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You’ve put the work into creating a beautiful office, now you need to show it off.

Why?

Companies spend millions customizing their offices with art, furniture, equipment, and amenities in order to attract and retain employees. In a highly competitive market, it’s no surprise that businesses need to create an environment and culture where people feel excited to work. However, once their space is created, sharing it with candidates can be a real challenge — as you know, getting every candidate to come by the office can be a serious scheduling and resource burden.

The environment and culture your company creates is a crucial selling point to getting people interested in joining your team. If they can’t understand what working for you will be like from content on your career page, they may not engage with your site or recruiters in the first place. So, how can you get people from all around the world to understand what you offer when they are unable to see it firsthand?

Virtual reality and 360 video tours offer a perfect solution.

Screen record from a vr tour of an office and its roofCreating the tour

When looking to put together a virtual tour of your office, you’ll need three things. First, a camera; second, a platform to build your content on; and third, a way for people to experience it.

Filming

To capture your office in its entirety, you’ll want to use a 360 camera. If you’re looking for something high quality and easy to use, the YI 360 VR camera offers an affordable solution at $370.

You’ll want to place this camera in your space on a tripod and film the scenes relevant to you. You can choose to do it without people or you can add a guide.

You will want to film multiple locations so people can travel from one place to the next. You may also want to create a menu using an open, beautiful space in your office that people can navigate from. This will all be done after filming.

example of a guided tour and menu

Creating

Once you’ve filmed and uploaded your stitched footage to the computer, you can add them to eevo.com to make your experience interactive. On eevo you can connect the different locations in your office and create ways for viewers to go from one location to the next based on where they look in the scene.

Sharing

When you’ve build your experience, you can publish it live to a variety of platforms. For the most immersive view, you can play the content back in virtual reality on the Oculus Go. These are great at college and job fairs, during interviews, or even sent in the mail. For a 360 view you can play content back on devices such as iPad, iPhone, and the web. For more information, check out our article, Three Ways to Use VR to Hire. Whatever platforms you choose, your candidates can get a real understanding for the office environment you’ve created and why they should come work for you.

Creating a VR tour of your office was originally published in eevo on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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Any company selling a product that exists in the real world has to deal with the difficult challenge of getting customs to experience their offering. These products typically fall into one of three categories. The first is spaces, where someone is selling something like real estate, a boat, or a hotel room. The second is an in person experience, such as concerts, travel packages, or cruise ships. The third is items best understood visually, such as furniture or any item that can be difficult to imagine in the real world. In all three cases, companies are looking to answer a similar question,

How do we get people to understand and experience something they don’t have access to?

For the last 2–3 years, companies have been leveraging immersive experiences to put people where they need to be. The team at eevo has seen immersive experiences implemented across a variety of companies in many different fields. In all cases, the business offers a product that is difficult to show people in the real world and has been using VR and 360 video to make their products more accessible and as a result make more sales.

Exploring Spaces

The idea of using VR/360 to show off a real world space is an obvious one. Companies are able to save massive amounts of time by providing virtual tours and customers are able to make decisions faster. The real estate space is increasingly adopting VR and 360 as a way to show off homes, especially in luxury markets.

An interactive VR/360 experience on eevo, here’s how it was created

Any large space that will require people to move themselves to a location to experience it can be captured and played back in interactive VR /360, as shown in the GIF above. For example, Yacht or boat tours have been a great use of immersive experiences. Here’s one bloomberg made in 2017 using linear 360 video on youtube:

Airlines like KLM have also been working with this technology since 2016 to show both passengers and crew members the layouts of their new planes, as you can see here:

Whether it’s for real estate, yachts, airlines, hotels, coworking, or any other space you need people to see, VR and 360 provide the most immersive way for people to understand what you offer.

Having Experiences

If you provide an experience as your product it can be very frustrating trying to get someone to understand why they should pay for what you’ve created. VR/360 helps solve this issue though by putting a potential buyer right in the middle of your experience. For example, if you’re a theater looking to sell tickets, you can follow the example of Broadway’s The Lion King:

If you provide travel experiences to people like eevo’s customer Travelopia, VR/360 allows potential buyers to understand the amazing locations they will be visiting before making a purchase. One of Travelopia’s brands put together 15 pieces of content for their Antarctica trip and offer VR/360 content for a large number of their experiences.

Some companies may not offer physical experiences but want their customers to understand the impact of their products, for example, Toms. Toms wanted people to understand the impact of buying a pair of their shoes for the communities they work with, so they created an experience for their customers:

There are countless numbers of ways to use immersive content to show people the experiences companies offer. Whether it’s for travel, concerts, theater, cruises ships, amusement parks, or really anything that exists in reality, VR/360 video provide an amazing way to capture and share experiences.

Seeing Items Best Understood Visually

If a company is looking to sell a product that someone will need to be able to properly visualize the size of, like a desk, a couch, or an entire room layout, VR offers a great solution. Macy's is providing these experiences to people today in their stores. Macy’s is able to show and sell people furniture that they don’t currently have in that store location, letting them use smaller areas to sell more products.

Lowe’s has also been using VR in their stores since 2015, offering people a similar ability to Macy’s in which a customer can design a room and then see it in VR.

What’s Next

There are lots of ways to implement VR and 360 video into the sales process and the right experience to create will be very different for each business. As you look to create immersive content, reach out to the eevo team at questions@eevo.com for guidance on what to create and how to create it. We offer both the platform and the services to make amazing immersive content that will help you sell more.

Thanks for reading!

VR Experiences That Increase Sales was originally published in eevo on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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The eevo team and platform are here to make your entrance into creating immersive 360 video and VR experiences as easy as possible. When businesses are looking to create experiences on eevo for their onboarding, recruiting, or training, they typically work with us in one of three different ways based on their experience with VR/360.

“Can You Handle It All?”

While there are many talented creators and studios you can hire today, the 360/VR space is still relatively new. Most people don’t know how to create this type of content, and may not be interested in learning. If you wish to have us handle your project from start to finish our content team will work with you to identify what we need to film and edit for you. We will come into your locations with a camera such as the Yi Halo to capture the moments you want people to experience. We will guide you on which devices to use for playback, such as the Oculus Go or iPad, and help you plan out the best way to implement immersive content into your company, get analytics back on peoples experience, and scale accordingly.

“I Got This”

While we love creating content, you may too, so we have built our platform and tools to be easy enough for anyone to use. The eevo platform offers a drag and drop toolset where creators can make branching experiences. If you know how to film 360 videos already you can start using the eevo platform today to build experiences. We’ll work with you to identify how you’re looking to use the platform so we can make sure you’re getting the most out of our toolset and analytics offering. If you’re looking to publish your content to a custom application the eevo team will handle all app submissions and maintenance for you.

“What Do I Do, Can You Teach Me?”

You may be new to 360 / VR content, but that doesn’t mean you can’t start creating now. If you’re interested in learning how to film content on your own, edit your footage in Premier, and build interactive experiences in eevo our content team will teach you and your team what to do. We offer 3-month pilots to our platform during which time we will create your first piece of content and train your team on what we’re doing to make it happen.

What’s Next?

No matter where you are in your experience with creating immersive experiences the eevo platform and team offer an easy to use solution. Our goal is to help you create the best content and improve the way your company onboards, recruits, and trains today. If you want to learn more about how we work with our customers, reach out to questions@eevo.com and we will be in touch shortly.

Thanks!

How to Start Working With eevo was originally published in eevo on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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When you’re bringing in a new employee, you need to get them set up with a lot of information as fast as possible. They need to know what will be expected of them, what the culture is like, and in an ideal situation, you want to familiarize them with the office and the neighborhood, along with give them face time with the CEO, executives, and team members. On the first day of work you want them to feel prepared and excited. Ideally, when they leave work they have an exciting day to share with their friends and family who are sure to ask how their day was. How do you cover so much ground though in a day without taking the time to put them into everyone one of the situations and meetings required to understand a companies operations, employees, and culture? Turns out Virtual Reality offers a wonderful answer.

Why VR Improves the Process
“VR provides new employees as close an approximation to their new workplace as they can have without actually needing to be physically present” — Sushman Biswas

There are many reasons why VR can improve your onboarding process over traditional in person, video, or written onboarding materials. Here are a few:

Understanding Company Culture Faster
“Employees who know what to expect from their company’s culture and work environment make better decisions that are more aligned with the accepted practices of the company.” — Roy Maurer, SHRM

Virtual Reality allows new hires to be in every room and situation that defines your company’s culture and mission. Using VR experiences, employees can experience sitting down with the CEO or founders to hear about the mission first hand. They can pick between topics that interest them most and learn directly from your leadership about how and why the company operates today. Employees can join meetings in VR, see what a typical lunch is like, and understand how people dress and act. New hires can explore your companies office without needing a guide, access locations they couldn’t otherwise, and experience any moment you think defines who your company is.

Connecting Your Teams

If your company is spread across the country or world, employees may never get a chance to see your most important locations or hear from founding members and high-level execs. Salespeople working in Texas may never get to see what a distribution center in Florida looks like, or meet their fellow employees there. Execs in NYC may never interact with restaurant workers or spend time in the store environment in Chicago. Engineers may not have access to see the layout of a Data Center under strict security just minutes away.

Whatever the situation, the more your employees can see and understand about your company, the more connected to the culture and mission they will feel. In some cases, understanding the layout of a factory floor or kitchen environment may be crucial to the employees’ ability to perform their job. Companies may spend hours showing new employees around their facilities, taking time from other employees who have been tasked with bringing them up to speed. With VR, you can cover more ground in a lot less time, with a lot less manpower. An employee can virtually explore your company’s facilities and leave their experience with a real-world understanding of where everything is and how it all works.

Fun / Innovative / Standing Out

Anyone who has experienced well made interactive content knows how engaging and fun it can be. This engagement is a great way to get employees excited and ready to work. With 49% of millennials wanting a better onboarding experience, 82% of millennials saying that high tech offices will influence their decision about a new job, and 58% of global millennial workers preferring high tech in-office perks, such as VR and AR, as opposed to traditional free snacks and ping pong tables, it’s clear that employees want to be engaged and more excited during their onboarding experience by technology like VR.

Safer

VR provides many of the same benefits of training in a physical environment , but without the accompanying safety risks. Many companies are using VR to improve their employees’ safety today, for example, in 2017 Siemens began using a Virtual Reality training program to prepare future employees for high-risk work environments such as oil and gas rigs.

By using interactive 360 / VR content, you can create experiences for your employees where they can learn to identify potentially hazardous situations. You can see an example of similar work today at TAFE SA.

If you need to bring your new employees up to speed on an environment that could cause them harm, VR can be a great way to do this.

The eevo team has worked in this area quite extensively. To read our Case Study on Emergency Evacuation Training, check out the article,Developing VR Training That Works, A Case Study.

Engaging / Isolation From Distractions

Getting someone’s full attention is a difficult task these days. Even when you’re binge-watching an incredibly addictive show on Netflix, you’re still prone to check your phone. By providing a sensory-rich VR experience via a headset, though, it is more likely to maintain engagement with the content as long as comfort levels remain high. (If nothing else, it’s a lot harder to check your phone).

Research has shown that memory retention of subjects after a VR experience is 2x higher than after viewing a video or text-based learning materials. Since memory is anchored and made stronger when there is increased multi-sensory and emotional input, the basis for this idea is simple: as presence — and emotional responsiveness — increases, memory retention also improves.

Consistency

An unfortunate reality of reality is inconsistency as a result of humans being human. To solve this problem, Honeygrow has been successful in filming their onboarding in VR with their CEO, allowing every employee a consistent onboarding experience run directly by the companies leader. The experience both eliminates the inconsistencies of previous onboarding and lets new employees feel closer to a CEO they wouldn’t otherwise get face time with.

As put by the CEO of Honeygrow,

“I know how hard it is to train our people. So, let’s say I’m having a great day. In training and onboarding, my tone will be great, I’m covering all points, I’m not rushing it. Whereas if I’m having a bad day, I might be curtailing that message and not giving you the right tone or the right message. So a group of people training in Chicago will not be getting the same consistent authentic connection to who we are relative to people in Philadelphia or DC.”

By transferring onboarding to VR, businesses are able to take the best version of their onboarding, film it once, and use it to deliver a consistent message on everything important to them.

Measurable Results

Being able to measure the success of your onboarding materials is a big deal. By working with the right provider you’ll be able to accurately track your employees’ experience in VR, as well as, integrate that data into your LMS. If you make your content interactive, you can ask new employees questions about their experience while in VR, see which paths and options interest them, and learn what your employees care about most.

In Summary

There are a lot of exciting things happening in the VR space and the technology offers a fantastic solution today for onboarding employees. It’s an exciting time and chance to stand out, improve your onboarding, and save time and money by doing so.

If you’d like to keep reading about where VR is beneficial and the science behind why it works, check out our White Paper to learn more. If you’d like to start brainstorming how you can improve your onboarding process, reach out to us at questions@eevo.com, and we will follow up shortly!

VR is Transforming Employee Onboarding was originally published in eevo on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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Every company will want to use VR at a different stage in the hiring process — whether they send top candidates a VR headset as part of a job offer, use headsets during an advanced interview round, or bring along VR headsets to college campuses and job fairs — particularly effective when looking to market the company more generally or attract younger employees.

Whatever the choice, we always suggest using the new Oculus Go headset. This headset is $200 per device and offers a fully immersive and wireless experience.

1. With Offer / Sent in Mail

If you have a potential hire you’re excited about, giving them a VR headset as part of the job offer is a great way to let them know more about your company and inspire them to join your mission. At $200 apiece, in fact, many companies decide that this is an appropriate price to pay for top candidates if it increases their acceptance rate.

Imagine for a moment that you’re a job seeker, unsure about your next step. You put on a VR headset you’ve just received in the mail and you’re immediately greeted by the CEO of a company that interests you. The CEO tells you how excited he or she is to have you join the team, shows you what building a career at the company might look like, and removes a lot of the uncertainty you’ve been feeling about your next career move. Later, as you scroll through PDFs with other companies’ job offers and continue to revisit your VR experience, you quickly become certain which company excites you the most.

This type of personal engagement is especially important for candidates who have not had the chance to visit the company’s offices or meet the team beyond perhaps a video chat.

If you spend a lot of money and time scheduling people from out of state or overseas to visit the office and meet candidates in person, this can be a great way to save some of that time and money as well.

2. During an Advanced Interview Round

As discussed in our post “Using VR to Attract Top Talent,” it’s critical to build a strong connection with candidates as they work their way through the interview process. And the ideal way to build this all-important connection is for candidates to learn about the company’s mission directly from the CEO or the founders and to see it in action first-hand.

But even if candidates meet you at your office, you won’t have time to get to them in front of all your key executives, much less allow them to experience the moments that define your company.

Giving the candidate a 10-minute VR experience during the interview process is therefore an ideal way to resolve this important issue and sell top candidates on your company’s mission and vision — letting them leave the interview excited and fully aware of why they should want to work with you.

3. College Campuses / Job Fairs

Recruiting younger talent is a textbook use case for VR.The next wave entering our workforce are the students of today to whom immersive experiences and new ways of engagement are not uncommon, so it makes sense to reach this generation using channels that speak clearest to them and that enhance how they experience us,” says Azwan Baharuddin, Accenture’s country managing director for Malaysia.

In fact, innovative consultancies like Accenture and Deloitte are already using VR to recruit on college campuses. And 82% of millennials state that high-tech offices will influence their decision about taking a new job and staying with a company.

As competition for smart young talent continues to increase, it will be ever more important to connect with this talent using technology they know and appreciate. And VR will introduce top candidates to your company and its mission in the most immersive way possible.

For more on why to use VR in the hiring process, see “Using VR to Attract Top Talent.

Three Ways to Use VR to Hire Top Talent was originally published in eevo on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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Virtual reality (VR) experiences offer a powerful solution to companies wanting to attract and inspire top candidates.

High performers are up to eight times more productive than other employees — and the gap rises as the work becomes more complex. Yet in today’s competitive job market, attracting top talent is harder than ever. Adding to the challenge, top candidates are only on the market for about 10 days. It’s essential to engage these candidates while they’re available. And the candidate’s experience during the hiring process can make or break recruiting goals.

How can your company offer the best possible recruiting experience to these high-performing candidates?

There are many reasons for accepting a new job, but for top people, we believe that inspiration is the primary motivator. As put by Stacey Browning of Paycor, “Attracting top talent is done by communicating what we all want in a new job — clarity about our mission, and colleagues who share the conviction that what the company is doing matters.” She further suggests that companies can authentically express these things “through video, robust career pages and personal communications from senior leaders.”

Of course, getting candidates to engage with senior leaders can be challenging, especially when companies scale. So how can your business get top candidates to understand your mission — and be inspired enough to come onboard — in the short time they’re available? Video and career pages are a start, but VR experiences offer a far more effective solution.

Connecting Talent to Mission and Culture

With VR, you can fully immerse your candidates into the company, the culture, and the moments that help define your company’s mission and vision.

Companies often spend so much time interviewing candidates that they forget to sell themselves. It’s should be no surprise that when they finally find the candidate they want and extend an offer, the candidate has already gone in another direction. In fact, companies are losing an average 41% of their top candidates in the final stages of the hiring process.

Given the work that goes into getting talent to the final stages of a hiring pipeline, any increase in acceptance rates makes a massive improvement in time and resources expended. It’s therefore critical to build a strong connection with candidates as they work their way through the interview process.

The ideal way to build this all-important connection, of course, is for candidates to learn about the company’s mission directly from the CEO or the founders and to see it in action first-hand… to visit the company’s key locations, see how the company works with customers, and experience company events, meetings, and moments that define the company’s culture.

But how is this possible once the company has reached any significant size?

This is where VR comes in.

Screen record (highly compressed) from interactive VR / 360 video recruiting demoBuilding Empathy

VR gives a feeling of “presence” that allows the brain to record and recall VR experiences as if they were memories.

Getting someone to care about your mission and culture means building empathy. “Empathy connects the heart with the head,” according to Rod Goldin, Product Design, Google. “It helps us feel what someone is going through, and inspires us to act to improve a product or service for the larger subset of customers that experience this pain.”

VR at its best can do more than immerse: it lets people appreciate new perspectives. — Will Byrne, Fast Company

When someone is in a VR experience, their brain responds and records the experience as if it had actually happened. That’s why VR is known as “the empathy machine.” If a candidate can use VR to “sit down” with a founder, join a meeting, or tour an office, they will have a vivid image of what working with your company might look like. They will be immersed into every scenario and location they need in order to understand who your company is. And they can experience this anywhere, anytime, in under 15 minutes.

Real World Results

We have the data and use cases within eevo’s customer base to understand how VR is currently helping companies recruit.

Companies need to engage and inspire their top candidates. We know that this pool of talent is highly mission-driven, so it’s important to let them experience your company’s culture first-hand and build empathy for the company’s mission and vision. And there’s no better way to deliver this message than through a VR experience.

The proof? While results differ from company to company, we typically see an increase of 15% or more in offer acceptances from top candidates through the use of VR in the recruiting process.

For more on how to use VR in the hiring process, see “Three Ways to Use VR to Hire Top Talent.

Using VR to Attract Top Talent was originally published in eevo on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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Businesses across all sectors are looking to Virtual Reality as a method for training their employees. Whether to improve employee’s safety, increase retention of training materials and engagement, or reduce the costs of in-person training, VR offers a variety of benefits when properly implemented. As business look to include VR in their curriculum, the question simply remains of how to pick the right use case, and when you do, how do you create it?

Picking The Right Use Case

VR can be implemented across many types of training; however, research shows that not all situations are perfectly suited for VR. It’s important to know when and why using VR in your training will benefit your trainees. There is a variety of research that will enable you to understand where VR can be added to your training curriculum. For a comprehensive report on the science of VR training and how it can be applied to your organization, read this white paper. This research can help you determine if the type of training you’re looking to do with VR will make sense for the medium.

Currently, research suggests that VR is most suited to training cognitive skills related to remembering and understanding spatial and visual information and knowledge; psychomotor skills related to head movements, such as visual scanning and observational skills; and affective skills related to controlling emotional responses to stressful or difficult situations. In addition to the research on the types of training that VR is good for, several studies highlight the important benefits of using VR. For instance, data suggests VR training can be more memorable than 2D video content. And in practical terms, it is easily repeatable, scalable, and provides isolation from distractions. What’s more, it can provide a safe alternative to real-world training.

With an understanding of the science, you can begin to ask yourselves whether the training you’re looking to do will benefit from being in VR. For instance, is your training highly spatial and visual in nature? Are you scanning an environment to locate potential hazards? Does your trainee need to have an understanding of a factory floor, airplane, or car? Is safety a large priority in exposing people to certain environments? Are there certain areas, such as data centers, that employees need to understand the layout of, but aren't allowed to access? If the answer is yes to questions like these, then you have good reason to believe using VR will benefit the transfer of this type of information to your trainees.

A partner of eevo’s, GP Strategies, one of the world’s largest training consultancies, can help guide you through this process as you look to create your first VR training. As a proof of concept GP Strategies developed VR content on the eevo platform to show off to their clients. GP Strategies chose to focus their content on emergency evacuation training as they determined based on the research that this type of training could benefit from being shown in VR.

GP Strategies VR content can be seen on the eevo app on iOS and AndroidWhy Emergency Evacuation Training

In the event of an emergency, like a fire, employees need to know where to go and how to act. Yet, despite the importance of this knowledge, this type of training is often not made a priority and is ignored or not engaged with by trainees. So when looking to create a better version of this training, GP Strategies asked themselves, as you should ask yourself:

Based on existing research, will this type of training benefit from being shown in VR?

We know from above that VR can help improve cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills, along with increase memory retention, safety, scalability, and safety while isolating people from distractions. So we will use these categories to break down the decision making process behind moving emergency evacuation training to a VR platform.

Cognitive Skills

Emergency evacuation training requires navigating a building or environment to find your nearest exit. It’s a highly visual task that asks the trainee to learn the layout of a building. Based on 2017 research, cognitive skill acquisition in VR is usually similar in effectiveness to that of in-person instruction and, in certain cases, is actually more effective than in-person instruction. Specifically, VR instruction is more effective than traditional instruction when used for learning visual and spatial information. Since understanding the layout of a building and its fire exits is a highly visual and spatial task, it could be safely assumed that VR will be an effective method for teaching people this type of information.

Psychomotor Skills

When a trainee experiences the emergency evacuation content and navigates through the halls of the office they will be asked to scan their environment in order to find the next door or hallway to travel through. This act of improving your ability to scan and observe is a form of psychomotor skill acquisition. Psychomotor skills involve coordination and the execution of simple or complex physical movements. Research shows that the effectiveness of VR training for psychomotor skills depends primarily on simulator fidelity. In other words, the more realistic the VR training, the better the learning outcome. Given the state of VR today, “in cases where the psychomotor skill is related to the movement of the head, such as visual scanning or observational scanning or observational skills, the current technology offers high simulator fidelity” (Jensen and Kondradsen, 2017). Scanning a virtual environment in a headset is very similar to scanning an environment in real life, so the trainees’ knowledge of the virtual office will transfer well to their understanding of their real-world office.

Affective Skills

In the event of an emergency, the environment can be highly stressful as alarms sound and trainees work with people to make their way out of the building. Learning to deal with the emotional stress of this situation is a form of affective skill acquisition. Affective skills involve the controlling of feelings or emotions. We can see evidence to support that VR is highly effective for affective skill acquisition based on the years of work where VR has been used to treat phobias and to practice stress management. Giving people an opportunity to experience a variety of stressful situations and types of emergencies will allow them to be more mentally prepared if a real emergency were to happen, making this type of training well suited for VR.

More Memorable

Remembering which exit to use and how to get there is the obvious goal of emergency evacuation training. Research shows that VR should be used for any training that involves memorization, especially of spatial or visual information. This finding is particularly relevant for the example of fire safety training in which using VR not only reduces distractions but increases the retention of critical safety information. To go further, because fire evacuation training is also spatial and visual in nature, research suggests that VR training could be even more effective than in-person training.

Scalable / Repeatable

If you want to create a highly realistic emergency evacuation experience in which parts of your office building (added in post-production) are on fire or damaged and certain exits are blocked then this experience is really only doable in VR, especially if you want to train a large number of people in a variety of scenarios. The repeatability of VR training can be used in any way that requires the employee to become habituated to potentially stressful situations. There are a number of ways in which the scalability and repeatability of VR could provide the ability to practice and train in ways that were previously only possible through repeated real-world experience or specialized and expensive in-person training.

Isolation From Distractions

Emergency evacuation training for situations like fires is something most employees (or students) will generally ignore, or pay very little attention to, even though engagement with this training has the potential to save lives. Oftentimes in evacuations, everyone goes to the most visible or familiar emergency exit path, ignoring other exit routes. In fact, research has found that exit route familiarity influences evacuation behavior, which leads to slower evacuations because of heavy foot traffic in some exit routes, while other routes remain almost unused. With this knowledge, transferring training procedures that rely on focused engagement and freedom from distractions, such as fire safety training, to a VR platform is both a practical and potentially ethical choice if the training leads to increased future safety.

Safety

All companies should explore any and all potential technologies that could help increase the safety of their employees. This is an obvious one for emergency evacuation training as a trainee can be exposed to a variety of dangerous environments all while staying safe in their headset.

How To Create the Content

Once it can be confirmed based on the existing research that moving emergency evacuation training to a VR platform is a logical decision, how did GP go about creating the content?

Filming 3D 360 Video

To create an interactive VR project that allows users to navigate through hallways and doors of their India office, GP Strategies started by purchasing a 360 camera, of which our recommendations can be seen here. They then filmed locations across their office that were all in eyesight of each other so trainees can go from one location to the next with a good understanding of where they are in the office. Once filmed, they began post-production work.

Post-production

GP wanted to make sure that trainees weren't aimlessly looking for exits, so they added a variety of overlays in post-production to make sure people knew where to go based on where they were in the office. This type of work can be done using tools like adobe photoshop, after effects, and premiere.

Using Creator tools

Once the content was filmed, GP Strategies worked with eevo to create their interactive content. Using the drag-and-drop Composer tool from eevo, GP connected their 360 videos until they had the full office laid out. They then added hotspots into their content to create areas in the scene that trainees can look at to navigate the virtual office.

Publishing

When it came time to publish their content GP Strategies chose to use the eevo apps for local playback instead of custom apps. At the moment, GP only needs to show off their content in person on a small number of headsets. Once they are ready to scale their training to thousands of employees they can move to custom apps they can easily share and send around for loading onto many headsets.

In Conclusion

When looking at VR as a method for training employees there is a ton of exciting work to be done across many sectors. It’s important to approach each training project you’re looking to do in VR with a calculated approach to make sure VR will be the best method for displaying the information you need to be conveyed. Once you’ve identified the type of training you need to do based on existing research you can, like GP Strategies, begin filming and creating content, making it interactive, and publishing it for your employees to begin experiencing.

Best of luck!

Developing VR Training That Works, a Case Study was originally published in eevo on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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What is the GDPR?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a European Union regulation on data protection and privacy aimed at protecting individuals’ rights. For EU residents, the regulation aims to increase individuals’ control over their personal data. For businesses, the GDPR is a unifying regulation across the EU. The GDPR takes effect on May 25th, 2018.

How eevo is complying with GDPR

We take security and privacy seriously and are applying the requirements of the regulation to protect all of our users. While there is much about the new regulation that will become more clear with time, we’ve taken a conservative approach to meeting its requirements.

Here are some of the actions we’ve taken:

System updates

Our mission is to provide a great toolset and distribution platform for content creators. In order to do this we use data and analytics to support and enrich our products. This means we had to decide what data we needed, what could be anonymized, and what we would stop collecting.

We reviewed and centrally documented our processing activities. We focused on anonymizing and reducing the collection of personal data as much as possible. We reduced the data our sub-processor could collect, and reviewed our agreements with them. We also formalized and strengthened our existing privacy and security practices and policies.

Updating our policies

We have made changes across the board, including updating our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. These updates provide better transparency to all of our users. We’ve improved control over Cookies used within our products, which are now opt-in. Users can opt-out at any time. Our Privacy Policy now separates the types of visitors and users of our systems and what data we collect on them. It covers how we transfer data, how long we keep it for, and individuals rights to this data.

We also applied for Privacy Shield self-certification to publicly codify our commitment to Privacy Shield principals. This will make it simpler for our partners and customers to demonstrate their compliance.

Third-party vendors and DPA

We use third-party vendors to help run eevo, and in order to protect individuals’ data, we have signed a Data Processing Addendum (DPA) with each of our sub-processors. This helps keep us compliant with GDPR and protect any Personal Data that we process. If eevo is a Processor for your company and you’d like to sign our DPA please email us at Privacy@eevo.com.

If you have any questions about GDPR, your personal data, or our policies in general please email us at Privacy@eevo.com.

eevo and GDPR Compliance was originally published in eevo on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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How Clinkenfilms created First Date, an interactive VR narrative

VR and 360 video are becoming a popular space for creatives, filmmakers, and artists alike. Many of these artists come from non gaming backgrounds but are looking for ways to participate in VR despite the technical challenges that exist in the medium today. While video game creators may find themselves using complex tools like Unity and Unreal, more traditional filmmakers and artists are looking for tools they can master without having to code. Most have found a home in 3D 360 video where they can make use of existing skillsets, but find themselves frustrated with the limits of the medium. Specifically, they want ways to create interactions in their content for the viewer, giving them a unique experience each time.

To solve this problem in his VR film First Date, Jon Clikenbeard of Clinkenfilms looked to eevo to create areas for interaction in his content. Specifically, First Date required the ability for a viewer to jump back and forth between two perspectives while staying in sync with the story.

360 Video Hotspots

To make this possible, Jon uploaded the 360 videos he wanted people to jump between and added hotspots on each. This gives a viewer an area to look at to change perspectives in the story.

Adding and adjusting a hotspot on eevo

Jon also need the viewer to join the other person’s perspective at the same time they left the first persons, so he used eevo’s “Start Time in Next Node” feature, which the option selected for “Now”. This allows viewers to enter a 360 video at the same time frame they left the 360 video they were just in.

Spatial Audio

Jon wanted viewers to be able to experience the perspective of each person, along with let viewers experience the inner dialogue of the selected character. To do this, Jon placed ambisonic audio onto all of his viewer’s potential paths. The spatial audio gives the feeling that the thoughts being heard by the viewer are coming from inside their own head. Viewers can jump back and forth in the conversation to hear how each person is feeling about the date so far.

Potential 360 video paths a viewer can follow with ambisonic audio files on eachBranching Paths

Jon also wanted the date’s outcome to be controlled in part by the user. To create this effect viewers are presented with a few options through out the experience that guide the date down the right or wrong path. Options can include things like getting wine or coffee.

The team behind the project commented that,

“We conceptualized how the date could go and created 4 scripts - 2 scripts where the date went well and 2 scripts where it didn’t go well, one for each character. We mapped out a breaking point in the narrative where the participant makes a decision about what type of drink the characters should have, that seems fairly innocuous but represents a different state of mind, and ultimately starts a chain effect that unfolds over the second half of the experience. Depending on what choice is made, the date either gets better and better or completely unravels.”

The content is the first of many great pieces from Jon and his team, and we encourage you to check it out when it goes live on iOS and Android soon.

To start creating your own work, go to eevo.com and sign up now!

Creating an Interactive 360° Story was originally published in eevo on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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