Loading...

Follow Official Fiverr Blog | The Do List on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

At Fiverr, our Data Science Team is always looking for new methods to better understand our data, as well as create new protocols to ensure our web pages, products, and online campaigns are running effectively for our community.

We’re excited to share that we have developed our very own A/B testing guide to help benefit everyone from data scientists and analysts to product managers and marketing professionals. This A/B Testing Guide — which was developed based on internal feedback — includes a detailed structure, recommendations, and guidelines for planning, executing, and analyzing a test.

You may be wondering…what exactly is an A/B test and why should I consider using this for my online business performance? A/B Testing is an excellent way to test two variants within your business as it pertains to how something is performing online. This test compares two variants (A and B) of the same webpage to different groups of website visitors at the same time and creates a comparison to see which variant drives the most conversions. Whichever variant generates the highest conversion rate is, of course, the new preferred variant for your website’s performance!

While numerous articles, blog posts, and “how to” guides have been written on A/B testing, there are still a few things marketers and data experts seem to get wrong, and if not careful, these oversights can greatly impact results. As a cornerstone of product changes and system updates, these kinds of mistakes can lead teams down the wrong path and have significant business changes. You can find the full list of areas to watch out for in our handy guide.

Since we’ve implemented this version of testing internally, we saw an opportunity to help the many members of our community who manage various web pages and online campaigns. Our goal is to help them understand which methods they should continue working with and build higher conversion rates that will positively impact their business. Ultimately, we’re hoping that our new guide serves as a resource that helps greatly improve the way we test.

Have you used A/B testing for your business? Let us know in the comments below!

The post The Official Fiverr A/B Testing Guide appeared first on .

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There’s nothing worse than feedback that creates more confusion than clarity. You’re frustrated, your freelancer is frustrated, and every miscommunication only pushes your timeline back further. 

The worst part? All of this could’ve been avoided. 

To skip the hassle and communicate clearly and effectively with freelancers from day one, here are a few tips to follow.

Express Yourself

Imagine if you made dinner for someone and they were furious you chose Thai over Italian. They never told you they wanted pasta, but somehow they expected you to just know. Seems ridiculous, right? 

Unfortunately, this is a common issue in the client/freelancer relationship that can derail your project before it even begins. To reduce the need for extensive revisions later on, clearly state your expectations and communicate any instructions from the get-go. 

This includes, but is not limited to:

  • Vision for the project
  • Brand colors and fonts
  • Brand voice
  • Target market
  • Project goals
  • Any internal/external style guide preferences 
  • Language to use/avoid 
  • Topic guidance
  • Competitors
Be Detail-Oriented 

Specific feedback is essential to a successful project. 

For example:

Bad Feedback: “I don’t like that color.” 

Good Feedback: “The color on the CTA is off-brand for us and deviates from the approved colors outlined in the style guide I sent you. Can you pick something that’s in (X) color family instead?” 

Note: You might want to ask your freelancer to explain their reasoning. Perhaps a certain color makes it 30% more likely you’ll get a conversion or a lighter shade allows copy to pop against graphic. Knowing this might make you reconsider your feedback. 

Here’s another example:

Bad Feedback: “This isn’t working for me.” 

Good Feedback: “Adding in statistics and quotes from credible sources would make this blog post much stronger.”

See the difference? The good examples were specific, meaningful, and gave actionable advice freelancers can implement. 

Point Out What They Did Well 

Along with giving useful feedback, it’s important to point out to your freelancer what they did well in the assignment. 

For instance, saying, “I loved how you used a metaphor to relate the topic to our target market,” will tell your freelancer they should do more of that in the future. That being said, keep your compliments reserved for ideas that actually work. Giving out good marks for the sake of being friendly may give your freelancer too much leeway for future assignments, which can lead to problems down the line. 

Try a Visual Approach

If you find it’s hard for you to pinpoint what you didn’t like about a design or content project, show instead of tell

Find examples of brands/websites/copy you like and forward them to your freelancer, but don’t stop there. Think of what you liked about these examples. Was it the edgy brand voice or the modern color scheme? These details will help your freelancer see your vision, and leads to better execution. 

Deliver Feedback Quickly

Feedback is always best when the project is fresh in your freelancer’s mind. 

If it’s a smaller project, like a blog post, provide feedback within a week of submittal. If it’s a larger project, like copy for several landing pages on a website, feedback should be given at scheduled intervals. In any case, establish a timeline from the beginning with regular check-ins so you can catch small revisions before they turn into massive mistakes.

Freelancers are there to make your life easier, not harder. Give them as much creative freedom as possible so you benefit from their expertise. After all, that’s what you’re paying them for! 

The post Ultimate Feedback Guide: How to Tell Your Freelancer Exactly What You Want appeared first on .

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you haven’t heard of style tiles before, it doesn’t mean they aren’t important to your business’ branding. According to Envato tuts+, style tiles are a rectangular image that contains the graphic elements of a business’ brand, including colors, typography, textures, and patterns. These are smaller, condensed versions of entire branding mockups, which are often a few pages.

What’s the Purpose of a Style Tile?

The purpose of style tiles is two-fold: it gives the business a high-level view of what their brand encompasses and it also allows designers to spend less time on brand design mark-ups that the rest of the team or the client may not like.

Styletil.es explains that this document helps facilitate the conversation between the designer and the client or other team members they are working with on the project. It ensures that everyone is on the same page when it comes to where a brand needs to go next, making it easier for everyone involved with less time spent brainstorming and fewer revisions for the designer. Creative Bloq states that style tiles shouldn’t necessarily replace design mock-ups, but are instead a “first step” before complete mock-ups that help everyone stay on the same page with the designer’s goals.

What Elements Should Style Tiles Have?

The Envato tuts+ article explains that all style tiles should contain most of the following elements where they make sense:

  1. Client logo
  2. Fonts
  3. Possible brand colors
  4. Textures (this is to convey a “message” about the brand, it doesn’t mean literal photoshop or background textures.)
  5. Adjectives
  6. Typography
  7. Buttons
  8. Background
  9. Version (to keep track of the iterations of style tiles)
How to Create Style Tiles

Styletil.es goes into this with more detail, but the four-step process for creating a style tile is as follows:

  1. Listen: have a design kick-off meeting to ask questions and make sure everyone is clear about the branding objectives and what the branding needs to convey
  2. Interpret: Review team feedback to turnkey phrases and adjectives into design elements.
  3. Define: Look at the list of adjectives and design elements to create the tile. Many designers do multiple versions of tiles and present a few at once. Here is a zip PSD template by Styletil.es to use as a starting point.
  4. Iterate: Present to the team. Depending on their feedback, this process may need repetition or you may need to combine elements from multiple style tiles to create a final version for branding.
Be Patient When Designing

Creating the perfect branding can be difficult to get right, especially if the designer, owner, or others working on the project have different ideas about what the brand needs to convey or what graphic elements to include.

That’s why style tiles are so important: they allow everyone to get on the same page, interpret expectations in a visual way, and include all the components that make up a company’s brand: typography, colors, and meaning through visuals.

Creating style tiles for branding can save time and resources while decreasing the chances of frustration or missed communication amongst project members.

The post Why Your Brand Needs Style Tiles (And How to Create Them) appeared first on .

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Knowing what to charge for freelance work is tough. Ask for too much and you might lose out on the job. On the other hand, if you go too low, the client might wonder if your bargain price is due to a lack of experience or quality.

So, what’s a freelancer to do? If you’re having a hard time pricing your services correctly, here are a few things to consider that can help.

Take a Look at the Competition

Whether you’re a freelance writer, designer, developer, or anything else, you’ll want to look at what your competition is charging.

Are your rates comparable, lower, or higher? Is the quality of your work on par with others? Knowing the answers to these questions will help you understand if your rates are fair not only to your clients, but to you.

Glassdoor has a salary tool that shows you the average annual earnings for a full-time employee in your industry and state. This information is important to know, too, especially if you’ll be billing many hours per week or collaborating with this client long-term.

Consider the Effort

Before you quote an hourly rate or flat fee, you’ll need to first figure out how long it’ll take you to complete the job itself.

What about …

  • Weekly client phone calls or progress check-ins
  • Drive time if you’re expected to attend kick-off meetings or in-person reviews
  • Strategy or consulting work
  • Anything you’ll need to complete the job, including SEO or competitive analysis tools, etc.
  • Miscellaneous purchases, like domain names or stock photography

If you forget to factor these items into your rate, you may end up feeling like the project wasn’t worth the time or effort — and ultimately, the pay.

Sell Yourself and Back It Up

There’s always going to be a freelancer who works for less than you, but you can’t let that deter you.

If you want to make a good living doing what you love, or earn some extra spending money from a side hustle you enjoy, you need to charge what you’re worth.

With solid experience and skills to back up your work, clients will understand the value of choosing you over someone offering the same services for much less. However, the key is knowing how to sell yourself and generate interest.

An impressive portfolio or website that showcases your best work is necessary, as well as a strong pitch. Come in hot by name-dropping big clients you’ve worked with in the past, include links to your most stellar work, and show them why you’re the best freelancer for the job.

Invest in a professional photo for LinkedIn (and any other social platforms) and beef up your online following. You may never meet your clients in person or even see them on a video meeting, but you can bet they’ll be looking at you online.

Whether you like it or not, perception is important for freelancers. And you’ll need to show clients that you’re worth every penny — and more.

The Price Is Right

Every industry is different, and skill level and experience play heavily into what you can charge, but you also don’t want to sell yourself short.

Here are a few more tips to consider:

  • If a higher rate isn’t working for you, reduce it by 10% the next time you pitch a client to see if they bite.
  • Revisit your pricing structure every six months and compare it to the demand in your industry and competitor rates.
  • Be upfront about rate increases. Tell your client why the increase is necessary, remind them of the value you’ve added to their business, and most importantly, be confident.
Kill ‘Em With Confidence

Don’t be afraid to charge what you feel is appropriate or increase your prices to a rate that makes more sense for the quality of your work.

You know how much research, strategy, and skill goes into your work, after all. Now you just need to charge like it.

The post  Know Your Worth: How to Price Your Services Correctly appeared first on .

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

—It’s finally done: your first (or updated!) brand logo. It may have taken you and a designer many weeks or months to get to the point of final delivery, but now that your logo is finished, how can you put it to good use? 

It may be a little overwhelming at first to have a newly designed logo, but the good news is that you have many places to include it. To make the most out of your logo, follow these steps to increase your brand visibility and update the logo where needed.

Create Brand Guidelines

A brand’s style guidelines give everyone, from marketers to website designers, concrete guidelines as to how your new logo and branding should be used. 

It is usually created by the designer who created the logo and includes rules on how the logo should be displayed, specific brand colors, fonts used, and other elements that are crucial to keeping the branding consistent. Without having brand guidelines, employees or contractors may use different color or font variations, leading to inconsistencies. 

Overall, this reflects poorly on the brand because it is seen as unprofessional, so make your rules firm and pass them along to anyone promoting your new look. 

Update all Versions of the Logo

Once brand guidelines are in place, make sure that the new logo and branding are updated on all your various platforms. This may include (but isn’t limited to):

  • Social media profile photos and header images
  • Email signatures for employees
  • Invoices
  • Websites
  • Marketing collateral, like flyers and postcards
  • Email marketing: newsletters and promotions
  • Business cards

Some of these don’t need to be updated ASAP and can be gradually phased in, like the business cards and paper marketing collateral. If anything, simply use what is left of the old logo and then when it’s time to order new products, make sure the new logo is used.

Freshen Up Other Assets to Match New Logo

With a new brand logo and guidelines usually comes an updated look for other marketing assets, especially your website. Most websites use common colors throughout its pages, including hyperlink colors or colored headers. These areas should be using the same brand colors that are included in the logo. 

Also, when compared to the new logo, your website may look outdated, meaning it’s time for a new website design as well. Logos and websites should be updated as needed every few years to keep the brand fresh and relevant. Plus, it’s a good opportunity to restructure your design in a way that drives conversions, as opposed to weighing your site down with pages and resources that hardly generate traffic. 

How Can Freelancers Help? 

If you don’t know where to start when it comes to improving your branding guidelines or updating your website and social media with your new logo, experienced freelancers can help. They are a perfect option for business owners who need assistance, but don’t want to bring on a new employee or hire a recurring contractor.

Consider reaching out to a designer or marketing expert that can give you suggestions on where to update your branding, as well as help you execute it. Hiring a freelancer can keep you accountable to ensure it actually gets done. After all, your new logo was created for a reason. Now it’s time to use it!

The post You Finished Your Brand Logo – Now What? appeared first on .

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you’re managing an internal team for your company, you might start to notice little signs that your team members aren’t producing their best work. Your internal team might be truly amazing, but at times, their workload and hours may start to affect their overall performance and even their attitude.

One way to solve these issues, quickly, is to hire a freelancer that can assist your team with specific tasks or projects. Freelancers can offer the expertise, skills, and time to remove some stress off your team, allowing them to, once again, produce their best work.

Below are a few signs to look out for that may indicate the need to hire a freelancer for your internal team.

1) Burnout

If your team is experiencing long hours and high expectations over a long period of time, they can start to burn out. To avoid stressing out your team, a freelancer can help shoulder some of the workload, which can decrease their demands and alleviate their attitudes.

2) Projects Are Delayed

If your team is usually running on time, but suddenly starts missing deadlines, it might be a sign that they need some assistance. Freelancers help your team avoid missing important timelines by taking on some of the work.

3) Wearing Too Many Hats

If you discover that your team members are being asked to be responsible for too many tasks outside of their expertise, hiring freelancers may be the solution. Freelancers take on the time-consuming tasks that are causing your team members to feel overwhelmed, and by doing so, it lets them focus on the things they do best.

4) A Decline in Quality

If you notice that the quality of your team’s work starts to decline, you should consider hiring freelancers. This often happens because your team is already starting to burn out, and needs help. For instance, a freelancer who specializes in graphic design could fill in the gaps for your creative department and assist in achieving high-quality work again.

5) Overwhelm

If you notice that your team members begin complaining of not knowing what to do first or having so much to do they become worried, they might be overwhelmed. Bringing in the right freelancers can start to relieve these feelings and help your team members prioritize assignments.

Contacting Freelancers

Once you start noticing these signs, you should consider looking for freelancers to fortify and assist your internal team. Before you start reaching out to potential freelancers, you should have a brief that outlines the project or tasks, and list the skills the freelancer needs to complete them.

Then, you can post the job or project description on a site like Fiverr, by hitting “post a request.” This allows freelancers to respond directly to your request with questions or proposals. You can also browse different freelancers by doing searches for the project type you need them to work on. You can contact them to see if they have the time and ability to assist you with your needs.

Next time you notice these signs remember that hiring freelancers is a great option to move projects along and keep your internal team performing at optimal levels.

The post 5 Signs Your Team Might Need to Hire Freelancers appeared first on .

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

What if everyone you hire could look at a single document and just get your brand? What if they knew right away what your company stands for and how you want to represent it across platforms?

A brand style guide can make this dream come true. A document created once and updated occasionally can keep a whole team on track with far less work. 

If you’re looking for a practical way to keep your branding consistent no matter how many people you have on your team or project, a brand style guide serves as a cheat sheet of writing and design standards that visually represents your brand. You could send your style guide to your new graphic designer to get your social media images sized to perfection or hand off a physical copy to your printer to get banners or flyers designed and printed. 

Either way, your first step is to get your style guide off the ground. Here are 3 essentials you need to make a great one: 

1. Your Logo

While your brand is much more than just your logo, it’s still an essential part of your brand, so you’ll want to include it in your style guide. It’s what makes your brand recognizable across platforms and is often the first thing potential customers notice. If you have multiple logos, it’s a good idea to include them, too. 

A freelance graphic designer may want options when designing graphics for online or print. Be sure to add some logo options that also have a transparent background to overlay on social media graphics and landing pages. Designing your logo as an overlay is a great way to protect your photos and make your brand graphics look more professional. 

2. Your Fonts

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but your fonts speak volumes when it comes to your brand identity. Different fonts can completely change the look and the feel of your brand. Some are classic. Some are serious. Some are playful. You will want more than one typeface in your brand tool belt, but keep your combinations consistent. 

In this section of your style guide, you may also include which fonts to use for titles versus body copy and how you want your copy formatted. This helps all the writers on your team get the formatting right the first time around, rather than sending revision requests back and forth. 

3. Your Colors

Is your brand bright and cheery, dark and mysterious, or somewhere in between? 

The fonts you choose have an impact and so do your brand colors. Your brand style guide is a great place to display your colors in a grid and also store the codes for each color for both online and print. 

When choosing which colors to add, look at top brands for inspiration as each color palette creates a different tone. Take cars for example. Luxurious brands, like Lexus, use grays, blacks, silvers, and golds. The more family-friendly brands like Ford and Volkswagen use more blue representing reliability and durability. 

Perfect The Essentials And Grow From There

Logos, fonts, and colors. These are the three core essentials of any brand style guide to save you both time and money. If you would like to expand your style guide later, you can also add guidelines for photography, iconography, and web-specific elements. 

You could also include your ideal target audience or customer avatar and brand mission statement. What you include is completely up to you. You can adjust your style guide over time as you work with your team to see what needs to be added or taken away. 

Start with these core essentials and you will be well on your way to branded bliss. 

The post 3 Essentials Your Brand Style Guide Needs appeared first on .

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“Thank you for finishing this, however, I forgot to mention that I also need this, this, and this before we can wrap up this project.” 

Does this scenario sound familiar? It’s a freelancer’s nightmare and can be a business owner’s nightmare too. 

A freelancer budgets his or her time for a project based on the scope you provide, although when you leave out important brand details or guidelines, the overall experience for both of you can be frustrating. The good news is that any lack of clarity, forgotten project details, and back and forth messaging can be avoided with a great brief. 

You can make your life so much easier by learning to create awesome briefs that you can share with hired creative professionals. Right from the start, you have the opportunity to lay out all your expectations on both sides. When working with freelance writers you will need to provide guidelines on your company’s tone or voice along with clear writing style guidelines.  

Here are some brief creation tips.

1. Must-Haves

First up in the must-haves category are links to your website and social media profiles. The freelancer will need to get a grasp of your brand, and taking a look over your online presence is a great way to do that. 

Next, you want to set boundaries. What should the freelancer not do? If there are certain things that are not allowed, like including links to a competing company, you need to specify them. Also, let your freelancer know your budget and how you want the project submitted. Whether it’s through Google Doc, WordPress, etc., make sure to provide any login information needed. 

Deadlines. What do you expect to be due when? Is there an outline required before the final project? Are there in between steps that need to be approved before the freelancer can move on?

These are essential. Then there are the …

2. Nice-To-Haves

The “why” of the project. You must have a purpose for hiring the freelancer to do this project. Share it. You will get a better outcome if you give details on the purpose behind the project. 

Example: You hire a graphic designer to create a Facebook Ad to get signups to your email list. Rather than just saying, “We need this ad and this is what we want it to look like,” you could share your goal: “With this design, we want to get 100 new engaged email subscribers interested in ____.”

Provide context and purpose. This promotes clarity. 

Another nice-to-have is examples. Providing examples of what you are looking for is an excellent way to make sure your freelancer is clear about what you want. You can use past projects or templates from your own company or share inspiration from a company similar to yours. 

Bonus Tips:

  • Keep the language simple (no company jargon)
  • Make the brief easy to read (bullet points, visuals, paragraphs)
  • Paint a picture of your desired outcome
To Get Quality Work, Create A Quality Brief

Getting quality work from your hired freelancers starts with creating a quality brief. Make sure your instructions are clear and boundaries straightforward. Declare your “why” and provide examples of your desired outcome. 

Make the brief easy to read by using simple language and breaking up large paragraphs with visuals and bullet points. Implement these tips and you will have writers who want to work with you and give you their best on a consistent basis.

The post How to Write a Great Brief: The Must-Haves appeared first on .

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When you think of your favorite brand, what comes to mind first? Logo? Font? Messaging? All of the elements that make up a brand’s identity are carefully selected to help ensure that it’s both recognizable and memorable. You could almost say it feels like seeing a familiar friend.

So how do you keep brand colors, fonts, and messaging consistent regardless of where your content is published? A brand style guide is an excellent place to start. A style guide is a resource that helps communicate the essence of your brand visually across all marketing channels.

Introducing our Newest Category: Brand Style Guides | Fiverr - YouTube

 Fiverr’s Brand Style Guide services include:

  • Brand Book Design
  • Brand guidelines for logos, iconography, typography, & more
  • Color Palettes
  • Branding Best Practices

Ready to get started? Hire a freelancer on Fiverr to help with all of this and more.

Questions about Brand Style Guides? Leave a comment below.

The post Introducing our Newest Category: Brand Style Guides appeared first on .

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Five years ago, we had a dream at Eco-Soap Bank​ to create and sell a zero-waste soap product that empowered women in the developing world and saved lives doing it. Its mission would be to revolutionize the way we do good in the world through our purchases.

But as a small team facing a lack of resources, we put the idea on hold… indefinitely. Until we were introduced to Do For Good. Do For Good is a collaboration between Fiverr and ​Givingway,​ an online volunteer portal.

This game-changing partnership will connect nonprofits with top-tier freelance services to address their most pressing business and creative needs. Now, our dream is a full-fledged initiative launching today on Kickstarter​!

And Do For Good is already helping to save lives.

We’re proud to introduce Project EcoSoap—a soap bar for the truly eco-friendly and socially-conscious. Every bar is 100% recycled and 100% zero-waste. We’re giving steady, fair-wage employment to economically disadvantaged women in developing countries to create the world’s most responsible soap.

And for every bar we sell, we’re able to give a hundred bars to children in need abroad.

We have the ambitious goal of providing 2.5 million people with soap and employing 45 women worldwide. And none of this would have been possible without Do For Good and a fleet of Fiverr sellers dedicated to turning our ideas into reality.

To bring Project EcoSoap to life, we received top-tier Fiverr Pro services, like product photography, graphic design and illustration, and digital marketing. The quality of their work totally blew us away—take a look at some of the results:

Lauren Coyle – Graphic Design and Illustration

Kimberly – Digital Marketing

Tim Ireland – Product Photography

Do For Good leverages the power of Fiverr’s marketplace to empower organizations around the world to bring their impact to the next level. We can’t wait to see all the good that Do For Good will do for nonprofit teams like us.

Project EcoSoap is live on Kickstarter!

How would you use Do For Good for your nonprofit? Let us know in the comments!

The post Do For Good: Saving Lives With Project EcoSoap appeared first on .

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview