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You can now search by address on all of Findmypast's UK census records

Our handy address search tool, which previously only featured on the 1901 and 1911 UK censuses , the 1939 Register and Australia Electoral Rolls , is now available across all British censuses from 1841 to 1911. This allows you to find out who was living at a particular address at the time each census was taken. Use this quick guide to get the most out of census address searches.

To start using the address search tool, head to any of our UK census records sets from 1841 to 1911. You can access these via the A-Z of records . To search for an address rather than a person, select 'Address' from the 'Person/Address' toggle switch at the top of the search screen.

Address search on the 1841 census

You will now be able to search by street, parish or town, county and/or country.

The 'parish or town' search field will return results for civil parishes, registration districts, towns, villages, boroughs or sub-districts. As you type a location into the the 'parish or town', 'county' or 'country' search fields, our clever predictive system will suggest matches for your search.

So for example, if you were to start typing in 'Weston' into the 'parish or town' field, you'll see a range of suggestions for places with 'Weston' at the start of their name.

If you were more specific, and typed 'Regent Road' into the 'street' search field, then that would bring up results for every 'Regent Road' in the census.

Then, if you click on any of the roads on your results, you will be taken to a list of all the houses on that particular road or street.

From there, you simply select the house you're interested in, and you will be taken to a transcription of the census record for that property.

The address search tool also recognises abbreviations ('St' for 'Street', 'Rd' for 'Road' etc).

As usual with our search forms, none of the fields are required. Therefore you can easily find all instances of a particular road name we have if you are not sure of any of the other historical information.

We hope this tool helps you get even further with your family (or house) history research.

Keep Learning Search Guide: UK Census Records An Introduction to British Genealogy How to Use Census Hints Like a Pro ]]>
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We are excited to announce our latest update to the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), including new articles to the index and images added to six publication titles. In total, 73,516 new images and 10,386 new articles have been added to the index.

Of the six titles, only one title has had images added previously, The Index Library .

Images have been added to the following publications:

Discover more about what this index can offer you with our PERSI landing page . Explore our full list of titles that have had images added.

Up next: Finding American ancestors in PERSI ]]>
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Records found on Findmypast depict major milestones in the life of one of the most influential men in history

Gary Oldman's portrayal of Winston Churchill in Darkest Hour has been met with widespread critical acclaim. To get to know the real Churchill, however, we delve into our records to bring you the key moments from his remarkable life.

Darkest Hour - Official International Trailer (Universal Pictures) HD - YouTube

Early Life

Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was born to Jennie Jerome and Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill at Blenheim Palace on 30 November, 1874. His birth record was registered in the district of Woodstock, Oxfordshire.

You can track Churchill's formative years in the 1881 and 1891 UK census records on Findmypast , where his family is listed alongside their numerous staff members. You'll also find mention of Churchill's childhood in our registers for Harrow School . Interestingly, his school records reveal a talent for fencing.

WInston Churchill in his school days

The Making of the Man

After graduating from Sandhurst Military Academy in 1894, Churchill served as a second lieutenant in the Fourth Hussars regiment of the British Army. You'll find several records of his time in the Hussars in our British Army Lists 1839-1946 .

His time in the British Army saw him visit Cuba, India, Sudan and South Africa. By 1899, his various military escapades gained him quite the fame back in Britain, which eventually saw him elected to parliament in 1900. In 1904, Churchill controversially crossed the parliament floor from his Conservative Party to the Liberals. This is documented in our historical newspapers, as seen below in an excerpt taken from a contemporary report of this extraordinary act.

Northern Daily Telegraph - Wednesday 01 June, 1904

As his notoriety grew, Churchill popped up in the newspapers more and more frequently from the early 1900s onwards. Explore the vast collection for yourself and see what you can unearth about him.

Winston Churchill married Clementine Ogilvy Hozier in 1908. Their marriage record features in our exclusive Westminster Collection and is rich in detail. It reveals the couple's ages, occupations (Churchill is recorded as the President of the Board of Trade), addresses, father's names and their occupations.

Winston Churchill and Clementine Ogilvy Hozier's marriage record

Their first child, Diana was born the following year . They would go on to have four more - Randolph, Sarah, Marigold and Mary. The family are listed living at Eccleston Square in the 1911 Census , where Churchill's occupation is recorded as, 'One Of His Majesty's Principal Secretaries Of State'.

The Churchill residence as listed in the 1911 Census of England & Wales

Height of Power

At the outbreak of the Second World War, Churchill was First Lord of the Admiralty. You can view his complete household record in the 1939 Register for free here .

Neville Chamberlain resigned as Prime Minister in 1940 and Churchill stepped in, making his famous 'Finest Hour' speech. You can find some fascinating, contemporary reports of that in our historic newspaper collection . Below is a recording of the speech in full. Stirring stuff if you have a spare half hour to listen to it.

Winston Churchill - Their Finest Hour Speech - Complete - YouTube

Churchill's years after the Second World War ended are documented on Findmypast through numerous resources including passenger lists and records and newspaper reports of his various accolades including his knighthood , his Nobel Prize for literature and his honorary citizenship of the United States, a recognition he was the first person in history to receive.

Illustrated London News - Saturday 20 April, 1963

After suffering his second major stroke, Winston Churchill died on 24 January 1965 aged 90. His state funeral was the largest in history up to that point, with representatives from 112 countries present.

That's Churchill's life in the records. Start your family tree today and discover what our records can tell you about your Britishand Irish ancestors. ]]>
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2017 was another epic year of family history at Findmypast. Here are the highlights.

Hundreds of brand new record collections, millions of additions to existing resources and some really useful site and search enhancements made 2017 a fantastic year to be a Findmypast member. We've shortlisted our favourite record releases and site improvements below in case you missed them during the year. Enjoy!

Click or tap each image to flip it and find out more information.

With more massive record releases and some nifty site updates planned for 2018, there really is no better time to research your family's history with Findmypast.

Start Your Journey Now

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In our latest update to the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), we've added more images to Allen County Lines , found exclusively on Findmypast.

Included in this update, images have been added for volumes 1 through 35, which span the years from 1977 to 2010.

Search PERSI now!

In the index, this publication appears under two title variations: Allen County Lines and Lines / Allen County Lines . The latter entry pertains to volumes 1.1-3.1 and 28. All other volumes are included under Allen County Lines .

Allen County Lines is a quarterly publication put out by the Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana. Discover genealogical resources and learn what projects the society has been involved in over the years. You may come across such useful information as cemetery inscriptions, such as those included in volume 3 issue 2, which include, in part, names and birth and death dates.

This is only one title of hundreds that are included in PERSI, many of which have had images added to them. If this specific title is of little interest to your research, check out the comprehensive list of periodicals that have had images added here .

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In this exclusive and educational webinar, Alex Cox, our webinar host, Andrew Marr and Audrey Collins will provide you with the search skills you will need in order to find out what your relatives were up to in 1939.

Here, we explain exactly what the 1939 Register is and why it is so significant for family research. You'll get all the hints, tips and tricks you need to be able to explore the Register and realise why it really is the perfect place to start your British family research.

1939 Register: The Perfect Place to Start Your Family History - YouTube

Throughout the webinar, viewers put their questions to our team of in-house experts. Alex answered a select few live on air which you can watch on the video. Here's the best of the rest.

1. Does the Register indicate where children might have been evacuated from as part of the Pied Piper Evacuation Scheme?

Many children who were evacuated are still redacted, so while name searches will reveal, some others will not be able to be discovered just yet.

2. Apart from servicemen and prisoners, who else might have been excluded from the 1939 Register?

Mercantile marines and fishermen on short-term voyages who landed in port after registration day might be excluded along with those on medium to long-distance voyages.

3. Why do we have to produce a death certificate to declare someone is over 100 years old?

The provision of a death certificate is as evidence of death, not that the person is over 100 years of age. The record of a person born more than 100 years ago should be opened by default. It's only persons who would be under 100 years today for whom evidence of death is required. The death certificate is required because of personal privacy and confidentiality restrictions around the data.

4. When the information was collected in September 1939, was the information collected on cards or straight into the book?

You can see a sample of the forms that were filled in by the householders here .

5. Was working in a glass works (Pilkington's St Helens) a restricted occupation?

It would depend on what the glass works were manufacturing, or if the factory was requisitioned for war work.

6. Do you know when we might be able to view the register for Scotland?

It is held separately for Scotland so you'd need to ask the National Archives of Scotland/NRS.

7. Why do you not have a general comment on the transcription error form so that we can report e.g. that someone is in the wrong household; or that the address for the whole household needs to be fixed?

The Report Transcription Errors link is at the bottom of the transcription. You can send us corrections for each line.

We apologise for the end of the video cutting off suddenly. We had a technical hiccup. If you want to view the short Evacuees video Alex mentions, here it is:

More About the 1939 Register: Webinar: Intro to the 1939 Register Tips for Searching the 1939 Register 1939 Register: A snapshot into British history ]]>
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As leaders in British and Irish family history, we know the hard work that goes into discovering and confirming the place of origin or birth of your ancestors across the pond. That's why we're incredibly proud to announce that we've launched a new and unique data set to make this milestone easier to achieve. Introducing the British and Irish Roots Collection , a database consisting of more than 98 million assorted records that have been hand-picked from existing collections by our in-house experts.

This ground-breaking collection gives family historians the chance to trace their ancestors' journeys across the Atlantic like never before by bringing together a wide range of record sets that list origin or place of birth as anywhere in Britain and Ireland. Millions of passenger lists, census records, naturalization applications and draft registrations, as well as birth, marriage, and death records spanning more than 400 years (1573 to 1990) of migration between the British Isles and North America can now be explored in one unified search, enabling North American family historians to trace the migration of ancestors from the Old World to the New through one simple search.

This is the first time such an expansive database has been curated in such a way. Now, exclusively with Findmypast, family historians can trace the origins of their transatlantic ancestors all in one place.

The journeys researchers can expect to find include:

  • Anyone leaving the UK or Ireland and emigrating to the US, Canada or the Caribbean
  • Anyone emigrating from Canada or the Caribbean to the US (this covers the large number of British and Irish immigrants who stopped temporarily in Canada and/or the Caribbean)
  • Anyone listed on any US or Canadian record with British or Irish origins, birthplace or parents

For example, if a US Military record mentions that a soldier was born in Wales, or if a US census return states that a household member was born in Athlone, Ireland, those records will be searchable through British and Irish Roots .

All records within this expansive collection will be free to search and explore for a limited period. Visit Findmypast today and start discovering your British and Irish roots.

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Our Catholic Heritage Archive continues to grow, with the addition of 4.9 million Sacramental Registers in partnership with the Diocese of Cincinnati!

Digitization will soon be underway on over 800,000 fully indexed images of original Cincinnati Catholic baptism, marriage and burial registers. These records contain over 3 million names and span the years 1800 to 1953. They'll be made available online for the first time, only at Findmypast, in 2018.

An additional 1.9 million Chicago Sacramental Registers will also be added to the site later in the year. These records will cover 125 years of city's history (1864 to 1989) and will add yet another important region to Findmypast's growing collection of United States Catholic records.

Today's announcement marks the latest in a series of updates to our exclusive Catholic Heritage Archive ; a ground-breaking initiative that aims to digitize the historic records of the Catholic Church in the United States, Britain and Ireland for the very first time. The digitization of collections such as these is a monumental undertaking and, when complete, this exclusive collection will contain over 100 million records spanning 300 years of Catholic history

In collaboration with various Archdioceses, Findmypast is helping to digitize these important records and make them widely accessible for the first time in one unified online collection. Beautifully scanned color images of original documents will be available to view and fully searchable transcripts will also be included, providing family historians with easy access to these once closely guarded records.

The Roman Catholic Church is the largest Christian denomination in the world and it has always been a significant component (up to 25%) of the American population. These records will allow researchers from around the globe to uncover the history of millions of Irish, Italian, German, Polish and many other nationalities as they made a new home in the USA.

Additional Cincinnati and Chicago records as well as additional updates from variety of British, Irish, US and Canadian Dioceses will be added to the Catholic Heritage Archive throughout 2018.


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With the royal engagement announced, we see if Harry and Meghan are living up to the names their parents gave them

Using our "You Called Me What?!" name analysis tool, we see if Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are indeed a match made in heaven. The results below seem to suggest otherwise... Anyway, moving swiftly on, using data sourced from civil registration records held by the GRO for England and Wales from 1837-2006, this name analysis shows what your name says about you, and how you stack up against those who share it.

Find out what's in your name!

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Thanks to our " You Called Me What?! " name analysis, we decided to see if Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are indeed a match made in heaven. Using data sourced by Findmypast from the civil registration records held by the GRO for England and Wales from 1837-2006, this name analysis will help you discover what your name says about you and how you stack up against those who share it.

Find out what's in your name!

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