets overall. In this BIP titledHierarchical Deterministic Wallets, Wuille specified a way of deriving the keys from a “Master Seed” in a hierarchical, tree-like structure. This means that from one seed, almost any given number of accounts and addresses can be generated — and these would come out the same every time you do so, given the same input (seed). In other words, at this point, you didn’t have to worry about individual keys so much, as long as you keep the master seed safely backed up.

“Wallet, Accounts and Addresses” Trezor Blog, 2017

Finally, in September 2013, the BIP-39 was created. First implemented in Trezor, BIP-39 describes the method of converting a random number into a set of common words which is then used to create a master seed of a wallet. This set of words is usually referred to as a seed phrase, recovery seed, or seed.

The recovery seed as defined in BIP-39 is now adopted by most of the popular modern wallets.

How do legacy paper wallets fare in comparison with hardware wallets?

Paper wallets remained a somewhat viable solution only for a handful of technically experienced users. We can assume, that the cost of creating and using a paper wallet could come at a relatively low cost for them if they already had the tools, previous experience, and a good understanding of the technology. Overall, using a paper wallet safely takes a lot of work and preparation.

For the absolute majority of users, especially beginners, one-key paper wallets hold no benefits over HD recovery seeds generated by a hardware wallet. You can achieve the security level of a paper wallet by writing your seed on a piece of paper and erasing the memory of the device which generated the seed. Looking at this, we can consider the HD seed to be a superset of classic paper wallets.

These are the specific factors we can use to compare paper wallets with hardware wallet (using a seed):

Creating a wallet

Hardware wallets have been designed to create and operate within an isolated environment. One of the basic premises you adopt when using a hardware wallet is that the computer and everything else connected to the internet might be compromised. To protect you against these dangers, hardware wallets generate the seed offline and use the secure trusted screen to show you the words directly on the device.

When creating a paper wallet, the burden of creating such a secure, isolated environment falls on the user. To mitigate the risk of the wallet being compromised from the start, you should use a live Linux from a CD, disconnect from the internet (preferably, you would use a machine which has never touched the internet before), and limit yourself to a “dumb” printer (with no access to the internet).

The bottom line is the same for both the paper and hardware wallets; You want your private keys offline and never see them have them anywhere in the digital form. Hardware wallets make the backup straightforward enough — from the device itself to your pen and paper.

Versatility and usability

If you have your paper wallet printed and your recovery seed is written down, you may want to think about storing these backups and the ways they can be used.

  • Paper wallets are usually limited to one key pair, which means that if you printed a bitcoin paper wallet, you have one address available, and this address will only be able to receive bitcoins. A seed used in a hardware wallet like Trezor can generate an almost unlimited number of addresses. The same seed can be used to handle wallets for multiple cryptocurrencies, encrypt passwords, authenticate login, sign messages, and more.
  • To get some security benefits of paper wallets, you have to consider them to be single-use devices. HD seeds can generate a fresh address for every new transaction so you never have to reuse an address. Using fresh addresses helps to maintain your privacy.
  • When using a paper wallet, you rely on QR codes and/or long strings of random characters (private key and the address in the base58 form). The seed is usually represented in a set of common English words which are far easier to read and work with. The seed can be easily stored in devices like Cryptosteel, or even memorized.
  • A BIP-39 seed is an industry standard supported by most of the popular wallets and endorsed by security experts. There are far more competing implementations of paper wallets, some less reliable and safe than others.
  • Importing the seed in a hardware wallet is just as easy as it is to create it. All of the words can be entered directly on the device and the hardware wallet ensures that the seed never leaves the secure environment. The mirrored level of convenience, or lack thereof, comes with the paper wallet too. When importing the private key from a paper wallet, you have to make sure the interface you’re using is free of malware and offline.
  • Hardware wallets handle the change for you when you send your transaction which makes it possible and easy to only spend fractions of your balance. Paper wallets are only good for spending the whole balance at once. Depending on which client you use to import the private key, you might be forced to manage your change manually.
Conclusion

Hardware wallets take care of the whole cycle of using cryptocurrencies (creating, storing, spending) in a secure and convenient manner. It is easy to use them to create the backup for your funds in an isolated and safe environment. The seed used in a hardware wallet is used for multitudes of different types of cryptocurrencies and features.

Paper wallets often prove to be too difficult to manage, especially for beginners and casual users who lack the in-depth knowledge of its mechanics.

In a scenario in which an experienced user could not get his/her hands on a hardware wallet (because of logistics of getting one), using a paper wallet to keep the private key offline could be the second best thing.

Paper wallets — a relic of the past was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
#FeatureFriday — SSH Agent

Anything you store on your laptop can be lost or stolen. When you use SSH login, you store your private key somewhere on your laptop, and automatically run the risk of a security breach. Now that SSH has been integrated with Trezor, you can not only safely store your private key offline, but you can also streamline the whole process of remotely managing systems and applications.

What it can do

SSH protocol lets you remotely log in to a server or another of your computers, securely. With your Trezor device, it provides authentication and encrypts any data that’s communicated between two computers connecting over an unsecured network.

The private key required to generate the public key for logging in to a server is stored on the Trezor device, allowing for a quick and ultra secure server connection.

Who can use it

SSH is a more advanced feature commonly used by network administrators when they need to remotely manage any systems or applications. They can log in to another computer over a network, execute commands, and move files from one computer to another with SCP. Either the Trezor One or Model T can be used with SSH.

Why use it

SSH protocol allows you to securely log in remotely, from one computer to another. Everything will be encrypted, making it impossible for anyone to see what you’re doing.

Using your Trezor device for SSH means that you don’t have to rely on a password to access a server. Passwords always come with the risk of being broken, while your private keys stored on your Trezor device can never be accessed by a remote attack.

Instead of storing your private keys on a computer that can be hacked or stolen, with SSH integration into Trezor you know your private keys will never be stolen. It also makes it more convenient to take your private keys and use them for SSH login from another computer, instead of having to transfer them somehow from one computer to another.

Without using your Trezor for SSH login, you can lose your private keys forever if someone steals your computer. Storing them on a Trezor device means you can recover your keys on a new device if the old one is damaged, lost, or stolen, just by inputting your original recovery seed.

How to use it

For a step by step guide to setting up Trezor SSH Agent on either Linux or Windows, head over to this Trezor Wiki page.

After you have set it up, you’ll be able to log in to another computer over a network, move files from one computer to another, and more, with all the convenience and security of a Trezor device.

Instead of inputting your private key on the computer, you simply confirm on your device to log in, and the private key never leaves the safety of your offline Trezor. As usual, any action must be confirmed by you on the device, either by tapping the screen or by pressing a button.

About Us

Created by SatoshiLabs in 2014, the Trezor One is the original and most trusted hardware wallet in the world. It offers unmatched security for cryptocurrencies, password management, and serves as the second factor in Two-Factor Authentication. These features combine with an interface that is easy to use whether you are a security expert or a brand new user.

Trezor Model T is the next-generation hardware wallet, designed with the benefits of the original Trezor in mind, combined with a modern and intuitive interface for improved user experience and security. It features a touchscreen, faster processor, and advanced coin support, as well as all the features of the Trezor One.

#FeatureFriday — SSH Agent was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
#FeatureFriday — Exchanges

How do I choose the best exchange? That’s one of the most common questions asked on social media within the crypto community. Some exchanges offer a wide range of traded assets, others provide discounts on trading fees, and some service only specific regions. Each exchange offers different advantages and perks. On the other hand, exchanges always carry several risks and disadvantages — phishing websites can impersonate exchanges, there are always privacy risks associated with user data processing, and there can also be complicated Know Your Customer (KYC) and Anti-Money Laundering (AML) checks and regulations.

The best way to avoid all of these risks is to use Trezor In-wallet Exchanges, which we will talk about in this #FeatureFriday article.

What it can do…

In-wallet Exchanges are built directly into the Trezor Wallet interface. This means that all trades are performed within the safety of the Trezor environment and you’re not required to access any third-party sites directly.

Currently, we offer three exchanges: Changelly, ChangeNOW, and CoinSwitch. All of these are established financial institutions with a history of stability, transparency, and fair policies. Each one offers a different selection of assets to exchange, different fees, and different exchange rates. With over 20 of the most favored cryptocurrencies to choose from, everyone can find the one that’s right for them.

Please remember that exchanges charge a small fee on every trade. There are also limitations to the minimum and maximum amounts of funds you can exchange in one trade. These and any additional limitations are described in the Terms and Conditions of each exchange. Trezor does not apply any restrictions on using the Exchange feature. The displayed estimated conversion rate may fluctuate during the trade.

Who can use it…

Trezor In-wallet Exchanges are available to every owner of a Trezor device via the Trezor Wallet interface.

Don’t have a Trezor yet? Get yours now and gain access to Exchanges and other features we offer, such as Password Manager, Two-Factor Authentication, and Labeling.

Why use it…

One of the major disadvantages of using centralized exchanges is the increased risk of a data breach or leak of private user information. Trezor Exchanges do not require any registration. No e-mail, text verification, or username. In addition to this, storing your funds on an exchange is risky, as you’re not the owner of the private keys of your exchange wallet. Not your keys? Not your crypto.

These risks are mitigated by using Trezor In-wallet Exchanges. Trezor partner exchanges do not collect any of your private data*, and because every transaction happens within the Trezor Wallet interface, you’re also protected from phishing websites, scammers, and exchange rate errors. This exchange feature allows you to send and receive traded assets directly into your Trezor wallet, without typing the address manually for Trezor native cryptocurrencies — reducing the risk of human error.

During the whole transaction process you can track the progress in the Exchange tab under Trades In Progress. Once your funds are traded they are safely stored within the protected Trezor environment. Your private keys, your crypto.

How to use it…

Using Trezor integrated exchanges is a simple and safe procedure. All you have to do is connect your Trezor device to a computer, open Trezor Wallet, and select the Exchange tab from the menu. After choosing the assets and amount you want to trade, you will be presented with offers from our partner exchanges. The best offer with the highest exchange rate displays at the top, followed by the second and the third best offer. After selecting an offer, your Trezor device will prompt you to verify and confirm both the receiving address and the transaction details directly on the screen of your Trezor.

For a full detailed guide please visit this Trezor Wiki page dedicated to Exchanges.

*Under specific circumstances undisclosed to Trezor, exchanges reserve the right to process KYC or AML verifications on certain transactions. If your transaction triggers this process, you will be notified in the Exchange tab. You have the right to cancel the exchange and receive your refund in such cases, or continue by supplying identification documents to the exchange service.

Finally…

This article is meant to be a guide for anyone unsure about how to proceed with their fiat-to-crypto purchase. We are not offering any financial or investment advice; we simply wish to keep our community informed about security and privacy best practices.

SatoshiLabs bears no responsibility for any part of the exchange process, including but not limited to functionality, rates, and KYC/AML. If your transaction triggers KYC/AML verification, please contact the respective exchange service. If you refuse to complete KYC, the transaction should be reverted. For additional information, please contact the exchanges.

About Us

Created by SatoshiLabs in 2014, the Trezor One is the original and most trusted hardware wallet in the world. It offers unmatched security for cryptocurrencies, password management, and serves as the second factor in Two-Factor Authentication. These features combine with an interface that is easy to use whether you are a security expert or a brand new user.

Trezor Model T is the next-generation hardware wallet, designed with the benefits of the original Trezor in mind, combined with a modern and intuitive interface for improved user experience and security. It features a touchscreen, faster processor, and advanced coin support, as well as all the features of the Trezor One.

#FeatureFriday — Exchanges was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
#FeatureFriday — Two-Factor Authentication

Are you keeping your online accounts safe with the most secure login option? Most of the websites that you use every day, like Facebook and Twitter, offer two-factor authentication to make sure it’s really you logging in to your account — but if you aren’t using a secure second factor, then your accounts can still be compromised. Take the right steps to improve the safety of your data online. One of those steps is using a Trezor hardware wallet as the second factor in two-factor authentication, which we’ll talk about more below.

What it can do…

There are two types of two-factor authentication, or 2FA. The most commonly used type is time based one-time password — you have to enter a one-time code during login. The second, more secure type is universal second factor (U2F). U2F ensures that your private key stays private.

You can use your Trezor device as the second factor, or security token. Using your Trezor device as the second factor in 2FA is an advantage because it puts your security into your own hands, rather than trusting a third party company. When you connect your Trezor and log in to a website, instead of typing in a code sent to your phone (which could be compromised), you simply confirm the login with a quick press of a single button. Your private keys never leave the device.

U2F Authentication on Model TWho can use it…

As long as you have Chrome or Firefox, you can use this feature to log in to some of the most popular online services. It’s as simple to use as the press of a button. For once, security and convenience go hand in hand.

This feature is available to anyone who has either Trezor One or a Model T. Don’t have a Trezor yet? Don’t lose your chance to secure your private data — get yours now!

Why use it…

If you don’t have a secure way to log in, then your accounts could be hacked. There is a shocking amount of personal data stored in your account, which a hacker could steal and use maliciously. Even if you use 2FA right now, most second-factor devices are still not secure. An SMS code can be intercepted, or an email can be hacked. When you receive a one time code as your second factor, the master key is sent through the internet.

Using your Trezor for U2F means no master key is ever revealed. Plus, the website you are trying to log in to will also show up on your Trezor device, so you can confirm that they match to make sure you aren’t logging in to a phishing site.

Your online accounts deserve the same security as your digital assets — because your private data is also a digital asset.

How to use it…

Here’s a step-by-step guide to adding Trezor to Google for 2FA. Most sites will have a similar process. Once you have your device set up with the website, you’ll be asked to confirm your login on your Trezor device every time you access your account.

You can explore a full list of websites that let you set up U2F here.

About Us

Created by SatoshiLabs in 2014, the Trezor One is the original and most trusted hardware wallet in the world. It offers unmatched security for cryptocurrencies, password management, and serves as the second factor in Two-Factor Authentication. These features combine with an interface that is easy to use whether you are a security expert or a brand new user.

Trezor Model T is the next-generation hardware wallet, designed with the benefits of the original Trezor in mind, combined with a modern and intuitive interface for improved user experience and security. It features a touchscreen, faster processor, and advanced coin support, as well as all the features of the Trezor One.

#FeatureFriday — Two-Factor Authentication was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
#FeatureFriday — Labeling in Trezor Wallet

No matter how much time you spend building your crypto portfolio, it can be a challenge to keep everything organized. Organization can often mean the difference between a safe transaction and mistakenly sending your cryptocurrency to the wrong address — which could mean losing that crypto forever. Today’s feature for #FeatureFriday is the answer to your organizational needs: labeling in Trezor Wallet.

What it can do

The labeling feature in Trezor Wallet lets you rename accounts, label receiving addresses, and comment on transactions by connecting Trezor Wallet to Dropbox and creating an encrypted folder where it will store your labels. It’s one more way to use a Trezor device to keep your private data secured, organized, and available from any computer.

Who can use it

Cloud labeling is a feature designed to help you be efficient and organized. Since everyone needs help with that, anyone with a Trezor hardware wallet can use cloud labeling, no matter their level of tech knowledge.

Why use it

Labeling is useful for keeping your Wallet well-ordered. Naming your accounts can help you keep track of things like “Which one is for business?” or “Which one is my HODL account?” or “Which one is for investing?” Labeling receiving addresses will help you keep your incoming payments straight according to their purpose. Commenting on transactions can help you keep track of your expenses.

How to use it

Connect your Trezor device and open Trezor Wallet. Click “Enable Labeling” in the menu on the left side of the screen and follow the prompt to sign in to Dropbox. Trezor will ask you if it can create a folder in Dropbox where it will encrypt and store your labels (you might recall from our #FeatureFriday article on Trezor Password Manager that your device also makes a folder for your passwords in Dropbox). You will have to manually confirm that on your Trezor device.

Click “Enable labeling” in the menu on the left side of the Trezor Wallet.

You can rename your accounts by clicking the tag next to the account name. To label a receiving address, you just have to type your label in to the space next to the fresh address, and save it. To comment on a transaction, you can fill in the space marked “Comments” for any transaction.

For a full guide including photos, click here.

About Us

Created by SatoshiLabs in 2014, the Trezor One is the original and most trusted hardware wallet in the world. It offers unmatched security for cryptocurrencies, password management, and serves as the second factor in Two-Factor Authentication. These features combine with an interface that is easy to use whether you are a security expert or a brand new user.

Trezor Model T is the next-generation hardware wallet, designed with the benefits of the original Trezor in mind, combined with a modern and intuitive interface for improved user experience and security. It features a touchscreen, faster processor, and advanced coin support, as well as all the features of the Trezor One.

#FeatureFriday — Labeling in Trezor Wallet was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When it comes to buying cryptocurrencies there are several different ways to do this. The most common way would be to use a standalone fiat-to-crypto exchange. However, exchanges come with certain risks and disadvantages that you want to avoid. At Trezor, we’re dedicated to making it as secure and simple as possible to use cryptocurrency, and that includes safely exchanging your hard-earned money for crypto.

In this article, we will introduce you to the Trezor Buy feature that allows anyone with a Trezor device to purchase cryptocurrencies directly from our partner exchanges.

Some important things to know

Before you buy, you should keep in mind that only certain cryptocurrencies can be bought with fiat. Some of the top coins by market volume available for fiat-to-crypto exchange include Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH), Ripple (XRP), and more. If you want to purchase a cryptocurrency that is only available for purchase with other cryptocurrency, and not with fiat, you will have to start with a fiat-to-crypto purchase, which we will walk you through in a moment.

The most common place to buy cryptocurrency is within an exchange. A cryptocurrency exchange is a platform that makes it possible to buy and sell cryptocurrency. Some exchanges only allow you to buy cryptocurrency with another cryptocurrency, and others allow you to purchase with fiat.

The most important question to ask yourself before purchasing is: Is it safe? You have probably heard about the large number of exchange hacks that have taken place over the last couple of years. As we will explain below, using your Trezor device and the available in-wallet exchanges makes the process much safer than going through an online exchange without your Trezor hardware wallet.

How to use Trezor Buy tab: Step by step

Step 1: Connect your Trezor device and open Trezor Wallet. If you have passphrase enabled, you will be prompted to enter your passphrase multiple times throughout the following process.

Step 2: Click on the Buy tab in the menu bar.

Step 3: Choose an exchange from those listed. There are ten exchanges listed within Trezor Wallet. Nine of them accept credit and debit cards as a method of payment, and the tenth also lets you use SEPA bank transfers. If you don’t know which exchange to choose, take a look at these three factors to help you find the right one:

  • Currency conversion rates: Some exchanges will offer different conversion rates for currency. You can always compare the offered rate to what you can find online, although some exchanges will display the current global conversion rates.
  • Exchange fees: every exchange will charge some percentage of your overall transaction as a fee for using their service. The percentage will vary.
  • Currencies available for purchase: Most exchanges will offer at least five of the top ten cryptocurrencies by market volume. Make sure the exchange offers the cryptocurrency you want before you continue. Some of the cryptocurrencies are not available for purchase with fiat at all.

Step 4: When you have selected an exchange, follow the directions given. They can vary slightly from exchange to exchange, but there are some things they will have in common, like registering (for first time users) or signing in (for returning users). You will also always be asked to enter your wallet address. Here’s how to find it:

  • Back in Trezor Wallet, choose the currency that you are purchasing (This is very important: you do not want to send the wrong currency to the wrong address. You cannot send Litecoin to a Bitcoin address, for example.). If you are purchasing Bitcoin, select Bitcoin.
  • Go to the Receive tab and choose “Create new address,” then select “Show full address.”
  • You will have to confirm the address directly on your Trezor device. Verify that the address displayed in Trezor Wallet matches the one displayed on your device, and manually choose “Continue.”
  • You will have to input that address back in the exchange. We recommend that you copy and paste the address instead of typing it in, to avoid making any mistakes. If you don’t input the correct address, you will not receive your coins.

After you enter the receiving address, you will be prompted to input your preferred payment method. This will look fairly similar across all exchange sites. Payment can be done by bank transfer, wire transfer, credit or debit card, bank drafts, or money orders.

Step 5: Success! You can find your newly bought cryptocurrency in your Trezor Wallet. It won’t show up instantly; it usually takes about an hour before your transaction is confirmed, although this period could be longer based on the volume of traffic on the blockchain and the exchange. The length of the delay depends on things like which exchange you’re using, how busy the network is, or what kind of currency you bought.

For any errors that occur, you can always contact the exchange directly, by email. As always, be careful about handing over your private information. Make sure that you are, in fact, contacting the exchange, and not a malicious third party by mistake.

Trezor In-Wallet Exchanges

You might be wondering how Trezor in-wallet exchanges are any different from using an online exchange by itself. As we mentioned earlier, online exchanges are constantly targeted by hackers, who are stealing from people who stored their coins in the exchange. Our in-wallet exchange is safer in three ways:

  • You have to physically confirm any transactions on your Trezor device before your coins will move anywhere.
  • When you make a purchase or a trade, your new coins can go directly to your Trezor wallet, meaning they cannot be stolen, because your device is offline and inaccessible to any hacker.
  • Finally, when you choose an exchange from within Trezor Wallet, it will go straight to the legitimate website. If you search for an exchange site using a search engine, there is always a chance that you could mistakenly open a phishing site that has mimicked the real exchange in order to steal your private data.

No more searching for a reliable and trusted exchange, we got you covered!

Finally…

This article is meant to be a guide for anyone unsure about how to proceed with their fiat-to-crypto purchase. We are not offering any financial or investment advice; we simply wish to keep our community informed about security and privacy best practices.

SatoshiLabs bears no responsibility for any part of the exchange process, including but not limited to functionality, rates, and KYC/AML. If your transaction triggers KYC/AML verification, please contact the respective exchange service. If you refuse to complete KYC, the transaction should be reverted. For additional information, please contact the exchanges.

About Us

Created by SatoshiLabs in 2014, the Trezor One is the original and most trusted hardware wallet in the world. It offers unmatched security for cryptocurrencies, password management, and serves as the second factor in Two-Factor Authentication. These features combine with an interface that is easy to use whether you are a security expert or a brand new user.

Trezor Model T is the next-generation hardware wallet, designed with the benefits of the original Trezor in mind, combined with a modern and intuitive interface for improved user experience and security. It features a touchscreen, faster processor, and advanced coin support, as well as all the features of the Trezor One.

How to Buy Cryptocurrency With Trezor was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
#FeatureFriday — Trezor Password Manager

Do you use the same password for all your accounts online because it’s too difficult to come up with unique, complex passwords for every login? Are you worried that keeping your passwords on an online password manager is unsafe? Trezor has the best solution for you.

What it can do…

Trezor Password Manager (TPM) makes it easy to generate, store, and organize your passwords for login credentials online or on apps. When a website asks you to sign up for the first time, TPM will generate a complex, more secure password for you. Once you create a password, you can save it to TPM and tag it. Tagging your passwords helps you to stay organized — less mess, less stress.

Who can use it…

TPM is easy to use no matter how proficient you are in technology. Just install the Chrome extension, plug in your Trezor, and you are ready to go.

Why use it…

One of the first barriers between your data and hackers is your password. It’s important to use long, complex unique passwords that are difficult to guess — that means they are also difficult to remember. There are several options for password managers online, but online password managers have been hacked before.

Most password managers require you to access your saved passwords by entering a master password; but if someone gets that password, they get access to all your saved passwords.

TPM does not require you to enter a master password. And when you need to access a password, your device will decrypt only one password at a time, rather than decrypting the entire file of saved passwords. Even if you’re on a public computer, your passwords will be safely hidden from view.

How to use it…

Connect your Trezor device and open Trezor Password Manager. Download TPM for Chrome and open it. Sign in with either Drive or Dropbox. If you use Dropbox, then your Trezor device will ask you for permission to create a file where it will store your password data. You’ll have to manually confirm that on the device. After you enable TPM with your device, you are ready to start generating and saving your passwords, securely.

Don’t worry, the stored data cannot be decrypted without your Trezor device and its unique seed. Your private data will have the same level of security as your cryptocurrency funds. If your Trezor is lost or stolen, you can recover all your data with your recovery seed.

For the most secure option, try Trezor Password Manager to store and cryptographically protect all your passwords.

For a full step by step guide, you can read this Wiki article.

About Us

Created by SatoshiLabs in 2014, the Trezor One is the original and most trusted hardware wallet in the world. It offers unmatched security for cryptocurrencies, password management, and serves as the second factor in Two-Factor Authentication. These features combine with an interface that is easy to use whether you are a security expert or a brand new user.

Trezor Model T is the next-generation hardware wallet, designed with the benefits of the original Trezor in mind, combined with a modern and intuitive interface for improved user experience and security. It features a touchscreen, faster processor, and advanced coin support, as well as all the features of the Trezor One.

#FeatureFriday — Trezor Password Manager was originally published in Trezor Blog on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview