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The adoption of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) networking technologies into industrialized environments is increasing. As industrial organizations ramp up their investments in Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, so grows the interest of cyber attackers. Electrical power plants, oil and gas mining, and manufacturing floors are a few industrial verticals adopting smart technologies into daily operations. A recent report states this market to be worth $320 billion by 2020.

Decision-makers who integrate smart technologies into their traditional industrialized infrastructure may realize several benefits:

  • Increased operational efficiency within industrial controlled environments
  • Widespread visibility and foresight of failure through data analytics
  • Faster incident response times
  • Quick response and agility to changing market demands

IIoT adds data gathering sensors to industrial machinery like temperature gauges, gas sensors, conveyor belts, and others. This data is passed along to automation services, predictive maintenance tracking software, and other analytics services. Use of IIoT sensors in manufacturing equipment and pairing those sensors with software allows companies to predict when equipment will fail, and it gives them the opportunity to fix small problems before they become bigger ones. Through strategic implementation of IIoT sensors, industrial companies can adopt a proactive approach versus a reactionary one when addressing equipment failure and analyzing equipment performance.

IIoT VALUE COMES AT A COST

As technology has evolved, so has the intelligence and sophistication of cyber terrorists and their tactics. A 2017 analysis of industrial cyber-attacks by Kaspersky Lab determined that 39 percent of industrial companies worldwide were attacked during 2016 and more than 20 percent of industrial control devices are attacked each month.

According to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the two most common threats to IoT technologies are Denial of Service (DoS) and Intrusion. Additional threats include:

  • Sophisticated command and control attacks
  • Packet spoofing
  • Hijacking of sessions / interception
  • Replay attacks
  • Use of worms
  • Trojans and remote controllable Trojans (Back Orifice)
  • Use of a Virus and Anti-forensic techniques
  • Attacks on Domain Name System (DNS) infrastructure

To combat these threats, industrial companies should take an identity-centric approach to security that assures only verified users and devices gain access to the network and sensitive resources.

NETWORK ACCESS CONTROL – IIoT SECURITY’S BEST FRIEND

Security practitioners of IIoT should consider a Network Access Control (NAC) solution as an essential piece of their security plan. Protecting IoT endpoints means preventing unauthorized access and intrusion into managed networks through visibility and enforcement.

Through NAC visibility tools, managed and unmanaged IoT devices are dynamically identified and classified. Administrators gain operational insight to all resources on their networks. Enforcement is implemented to prevent unauthorized access to the network and data. Devices are also remediated based on a centralized policy before being allowed network access.

Common policy rules for IIoT devices should include:

  • Access restrictions based on time of day and week
  • Role (e.g. admin, user, guest)
  • Physical MAC Address

The security policy should be flexible to rapid change, and restrictive to thwart the most clever of cyber attackers. The result is that only authorized users or devices have access to the right information.

SECURE ACCESS FOR TODAY AND THE FUTURE

From electric utilities to manufacturing plants, to oil refineries and air traffic control, expansion for industrial companies and critical infrastructures shouldn’t come at the price of security. Security teams should invest resources into devising standards that include use of a NAC solution to identify through visibility and enforce policy and remediation of all IIoT endpoints. This should be just one of several major milestones in the evolution of the IIoT security plan.

It is not a matter of ‘if’ a cyber-attack will happen, rather a question of ‘when’ the next attack will occur. Increased levels of automation and use of data analytics to improve processes and streamline efficiency and identify problems will continue to drive industrial companies to expand their IIoT footprint for the foreseeable future. With this should come an invested expansion into Secure Access today to keep up with the future of IoT. Learn more at https://www.pulsesecure.net/ 

Related Blogs

Prevent Threats of IoT from Sneaking Past Your IT Team

The post Expansion of IoT within Industrial Organizations appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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It is no more a question of go or no-go when it comes to allowing BYOD in an organization. Organizations of all sizes and of all industries have adopted mobility solutions in some form or shape. Some organizations have strict security policy enforcement requirements while other organizations have slightly flexible policies which are targeted towards BYOD programs.

An important question for IT teams is –  How to deliver mobile access securely and seamlessly. While IT teams want full control on how mobile access should be allowed, it should not come at the cost of end-user experience which would reduce the benefits of allowing mobile access for improved productivity. Organizations should carefully evaluate the full range of deployment options as well as security controls that any secure mobile access solution offers.

Pulse Secure offers a highly secure and flexible deployment option for mobile platforms using the Pulse Mobile Clients. Pulse Mobile Clients are supported on both iOS and Android platforms, and offer a wide range of features. Below is a summary of different deployment options, Pulse Mobile Clients readiness and use cases.

 Deployment Options

Highlights of Pulse Mobile Clients

  • On-demand VPN: Pulse Secure is the only solution in the market to provide on-demand VPN for both Android and iOS platforms. Pulse Secure has developed its own technology for implementing on-demand VPN on Android though the underlying framework doesn’t have any capabilities. On iOS, Apple framework is used to implement on-demand VPN. Customers can have consistent user experience across both mobile platforms unlike other solutions where on-demand VPN might be available only on iOS.
  • Flexibility: As explained in the above table, there are multiple deployment options that customers can choose from based on their business and infrastructure needs. Pulse Mobile Clients provide the flexibility for admins to choose their preferred option.
  • Unified Clients: Pulse Mobile Clients can be managed with any of the common EMM solutions such as AirWatch or MobileIron. Pulse Secure has its own lightweight EMM product Pulse Workspace. Pulse Mobile Clients are tightly integrated with Pulse Workspace so that the same client can perform VPN as well as EMM operations. Customers can have a single platform for secure remote access, secure mobile access and secure network access with unified clients.

It is a tough job to strike the perfect balancing act between IT security controls and seamless end-user experience. Pulse Secure has the history and expertise to help customers achieve the best of both worlds with its strong Secure Access product portfolio.

Related blog: Increase User Productivity Today with Secure Access

For more information about Pulse Secure Mobile Clients, please refer to

https://www.pulsesecure.net/techpubs/pulse-client/pulse-secure-client-mobile

The post Balancing IT Control and User Experience with Pulse Mobile Clients appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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It has been six months since we completed the acquisition of the vADC business into Pulse Secure. Expanding our Secure Access portfolio with vADC allows Pulse Secure to better realize our vision of delivering secure access solutions for people, devices, things, and services.  Hybrid-IT is driving new paradigms for what it means to be secure. Together we now can bring our people, products, and customers together to solve these new challenges with innovative solutions.

People:

With the vADC business came nearly 100 people from across all disciplines, each with deep knowledge of their functional area.  From Engineering, Product Management and Marketing to Sales, Sales Engineering and Support, the vADC team has been working closely with the existing Pulsers to truly become better together.  One of the best examples of this was  a recent cross-training session for Sales Engineers.  After basic product orientations and demos, the talented and collaborative team got real.  They quickly went into joint solution mode, identifying known customer challenges that could be filled with each other’s products, as they stand today.  The team was further brainstorming new creative solutions that would meet our customers’ emerging needs.  Watching these smart-creatives iterating and developing new customer solutions together was quite inspiring.  That kind of energy is present in every team, fostering new ideas which leverage each other’s strengths.  Born virtual, the vADC team brings deep cloud, virtualization and hybrid experience to the broader team.  Twenty-thousand customers strong, Pulse Secure’s team has scale, and customer support experience second to none.  Putting all these strengths together, plus the product synergies, shows just how much better together we are going to be.

Product:

Innovation is the key to product development, especially in the high-tech world of Silicon Valley.  In a mature category, like Application Delivery Controllers or VPN, innovation can come in several forms from core product functionality, or contextual frameworks of cloud, enterprise management and analytics to development of new business models. Here at Pulse Secure, fulfilling the Secure Access story with the addition of vADC does all three.  We are well on our way to having solutions that address use cases in the core of secure access, including scaled installations of Pulse Connect Secure, Pulse Policy Secure, and application access. Leveraging the combined knowledge and creativity of our team allows us to innovate even more quickly.

In addition to the core functionality, we have been hard at work developing the next generation of the contextual elements of Pulse One and Services Director. Both are enterprise management and analytics platforms offering rich features, but each has complementary strengths. Pulse One is stronger in the enterprise management realm while Services Director is stronger in analytics and pooled license management.  Combining these two platforms into one innovative, robust Pulse One solution will enable our current and future customers to easily realize the benefits of the Secure Access story, together with leveraging all the product Pulse has to offer.

Customers:

I am personally most impressed with our customers.  They have shown incredible faith and resilience as we transitioned over to Pulse Secure.  After a very long period of uncertainty, our customers see that the vADC team and product have found the perfect fit for the long run.  We have seen existing customers resume their normal buying patterns and new prospects convert into newly loyal Pulse Secure customers. Many of the existing installed base truly see the Secure Access vision and how vADC fits so nicely.  Witnessing the quick emergence of such buying trends further validates that Pulse is the right home for our team.

Pulse Secure CEO, Sudhakar Ramakrishna said “We had the opportunity to talk to a number of customers before the acquisition. Without exception, every customer seemed genuinely committed to the vADC solution and appreciated the team’s focus, commitment and competence. The rationale for the acquisition also was well received in the broader context of Secure Access – after all, the vADC provides scalable, secure access to applications and helps ensure a great user experience no matter the device or location of users. “

Truly better together is more than solely a product vision.  Being better together means that by combining the vADC team, product and customers within the larger Secure Access vision of Pulse Secure we can accomplish greater things as a company and can provide better solutions to our customers as they make their journey into an increasingly hybrid-IT world.  After only six months, we can see this combined vision taking shape and already yielding results.

Marion Smith III

Vice President & General Manager

vADC Business Unit – Pulse Secure

Read our latest press release on Pulse vADC solutions for Azure

The post Secure Access – better together. appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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How is IT managing guest accounts at your organization? Enterprises should have a refined yet simplistic IT strategy that defines the roles of such users who need to connect to the network…because sometimes your guest’s productivity means your productivity.

Visitors always expect Secure Access when arriving at a corporate office. While we provide network access to guests, some users like contractors or employee sponsored need additional resource access. Today we are excited to support a Sponsored Approved Guest Access solution with the latest release of Pulse Policy Secure 5.4R3. This feature enables sponsors to grant permissions for special users who are not necessarily traditional employees.

PPS supports three types of mechanisms for Sponsored Guest Access.

Self-Registration: Visitors can connect to the corporate network and upon connection, Pulse Policy Secure enables them to self-register via a self-registration page and create their own guest account for Internet access.  Once this registration process is complete, we will further automate this self-registration process by delivering account credentials directly to the user browser. Optionally we also support sharing credentials through SMS/E-mail.

Guest User Account Manager (GUAM): In this case, a guest admin can act as administrator and create guest users and manage their accounts. Additionally, these admins can create multiple guest accounts and notify credentials through SMS/E-mail.

Sponsored Approved Guest Access: Pulse Policy Secure provides additional security to validate guests/contractors by sponsoring before access is granted to the corporate network. Sponsors can approve or deny guest accounts and in turn activate or delete accounts.

Pulse Policy Secure also provides compliance checks for all users to validate the security posture of the endpoint. The Host Checker component performs and evaluates that user endpoints are compliant with the latest anti-virus, patches and firewall securities in order to prevent the risk. Admins can also implement remediation steps if user endpoints fail to meet Host Checker policy, by applying enforcement policies dynamically to restrict endpoint access and automatically remediating.

Before you welcome your guests, be sure to have a defined role-based strategy that enables them to connect securely while your enterprise maintains its Secure Access integrity.

Check out how Secure Access with Pulse Secure can increase user productivity: https://blog.pulsesecure.net/increase-user-productivity-today-secure-access/

Quick Access Series - Pulse Policy Secure (PPS) 5 4R3 Update - YouTube

The post Automating Solutions for Guest Access appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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With spring approaching, I can’t help but think about the hunt for eggs, the bad eggs within an IT business strategy that is. Technologies and processes evolve quickly and new business products hit the market faster than ever. Consumer buying demands and behaviors change at the speed of light. To maintain best-in-class access security, a company must constantly review, adapt and update their IT business strategy to keep up with the market, trends and competitors. This fast-paced implementation environment can result in bad eggs within an IT business strategy.

An IT business strategy is developed to guide organizations throughout its lifespan and is the cornerstone of their stance on technology use. The IT business strategy details the use of technology on multiple levels, including the what, why, when and how it is used in the workplace.

A comprehensive strategy details past, present and future technology use. Adoption of new technology is both imperative and time-consuming. Introduction of security vulnerabilities, disruption to business continuity and increased operational overhead are just a few considerations when thinking about new technology adoption.

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) and the cloud are recent examples of disruptive technologies that required rapid adoption that caused IT organizations to scramble. The business landscape is always in motion and IT business strategies need to have the flexibility to accommodate adoption and help organizations stay ahead of the technology curve, leaving teams time to develop adoption plans.

When deciding whether to implement a new strategy, a company must weigh the pros and cons, especially since adopting technology will have its benefits and challenges. C-level executives work long hours with legal, business and budget leaders to ensure it aligns with business goals. Only after the strategy is complete can IT leadership disseminate plans at a functional level.

The path to developing and maintaining an effective IT business strategy is littered with unique challenges. One must find these bad eggs that diminish its effectiveness and course-correct as needed. Limited budgets, lack of skilled employees and failure to communicate strategic initiatives can also derail plan execution. Failure for strategy acceptance among key business leaders can also slow company-wide IT strategy tactics. A failed IT business strategy and agile recognition of disruptive technology trends may ultimately result in a negative outlook of the company.

An active top-down approach that incorporates business and IT thought leadership is key to hunting down and correcting the bad eggs. Effective IT strategy development should be approached from a strategic position and flow downward from executive management.

Starting with a clearly defined IT mission statement that outlines support for business objectives provides the guidelines from which all activity will emanate from. Hiring highly-skilled employees provides a fresh perspective on what current and future technologies will extend business outreach and improve competitive positioning. During an IT strategy’s lifespan, periodic review and updates ensures the strategy stays aligned with business requirements and allows for the discovery of bad eggs to be improved and corrected.

As I use spring as a point of life reflection, so should companies practice due-diligence in reflecting upon their IT business processes. Hunting down and uncovering the bad eggs will guide use of technology and keep both IT and business requirements closely aligned and up-to-date.

The post Hunting for bad eggs in your IT business strategy appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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Want to get the best learning experience in your life? If yes, read on! When I got selected as an Intern, I was apprehensive about the program but got more excited as I learned about the details. On joining the program, I learned about Pulse as a company and how far and fast we had come in the 3 years. It was all inspiring and overwhelming at the same time.

As an operations intern, specializing in Supply Chain Logistics, I worked in an environment that constantly challenged me, interacted with highly experienced leaders, and collaborated with the friendliest colleagues I could imagine. During my internship, I focused on learning the supply chain model, brainstorming innovative ideas and networking with new people each day.

I had worked with various teams of Pulse’s Operations department and was given five projects to complete in 12 weeks. These projects were further divided into two sections. One such project, gave me exposure to interact with multiple suppliers, buyers and facilitators, which in turn boosted my Negotiation, Project Management, and Decision-making skills. Building on these helped ensure my continuous growth as a supply chain professional.

Another valuable element of the program was that I collaborated with all other functions outside of Operations as well. This helped me learn about the holistic business and value each function contributes in an elevated progress. Apart from these projects, I and 20 other fellow interns spent a major chunk of our time competing in Intern learning exercises. Every Friday, we had various exercises in which we performed with a team and showcased our project deliverables in innovative ways. This revitalized my presentation skills, public speaking, critical thinking, and collaboration tenacity.

During my internship, I observed that Pulse Secure’s culture is about redefining things, exploring new solutions and leading others to rise to bigger and better levels. Managers here proved that leadership is about bringing progress and provoking evolution, and this might not necessarily be done from inside the margins of the status quo, hence they encourage you to not stay in a single place but rather to carry out your activities outside the box – This could only happen when you’re at Pulse Secure.

Today, 6 months after my internship ended, I was offered a full-time position at Pulse Secure, the best part is this position was customized per my strengths and internship performance. I couldn’t be more excited to get started and see what I achieve together with the team at Pulse!

The post Transform the Future of Your Career – Pulse Secure Internship Program appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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This is the first of a series of posts around a Secure Access Fabric provided and orchestrated by Pulse Secure solutions and services. In this entry, we will focus on trust as one of the key pillars in our fabric orchestration architecture.

The increased prevalence and diversity of end-user devices, IoT devices, applications, networks, connections, cloud services, enterprise applications and their information creates a web of connections with different forms and levels of trust and security.  As shown below, such multi-cloud connections or an access fabric extend well beyond the boundaries of traditional data centers and corporate networks. 

The concept of an access fabric or security fabric is not new and certainly not unique. They represent instances of emerging models like perimeter-less security and zero-trust security. Given their primary philosophy to “never trust and always verify,” in principle every access request would need to be checked and authorized explicitly and completely. Any user or device would be considered a remote, “external” user, and all enterprise applications and their information would be considered under threat, always.

From a security purist perspective, this may seem ideal; however, such an explicitly controlled, restrictive, no-trust approach is not really a viable option. An attempt to perform a complete user identification, client application and device reputation validation for each and every access request would be detrimental to performance and productivity. So, what is the solution? You would need to establish, manage and verify some form of lasting trust (however long or short) throughout the identification, authorization, and request handling stages of all secure access events. That means different stages of secure access events will have to rely on pre-established trust from different layers in the model.

For those of us with children, we experience similar considerations of trust on a daily or weekly basis: “Do you really want to check or authorize every action or choice that your child makes every minute or hour, or do you establish trust levels & boundaries with checks and balances?” Ongoing verification however is critical in identifying the actions and impact of bad actors on secure information access. This is no different from getting to know more about the crowd that your children may hang out with to identify any potentially bad influencers.

So how do we structure a trust model that incorporates the good aspects of zero trust? How can we maximize collaboration and dynamically enable access anytime, anywhere, all with a basis of established levels of lasting trust?

One such model defines trust across four access layers that typically are associated with distinct IT disciplines:

  • Identity & information
  • Applications
  • Infrastructure
  • Network

Looking at that model, the overall objective for secure access is to allow the users (or IoT devices) to securely create, store and retrieve information.  In our trust model, this means relying on client-side services and applications that connect to their corresponding cloud and enterprise applications. In turn, this also means relying on client devices connecting to cloud and datacenter infrastructure through wired and wireless connectivity across and into public and corporate networks. Secure access then translates this into “information access based on trust across and between the access layers.”

Some use cases rely on implicit trust, whereas others require explicit trust relationships.  For example, a user who logs into a legacy corporate computer that is connected to the corporate LAN used to be implicitly trusted to access most internal applications (email, intranet, et al). In today’s environment, a user may need to authenticate with a mobile application that was installed and secured by an endpoint management solution that uses a trusted device for enabling corporate, Wi-Fi connections to access the enterprise application behind the firewall. A user or device profile would determine which part and what information of the application would be accessible (i.e., trusted to be accessed).

What becomes clear is that key attributes of the trust will have to last beyond the duration of a single secure access event. Rather than a pure “never trust” approach, we must instead provide an orchestration solution whereby the various trust relationships between and across the layers are carried forward, distributed and orchestrated across the access fabric.

In our next post we will look at how we can manage trust in a Secure Access Fabric that is based on both Pulse Secure and third-party solutions.

INSERT AUTHOR NAME, TITLE, ONE OR TWO SENTENCE BIO

The post Trust in a Secure Access Fabric appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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Let’s face it…this is a challenging and scary world we live in…we want to help you survive by preparing for the worst. IT systems are complex – and as your business grows, you need to invest continually to ensure that your systems are robust, secure, and can stand up to catastrophes.

But while it is possible to prepare for the most challenges, it’s almost impossible to plan for every possible incident. And even if your systems are not directly affected by an outage, you can be overwhelmed as new customers rush to access your services when their own providers are unavailable. That’s why it’s more important than ever to build robust systems, which are designed for rapid restoration of services, and support recovery surges as users come back online.

With Pulse Secure, you can quickly build an IT strategy for reliable, adaptive and secure systems, so that you can respond quickly to unexpected events. So when you need your key employees to access remote services at short notice, Pulse ICE (In Case Of Emergency) enables you to boost access capacity at a moment’s notice. And when your applications need to support a sudden surge as users rush to sign up for your services, you can use Pulse vADC to distribute traffic to alternate data centers, or boost capacity without breaking stride:

Global Business Continuity – Customized Disaster Recovery strategies, supporting cross-region cloud or hybrid deployments. Pulse Secure solutions make it easy to restore services on-demand, rerouting the most critical services and prioritizing others.

Reallocate Resources – Just when you need it most, Pulse flexible capacity management can support rapid re-allocation of licensed capacity, to focus resources for rapid recovery.

Pulse ICE – Pulse offers a flexible license option, ICE (In Case Of Emergency) to help keep you up and running, as you restore your operations to full performance.

The post Robust IT Strategies that Stand Up to Unexpected Events…FAST appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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It is not just about seeing and controlling what is connected to your network. It is also about how quickly we are identifying and categorizing endpoints to mitigate the risks. It starts with the visibility of every endpoint connected to the corporate network.

We are no longer talking about just the desktops or smart phones and what operating systems they are running. With advancements in the Mobile market, we have to get the identity of each and every IP-enabled IoT endpoint like IP cameras, printers, bar code readers, sensors and all other things connected locally or remotely to the network.

How do we get classification of all these things connecting to a corporate network?

One solution is to deploy Pulse Policy Secure’s Profiler which provides contextual details of every endpoint’s identity to get visibility into the network devices including both managed and unmanaged endpoints. Profiler also helps the administrators in identifying and classifying by MAC address, IP address, location and type / function. All this can be accomplished by using various collecting techniques such as passive and active discovery methods.

How do we apply and enforce security policies?

Among the many differentiators in our Secure Access solution, integration between Pulse Secure’s core products Pulse Connect Secure and Pulse Policy Secure, enables administrators to not only have visibility but also provides seamless access from all connecting devices to the corporate network.

With standalone Profiler functionality, the administrator enables PPS or PCS to send endpoint contextual information to standalone Pulse Profiler for visibility. Standalone Profiler can be deployed in a PPS Active/Active cluster or Active/Passive cluster or unclustered appliances behind a load balancer environment. Each node in a cluster is configured to fetch profiler data needed from the standalone Profiler and applies consistent role mapping based on the device profiles and defines security policies and enforcement across local and remote endpoints, automatically remediating to mitigate risks.

With increasing use of smartphones and rapidly adopting mobile technologies, Profiler also enables administrators to profile mobile devices by contacting MDM servers and collecting device attributes. This supports integration with Pulse Workspace and third-party MDM servers like AirWatch, MobileIron, and Microsoft Intune.

Device Sponsoring via Profiling allows admins to approve/deny devices connecting to the network based on a specific category. Pulse Secure Profiler optionally notifies admins of new devices needing approval via email. Once approved, devices are placed in the correct role depending on the configured role-mapping rules.

For more information, visit https://www.pulsesecure.net/policy-secure/

Quick Access Series - Profiler Update - YouTube

The post Network Visibility with Context appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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Perhaps it sounds like a strange transition – leaving one IT company where I was CEO to become Chief Revenue Officer at Pulse Secure. Why Pulse Secure? Why not some other option? The reasons I chose Pulse are the same reasons so many companies worldwide choose Pulse as their next secure access move: to achieve transformation and success.

Here is why Pulse Secure is the perfect fit:

The PEOPLE. My passion to lead awesome, global teams naturally led me here – and there are no better teams than those at Pulse Secure. The people here attack both challenges and opportunities with a level of enthusiasm, vim, and vigor that I don’t see in a lot of organizations. The people and teams not only have the intelligence needed to execute, but they also care. They care about the products; they care about our customers. Together, we will continue to accelerate business, revenues, and our value within the market.

The CUSTOMERS. I’ve talked to my peers in other companies who admit, “Our products suck. Customers are unhappy. It’s a total disaster.” You don’t hear that at Pulse. In fact, it’s the complete opposite. We have a broad base of happy customers who experience the benefit of our solutions every day. That’s a huge asset not a lot of companies can boast of.

The  PARTNERS. Like many other firms, we live and we die, we breathe and we eat, and we expand and we grow through our channel partners. That’s why one of my big initiatives in my new role at Pulse is to make sure that we take the existing partner program to the next level from an overall compensation and profitability standpoint. We want to give our channel partners a richer experience so that, in turn, our customers are delivered a best-in-class experience as well.

The PRODUCTS. What I have seen in other companies is that they have one product that works great, then they start throwing a bunch of other products onto it to call it a “suite” … but the quality drops off a cliff because they’re rushing to market. That’s not the case at Pulse. Every product offered by Pulse Secure is in great shape because every person is committed to drive value and deliver ROI for our customers.

Our people. Our customers. Our partners. Our products. Put simply, Pulse Secure has the opportunities and the solutions to deliver transformation and success, and that is why I chose Pulse. There’s simply no better place to be.

The post Transformation and Success through Secure Access appeared first on Pulse Secure Blog.

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