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Do naps have a bad rap?

If done wrong, some fear naps will ruin your day and your night’s sleep. But when taken the right way ― at the right time and place, and just the perfect length, a snooze can energize you, improve your thinking, and your mood, too!

Napping isn’t some antiquated practice, or one saved only for quaint Spanish villages. These Seven Myths about Napping tackle the ideal length of a nap, the best time of day for a nap, and whether you have to sleep to reap the benefits.

Even though it’s summer, and you may only need to think clearly enough to get from your door to the beach, naps can make you smarter, according to The Science Behind Napping and How to Make it a Habit, which cites a link between sleep deprivation and cognitive abilities.

An afternoon nap may “foster both mental health and resilience,” according to experts at Harvard Medical School. During a siesta your autonomic nervous system “helps take info in your short-term memory and solidify it in your brain so that you remember things for the long haul,” according to Guys, Take a Guilt-Free Nap, which shows that men get an average of 23 minutes less restful time in bed than women. The best part of a solo afternoon nap is you that you don’t have to engage in Summer Sleep Battles with your spouse. Some 75 percent of couples don’t agree on what temperature their bedroom should be. But nap alone, and you can be as cool as you like.

Still not convinced you’re a napper? If the Afternoon Slump Got You Down? There’s a Nap for That. Specifically, a video explains why your circadian rhythm dips in the afternoon, and how there’s so much power in an afternoon nap.

As poet Sir Philip Sidney wrote in Sonnet 39:

“Come Sleep! O Sleep, the certain knot of peace,

The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man’s wealth, the prisoner’s release, Th’ indifferent judge between the high and low.”

Like diet and exercise, quality sleep is essential for optimal health and performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds with SleepIQ® technology inside adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. SleepIQ technology tracks how well you sleep each night, giving you personal insights into your sleep so you’ll learn how life affects your sleep and how sleep affects your life. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

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Tami Carpenter is not one to sit still. By day, this Sleep Number Insider from Buffalo, Minnesota is a corporate executive, but when she’s off the clock, she’s often on the move, preferably on her Harley-Davidson motorcycle.

Tami and her husband ride all over the USA and Canada. Last year, they went to Calgary for the Stampede rodeo and festival, and out to Washington state to visit the Boeing factory (as former engineers, the two are self-professed “geeks” about the intricate ways things are put together). The trips are usually a week or two long: out to East Coast, or south to Texas, or west to Montana, “just sort of exploring, spending the day driving and enjoying the outdoors.” They’ve been to North and South Dakota, and, naturally, to Sturgis three times for the iconic motorcycle rally, soaking up the atmosphere and enjoying the company of kindred spirits who long for the open road.

Even when they’re not on their Harleys, the couple likes to stay in motion, road-tripping in their car. They go to Disney World at least every other year and recently visited Savannah to soak up the history, including the city’s haunted houses. They also like to ride roller coasters, seeking out the biggest and best around the USA. “The vacations where you sit in your chair—that’s not us,” Tami says. Even at home, on a lake in central Minnesota, they stay busy by boating and waterskiing.

The couple’s Sleep Number mattress helps support their active lifestyle. “I hurt my back a long time ago riding horses,” Tami says, “and if it’s a day that my back is bothering me, I can make the mattress a lot softer, and if it’s a day that it’s not, it feels a lot better to have it a little firmer.” As former engineers, the two also appreciate the high-quality construction of their mattress— it works well “and you don’t have to mess around with it,” Tami says—and the ability to tailor the firmness. “My husband likes to sleep on a board and I like to sleep in a hammock,” Tami jokes, “so neither one of us has to compromise.” They purchased their first Sleep Number mattress around 2001, and now have three.

The couple have passed their passions down to the next generation. Their son motorcycled out to Alaska with Tami’s husband, and also took a Sleep Number mattress with him to college—“He was tired of not sleeping at school,” Tami says with a laugh.

What’s next on their travel list? “We’d like to do more overseas, but there’s also just so much to see here in the U.S.—we just haven’t gotten there yet.” As recent empty-nesters, though, the two now have more time to travel, and they’re sure to be back on the road soon, their Harleys rumbling down the road, in search of a new adventure.

Tami’s Sleep Number setting “waivers between 25 and 35.”

 

 

Like diet and exercise, quality sleep is essential for optimal health and performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds with SleepIQ® technology inside adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. SleepIQ technology tracks how well you sleep each night, giving you personal insights into your sleep so you’ll learn how life affects your sleep and how sleep affects your life. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

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The kids are out of school, shuttling among camps, swim lessons, karate and dance. There are graduation and birthday parties, weddings, a family reunion, book clubs, date nights, and the general craziness that comes with long, warm days.

It’s enough to drive a parent mad — and to skimp on sleep. Prepping and driving everybody where they need to go takes a lot of time. But parenting experts caution that summertime is also a good time to cut back on activities, so everyone enjoys the weather, and each other, while preserving the right amount of healthy shut-eye.

“Over-scheduling is simply not good for kids or parents,”states Dr. Josh Klapow, a clinical psychologist and behavioral scientist who also teaches at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He has written extensively on how over-scheduling and busyness can harm child development. Summer is exciting because there’s so much to do, but he cautions that it’s a good idea to resist the temptation to attend every event.

“There’s health and emotional, and even sleep consequences, of essentially overstimulating our kids,” he warns, “You don’t want your kids lying around doing absolutely nothing for the summer, but at the same time, if kids are staying up too late, and if they’re literally being cognitively or mentally exhausted, their sleep suffers.”

Jenn LeFlore, creator of the Chicago-based Mama Fresh Chi lifestyle brand for city moms, agrees. She “puts a pause” on all extracurricular activities for the summer in favor of more lighthearted fun. “Flexibility is key for summer,” says LeFlore. “We’ve paused our standard classes and will pick them back up in the fall.”

Paring Down

It’s not always easy to step off the roller-coaster of warm weather activities. These tips from experts might help families start down that path.

1. Select activities mindfully

Being mindful of what the family needs to do and why they should do it is the first step to reducing anxiety and relaxing into summer. Mindfulness expert Dr. Amy Saltzman created a curriculum to help parents and children work together to practice being present. Parents can be mindful in selecting activities adds LeFlore, who recommends that parents try one class instead of four or five.

2. Look to your child for clues

Children often talk back, and become aggressive and hyper when they need rest and downtime, tell Klapow. “Does your kid look exhausted? Are they getting sick? Are they falling asleep at or before dinner?” This behavior gives a parent permission, so to speak, to reduce activities.

3. Ask yourself a few key questions & ignore social media

Review your schedule as if you are a therapist for someone else, offers Klapow. Is there time during the day for rest? Are they going to bed at a reasonable hour? Is there time for dinner? Is there time for summer studying? If not, says Klapow, suggest that your client remove activities that interfere with rest, sleep and unstructured play. Also, note that social media images don’t show the cranky babies, sullen teens, and summer sore throats that often stem from poor sleep.

4. It’s OK to say no

“Don’t be fooled by what you think everybody else thinks,” states Klapow. She says if you are running ragged and/or seeing the same people at the same events — so are they. It’s hard sometimes to feel like you’re disappointing family or friends, but attending one party a month instead of four will make you a happier guest and a better, more rested friend.

5. Get active with the kids

“Summer is the time to reinforce things you’re learning in other parts of the year. So if you’re already into soccer, it’s time to kick the ball around as a family,” suggests LeFlore. The extra activity will be good for parents and kids, and will build a memory that means more than yet another STEM or art class.

Like diet and exercise, quality sleep is essential for optimal health and professional performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

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Arianna Huffington welcomes renowned interior designers and stars of TLC’s Nate and Jeremiah by Design, husbands Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent, for an in-depth conversation about how they manage to not only run a chaotic household parenting two children under three, but successfully run a business together. Nate also reflects on how surviving the 2004 Sri Lanka tsunami caused him to “reprioritize everything.” The Thrive Global Podcast is brought to you by Sleep Number.

Like diet and exercise, quality sleep is essential for optimal health and performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds with SleepIQ® technology inside adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. SleepIQ technology tracks how well you sleep each night, giving you personal insights into your sleep so you’ll learn how life affects your sleep and how sleep affects your life. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

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“Hockey has always been part of my life,” Gary Horn says. He was in elementary school when his local heroes, the Philadelphia Flyers, won back-to-back Stanley Cups in 1974 and 1975, as young Gary listened on the radio, cheering them on. But it wasn’t until he was 30 years old that Gary first played organized hockey, pulling on a jersey and joining a team—and it wasn’t on ice skates but on Rollerblades.

At the time, he says, “I had trouble going up the stairs and getting out of breath, so I had to do something—and I’m not a gym guy.” He found a roller hockey league near his house, in New Jersey, signed up, and he’s been playing ever since, more than twenty years, although he no longer plays in a competitive league but on a more informal basis, with guys who don’t keep score. For Gary, it’s all about the love of the game and the camaraderie. “You still have the same puck battles in the corners and we battle really hard,” he says, “but after the game, there’s no animosity”—it’s more enjoyable because it’s not quite as serious.

The very nature of roller hockey makes it more enjoyable, Gary says. Rink time is less expensive than it would be for ice hockey, and equipment costs less. Here you can get away with a pair of skates, some basic shin pads, a jersey, a helmet and a mouth guard. And when you do get hit with the puck, it’s not as heavy— “You get a little bit of a bruise instead of a nasty welt.”

Hockey helps keep Gary in shape, and a good night’s sleep also provides an important supporting role, not just on the rink but in his everyday life. For years, Gary and his wife, Anjie, couldn’t find a bed that would work for both of them. There was the mattress Gary’s mother gave them back in 1996, and then a foam mattress, a few years later, that developed a divot within a year and a half. That was followed by a hybrid mattress of which Gary says, “I hated it from the first night I slept on it. Every morning I woke up, my lower back hurt.” The next mattress was firmer—perfect for Gary, not for Anjie, so they went back to the previous mattress.

The search for happy sleep continued. “For the last three years, [Anjie] has been like Goldilocks down the Jersey Shore, trying to find a bed she can sleep on,” Gary says. Finally, last September, she suggested they get a Sleep Number. They purchased a c4, and immediately Gary’s lower back pain went away, and Anjie was sleeping better, too. Gary uses his smart watch to track his sleep, and says on “on the previous mattress, I was at 84-85 percent. As soon as we got the Sleep Number, I went up to 90 and above. So, I can statistically show you that I’m a better sleeper than I was before!” Having finally found just what they need, they also got a Sleep Number bed for their house at the shore.

“We’ve been married for 27 years,” Gary says, “And, apparently, for 26 of those years Anjie has hated the bed we’ve been sleeping in.”

Back at the hockey rink, Gary still plays two or three times a week. “My policy has always been, as long as I’m not the worst player on the team, I’m still going to play,” he says with a laugh. His years of experience help him keep up. “I used to play with a bunch of guys and were always the oldest and arguably the slowest in the league,” Gary recalls, “but we won with guile instead of speed. We would move the puck—we would pass, we would support each other.”

“I can’t run at all—my knees absolutely kill me,” Gary says, “but I can play hockey without any great difficulty, and it’s just so much fun.”

Gary’s Sleep Number setting is between 70 and 75; Anjie’s is between 40 and 45.

 

Like diet and exercise, quality sleep is essential for optimal health and performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds with SleepIQ® technology inside adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. SleepIQ technology tracks how well you sleep each night, giving you personal insights into your sleep so you’ll learn how life affects your sleep and how sleep affects your life. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

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Ever have a dream so vivid you thought you were watching a movie? Hollywood director James Cameron did, and that dream inspired the movie character and film of the same name, “The Terminator.”

Or consider the famous Rolling Stones song, “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.” Keith Richards not only dreamed the opening verse one night, but woke up to find that he had tape recorded it.

According to a poll commissioned by the meditation and sleep app Calm, these are just two of the best ideas either inspired by a dream or conceived during sleep.

You don’t have to be a movie director or musician to come up with a great idea. Sleep-storming is for everyone, says Peter Freedman, the man behind the term. Freedman is a UK-based ideas consultant. He has been thinking, writing about, and teaching creativity and idea generation for 20 years, helping others come up with their own ideas by facilitating brainstorms for them.

Most recently, Freedman has worked closely with Calm, thinking and learning more about sleep and sleeping, including, he says, “how and why sleep is arguably the greatest single source of creativity.”

“Or,” he continues, “as Marcel Proust, the great French writer put it, ‘sleep is the only source of invention.’ ”

As part of his work, Freedman facilitates brainstorming for his clients.

“If there’s a user-friendly term for generating ideas while you’re awake, there should also be one for doing likewise while you’re asleep,” he states, explaining the reasoning behind the term “sleep-storming.” It’s certainly a much snappier phrase than the scientific term, “structured unconscious generative ideation.”

For Freedman, sleep-storming is not simply a catchy marketing tool, but also about harnessing the process of being creative while you sleep.

3 tips for more productive dreaming:
  1. Keep a notebook by your bed to write down your dreams. How many times have you tried to remember a dream, only to realize it’s evaporated from your consciousness? By writing down your dreams as soon as you wake, you’ll have a better chance of improving your dream recall.
  2. Before going to sleep, ask your subconscious a question. Have a problem at work you’re trying to solve? Ask yourself how you should solve it. Then, instead of worrying all night, focus on something relaxing, like reading or meditating, before going to bed. Let your subconscious do the work while you’re getting your rest.
  3. Wake up mid-sleep. Artist Salvador Dalí and inventor Thomas Edison woke themselves on purpose so they could take note of their dreams. While we don’t advocate interrupting your sleep on purpose, this does present a rosier picture than being annoyed that you’re waking up in the middle of the night. Use that time to jot down any dreams or ideas you’ve had.

Like diet and exercise, quality sleep is essential for optimal health and professional performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

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Stop by HarborCenter in Buffalo, New York on any given day and you’ll probably find at least one hockey game in progress, maybe two, perhaps even three, if you include the adjacent KeyBank Center, where the NHL’s Sabres play. And at least once each week, year-round, you’ll find Josh Smith lacing up his skates and stepping out onto one of the facilities sheets of ice.

After years of playing college and junior hockey, Josh now plays in an elite league at HarborCenter. There are lots of players in the area, he says, and some even come in from Canada to play in his league. Josh has been playing since he was three years old, and he’s showing no signs of slowing down.

When he’s not on the ice, or at his day job as a sales supervisor for an insurance company, Josh is still on the move, with other favorite pastimes including golf and, in the summer months, wakeboarding on a lake south of Buffalo, where his family owns a cottage.

A while back, Josh was having lower back pain that was slowing him down.  “It was a feeling like a disc in your back was not in the right place,” he recalls. “It got to the point where I had to go to a chiropractor.” Playing hockey and other sports comes with some bumps and bruises, but Josh pinpointed another reason for this particular pain: his mattress. He and his girlfriend, Lauren, had purchased it when the bought their house, but after a year, it had already started to sink.

Josh had slept on a Sleep Number bed at a hotel, and he had fond memories of it: “It was probably one of the best nights of sleep that I’ve had.” So, he and Lauren went to their local Sleep Number store to try the various models and see what fit them best. They selected a Sleep Number 360 p6 bed. “I love it,” says Josh, “especially the fact that we can adjust the firmness. Lauren likes a soft mattress and I want more support.”

It’s made a difference, too: Josh no longer wakes up with back pain, which means he’s able to get up and go right away, whether it’s to work or to the rink.

Josh’s Sleep Number setting is 45 and Lauren’s is 25.

 

Like diet and exercise, quality sleep is essential for optimal health and performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds with SleepIQ® technology inside adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. SleepIQ technology tracks how well you sleep each night, giving you personal insights into your sleep so you’ll learn how life affects your sleep and how sleep affects your life. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

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It’s true — there are so many many books about parenting. The problem might be not picking up a book, but choosing which one. How to Parent Books for Every Age.

Here are a few parenting books for kids of different ages, to give you ideas, make you feel better, open your mind, comfort your soul and even make you a better parent (or at least feel like one).
 

Infant

Your pregnancy has turned into a real, live human being — and you don’t have a clue about what to do.

In the “The Baby Whisperer,” parenting expert Tracy Hogg offers a schedule of when to feed, burp and put your baby to sleep. She’ll show you things from the tot’s perspective, helping you treat your newborn with the respect a budding individual deserves.

In “Elevating Child Care: A Guide to Respectful Parenting,” Janet Lansbury encourages parents and childcare professionals to perceive babies as unique, capable human beings with natural abilities to learn without being taught.

Both authors have books for toddlers, too.

Toddler

Watching your cuddly ball of mush explode with a personality can be shocking, especially hearing that first fierce, “No!”

In “How Toddlers Thrive:What Parents Can Do Today for Children Ages 2-5 to Plant the Seeds of Lifelong Success,” child psychologist Dr. Tovah P. Klein explains this crucial period of brain development — empowering parents to understand what makes toddlers tick.

Try “Toddlers Are A**holes: It’s Not Your Fault” for a laugh. It’s a satirical guide to this food-throwing, foot-stomping, tantrum-throwing period (which might offer you a window into the teen years).

Grade School

For many parents, this is the sweet spot of child rearing.

The Whole Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind” uses science to show how a child’s brain is wired, how it matures and how to foster healthy brain development and raise calmer, happier children.

For something more emotionally attuned, try “The 5 Love Languages of Children: The Secret to Loving Children Effectively,” to see how to relate and appeal to your unique offspring.

Teenagers

The teenage years are about your child learning to separate from you — which often comes in the form of eye-rolling, yelling and slamming doors. Every parent of a teen needs help.

But boys and girls can have different journeys.

For your dramatic daughter, read “Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood to understand your daughter’s confusing behavior, when to pull back and when to worry.

For the parents of teen boys, try “Masterminds & Wingmen: Helping Our Boys Cope with Schoolyard Power, Locker-Room Tests, Girlfriends, and the New Rules of Boy World” shows you how to enter uncommunicative “boy world,” and help your boy develop a positive, authentic and strong sense of self.

College Age

Yay, you’re done, right? Not so fast.

Whether your kid has moved back home — or never left — in “Parenting Your Emerging Adult: Launching Kids From 18 to 29,” you ‘ll learn how to foster his or her independence and end coddling that may prevent your offspring from going out in the world.

Getting to 30: A Parent’s Guide to the 20-Something Years” helps pave the long, long road to adulthood (are we done yet?), and how to have an optimistic and hopeful parenting attitude.

Like diet and exercise, quality sleep is essential for optimal health and professional performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

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Falling asleep can be very difficult for many of us. Our nightly routines tend to consist of watching television or scrolling through our phones until our eyes close shut. If you have trouble sleeping or frequently wake up throughout the night, a new bedtime routine may be of use to you. These 4 must-have items below will help unwind and relax your body, ensuring you get the best night’s sleep.

Lavender

Lavender has been scientifically proven to not only help you fall asleep, but also help reduce stress. It promotes restful sleep by decreasing your heart rate and relaxing your muscles. You can use lavender in many different ways, including putting lavender oil into a diffuser or using lavender-scented lotion before bed. I suggest keeping a chic diffuser on your nightstand which is not only easily accessible, but adds a glam feel to the space.

A Journal

It is not uncommon for stress to keep us up at night. Writing down your thoughts or a to-do list of tasks you need to accomplish the next day will help relieve some anxiety and put you to sleep. Keep a journal in your nightstand or somewhere easily accessible in your bedroom!

Decaf Tea

A few sips of tea will help calm your body before bed. Some herbal teas, like valerian or chamomile, consist of compounds that are scientifically proven to help promote a good night’s sleep.

A Book 

Turn off your phone and television and pick up a good book before bed. Reading is a calming activity that will help remind your body that it’s time to sleep. Reading will also help you avoid any bright lights from electronics, which is scientifically proven to keep you from a good night’s rest. As an added, tasteful effect, you can stack some books under your lamp on your nightstand. Like this!

A Mattress You Love

This is probably the most important tip for getting the best night’s sleep. You have to invest in a good mattress! A comfortable and supportive mattress will keep you from constantly turning and waking up in the middle of the night. Make sure to decorate your bed with a few fluffy down throw pillows. This will create an extra cozy, welcoming feel in your space!

Do you have any bedtime routines or items you swear by? Feel free to let us know through our social platforms down below!

Brought to you by Chelsey Brown, Author and Founder of City Chic Décor.

Like diet and exercise, sleep is essential for optimal health and performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds with SleepIQ® technology inside adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. SleepIQ technology tracks how well you sleep each night, giving you personal insights into your sleep so you’ll learn how life affects your sleep and how sleep affects your life. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

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Some people seemingly can’t get enough z’s. They might sleep for hours on end and still feel exhausted while others around them are waking up refreshed.

Getting extended hours of shut-eye seems like a gift rather than a curse, but there are some caveats. Sleeping in on a Saturday morning is an indulgence. Regularly sleeping 10 or more hours, however, may be an indication of something serious, especially if you’re still in desperate need of a midday nap.

“Most adults need seven to eight and a half hours of sleep,” Ronald Chervin, director of the Sleep Disorders Center at the University of Michigan, told HuffPost. “But if someone is sleeping unusually large amounts and still feels unrefreshed, that would be a reason to see a sleep physician.”

We asked the experts why some people hit the snooze button a little more regularly than others and what you can do if your unconscious hours are becoming a problem. Here’s what you need to know:

1. Needing more sleep might be built into your DNA

Research suggests genetics may play a role in why some people need those extra hours.

“Some are just predisposed to require more sleep. There’s not much we can do individually about our genetics,” Chervin said. “But we can do things about other factors that control how much we sleep, like regularity of bedtime and rise time.”

Adolescents are also generally prone to sleep longer and have a harder time waking up.

“It’s believed to be associated with a lengthening of inner circadian clocks, which normally control sleep, though habits play a role,” Chervin continued. So if your parents ever gave you a hard time about sleeping in late as a teen, you weren’t entirely at fault for those extra hours.

2. It might be a sign of a sleep disorder

You might be suffering from one of multiple sleep disorders, some of which result in a late start to your day. One is hypersomnia, or “sleep drunkenness,” which is nicknamed for its side effect of disorientation.

“A person with hypersomnia can’t get out of bed and 10 hours is never enough. They can take two- or three-hour naps and still feel the need to sleep,” said Emmanuel H. During, a neurologist and psychiatrist specializing in sleep medicine at Stanford University. “You can develop it at any age and we don’t fully understand its cause.”

A rare neurological disorder called Kleine-Levin syndrome, or “sleeping beauty syndrome,” can also induce an extreme need for sleep.

“They can spend 15 or 20 hours in bed for days or weeks at a time and only get up to use the bathroom or eat,” Chervin said. Research suggests the syndrome affects only one in a million individuals.

3. Your mental health might be a culprit

“Long sleep is one way that depression can manifest itself. A person can sleep more and feel sleepy throughout the day and rest 10 or 11 hours regularly,” During said.

Research shows there may be a link between depression and sleep disorders, frequently associated with cases of insomnia and hypersomnia. Certain medications used to treat conditions can also result in a general grogginess and longer sleep. It’s best to consult a doctor if you suspect a medication is the culprit.

4. An underlying medical condition might be to blame

Traumatic brain injuries can result in long sleeping patterns, During said. One study found that people who recently suffered traumatic brain injuries often slept much more than healthy volunteers. Sleep is also strongly linked to recovery for trauma victims, with research showing that brain function improved with sufficient sleep.

5. You’re severely lacking in sleep

If you’re prone to pulling an all-nighter or two, it’s common to sleep longer when given the opportunity. Fortunately, this is more a consequence of habit rather than an indication of something deeper, as long as it’s not a natural pattern, During said. That said, compensating for sleep debt through sporadic naps or longer sleep does not always produce the desired effect.

People tend to view sleep as a fund so they try to sleep less one night and think they can make up for it with a long snooze later, Chervin said. “But you won’t always make up hours that you missed,” he added.

Research shows that sleeping 10 hours when chronically deprived only initially boosted performance before a rapid drop, calling into question the effectiveness of catching those extra z’s.

Bottom line: If you feel consistently fatigued despite getting enough sleep, check in with a doctor, During said. But if you typically wake up feeling refreshed and ready to take the day on, sleeping more every once in a while won’t harm you. After all, you spend a third of your life asleep — what’s a few extra hours?

Like diet and exercise, sleep is essential for optimal health and performance. Because everyone’s sleep needs are different, Sleep Number® beds with SleepIQ® technology inside adjust to your ideal level of firmness, comfort and support. SleepIQ technology tracks how well you sleep each night, giving you personal insights into your sleep so you’ll learn how life affects your sleep and how sleep affects your life. Find your Sleep Number® setting for your best possible night’s sleep.

Click here to view original article on The Huffington Post.

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