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Nail trimming can be a sensitive issue, especially when dealing with a nervous dog. If your dog gets anxious by the plain sight of nail clippers, rewarding good behavior is important to show your dog that touching feet is not a threat. Nail trimming is a step by step process and it is okay if not all nails get done in one sitting.

Why do dogs need nail trimming?

Most of the time, dogs regularly walking on hard surfaces don’t need nail trimming as concrete keeps their nails short. However, dogs have a dewclaw, comparable to our thumb, that sits higher on the paw and does not get a lot of wear and tear. Because of that, this nail is often longer than the others and requires clipping to avoid snagging the nail on anything and potentially getting hurt.

How to trim nails?

Some dogs may have different colored nails. Dark nails can make nail trimming a daunting task as the centre of a dog’s nail contains a ‘quick’ with blood vessels and nerves and can be hard to see. It is important to not cut the quick as it will bleed, is painful to the dog, and is counterproductive when dealing with a nervous four legged friend. If too much of the quick is clipped, a styptic pen applied to the injured area works great to stop the bleeding. If in doubt, clipping the very tip of the top of the nail will be sufficient and won’t hurt your dog. Fortunately, light nails are much easier to clip, as the pink coloured quick inside the nail is visible.

Guillotine clippers with a sliding blade and a safety guard are the best nail clippers – make sure to choose an appropriate size for your dog! Once ready to clip the nails, align them carefully along the piece of nail you wish to remove and snip it off without damaging the quick. 

If your dog is particularly nervous, consider having it done by the vet. Vets and vet nurses will be more than happy to show you how to properly handle your dog and cut their nails safely, so you can do it at home.

The post Why is nail trimming important? appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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Tails.com Dog Blog by Sophie Van Der Veken - 4d ago

There’s a juicy kebab (or five) cooking on the grill. The burgers are piled high and the buns are loaded with ketchup, mayo and pickles. There’s a lump of cheese dripping over a sausage, and the picnic table is groaning under hot dogs, bowls of crisps and lashings of creamy dips and desserts.

And then, of course, there’s a pair of pleading puppy dog eyes following your every move. Desperate to get a lick or a sniff of whatever’s on your plate.

But before you give the dog a burger, let’s take a moment. Should pups be tucking into all that mouth-watering summer tucker? Follow our BBQ feeding tips and you won’t make your next BBQ into a dog’s dinner. 

Skip the sausage

Can dogs eat pork? It’s a brilliant protein, but not in sausage form! Sausages are so popular we even name a dog after them, but with their salt and fat content, they’re best avoided – as are the buns they come in. The same goes for the blue cheese on your burger, as too much cheese will upset their digestion and cause sickness and diarrhea.

Chips and dips

Can dogs eat potatoes? That dollop of potato salad is dripping in oily mayo. And those crisps from your sharing bag? They’re way too salty for his tummy. So it’s a no and no on chips and dips. Next!

Bin those bones

It’s a good idea to set boundaries with guests and little people before the fun starts. Scraps of food – as well as bones – might seem like an easy treat, but keep them out of reach. Chicken bones can cause obstructions and if swallowed whole, they can even perforate the intestine. Cooked bones will splinter much quicker than raw bones, so always keep an eye on them!

The naughty list

Beware the marinade and the dip. Citrus fruits, garlic and onions – even the avocado in that tasty guacamole – are all big feeding no no’s, and you don’t need us to tell you that alcohol and tobacco are way off-limits, along with raisins and grapes, macadamia nuts and chocolate. If you want to feed them something sweet, raw peanut butter (make sure there’s no Xylitol sweetener in it!) is best.

Salad days

Feed them corn – it’s in a lot of lovely dog food – but not the cob, which could get stuck. We often get asked can dogs eat cucumbers, and we say yes, but make sure it’s not got anything on it (see the naughty list). 

It’s not all doom and gloom, we promise! A little bit of chicken bbq’d plain is a lovely treat, guaranteed to make tails wag – and wag.

The post Can dogs eat barbecue food? appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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One minute it’s hot, then it’s not. Welcome to the Great British Summer. Whether it’s raining cats and dogs outside or sizzling hot, there are amazing things to do with your dog this summer.

Here are the tails.com tips.

The best dog beaches

  

You don’t need to spend a fortune or pack a pet passport, because it’s never been easier to have a dog friendly holiday right here in the UK. There are loads of dog friendly beaches in the UK where you can both safely enjoy the seaside.

– Sandymouth, Cornwall

– Westward Ho! Devon

– Berrow, Somerset

– Holkham Bay, Norfolk

– Milford-on-Sea, Hampshire

– Little Quay (Cei Bach), Ceredigion

– Climping, West Sussex

Go on a boat trip

 

Sailing past riverbanks or through pretty cities, boat trips always get our vote. From cruising the capital to the coolest dog-friendly canal boat holidays further afield, we’ve rounded up the best ways to get on the water this summer.

Go Boat London

Stuartline cruises

Boat Trip on the River Thames

Dog friendly boating holidays

Dive in

  

There’s getting on the water, and then there’s getting in it. Did you know lots of the UK’s lidos take Fido? If you’re nowhere near a beach, why not have a doggy paddling pool in the garden or on the patio, with enough water to help them cool down and have a play.

Remember to keep an eye on your dog, and give them a life vest if they don’t know how to swim!

Dog pools

Camping with dogs

 

Sleeping under canvas this summer? We’ve got lots of dog-friendly campsites for you thanks to the brilliant barkpost and the Camping and Caravanning Club. Remember to always make sure your dog has water and can go in the shade – and don’t forget the travel bowls!

Frozen dog treats

Move over dog biscuits, we’ve got some tasty frozen treats in store because summer isn’t summer without (dog-friendly) ice cream! Using dog-friendly ingredients, all our homemade dog treats are super easy to put together – just mix and pop in the freezer. They’ll thank you for it!

The post 5 things to do with your dog during summer appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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A little over a year ago, vet student Marie Francesca Menniti shadowed our Head Vet Sean for two weeks to learn the ins and outs of tails.com; how we create a unique recipe for every dog with the nutrition they need in a taste they love. Fast forward to today, Marie has graduated from University and is working as a vet. She recently won the American Academy of Veterinary Nutrition (AAVN) Companion Animal Blog Competition. We think this deserves a celebration and so wanted to share her blog with our readers. Read on for her article (that will also appear in the AAVN newsletter): 

Tetris for your Terrier, Sudoku for your Saluki: Puzzle Feeders

Just as Tetris, Sudoku, and the good old jigsaw are fun puzzle challenges for us, puzzle feeders are a great way to keep your pooch entertained. Puzzle feeders are toys which are manipulated by your dog to dispense individual tasty tidbits. These feeders are so captivating that they are frequently used as boredom busters to redirect unwelcomed behaviours in the home- I’m looking at you chronic barkers and “home redecorators”.

How to integrate puzzle feeders in your dog’s meal routine

Puzzle feeders can easily become part of your dog’s meal routine. Rather than using high-calorie treats, a portion of your dog’s daily kibbles can be used to load the puzzle feeder. We’ve all met Beagles who can make entire bowls of food disappear in the blink of an eye. Especially in their case, a puzzle feeder can be used to prolong meal time. Most of the time, your dog will be so excited at the prospect of a new game that they’ll hardly notice the difference! These toys prevent begging behavior in-between meals and are often recommended to pets on a calorie-limited diet.

Types of puzzle feeders

There are two main types of puzzle feeder: the bowl slow feeder and the interactive challenge feeder. Bowl slow feeders look like shallow mazes which are inset into your dog’s food bowl. The walls of the maze are just wide enough for your dog’s tongue to pass through and they have to skillfully maneuver to retrieve each morsel. When it comes to interactive challenge feeders, there are a lot of options available. Your dog may have to roll a ball along the floor, nudge a slider door with their nose, or operate a push button to get to their meal. Advanced level feeders will require dogs to fulfill two different actions before getting their reward, such as pulling out a pin to unlock a treat-holding drawer. When choosing a puzzle feeder, ensure that the challenge won’t be too difficult for your dog and that the rewards are able to fit through the puzzle windows. However, with so many options, it’s easy to find a feeder that works well for your dog and their diet. Many people have had success with creating their own interactive puzzle feeders. There are plenty of online resources that can be used for inspiration. One good place to start is the Snuffle Mat puzzle feeder project by Dogs Trust. You can find the link to make your own here. Try rotating two or three puzzle feeders every few weeks to ensure your dog always has a fresh challenge.

Whether purchasing from the local pet store or crafting your own at home, watching your dog work through a puzzle feeder challenge is a lot a fun. It’s no coincidence that searching for “dog puzzle feeder” online yields hundreds of video results! Although most dogs use the trial-and-error approach, it is satisfying to watch them master a new skill and gradually decrease the time taken to solve their puzzle. Keeping an eye on your dog means you can also ensure they aren’t getting too frustrated and give a little hint when needed.

Who are puzzle feeders for?

So, puzzle feeders seem great all around! You might be asking yourself, is there any reason that they shouldn’t be used? There certainly is a group of dogs that would not be well-suited to using interactive puzzle feeders, particularly surrounding mealtimes. Some elderly dogs may have difficulties with their sight and sense of smell, both of which are required to fully engage in an interactive puzzle feeder. Additionally, they may have difficulties chewing and fare much better on a wet diet than on hard, crunchy kibbles. These older dogs need a bit of extra tender loving care to ensure that they consume all the calories they need in a day. It’s best to leave the complicated puzzle feeders to the frisky youngsters! Certain illnesses are also incompatible with advanced puzzle feeding. For example, there is a condition called “megaoesophagus” in which food has trouble passing to the stomach after being swallowed. Dogs with megaoesophagus must be fed from a stationary elevated position- no intricate button-pressing or ball-rolling allowed! Always keep in mind your dog’s own special needs before settling on a puzzle feeder and stay attentive for signs that a particular puzzle feeder isn’t a good fit for them.

Puzzle feeders are so much more than simple novelty toys. They’re a fun way to bond with your dog and keep busy minds out of trouble. Furthermore, they help to manage fast-eating fiends and will fit into the mealtime ritual for most of our four-legged friends. Tetris? Sudoku? Jigsaw? I’d like to see one of those puzzles be able to do all that!

The post Tetris for your Terrier, Sudoku for your Saluki: Puzzle Feeders appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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Tails.com Dog Blog by Sophie Van Der Veken - 3w ago

Having met the most popular French dog breeds, we thought it was time to find out more about their Belgian neighbours. Here are six of the most popular dog breeds from Belgium, and a little bit about what makes each one of them so endearing.

Belgian shepherd

Great work ethic

There are actually four breeds referred to as a “Belgian shepherd”, but the one that most commonly takes that title is the Groenendael. Named for the village in which they were first bred, the Groenendael is known for its distinctive black coat (which sheds twice a year).

As the name suggests, they were originally bred as sheepdogs and their “work ethic” is very much ingrained in the breed. They need a job or something similar to focus on, so they continue to work as shepherds but also excel in events like flyball and obedience. Groenendaels bond deeply with their families and can experience severe separation anxiety if left alone too long – even working Groenendaels can’t sleep outside or in kennels away from their families. 

Did you know?

Even in domestic settings, the herding instinct is so inbred that Groenendaels are prone to herding their families or other animals. If they aren’t trained that this behaviour is unwanted, your Groenendael might nip at your heels, chase or circle you.

Belgian Malinois

Herding up criminals

Sometimes classified as a variety of the Belgian shepherd, the Belgian Malinois actually looks more like the German shepherd, with a similarly striking, square build. Predictably, the Malinois was also originally bred as a sheepdog, but today uses its natural skills for protection and detection in different ways.

The Belgian Malinois is fast becoming the dog of choice for law enforcement and security services, especially in the UK, as they’re smaller, more agile and stronger than the traditional German shepherd. Police in North Wales even use their natural herding behaviour to apprehend suspects, with a sharp headbutt to the midriff! Meanwhile in the USA, the Secret Service uses Belgian Malinois to guard the grounds of the White House. 

Did you know?

Like many Belgian breeds, the Malinois is named for the city they originated from. But it’s actually based on the French name for their hometown (Malines) rather than the Belgian name of Mechelen.

Belgian Tervuren

The elegant sheepdog

A third variety of Belgian shepherd, the Belgian Tervuren is also named for the area in Belgium it originated from. It’s considered the most elegant of the Belgian sheepdogs, and with a thick double coat in varying shades of mahogany and black, it’s easy to see why.

While they’re known as sheepdogs, the first Belgian Tervurens had a very different job. The foundation couple of the breed were owned by a brewer, and the male pulled a beer cart during the day and guarded the brewery at night. These watchdog instincts have stayed with the breed ever since, and Tervurens are used for police work in their native Belgium.

Did you know?

Their herding instinct has transferred successfully from the field to the showring – the first recorded champion of the American Kennel Club herding championship was a Belgian Tervuren. 

Bouvier des Flandres

A gentle giant

From herding sheep, we go to a dog bred for herding cattle – bouvier des Flandres literally means “cow herder of Flanders”. The breed originated at the Ter Duinen monastery, where the monks crossbred Irish wolfhounds and Scottish deerhounds with local farm dogs until a suitable cattle dog was obtained.

A fully-grown bouvier des Flandres can stand almost 1 metre high and weigh a whopping 40kg (over 6 stone). But despite their large size, they can be gentle and docile with a pleasant nature, and their herd-protection instincts make them protective family pets. 

Did you know?

The breed was almost wiped out during the First World War and the damage inflicted in the Flanders region. Fortunately, many bouviers des Flandres served in the Belgian army, and a military veterinarian was able to resurrect the breed from a few remaining dogs.

Brussels griffon

The Queen’s favourite toy

The Brussels griffon (or griffon Bruxellois) is a toy dog that has its origins in the ratters and stable dogs of Belgium’s hansom cab drivers. These local breeds were crossed with imported toy dogs like pugs and King Charles spaniels, gradually developing into the wide-eyed, round-headed Brussels griffon we know today.

The popularity of the Brussels griffon has gone up and down over the years. It reached perhaps its biggest peak at the end of the 19th century when Queen Marie Henriette began to breed and promote the Brussels griffon at home and abroad, but by the end of the Second World War there were almost none left in their native Belgium. Fortunately the vigilance of British breeders has ensured the Brussels griffon lives on.

Did you know?

The little wire-haired dog seen in van Eyck’s “The Arnolfini Marriage” is thought to be an early form of the Brussels griffon.

Schipperke

Small dog, big personality

This small Belgian breed is the subject of much debate – is the Schipperke a spitz or a miniature sheepdog? They date back to the 16th century, where they best known for guarding canal boats that travelled between Brussels and Antwerp. Schipperkes were also employed by tradesmen as ratters, and still have that drive to chase rodents and smaller animals today.

One of the best examples of a big dog attitude in a small dog body, the Schipperke has a mischievous and stubborn temperament that has earned them nicknames like the “Tasmanian black devil” and the “little black devil”. They’re headstrong and energetic dogs that often choose to do what suits them rather than following commands. All that energy can get directed in destructive ways, but with the right training and activities, a Schipperke can be a well-behaved friend for life.

Did you know?

In 1690, members of the shoemakers guild were invited to display their Schipperkes (and their hammered brass collars) in the Grand Palace of Brussels, marking one of the first “specialty” dog shows.

If you have any of these breeds in your family, we’d love to hear your stories in the comments. And remember that we can create a unique recipe of food for your dog, no matter what breed, with the right nutrition in the taste they love.

The post Top Belgian dog breeds appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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Tails.com Dog Blog by Sophie Van Der Veken - 3w ago

We’re a nation of dog lovers, with thousands of puppies born every week and going to wonderful homes. But this has led to a lot of over breeding of dogs in recent years, and many dogs that were intended for good homes have ended up in dog shelters, rescue centres and charities up and down the country. So if you’re thinking of buying a dog, choosing a rescue dog or puppy is a wonderful way to give a dog a second chance to be part of a loving home again.

Why are there so many dogs for adoption?

Most rescue dogs have nothing wrong with them. They’re happy, healthy dogs that simply need a new home due to a change in circumstances that mean their owners can no longer take care of them or give them the home they need. There are also instances of owners simply not being prepared for the needs of the dogs they choose – fashionable breeds like pugs and French bulldogs have become very popular through advertising and social media but can come with health conditions. These often end up for adoption too, looking for an owner with the patience and experience to give them the care and attention they need.

Sadly, not all of these dogs will get a new home, as many shelters simply can’t house their dogs for more than a short time. This means too many healthy dogs are put to sleep for no reason other than not being able to find a home.

Why do people buy new dogs instead of adopting?

There are lots of assumptions that come with choosing a new dog over adoption. Many people think that when they buy a puppy, they can be sure of how their dog will turn out, based on their breed and pedigree – and that they’ll be able to raise and train their puppy to behave the way they want it to. Most of this is true, but that doesn’t mean that the same can’t be true for rescue puppies, or even older dogs for adoption.

There are many pedigree dogs that are put up for adoption – and for those that aren’t, not knowing the dog’s background isn’t really a problem. If the dog is a crossbreed, the traits of the parent breeds are a good enough indicator of their behaviour, and the team at the shelter will get to know each dog well enough to know their personality too. There are also plenty of puppies for adoption too, either due to their pregnant mother being put into the shelter, or they were part of an unexpected litter that now need a home. 

The biggest myth about rescue dogs is that they have some sort of health or behavioural issue. While this can sometimes be true, they can often be minor issues that shouldn’t stop the dog from being a lovable pet, especially for more experienced dog owners who have the time and knowledge to give the dog the care and attention they need.

What are the advantages of adopting a dog?

There are many advantages that come from choosing a rescue dog:

  • Rescue dogs are all behaviorally assessed by the shelter
  • The shelter will usually do the neutering, worming and flea treatment as part of readying their dogs for adoption
  • There’s often only a small adoption fee
  • Shelters and charities do a wonderful job for animal welfare, which you would be supporting
  • You can go back for advice and support after adopting your dog. There’s often a behaviourist on site you can speak with too
  • You’re giving a second chance to a dog that really needs it
Why adopt a rescue dog?

Dog shelters, charities and rescue organisations are dedicated to giving every one of their dogs a new home, with the right owner(s) to let that dog live their best life. Shelters won’t let new owners adopt a dog if they don’t fit with your personality, lifestyle or circumstances, because the last thing anyone wants is for the dog to go back up for adoption.

If you don’t have any luck finding the right dog for you at a larger organisation, local authority shelters or local dog charities can often be a better fit. The staff at these smaller sites can work more closely with you to find the right match. And many organisations can put you on a waiting list so that when the right dog for you arrives at their shelter, you can be brought together straight away.

If you want some advice on what breed to choose, have a look here.

The post Adopting rescue dogs appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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Tails.com Dog Blog by Sophie Van Der Veken - 1M ago

What makes a great dog-friendly pub? For us it’s all about the details: treats on the bar, fresh water bowls, maybe a garden with plenty of shade. For our dogs, it’s mostly a case of sniffing other dogs and getting a good belly rub from any passers-by.

Whatever you’re looking for, finding a good pub that loves dogs often feels like a mission accomplished – and there’s nothing better than a recommendation from fellow dog owners. That’s why we picked out five of our favourites to share with you – and even better, you’ll find a free pack our Good Dog Treats waiting for you at the bar, and a 1 month free trial for anyone who wants to try tails.com for their dog. Cheers!

            

The Railway Inn – Whitacre Heath, Birmingham

This traditional country pub allows dogs in the bar area where they are as well looked-after as their owners. Reviewers say that “nothing is too much trouble” for the team there, with a wide range of food, drinks and entertainment. And there’s an outside play area that’s fun for kids – and dogs too.

The Railway Inn

The Fox and Hounds – Reading, Berkshire

Set in the charming village of Theale on the outskirts of Reading, the Fox and Hounds was named the UK’s most Dog-Friendly Pub. And it’s easy to see why – not only do they offer dogs a warm welcome every day, they also raise money for local dog charities with an annual dog show and doggy calendar.

The Fox and Hounds

The Gatehouse – Highgate Village, London

The ideal rest stop after a walk through nearby Hampstead Heath, the Gatehouse welcomes dogs all day and night, whether you’re popping in for a drink, a bite to eat or to enjoy some Sunday jazz. Dogs are welcome in the bar, restaurant and the large beer garden, and the friendly staff are known to make a real fuss of their four-legged visitors.

The Gatehouse

The Brown Dog – Barnes, London

Barnes is one of the most dog-friendly places in London, and the Brown Dog is a great example of this – it’s not uncommon to find the place filled with dogs of all breeds and sizes. Fortunately, there’s plenty of space for them to run and play. And the landlord’s dog is always on hand to greet every dog who stops by.

The Brown Dog

The Queens Head – Congleton, Cheshire

You’ve heard of happy hour? Well, the Queens Head have a “Yappy Hour” on the last Sunday of the month, at the end of their monthly dog walk. It’s all part of their efforts to build a thriving dog-friendly community where dog lovers and their dogs to get together for exercise and socialising.

The Queens Head

Have we missed out your favourite dog-friendly pub? Tell us in the comments!

The post Five of the best dog-friendly pubs appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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Tails.com Dog Blog by Sophie Van Der Veken - 1M ago

Introducing a dog to your family is a wonderful thing – especially for children, who get an inseparable best friend for life, from adventures in the park to snuggling up at home. Having a dog can help teach your children care and responsibility, and help develop their social skills. So if you’re looking to welcome a dog into your home, we can help you identify the best dog breeds for families, and the best dogs for kids too.

What are the best family dogs?

With the right training and upbringing, and the right amount of love and care, any dog can be a great companion for you and your family. Some breeds are better around children and more suited to be good family dogs than others, but finding the dog that matches you and your family’s lifestyle and personalities is key. The three most important things to think about when looking for the best family dog are:

  • Temperament – high-energy, or a bit more chilled out? Do you need a dog who’s happy to be surrounded by lots of different people or one that’s more independent and comfortable in their own space?
  • Size – match the age and size of your children with the needs of the dog. A big puppy can be quite clumsy around small children, so it may be better to choose a smaller breed. It’s also a myth that only small dogs are suited to a small home, and only big dogs need a larger space. The amount of energy the dog has, not their size, influences how much room they need.
  • Exercise – active, outdoors type or more likely to curl up on the sofa? This one goes for both you and your dog, making sure you’re a good match for each other. Dogs don’t exercise themselves, so the size of your home or garden is far less important than how much you can walk, run and play with them.
What are the best dogs for kids?

Your dog and your children need to get along and be comfortable in each other’s company, so socialisation is the most important thing to consider. If you already have a dog in your home, even a well-socialised one, it can sometimes be a bit of a culture shock to bring children into their lives, as they behave in very different ways to adults:

  • Their voices are higher-pitched, with crying higher still – which can be stressful for dogs
  • Their behaviour can be more unpredictable with bursts of energy and spontaneous activity
  • They don’t understand or respond correctly to a dog’s body language

It can be easier with a puppy, as they will get socialised alongside the children (a rescue dog may also need to be socialised in the same way). But you’ll need to train your children almost as much as your dog, ensuring they get to know the “dog rules” – like how your dog’s bed or crate is their space, and that the children know not to disturb your dog when they’re in it – and to act gently, with care and respect.

It’s also key that your children learn to read your dog’s body language so they can act accordingly. For example, recognising that if your dog’s ears are folded back or tail is between their legs, it’s because they’re frightened. Getting children and dogs used to one another is always a two-way process, but it leads to inseparable friends for life.

Which are the best dog breeds for families and kids?

While there are plenty of breeds that are known to be good around children, you may want to think about getting a crossbreed – and there are often plenty of crosses with lovely temperaments at rescues and shelters who are looking for good homes. Working with the team at your local rescue, you should be able to find a cross that has the right attributes and personality to suit you and your family. There are often plenty of puppies at rescues and shelters too.

If you’re looking for something more specific, or just a starting point, some of the most popular child-friendly dog breeds are:

Staffordshire bull terrier

The Staffie is also known as the ‘nanny dog’ and was historically used for looking after children. They’re caring, patient and get very attached and protective of their young friends.

Beagle

Beagles are gentle and patient, but also active and fun and in need of lots of stimulation – which kids can deliver in spades.

Labrador retriever

The ‘gold standard’. The Lab is the most popular dog in the world for families because it’s a great all-rounder, from long walks to chilling out at home and almost everything in between.

Golden retriever

Another great all-rounder, especially suitable for families with older children as they can be less patient with younger children who don’t respect their space.

Cavalier King Charles spaniel, Maltese, bichon frise

Small, gentle and friendly dogs that are especially good when you have young children. You can also include crosses like the cavachon because they combine the best of their parent breeds with the potential for fewer health problems.

Border terrier

A smaller dog that’s great for a more active family. Border terriers are happy and laid back with loads of energy too – and without the stubbornness other terriers can have.

Learn more about different dog breeds.

The post The best family dogs appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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The Royal Veterinary College (RVC) have recently analysed data from 455,557 dogs in the UK to find out which issues have the highest welfare impact on our nations’ dogs.  

RVC were looking into which conditions were the most common, which lasted the longest and which were the most severe – they then took all these factors into account and came up with a list of the top three conditions that owners should try to prevent in their dogs.

This UK wide study showed the conditions with the highest welfare impact overall are:

  • obesity
  • osteoarthritis
  • dental disease

Dr Dan O’Neill, co-author of the research, said: “During my 20 years as a first opinion vet, owners constantly asked me to advise them about the most important conditions that they should try to prevent in their dogs. At that time, I could not answer this as it was unknown to science.

“We now have this answer; and we can now advise owners to focus on dental health, monitoring for joint disease and to pay special attention to their dogs body condition score. Finally, we have the key to prioritising long-term health in dogs overall.

How can tails.com help?

Here at tails.com we’re focused on changing the world of pet food for good, and improving the lives of dogs and their owners. We believe that every dog deserves to live their happiest, healthiest life, for as long as possible and that’s why we make a unique recipe for every single dog in the taste they love, with the nutrition they need.  

Feeding your dog tails.com can help combat these welfare impacting conditions in the following ways:

Obesity:  serving the right portion

Tails.com can help your dog hit their ideal weight for good – we do exact portions, made easy with our handy scoop and bespoke feeding plan. Whether you’re sticking to kibble or feeding your dog a mix of wet food and dry, you’ll always know how much food to put in the bowl. And we’ll adjust their recipe and portion size as they age, so you never need to worry about it.

Osteoarthritis and joint support

We can help support painful, stiff or diseased joints in several ways to keep dogs happy and healthy for longer

  • We can include Omega 3 fatty acids –  clinically proven to reduce joint inflammation
  • We can include various levels of glucosamine, chondroitin and MSM according to a dog’s needs
  • A tails.com diet helps you to hit their ideal weight for good and ease pressure on sore joints
Dental Disease

We all know that the gold standard for dental care is brushing your dogs’ teeth every day, and if not daily, 2-3 times weekly to prevent plaque and calculus accumulation. Feeding dry food can also help to keep your dog’s mouth healthy by abrasive action as they crunch. Our Dental Dailies treats given each day have been shown to reduce the buildup of plaque and calculus over time too. They’re made with pumice for abrasion at the tooth surface level and are star-shaped to get into the interdental spaces for cleaner teeth and gums – a welcome aid to reduce plaque and tartar build-up that causes periodontal disease.

Sean McCormack, Head Vet at Tails.com says:

“We’ve long suspected that obesity, dental disease and osteoarthritis are three of the most significant issues affecting dog health, welfare and quality of life, but it’s excellent to have this backed up by solid evidence. One of the reasons I joined tails.com was that I could see the difference a diet tailored to the individual dog and a customer centric business could make in all three of these health categories.

Ultimately, as vets, it’s our duty to promote animal health and wellbeing, whilst maintaining quality of life. We hear from our customers every day about the difference we have made to their dogs’ lives, whether that’s in terms of weight control, easing painful joints or encouraging healthy dentition.”

The post RVC Welfare Prioritisation Report June 2019 appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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Water is the best drink you can give your dog. All dogs need constant access to clean, fresh and preferably cool water. For your dog, drinking water really is the best way to keep them hydrated and healthy – no other possible drinks come close. This is especially true during the summer when it gets hotter and stays that way for longer, as drinking water helps your dog cool down. If you’re going for long car journeys or days out enjoying the summer sun, we recommend you have sufficient drinking water for your dog with you and some sort of travel bowl so they can have a drink when they need it.

Can dogs drink milk?

While milk is full of healthy nutrients like calcium and protein, it’s actually not a good choice for your dog. Most dogs are lactose intolerant, meaning that milk can upset their digestive system and make them feel quite poorly – leaving you with some messes to clean up. Not all dogs will have this reaction straight away, and it can vary from dog to dog how much milk will upset their stomach. The best advice is to err on the side of caution and simply not give them any.

Can dogs drink tea or coffee?

We don’t recommend you give your dog tea, coffee or any other caffeinated drink. Caffeine can be toxic to dogs and even the smallest amount can give them caffeine poisoning. Dogs are much smaller than us and what might seem like a small serving of tea or coffee could be big enough to cause serious health problems.

Can dogs drink alcohol?

Some people think it’s okay or even funny to give their dog a sip of beer, wine or other alcohol. But alcohol is toxic for dogs and shouldn’t be given to them under any circumstances.

What about specialist doggy drinks?

There is a growing range of dog-friendly alternatives to popular drinks on the market, including alcohol-free dog beer, wine and prosecco. There are even products like health tonics and herbal tea for dogs that contain no caffeine. These are marketed as treats, and if you choose to serve them to your dog they should certainly be given as an occasional treat and not a regular part of your dog’s diet. But your dog will likely prefer a tasty and more nutritious biscuit or similar bite-size treat with a little water instead of a fancy drink.

If you want to read more about how to keep your dog cool in hot weather, click here.

The post Can dogs drink something other than water? appeared first on The Inside Scoop.

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