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If you wake up to pee more than once during the night, you may have a condition called “nocturia.” People with nocturia either have low bladder capacity or produce too much urine during the night, or possibly a combination of both.

Normally, your bladder should be able to hold urine for the typical 6-8 hours without any problem. If it’s not, that may be a sign you need to get it checked out by an experienced OB/GYN.

What are some common causes of nocturia?
  • Drinking too much caffeine or alcohol during the day (especially in the evenings)
  • Overactive bladder
  • Urinary tract infection (UTI) or bladder infection
  • Sleep apnea or other sleep disorders
  • Age (the older you are the worse bladder control gets)
  • Diabetes
  • Certain medications
Can nocturia be treated?

If getting up at night is disrupting your life to the point where you’re unable to concentrate, or if it’s causing other health issues, you should talk to your doctor.

Treatment options will vary based on whether or not there’s another underlying problem, but sometimes it’s as simple as lowering your fluid intake, avoiding caffeine or alcohol, or switching medication. There are also medications that can be prescribed to keep your bladder calm during the night.

The women’s doctors at All About Women care about all aspects of your health. If you have questions or concerns about urinary incontinence or any other issue, make an appointment at our Gainesville or Lake City office today.

The post Nocturia: Is Nighttime Urinary Incontinence Disrupting Your Sleep? appeared first on All About Women.

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Many people, women in particular, often feel like their doctor rushes in and rushes out without really listening to their concerns about their health.

Doctors are often short on time and have to get through a certain number of patients in a day, making them feel pressured to move on.

In spite of this, it’s essential that a doctor actually listens to and acknowledges their patient’s questions and concerns to make sure they’re providing the best care possible. Building trust is the most important part of a patient/doctor relationship.

Finding a truly compassionate doctor who’s the right fit for your health needs can take time and patience, but it’s worth the effort for medical care you trust.

Follow these tips in your search for a compassionate women’s healthcare provider:

1. Ask for recommendations from trusted friends or look at reviews online.

Good friends are a great resource for suggestions. If they like their doctor, chances are you will too.

There are also various websites that review doctors and/or allow patients to review them. Do a quick Google search to see which doctors get the best online reviews in your area. You can also check a practice’s website for patient testimonials.

2. Write down your concerns and record symptoms as they happen.

Sometimes it can be hard to remember every question or issue you want to bring up when you finally do get time to ask, so writing them down beforehand can help.

Also, keeping a health journal or record of symptoms that are concerning you can give the doctor a better idea of what’s going on and how serious it may be.

3. Don’t hesitate to speak up and voice your concerns.

According to this article by the Huffington Post, women tend to be stereotyped as “overly dramatic,” but don’t let that stop you from speaking up.

You are the only true advocate for your health, so it’s important that your voice is heard and your concerns aren’t brushed aside.

4. If you’re still not being heard, find another doctor.

You always have the option of finding another doctor.

If you feel like you’re receiving sub-par care or your concerns are being ignored, don’t be afraid to go elsewhere.

The compassionate women’s doctors at All About Women take every patient’s needs and concerns seriously.

If you’re looking for an OB/GYN in northern Florida that will listen to you, make an appointment with one of our doctors at our Lake City or Gainesville locations.

The post 4 Tips to Ensure Your Women’s Doctor Takes You Seriously appeared first on All About Women.

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While they may sound familiar, a hysterectomy and a hysteroscopy are NOT the same procedure.

Not even close.

When it comes to your health and wellbeing, it’s always best to be informed. Both of these procedures are common, so we’re going to break down the differences between a hysterectomy and a hysteroscopy.

What is a hysterectomy?

A hysterectomy is a well-known procedure for most women that involves removing all or part of the uterus and the cervix. While a hysterectomy is a very common procedure, it’s also a major surgery that requires a short hospital stay (usually 1-4 days) and several weeks of recovery at home.

Hysterectomies are typically done when women have issues such as endometriosis, uterine prolapse, cancer (uterine or cervical), uterine fibroids or excessive bleeding. There’s a very high success rate with a hysterectomy completely alleviating a woman’s symptoms, so it continues to be a good option for many women, depending on their age and situation.

Also, depending on the woman and the circumstances, a less invasive options like a laparoscopic hysterectomy or robotic procedure may be performed. These types of hysterectomies require a much shorter recovery time and usually have fewer complications, but are still considered major surgery.

What is a hysteroscopy?

A hysteroscopy, on the other hand, is not as familiar and is sometimes confused with a hysterectomy because they sound so similar. A hysteroscopy, however, is more of an exploratory surgery to find out what may be causing a woman’s pain, bleeding, etc. If a cause is found, it can sometimes be fixed during the same procedure.

Hysteroscopies are done as outpatient procedures because the doctor simply inserts a scope into the uterus through the cervix, rather than making any incisions. There may be some minor bleeding for a couple of days, but patients are discharged the same day. Hysteroscopies are considered a minimally invasive procedure.

Hysterectomy vs. Hysteroscopy: What do you need?

Depending on your symptoms and age, a less invasive procedure like a hysteroscopy may be a good place to start and is often more affordable. Hysteroscopies take care of smaller issues like endometrial ablation and removing uterine fibroids, but they cannot resolve bigger problems.

If you’re struggling with pain or excessive bleeding, talk with your doctor right away to figure out the best course of treatment for you.

The surgical staff at All About Women has extensive experience with hysterectomies and other women’s surgical procedures. If you live in North Florida, make an appointment to discuss your symptoms today at our Gainesville or Lake City office.

The post Hysterectomy vs. Hysteroscopy: What’s the Difference? appeared first on All About Women.

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A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common issue (particularly in women) that can usually be identified by painful, pungent and frequent urination. If the infection goes untreated for too long, it can also lead to fever and blood in the urine.

UTIs are very treatable with antibiotics, but if you catch them early, sometimes various natural treatments at home can clear them up. Just be careful not to let it go too long or the infection can move to your bladder or kidneys.

How to treat a UTI at home

Here are five top ways to treat a UTI naturally:

1. Probiotics

Taking a high-quality probiotic puts good bacteria back into your gut and urinary tract. The good bacteria can help fight off the bad bacteria causing the UTI by leveling the pH of your urine and making your urinary tract a less favorable environment for the infection to thrive.

2. Vitamin C

Some research suggests that vitamin C helps prevent or treat UTIs because it’s an antioxidant that makes your urine more acidic, keeping the infectious bacteria from growing.

3. Garlic

Garlic contains a natural antibacterial component called “allicin” that can stop the growth of bacteria. It can be taken in pill form or in raw form.

4. Cranberry juice

The effectiveness of cranberry juice is a little questionable, but some studies have shown that it can be beneficial for UTIs. Make sure to drink unsweetened cranberry juice if you do try this method, because bacteria feeds off of sugar.

5. Diet changes

Avoiding foods or drinks that are spicy, contain any sugar (artificial or natural), caffeine or alcohol help to keep your bladder from working harder. Instead, eat foods that are high in fiber (like oatmeal and lentils) and lots of fresh fruits and vegetables.

You should also drink plenty of water and practice good hygiene to help keep the bacteria from the UTI at bay.

Talk to your OB/GYN doctor about UTI treatment

Always talk to your doctor about any signs and symptoms of a urinary tract infection as soon as possible. As we’ve mentioned, UTIs can become more serious problems quickly, so it’s important to begin treatment right away — whether at home, with an antibiotic, or both.

If you live in North Florida and need an experienced women’s doctor, contact All About Women today to schedule an appointment.

The post 5 Natural Treatments for UTIs (Without Antibiotics) appeared first on All About Women.

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Women’s History Month is a great time to celebrate the woman you are as well as all the amazing women in your life. Here at All About Women, one way we help you do that is by taking an interest in your health.

If you don’t believe us, we’ve compiled a list of quotes that we think you’ll appreciate — words of wisdom from powerful women who, like us, have taken an interest in women’s health.

At All About Women, we celebrate women and their health all year round!

Best quotes about women’s health
“Communities and countries and ultimately the world are only as strong as the health of their women.” – Michelle Obama
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“And I believe that the best buy in public health today must be a combination of regular physical exercise and a healthy diet.” – Julie Bishop
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“A woman’s health is her capital.” – Harriet Beecher Stowe
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“At the end of the day, your health is your responsibility.” – Jillian Michaels
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“Beauty begins the moment you decide to be yourself.” – Coco Chanel
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“A woman is like a tea bag — you never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water.” – Eleanor Roosevelt
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“Women’s health needs to be front and center – it often isn’t, but it needs to be.” – Cynthia Nixon
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“Being a healthy woman isn’t about getting on a scale or measuring your waistline.” – Michelle Obama
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“I’m interested in women’s health because I’m a woman. I’d be a darn fool not to be on my own side.” – Maya Angelou
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“Exercise is a celebration of what your body can do. Not a punishment for what you ate.” – Unknown
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At All About Women, we believe women’s health is extremely important—both physically and emotionally. If you have questions or concerns about your health and live in Northern Florida, make an appointment at our Gainesville or Lake City women’s clinics today to see one of our experienced gynecologists or obstetricians.

The post Our 10 Favorite Quotes About Women’s Health appeared first on All About Women.

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Many of us struggle to stay hydrated, but water is one of the most important factors in women’s (and anyone’s) health. Your body uses water for so many different functions that not having enough can take a huge toll on your health. In fact, your body is made up of anywhere between 55-75% water.

Water’s lasting effects on women’s health

An article on water and women’s health published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information says this about water:

“Even small dysfunction in its distribution may cause reversible and later irreversible changes in cell and organ functions.”

Here are some top ways water can benefit a woman’s body and overall health:

  • Water allows the brain to function as it should, allowing you to concentrate better and think more clearly.
  • Water keeps skin hydrated, which helps prevent dry skin and wrinkles, leaving you looking younger.
  • Water helps to lower stress. Water carries hormones where they need to go in the body, so drinking adequate water allows them to function properly.
  • Water helps to regulate body temperature.
How much water is enough to be healthy?

We understand that knowing water is important for your body and actually taking the steps to drink enough in a day are two totally different things.

So how much is enough?

Some say eight eight-ounce glasses, but some health experts think more is necessary. Your body generally uses up an average of 12 cups of water a day (depending on your activity level), so shooting for more than eight is not a bad idea. In general, it’s very hard to drink too much water.

Here are some practical ways to stay hydrated throughout the day:

  • Always keep a bottle or large cup of water with you.
  • Add some lemon or light flavor to your water (just don’t choose one loaded with sugar or other unhealthy ingredients).
  • Use an app (like Aloe Bud or Plant Nanny) to help remind you to drink and keep track of your water intake.
  • Drink a glass of water with each meal.

If you’re dealing with health issues like indigestion, constipation, mood swings or the inability to concentrate, one possibility is that your body is dehydrated and you need to up your water intake. But these symptoms also could be linked to other causes, so make an appointment with your doctor to find out the root cause.

Need an experienced gynecologist in the Northern Florida area? Contact All About Women in Gainesville and Lake City to schedule your appointment.

The post Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired? Drink More Water! appeared first on All About Women.

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Every new mom and baby experience the fourth trimester, but it’s not often talked about. In fact, even as an expectant mother, you may not be familiar with it, even if you’ve already brought baby home.

The term “fourth trimester” is often used to describe the postpartum phase from the birth of your baby until they are three months old.

The mental and emotional challenges of the fourth trimester

There are so many different elements at play that those first three months can be overwhelming, exhausting and may even leave you wishing you didn’t have a newborn to care for at all.

First, there are several changes happening with your own body: hormones are bouncing off the walls, you can’t sneeze without peeing, and you’re so sleep deprived you could cry… or maybe you just want to cry for no reason at all.

One of the best things you can do is make sure you’re not neglecting yourself. Yes, that’s hard to do when you’re taking care of a new baby, but it’s too important not to try.

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a very real problem among many new moms. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, about 80 percent of women struggle with “baby blues” and at least 15 percent struggle with PPD.

If your mood and anxiety are interfering with your daily life and taking care of your family, seek help from your doctor or a therapist.

Caring for mom (and baby) post pregnancy

In addition to mental health, you have to take care of your physical health. If you need physical therapy to help with incontinence issues, your pelvic floor or diastasis recti (a separation of your abdominal muscles), take the time to do that. If you’re dealing with any pain after birth from breastfeeding or stitches or other vaginal issues, these also need to be addressed immediately.

As for your newborn, they’re also trying to adjust in many different ways to this big, new world. Here are some helpful tips to keep them calm and happy during their first three months of life:

  • Swaddle them often (especially during sleep) and babywear.
  • Make loud shushing noises and don’t keep things too quiet — it’s not quiet in the womb!
  • Focus on feeding them and helping them sleeping. Both of you will be happier.

If you have concerns about your own mental and physical health, or the health of your newborn, don’t hesitate to contact your OB/GYN or pediatrician. Our compassionate staff knows it can be a big time of adjustment and we’re here to help.

Also, don’t forget to give yourself grace as you navigate being a mom to a new baby.

Do you live in Northern Florida and need an experienced OB/GYN? Contact All About Women to schedule an appointment.

The post The Fourth Trimester: What Is It & How Do I Get Through It? appeared first on All About Women.

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Menorrhagia is the medical term for periods (menstrual cycles) that are unusually long and/or heavy. Those who have menorrhagia have to adjust their daily activities during their cycles because they have such heavy blood loss.

A large number of people do experience heavy blood flow for 2-3 days of their cycle, but don’t experience the kind of blood loss or cramping that comes with menorrhagia. However, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), approximately 10 million women deal with menorrhagia every year.

Symptoms of Menorrhagia

If you suspect you may have menorrhagia, here are the most common symptoms to watch for:

  • Pad or tampon needs to be changed at least every hour
  • Pad or tampon needs to be changed multiple times during the night
  • Large blood clots (bigger than a quarter)
  • Bleeding lasts for more than a week
  • Tiredness and/or fatigue (usually due to anemia)
Causes of Menorrhagia

Possible causes of menorrhagia fit into two major categories:

  • Uterine problems: uterine fibroids or polyps (non-cancerous growths), uterine cancer, adenomyosis, miscarriage, or certain IUDs.
  • Hormonal problems: imbalance of estrogen and progesterone, PCOS, thyroid issues, or anovulation.

Certain medications can also cause excessive bleeding as well as some kidney and liver diseases.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Menorrhagia

Your doctor will probably do a blood test, ultrasound and/or an endometrial biopsy to confirm whether or not you have menorrhagia. They may also opt to do further testing if necessary.

From there, there are many different treatment options, including various medications and procedures. The most common procedure is an endometrial ablation.

Choosing which treatment to try often depends on several factors such as stage of life, future pregnancy plans, and the severity of your bleeding and pain.

Talk to Your Doctor If You Think You Have Menorrhagia

If you are experiencing the symptoms of menorrhagia and your everyday life is significantly affected, talk to your gynecologist or OB/GYN to find possible causes and solutions. Don’t wait to make an appointment to discuss your options because if menorrhagia goes untreated, it can cause other issues like anemia (which causes fatigue and weakness).

If you live in North Florida and need an experienced women’s doctor, call our Gainesville or Lake City offices today to schedule your appointment.

The post What is Menorrhagia? Definition, Symptoms & Causes appeared first on All About Women.

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February has been named National Self-Check Month to raise awareness about the importance of regular self-checks for both men and women. Self exams are something most people forget or just plain avoiding doing, but they’re actually very important for early detection of any abnormalities and possible cancer.

Whether you’re a patient of All About Women in Gainesville or Lake City, Florida, or you are a woman who simply needs a reminder, we want to take this time to talk about the importance of breast self-exams (BSEs).

Why are breast self-exams so important?

There are many reasons why monthly BSEs are important, but here are three main ones:

  1. They help you to familiarize yourself with your breasts so you can better detect subtle changes.
  2. Early detection is key to fighting and beating breast cancer.
  3. There are other conditions that can be detected by breast changes besides cancer.

One important thing to remember when doing breast self-exams:

Just because you find a small lump or other abnormality, it doesn’t automatically mean it’s cancer. Try not to get anxious if you feel something —just call your doctor to schedule an appointment. Many times, it’s not anything to worry about.

Tips for performing a BSE
  • Do your BSE at the same time every month (but not during your cycle).
  • Check for any changes in size or color.
  • Feel your breasts while lying down.
  • Use a circular or up and down motion to feel across your breast from one side to the other.
If you have any questions about how to perform a breast self-exam or concerns about your findings, don’t hesitate to talk to your doctor. Importance of yearly well woman exams

Another important thing to remember is that monthly BSEs shouldn’t take the place of yearly well woman exams and mammograms. Your gynecologist may be able to detect changes that you cannot and mammograms are even better at finding small abnormalities early.

Is it time to schedule your yearly exam or mammogram? Are you concerned about something you found doing a BSE?

Contact All About Women at our Gainesville or Lake City office today to schedule an appointment.

Happy National Self-Check Month, everybody!

The post In Honor of National Self-Check Month, Remember Your Breast Self-Exam appeared first on All About Women.

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You may not realize it, but if you go to an OB/GYN for your women’s health needs, you’re actually seeing a doctor with two specialities. An obstetrician (OB) specifically deals with pregnancy and prenatal care, while a gynecologist (GYN) handles all other issues specific to women.

A good majority of women’s doctors do both, but some decide to just focus on obstetrics or gynecology.

Continue reading for a more detailed breakdown of the differences between an obstetrician and a gynecologist.

Obstetrician

As we mentioned, an obstetrician specializes in caring for pregnant women and their unborn babies. They receive special training to spot warnings signs of possible complications that can occur during pregnancy, labor and delivery. They are also skilled in performing c-sections and other interventions when needed.

Obstetricians can also help with fertility issues and find the best treatment options for those struggling with infertility.

Gynecologist

A gynecologist focuses on a woman’s reproductive health when it’s not connected to pregnancy. Gynecologists like to see women at least once a year for checkups and pap smears to look for any potential concerns. They also treat women for issues that are just specific to a woman’s body such as:

  • Yeast infections
  • Uterine prolapse
  • Irregular or painful periods
  • Menopause
  • Ovarian cysts
  • Endometriosis
  • Uterine or ovarian cancer

Depending on your age and specific needs, you may choose just to see a gynecologist or you may prefer an OB/GYN for more comprehensive care.

If you live in northern Florida and are looking for an experienced gynecologist, obstetrician, or OB/GYN, come see the patient-centered staff at All About Women. Contact us to make an appointment at our Gainesville or Lake City office.

The post Obstetrician vs. Gynecologist: What’s the Difference? appeared first on All About Women.

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