Loading...

Follow Live In Mauritius on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

You’ve certainly heard about Heritage Bel Ombre. It’s time to discover and live it out first-hand! This sprawling estate in the South of Mauritius will blow you away with its stunning landscapes and flurry of activities. Here are 4 ways to discover Heritage Bel Ombre and feel its unique vibe. All you need to do is take your pick!

1. Play the 18-hole championship golf course

Heritage Golf Club is definitely a must-play while in Mauritius. Voted the best golf course in the Indian Ocean at the World Golf Awards for the last five years running, it also hosts the prestigious AfrAsia Bank Mauritius Open. This championship course combines technical challenges with stunning views of the estate. Its 9-hole course is also set up for footgolf, a combination of football and golf which offers a great way to have fun with family and friends.

2. Treat yourself to a spa or wellness break

Two Seven Colours spas boasting an array of indulgent facilities and treatments as well as Wellness Break packages are available throughout the year around Heritage Bel Ombre. Seven Colours is a Mauritian brand offering a holistic approach with a wealth of wellness solutions. The Wellness Breaks include classes and workshops with world-renowned experts sharing their experience. The estate will also host the first Mauritius Wellness Festival from 3 to 5 May 2019.

3. Immerse yourself in a nature reserve

Heritage Bel Ombre is home to a 1,300-hectare nature reserve that is yours to discover as you please. Trekking, quad-biking, buggy rides and 4×4 safaris with a guide from the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation are among the best ways to discover the island’s endemic fauna and flora, with outings lasting between 90 and 120 minutes. A picnic is another option for those who only want to chill and enjoy the natural beauty of the area. The spas also offer wellness activities in the forest.

4. Enjoy the pristine white beaches and turquoise blue sea

Heritage C Beach Club is the place to be for thrill-seeking water sports enthusiasts – with activities such as kitesurfing, scuba diving, windsurfing and SUP in one of the most beautiful lagoons of Mauritius – as well as those who just want to lounge by the pool and bask in the sun. The club has a well-equipped boathouse and the KiteGlobing School offers kitesurfing lessons as well as a whole range of equipment for rent.

For a cool refreshing drink or a bite to eat after playing a round of golf, indulging in a spa treatment, spending time in the wild or at sea, everything you need is on hand at the clubhouse overlooking the golf course or in the relaxed atmosphere of Heritage C Beach Club.

The post Four ways to experience the Heritage Bel Ombre vibe appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Mauritian law governs inheritance of immovable property in Mauritius.

The main provisions of Mauritian inheritance law are embodied in the Mauritian Civil Code, the Successions and Wills Act, the Code of Civil Procedure, and the Non-Citizens (Property Restriction) Act. Private international law (conflict of laws) rules are derived from French case law (prior to European Regulation reforms).

The principles applying to the inheritance of property in Mauritius are:

  • Lex rei sitae – (the law where the property is located) applies to immovable property
  • Lex domicilii – (the law of the domicile of the deceased) applies to movable property

Mauritian law systematically governs the inheritance of immovable property situated in Mauritius; however, the inheritance of movable assets is governed by the laws of the last domicile (i.e. country of permanent residence) of the deceased. In certain cases, movable property may be governed by another national law designated by the deceased prior to his/her death, subject to the mandatory public policy provisions of Mauritian law.

If real property in Mauritius is acquired through a legal entity, the shares in that entity are deemed to be movable assets in a Mauritian estate and are therefore governed by the domiciliary law of the deceased, unless the transaction was structured for the essential purpose of evading the mandatory statutory provisions of Mauritian inheritance law.

Restrictions on inheritance of property in a foreigner’s country of origin are reciprocated in Mauritius i.e. a foreigner may not inherit property in Mauritius unless a Mauritian citizen is legally permitted to inherit property in the deceased’s country of origin. This provision stems from a general principle laid down in Article 13 of the Mauritian Civil Code whereby “a non-citizen shall enjoy the same rights in Mauritius as those which are or may be granted to Mauritian citizens by international conventions entered into with the State of the said non-citizen“.

Renvoi is given effect under the principles of Mauritian private international law. If the foreigner’s domiciliary law refers inheritance issues back to Mauritius, then the notary or judge in charge of the execution of the Mauritian estate accepts the renvoi and applies Mauritian law.

The procedural aspects of inheritance are dealt with by the Master and Registrar of the Supreme Court of Mauritius (a high-ranking judge). Inheritance cases are heard on the merits before the Supreme Court, either by a Judge in Chambers, or by a Bench comprising one or more judges, depending on the amounts involved.

Prohibition under the Non-Citizens (Property Restriction) Act governs the acquisition of real estate in Mauritius.

Authorization is required from the Prime Minister’s Office before real property can be purchased by a foreigner in Mauritius. The main derogations are acquisitions by inheritance, or by the effect of marriage (subject to certain provisos), or under the Integrated Resorts (luxury villas) and Real Estate Development schemes. The acquisition of movable assets in Mauritius is not subject to such restrictions.

A reserved portion applies in Mauritian law

Mauritius is a forced heirship jurisdiction and reserves a portion of the estate for the children of the deceased. This jurisdiction applies equally to Mauritian citizens and foreigners (provided they are entitled to inherit in Mauritius).

Pursuant to the Mauritian Civil Code, no testamentary provision may encroach upon the “reserved portion”, which consists of:

  • One half of the estate – if the deceased leaves one child
  • Two thirds of the estate – if the deceased leaves two children
  • Three quarters of the estate – if the deceased leaves three or more children

The reserved portion is divided equally amongst the surviving children and the descendants of any pre-deceased children (i.e. children who die before their parent). The descendants of a pre-deceased child are jointly entitled to the pre-deceased child’s share of the reserved portion.

The unreserved or “available portion” of the estate may be freely willed to any other person, including an heir under forced heirship provisions, or any entity, charitable or religious body, whether Mauritian or foreign. The beneficiary under such a will must not be subject to any legal incapacity.

Protected heirs are designated in the absence of a will

In the absence of a will, the legal order of inheritance, in descending order of priority, is as follows :

  • The descending line, and the surviving spouse
  • The favoured ascending line (father and mother) and favoured collateral line (siblings and children of predeceased siblings)
  • The ordinary ascending line (grandparents, great-grandparents)
  • The ordinary collateral line up to the 12th degree.

In the absence of any protected heirs, the deceased’s estate vests in the Mauritian State.

Although the surviving spouse forms part of the first class of legal heirs, he/she is not a protected heir, and his/her share may be bequeathed to another legatee by gift or testament. Notwithstanding the above, the surviving spouse is entitled to a lifetime right of usufruct over the matrimonial home and furniture.

It is advisable for a foreigner to draw up a will in Mauritius.

A will is not required if the testator’s intention is to bequeath assets equally to his/her legal heirs according to the provisions of the Civil Code; however, a will is essential to favour one or more beneficiaries e.g. if a testator wishes to allocate the available portion preferentially to one child, or if a testator does not have children, and wishes to distribute his/her estate amongst non-preferential heirs, or other legatees, or to a charitable institution.

A foreigner is advised to make a local will in Mauritius to avoid cumbersome legalization, registration and cross-border enforcement formalities associated with a foreign will.

A Mauritian will must be in writing and may be drawn up either as a private deed or a notarised instrument. A private deed (holographic will) must be written, dated and signed entirely by the testator’s hand on any kind of material. It is usually remitted for safekeeping to a trustworthy person or a notary. When drawn up by and before a notary, the will may be either (i) a public will, which requires the presence of two witnesses and the fulfilment of a number of statutory formalities, or (ii) a “secret will” (testament mystique) which is handed over in a sealed envelope to a notary in the presence of at least six witnesses, subject to the fulfilment of specific formalities.

It is advisable to have a public will draw up before a notary in Mauritius. This ensures physical preservation of the document and avoids any subsequent unwarranted litigation regarding the validity of the testament.

Inter vivos gifts of property must consider the share of the forces heirs

Property in Mauritius can be given to any person during the lifetime of the owner (subject to exceptions deriving from the application of the donor’s matrimonial regime); however, if the deceased is survived by heirs protected by forced heirship rules, then the donated assets must be pooled back into the estate for the purposes of calculating the reserved and available portions. If the value of the inter vivos gifts exceeds that of the available portion, then the gifts are reduced down to that value, and the excess is allocated to the protected heirs. In the absence of protected heirs, all lifetime gifts remain valid and effective in their entirety.

Ownership of matrimonial property is determined by the matrimonial regime governing the spouses.

The simplest case is that of spouses, whether Mauritian or foreign, married under Mauritian law. In the absence of an express choice, the statutory joint matrimonial property regime (communauté de biens) applies. Only assets acquired after marriage are owned in common, and assets owned prior to marriage remain the sole property of the relevant spouse. Alternatively, spouses may elect to be governed by the separate matrimonial property regime, or by a prenuptial agreement.

If spouses have different nationalities, this is not relevant to inheritance law, but it might become an issue with respect to the spouses’ matrimonial regime. The spouses’ joint matrimonial assets, if any, must be partitioned before the estate of the deceased spouse can be allocated to the protected heirs. Nationality per se is not a criterion for the applicability of a matrimonial regime but can be one of the factors taken into account to determine applicable law where the domiciliary law of a spouse comprises mandatory provisions to that effect.

The situation is more complicated if other elements of extraneity are introduced; for example, a French-Mauritian couple could get married in France during a holiday trip, then settle in the UK, and own property both in England and in Mauritius. The overriding principle is that the law of the spouses’ first effective (not temporary) matrimonial domicile is the applicable law. Thus, although both French and Mauritian law provide for the joint matrimonial property regime to apply by default, in the example given here, both spouses are governed by the English regime of separate matrimonial property, because England is the country of their domicile.

There are myriad such permutations, and each case must be individually assessed for the purposes of determining applicable law(s). However, as in the case of cross-border inheritance, Mauritian conflict of laws principles are exactly the same as those stemming from French case law (prior to European Regulation reforms).

Ownership stems from registered title in the case of immovable property, and from possession in the case of movables.

The evidentiary value of the registered title deed is paramount, but it should be noted that if a person is married under the joint matrimonial estate (communauté de biens) regime, any property purchased in the sole name of a spouse nevertheless automatically becomes jointly-owned by both spouses.

The English legal system of “equity” forms part of Mauritian law, which also incorporates a Trusts Act. Thus equitable interests (beneficial ownership) are recognised and enforced in Mauritius, provided that the legal owner is registered in the capacity of trustee of the property. Implied equitable interests may also arise, although there is no Mauritian case-law on this subject to date.

An estate may validly be vested in whole or part to a minor or other legally incapable person.

A parent or court-appointed guardian must administer inherited property in the interests of a child until he/she is of age. In the case of a protected adult, the property is administered by the court-appointed guardian or curator.

The post What inheritance laws apply in Mauritius? appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Mauritian law governs inheritance of immovable property in Mauritius.

The main provisions of Mauritian inheritance law are embodied in the Mauritian Civil Code, the Successions and Wills Act, the Code of Civil Procedure, and the Non-Citizens (Property Restriction) Act. Private international law (conflict of laws) rules are derived from French case law (prior to European Regulation reforms).

The principles applying to the inheritance of property in Mauritius are:

  • Lex rei sitae – (the law where the property is located) applies to immovable property
  • Lex domicilii – (the law of the domicile of the deceased) applies to movable property

Mauritian law systematically governs the inheritance of immovable property situated in Mauritius; however, the inheritance of movable assets is governed by the laws of the last domicile (i.e. country of permanent residence) of the deceased. In certain cases, movable property may be governed by another national law designated by the deceased prior to his/her death, subject to the mandatory public policy provisions of Mauritian law.

If real property in Mauritius is acquired through a legal entity, the shares in that entity are deemed to be movable assets in a Mauritian estate and are therefore governed by the domiciliary law of the deceased, unless the transaction was structured for the essential purpose of evading the mandatory statutory provisions of Mauritian inheritance law.

Restrictions on inheritance of property in a foreigner’s country of origin are reciprocated in Mauritius i.e. a foreigner may not inherit property in Mauritius unless a Mauritian citizen is legally permitted to inherit property in the deceased’s country of origin. This provision stems from a general principle laid down in Article 13 of the Mauritian Civil Code whereby “a non-citizen shall enjoy the same rights in Mauritius as those which are or may be granted to Mauritian citizens by international conventions entered into with the State of the said non-citizen“.

Renvoi is given effect under the principles of Mauritian private international law. If the foreigner’s domiciliary law refers inheritance issues back to Mauritius, then the notary or judge in charge of the execution of the Mauritian estate accepts the renvoi and applies Mauritian law.

The procedural aspects of inheritance are dealt with by the Master and Registrar of the Supreme Court of Mauritius (a high-ranking judge). Inheritance cases are heard on the merits before the Supreme Court, either by a Judge in Chambers, or by a Bench comprising one or more judges, depending on the amounts involved.

Prohibition under the Non-Citizens (Property Restriction) Act governs the acquisition of real estate in Mauritius.

Authorization is required from the Prime Minister’s Office before real property can be purchased by a foreigner in Mauritius. The main derogations are acquisitions by inheritance, or by the effect of marriage (subject to certain provisos), or under the Integrated Resorts (luxury villas) and Real Estate Development schemes. The acquisition of movable assets in Mauritius is not subject to such restrictions.

A reserved portion applies in Mauritian law

Mauritius is a forced heirship jurisdiction and reserves a portion of the estate for the children of the deceased. This jurisdiction applies equally to Mauritian citizens and foreigners (provided they are entitled to inherit in Mauritius).

Pursuant to the Mauritian Civil Code, no testamentary provision may encroach upon the “reserved portion”, which consists of:

  • One half of the estate – if the deceased leaves one child
  • Two thirds of the estate – if the deceased leaves two children
  • Three quarters of the estate – if the deceased leaves three or more children

The reserved portion is divided equally amongst the surviving children and the descendants of any pre-deceased children (i.e. children who die before their parent). The descendants of a pre-deceased child are jointly entitled to the pre-deceased child’s share of the reserved portion.

The unreserved or “available portion” of the estate may be freely willed to any other person, including an heir under forced heirship provisions, or any entity, charitable or religious body, whether Mauritian or foreign. The beneficiary under such a will must not be subject to any legal incapacity.

Protected heirs are designated in the absence of a will

In the absence of a will, the legal order of inheritance, in descending order of priority, is as follows :

  • The descending line, and the surviving spouse
  • The favoured ascending line (father and mother) and favoured collateral line (siblings and children of predeceased siblings)
  • The ordinary ascending line (grandparents, great-grandparents)
  • The ordinary collateral line up to the 12th degree.

In the absence of any protected heirs, the deceased’s estate vests in the Mauritian State.

Although the surviving spouse forms part of the first class of legal heirs, he/she is not a protected heir, and his/her share may be bequeathed to another legatee by gift or testament. Notwithstanding the above, the surviving spouse is entitled to a lifetime right of usufruct over the matrimonial home and furniture.

It is advisable for a foreigner to draw up a will in Mauritius.

A will is not required if the testator’s intention is to bequeath assets equally to his/her legal heirs according to the provisions of the Civil Code; however, a will is essential to favour one or more beneficiaries e.g. if a testator wishes to allocate the available portion preferentially to one child, or if a testator does not have children, and wishes to distribute his/her estate amongst non-preferential heirs, or other legatees, or to a charitable institution.

A foreigner is advised to make a local will in Mauritius to avoid cumbersome legalization, registration and cross-border enforcement formalities associated with a foreign will.

A Mauritian will must be in writing and may be drawn up either as a private deed or a notarised instrument. A private deed (holographic will) must be written, dated and signed entirely by the testator’s hand on any kind of material. It is usually remitted for safekeeping to a trustworthy person or a notary. When drawn up by and before a notary, the will may be either (i) a public will, which requires the presence of two witnesses and the fulfilment of a number of statutory formalities, or (ii) a “secret will” (testament mystique) which is handed over in a sealed envelope to a notary in the presence of at least six witnesses, subject to the fulfilment of specific formalities.

It is advisable to have a public will draw up before a notary in Mauritius. This ensures physical preservation of the document and avoids any subsequent unwarranted litigation regarding the validity of the testament.

Inter vivos gifts of property must consider the share of the forces heirs

Property in Mauritius can be given to any person during the lifetime of the owner (subject to exceptions deriving from the application of the donor’s matrimonial regime); however, if the deceased is survived by heirs protected by forced heirship rules, then the donated assets must be pooled back into the estate for the purposes of calculating the reserved and available portions. If the value of the inter vivos gifts exceeds that of the available portion, then the gifts are reduced down to that value, and the excess is allocated to the protected heirs. In the absence of protected heirs, all lifetime gifts remain valid and effective in their entirety.

Ownership of matrimonial property is determined by the matrimonial regime governing the spouses.

The simplest case is that of spouses, whether Mauritian or foreign, married under Mauritian law. In the absence of an express choice, the statutory joint matrimonial property regime (communauté de biens) applies. Only assets acquired after marriage are owned in common, and assets owned prior to marriage remain the sole property of the relevant spouse. Alternatively, spouses may elect to be governed by the separate matrimonial property regime, or by a prenuptial agreement.

If spouses have different nationalities, this is not relevant to inheritance law, but it might become an issue with respect to the spouses’ matrimonial regime. The spouses’ joint matrimonial assets, if any, must be partitioned before the estate of the deceased spouse can be allocated to the protected heirs. Nationality per se is not a criterion for the applicability of a matrimonial regime but can be one of the factors taken into account to determine applicable law where the domiciliary law of a spouse comprises mandatory provisions to that effect.

The situation is more complicated if other elements of extraneity are introduced; for example, a French-Mauritian couple could get married in France during a holiday trip, then settle in the UK, and own property both in England and in Mauritius. The overriding principle is that the law of the spouses’ first effective (not temporary) matrimonial domicile is the applicable law. Thus, although both French and Mauritian law provide for the joint matrimonial property regime to apply by default, in the example given here, both spouses are governed by the English regime of separate matrimonial property, because England is the country of their domicile.

There are myriad such permutations, and each case must be individually assessed for the purposes of determining applicable law(s). However, as in the case of cross-border inheritance, Mauritian conflict of laws principles are exactly the same as those stemming from French case law (prior to European Regulation reforms).

Ownership stems from registered title in the case of immovable property, and from possession in the case of movables.

The evidentiary value of the registered title deed is paramount, but it should be noted that if a person is married under the joint matrimonial estate (communauté de biens) regime, any property purchased in the sole name of a spouse nevertheless automatically becomes jointly-owned by both spouses.

The English legal system of “equity” forms part of Mauritian law, which also incorporates a Trusts Act. Thus equitable interests (beneficial ownership) are recognised and enforced in Mauritius, provided that the legal owner is registered in the capacity of trustee of the property. Implied equitable interests may also arise, although there is no Mauritian case-law on this subject to date.

An estate may validly be vested in whole or part to a minor or other legally incapable person.

A parent or court-appointed guardian must administer inherited property in the interests of a child until he/she is of age. In the case of a protected adult, the property is administered by the court-appointed guardian or curator.

The post What inheritance laws apply in Mauritius? appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The South African professional golfer, Haydn Porteous tells us about what prompted him to invest in property at La Balise Marina.

Could you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I grew up in Johannesburg, South Africa and I play golf for a living. I travel a lot for work and I was looking for a holiday home to just relax and unwind.

Why did you decide to settle down in Mauritius?

I came here to play in the AfrAsia Bank Mauritius Open and I really liked it. We often come here for a 1-2 weeks’ trip and the lifestyle is great. Furthermore, I don’t want to bubble wrap my children. I would like them to make their own experiences and not be stuck behind a screen. I want them to enjoy outdoor activities and Mauritius offers more than enough in a safe environment.

In addition, the island is only 4 hours away, making it convenient for my parents, other members of my family and friends to fly to from South Africa. We would like to spend a full month together here during the festive season. The weather is also nice and warm all year round.

Property is appreciating in Mauritius – buying here represents a good investment.

What made you choose to buy a home at La Balise Marina?

We were looking around and I obviously didn’t want a golf resort because I spend much time on golf courses throughout the year. I really wanted to disconnect while in Mauritius. When I am here, I want to put my feet up, relax and not think about work.

La Balise Marina represented a good choice – it is a niche product, being the only residential marina on the island. There is so much down here, from snorkeling to deep-sea fishing, shore fishing, and obviously the beach. But what really surprised us is that the development is only a 5-minute drive from the Black River Gorges National Park and all its hiking trails. This was definitely a bonus which we didn’t know about.

Dani (my partner) and I visited the showroom and decided that was exactly what we needed. We decided to buy a fully-furnished, turnkey apartment. I play 30 tournaments a year and didn’t want to go through the hassle of choosing how to furnish it, and realistically it takes time to ship everything here. We were very happy with the quality, the easiness of things. As time goes by, we might personalise a few things like certain lights but for now, everything is fine.

My next step is to buy a boat so that I can enjoy the marina more. But I am still very much enjoying it now: exercising early morning, having lunch at the clubhouse, going to the beach, coming back for a swim in the lap pool, having a braai…

We also like the local cuisine a lot. I grew up in Johannesburg; the nearest coast was 5-6 hours away and we didn’t have fresh seafood – the lobsters here are absolutely delicious.

Life in Mauritius is really nice; we are considering spending more time here in the future!

The post Interview with Haydn Porteous, happy owner at La Balise Marina appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
You may also listen to this podcast by Live in Mauritius on

Beyond its mind-blowing scenery and relaxed atmosphere, Mauritius is a natural haven for healthcare.

Here are 6 reasons why choosing to live in Mauritius will make for a healthier lifestyle:

Reason No. 1: Invigorating clean air

The idyllic seashores of the island are a tourist asset but also a valuable health-enhancing resource. The sea air is charged with negative ions and has outstanding therapeutic benefits, addressing our deficiencies, boosting our immune system and cleansing our living environment. Mauritius indeed ranks among the best countries in Africa for air quality.

The air in the surroundings of waterfalls and mountains is rich in negative ions which strengthens the body and helps it cope better with urban air pollution.

Reason No. 2: Say goodbye to cold winters and low morale!

Mauritius has a very mild subtropical climate. With only two seasons (summer and winter), the island experiences very little seasonal temperature fluctuations.

The mild winter reduces the risk of developing seasonal affective disorder due to lack of sun exposure, which should not be taken lightly!

Reason No. 3: Rigorous health controls

The country takes health control very seriously both at the port and airport. Efficient health units with high-quality equipment conduct screenings at the airport as well as in the port, depending on the ship’s country of origin.

These measures have recently proven to be effective as Mauritius has been able to erode paludism and dengue fever. The country has also won the battle against Chikungunya – all these demonstrate the rigorous health controls in the country.

Reason No. 4: Outdoor living at your doorstep

Mauritius also offers a wealth of opportunities for outdoor experiences in nature. Various open-air activities such as golf, sailing,tennis, horse riding, among other, are available close to you all year round.

You will no longer need to travel hundreds of miles to breathe some fresh mountain air or let off steam in a pastoral setting.

Reason No. 5: World-class private clinics

The island has numerous private paying hospitals that provide world-class healthcare services. There are various general private hospitals around the island with a broad array of medical specialists to address the patients’ needs.

Other more specialised private hospitals have opened in recent years such as the dental clinic, Dentcare and Dr Awargal’s Eye Hospital, which provides high-quality eye care services in Mauritius.

You will find here a list of world-class clinics.

Reason No. 6: A hub for medical tourism

Mauritius has now become a key hub in medical tourism when it comes to hair grafting as well as dental or plastic surgery. Over the last few years, health-related tourism has experienced a boost, hence the establishment of an Indian Ocean Centre for Aesthetic Surgery in the North since the early 2000s with a wide range of surgical interventions performed by renowned medical practitioners.

What about health insurance?

It is strongly advised for both Mauritians and expatriates take up a health insurance policy. There are many highly reputed local insurance companies, amongst them are the Swan Insurance and Mauritius Union. Most of the health insurance premium are paid on a monthly basis and medical expenses incurred locally and abroad are covered up to a certain threshold, depending on the type of policy you choose. French nationals contributing to the Fund for French Citizens Abroad (CFE) are also covered for various medical procedures locally and abroad.

The country’s medical sector has experienced a tremendous boom. With skilled health personnel from around the world and European-level medical services, Mauritius now positions itself as a place where it feels good to live!

The post [PODCAST] 6 reasons why moving to Mauritius will make for a healthier lifestyle appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Whether on weekdays or weekends, there are plenty of ways to fill your leisure time on the west coast of Mauritius, from easing into the evening with some jazzy vibes on the beach to partying the night away, dining with musical entertainment and karaoke parties. Here’s our selection of the 5-best resto-bars in Black River – plus a special bonus. You’re in for a real treat!

1. Veranda Tamarin

The Crazy Fish Bar, the main bar at Veranda Tamarin Hotel regularly delights the public with music and tapas evenings. Flip-flops are a must in the trendy and relaxed atmosphere of this recently renovated property! Set in the sand of Tamarin Bay, the Crazy Fish Bar is an open-sky bar with a stage to catch live music on weekends. Stay tuned to know all about the renowned local and international artists performing there, such as Sébastien Margéot from Mauritius and Eliasse from the Comoros. Live music usually starts at 7pm and the bar is open till 11pm.

Veranda Tamarin Hotel Mauritius - Musical Events - YouTube
2. Seeloy Island Club

Overlooking the ocean on one side and the marina on the other, La Balise Marina’s clubhouse, Seeloy Island Club, is surrounded by a lush vegetation of tropical flowers. It offers an amazing culinary experience in a perfectly relaxed atmosphere with some of the island’s best views.  The club’s membership gives access to an array of facilities including a 325m² infinity pool along a fine sandy beach, a fully-equipped gym with stunning views over the tranquil river, beachside sun loungers as well as a range of events.

3. Big Willy’s

Big Willy’s on the edge of the village of Tamarin is a favourite nightlife destination on the west coast. This resto-bar and nightclub features a delicious menu for meat lovers with a selection of Australian rib steak, Wellington beef fillet, lamb shank and the traditional burger. Big Willy’s hosts the live screening of major football and rugby matches as well as other sporting events. Additionally, it often offers live concerts and DJ sets to entertain you all night long. For sing-along fans, the resto-bar’s Karaoke Wednesdays are a must!

(c) Big Willy's
4. Lakaz Cascavelle

Clubbers from all around the island flock to Lakaz Cascavelle. Located within Cascavelle Shopping Village, the restaurant has a varied menu, including fish, seafood, meat, vegetarian and vegan dishes. Weekend evenings kick off with live music, which gives way to a nightclub atmosphere after midnight. ‘Lakaz’, as the place is commonly called, is also famous for its Wednesday jam sessions – this is a great opportunity to showcase your singing and musical skills.

(c) Lakaz Cascavelle
5. Roots Spirits

Situated just a short while from Tamarin, along the coastal road at La Preneuse, Roots Spirits is the perfect spot to get the evening started – it’s so popular that parking lots are often full. Tapas, salads and full course meals combine with the fusion cuisine prepared by the chef for a ravishing dining experience in the Roots Spirits’ garden, where you can chat and chill while enjoying great music by solo artists or duets. The stage is sometimes open for impromptu performances and the bar, also set in the garden, is the right place to while the evening away over a few drinks.

6. La Bonne Chute

Set amidst a beautiful garden, La Bonne Chute is one of the oldest restaurants on the west coast, famous for its game and seafood dishes as well as its mojito. It is a popular meeting place for rugby fans with big screens to watch international events and enjoy a few drinks and snacks after the games! La Bonne Chute has a happy hour every Friday from 7pm to 10pm with a resident DJ and occasional theme evenings (Wild Wild West, Ladies’ Night, 80s Party, etc.) – so get dressed up in your glad rags for an evening of fun!

(c) La Bonne Chute
Bonus : Vanilla Café

Although not a resto-bar per se, Vanilla Café is a preferred venue in Black River for its innovative concept bringing together a B&B, a stylish cafe and trendy boutiques in a single spot. It is a tranquil place with a kids’ playground where families can enjoy a pleasant time together. Open from 8am to 3.30pm, the cafe serves a mix of local dishes as well as burgers, salads and sandwiches. A Sunday brunch is available from 11.30am to 3.30pm with nice music in the background.

Some amazing destinations to add to your list!

The post The top 6 resto-bars around Black River and the west coast appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Whether on weekdays or weekends, there are plenty of ways to fill your leisure time on the west coast of Mauritius, from easing into the evening with some jazzy vibes on the beach to partying the night away, dining with musical entertainment and karaoke parties. Here’s our selection of the 5-best resto-bars in Black River – plus a special bonus. You’re in for a real treat!

1. Veranda Tamarin

The Crazy Fish Bar, the main bar at Veranda Tamarin Hotel regularly delights the public with music and tapas evenings. Flip-flops are a must in the trendy and relaxed atmosphere of this recently renovated property! Set in the sand of Tamarin Bay, the Crazy Fish Bar is an open-sky bar with a stage to catch live music on weekends. Stay tuned to know all about the renowned local and international artists performing there, such as Sébastien Margéot from Mauritius and Eliasse from the Comoros. Live music usually starts at 7pm and the bar is open till 11pm.

Veranda Tamarin Hotel Mauritius - Musical Events - YouTube
2. Big Willy’s

Big Willy’s on the edge of the village of Tamarin is a favourite nightlife destination on the west coast. This resto-bar and nightclub features a delicious menu for meat lovers with a selection of Australian rib steak, Wellington beef fillet, lamb shank and the traditional burger. Big Willy’s hosts the live screening of major football and rugby matches as well as other sporting events. Additionally, it often offers live concerts and DJ sets to entertain you all night long. For sing-along fans, the resto-bar’s Karaoke Wednesdays are a must!

(c) Big Willy's
3. Lakaz Cascavelle

Clubbers from all around the island flock to Lakaz Cascavelle. Located within Cascavelle Shopping Village, the restaurant has a varied menu, including fish, seafood, meat, vegetarian and vegan dishes. Weekend evenings kick off with live music, which gives way to a nightclub atmosphere after midnight. ‘Lakaz’, as the place is commonly called, is also famous for its Wednesday jam sessions – this is a great opportunity to showcase your singing and musical skills.

(c) Lakaz Cascavelle
4. Roots Spirits

Situated just a short while from Tamarin, along the coastal road at La Preneuse, Roots Spirits is the perfect spot to get the evening started – it’s so popular that parking lots are often full. Tapas, salads and full course meals combine with the fusion cuisine prepared by the chef for a ravishing dining experience in the Roots Spirits’ garden, where you can chat and chill while enjoying great music by solo artists or duets. The stage is sometimes open for impromptu performances and the bar, also set in the garden, is the right place to while the evening away over a few drinks.

5. La Bonne Chute

Set amidst a beautiful garden, La Bonne Chute is one of the oldest restaurants on the west coast, famous for its game and seafood dishes as well as its mojito. It is a popular meeting place for rugby fans with big screens to watch international events and enjoy a few drinks and snacks after the games! La Bonne Chute has a happy hour every Friday from 7pm to 10pm with a resident DJ and occasional theme evenings (Wild Wild West, Ladies’ Night, 80s Party, etc.) – so get dressed up in your glad rags for an evening of fun!

(c) La Bonne Chute
6. Bonus : Vanilla Café

Although not a resto-bar per se, Vanilla Café is a preferred venue in Black River for its innovative concept bringing together a B&B, a stylish cafe and trendy boutiques in a single spot. It is a tranquil place with a kids’ playground where families can enjoy a pleasant time together. Open from 8am to 3.30pm, the cafe serves a mix of local dishes as well as burgers, salads and sandwiches. A Sunday brunch is available from 11.30am to 3.30pm with nice music in the background.

Some amazing destinations to add to your list!

The post The top 5 resto-bars around Black River and the west coast appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you are thinking of settling in Mauritius, you must be something like a watersport enthusiast or – at least – a beach addict. Whether you are looking for a quiet SUP ride, the hair-raising sensations of sailing or a pure shot of adrenaline, you will definitely find your perfect fit on this dream island.

In rhythm with nature

For the last few years, the SUP (Stand-Up Paddle) craze has swamped the Mauritian shores, and it is now easy for anyone to buy or rent a paddleboard. You can depart from Tamarin Bay in the early morning to catch a glimpse of dolphins or late in the afternoon to gape at the mesmerizing sunset views. Of course, you can choose to explore other spots around the island. Since paddling is said to get all your body muscles working, it is the perfect way to combine sports and pleasure.

Kayaking is another way to enjoy the sea in perfect harmony with nature. There will be no motor noise, just the gentle clapping of the waves against the paddle. You can hop into your kayak for a solo ride or for a fishing trip with friends, or even join a group on a guided tour. Yemaya Adventures, for instance, offers excursions to exceptional places, like the natural mazes of mangroves.

(c) Dane Smith

When it comes to diving, you can choose between two options: snorkelling and scuba-diving. Certified diving centres are easy to find and diving spots are legion along the coast from Flic en Flac to Morne Brabant. You are invited to dive along a superb underwater arch, which is commonly named the Cathedral, explore a 19-meter long wreck or take a night dive to observe turtles.

(c) Spiegelphoto
Downwind

In the last few years, Mauritius has become a popular kitesurfing spot for kiters from the whole wide world. Numerous kitesurfing sites are found in several parts of the island: Le Morne Brabant, Bel Ombre, Anse la Raie, Poste Lafayette… If you are ready to give it a try, you can attend classes and rent the equipment at a certified training centre, such as KiteGlobing. If you are an experienced rider, just get going and glide.

(c) Spiegelphoto

Before kitesurfing became widespread, Mauritius was a paradise for windsurfers – and still is for those who are sticking to this sport. If you are a die-hard windsurfer, you will find your likes somewhere along the East coast, between Pointe d’Esny, Poste Lafayette, Trou d’Eau Douce and Belle Mare. Leave your winter jacket behind: here, you will spend your “winter” days surfing in your lightest clothing.

Joining a sailing club is an opportunity to meet people who share the same passion. You will also be given the possibility to join a team to take part in races and benefit from full access to a secure parking for your boat. In this ways, you can sail away anytime you want and drop the anchor in the sandy bottom somewhere around a desert islet.

Thrills and chills

If you are looking for extra excitement, you can try the Seakart. You will be the only pilot on board this stable, unsinkable easy-to-ride boat, with guides following you to ensure your safety. It can reach up to 70 km/h!! Along with the thrill of speed and the blast of fresh air, you will be blown away by the splendid views of the south-eastern coast. You can choose between a one-hour ride and a half-day cruise.

(c) Fun Adventure

Water-skiing is a an old-time favourite, which combines speed, fun and sport… Simply the winning formula! Seasoned water-skiers can still push their limits with a wakeboard or barefoot (when you literally ski on your feet) – but we leave this last option to the more adventurous among you!

Who said fishing was not a sport? Especially deep-sea fishing! In summer, pelagic fish stream closer to the reef: what is when you are most likely to catch a spearfish, a shark, a tuna or a barracuda. If you wish to enjoy the pleasures of fishing in an eco-conscious mindset, you can contribute to the conservation of the marine wildlife by putting a tag on every catch before you release them and by recording information on the time, location and type of fish, which you will then submit to a conservation organisation. You can also take part in sports events such as the Mauritius Billfish Release International Tournament. This competition is organised by deep-sea fishing fans and professionals, who favour the catch and release method to better preserve fishing resources.

(c) JPH Charters

As you can see, there is something for every taste! In the end, it will depend on your mood of the day.

One more reason to #LiveInMauritius..

The post Mauritius: a watersport paradise appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Happy Independence Day!

We gained our independence in 1968. It wasn’t without problems: there were the communal riots in January the same year, leading to a state of emergency. No-one was sure what to expect post-independence: would Mauritius be left to fend for itself?

More than 50 years later, we can safely say that we are one of the most successful countries in the African continent: economically, culturally, you name it. No civil wars – just different groups of people cohabiting peacefully with one another. If you compare us to the rest of the world right now, we’re doing brilliantly.

Celebrating Independence

Wherever you’ll find Mauritians, you’ll find an Independence Day celebration. I’ve read that parties are planned in Australia, Canada, and, undoubtedly, around the world. Of course, they seem to be very much dance and food focused – two cornerstones of Mauritian culture, after all.

And so! Here’s what you should be up to, so as to make the most of it:
  • Get a Mauritian flag from a supermarket and pin it in front of your house/on your car /somewhere nice.

  • As a tribute to our culture and our language, I would definitely recommend checking out L’Express Weekly’s Kreol Korner.The illustrations are really clever, and are guaranteed to produce embarrassingly loud laughter, wherever you may be.
  • Spend some time on YouTube, or just turn on your radio (for once) to enjoy all the Mauritian hits – from Ti Frer to Kaya, Linzy Bacbotte to Laura Beg, Zulu and Menwar, Cassiya and Blackmen Bluz to Patyatann and Flashback.  You will also find a collection of the top 70 Mauritian songs from sega, to Bhojpuri.
  • Head to the beach, those multicultural spaces open to all, those staples of Mauritian life – Tamarin, Le Morne, Bel Ombre, for instance. Soak up the atmosphere.
  • Whip up some traditional Mauritian food. Not only is our food the very symbol of our melded heritage – Indian, Chinese, Creole, European, you name it, we’ve got it – it’s also one of the strongest institutions we value and uphold. The streets are where you’ll indulge in Mauritian food at its finest and cheapest.
Happy flag raising!

The post Mauritius Independence Day: history and celebrations Mauritian style appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Ganga Talao, "Grand Bassin"

Everyone can walk to Ganga Talao, the sacred crater Lake in Mauritius. Many streets are lined with people offering food and drinks, religious music permeates the air. I was in my car today, slowly moving behind gorgeous kanwars, and a lovely woman came and gave me a ti puri, a deep-fried kind of flatbread with curried Lima beans. She really didn’t have to do this – it was obvious that I was a) not heading to Grand Bassin b) not a pilgrim, and so technically I didn’t need the nutrition.

That, of course, isn’t the point: many families have saved up for months and months in order to give so freely. In many respects, this overwhelming kindness is the essence of this week of festivities.

Maha Shivaratri
Maha Shivratri - a peaceful walk - YouTube
Shiva

Maha Shivaratri (Sanskrit: The Great Night of Shiva) is one of the most important religious festivals of the year – the most important for devotees of the Hindu god.

Shiva is one of the main deities of Hinduism, and is represented in multitudinous forms: the cosmic dancer, the ascetic, the master of fertility, master of both poison and medicine (through his ambivalent power over snakes). In temples and private shrines, Shiva is also worshipped in the form of the lingam, a votary object that symbolises the God and is revered as an emblem of generative power.

During the festival, Hindus remember and meditate upon Shiva, his ethics and virtues – self-restraint, forgiveness, self-restraint, honesty, social harmony amongst others.

(c) Kounal Gopaul

Approximately 300,000 to 400,000 pilgrims walk to Ganga Talao every year. Apparently, the lake’s name literally means ‘Lake of Ganga’, where ‘Ganga’ refers to the Ganges river. A legend says that, while Shiva was carrying the river Ganges on his head, he spilled a few drops of the water – and this water created Ganga Talao. At the lake, devotees pay their respects and pour holy water and offerings over shrines.

Om Namah Shivaya, the chant

My friend Kounal tells me that: “On the occasion of Maha Shivaratri, devotees prepare themselves to worship lord Shiva and offer them prayers and chant ‘Om Namah Shivaya’ all night long (during what we call a ‘char pahar’ in four rounds).”

Kanwars

You cannot be indifferent to the kanwars: these are the structures that pilgrims carry to the lake. They are a visual feast, and are sometimes truly spectacular in size and creativity. Once your eyes turn away from the structures to the people holding and carting them along, your admiration turns to awe.

To lift kanwars for kilometres at a time, under this tropical sun and hilly terrain – these are feats that are almost surreal. Kanwars are heavy: I’ve seen creative types come up with elephants, serpents (as seen below), Gods spouting fountains from their mouths. The pilgrims walk, sleep on the ground in specially designed shelters, then pick up their kanwars and start again. They reach the sacred lake, pray and give thanks, and then do the same journey all over again to their homes, where they observe a fast and a night vigil. The following day, everyone rests.

Indeed Mauritius is a multicultural society where we have different ethnicities live  in peace, harmony and stability.

Pious Maha Shivaratri to everyone!
© Khatleen Minerve

The post Maha Shivaratri in Mauritius – A festival for all appeared first on Live In Mauritius Blog #liveinmauritius.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview