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I often get asked by job seekers if they should include a resume summary statement. My answer is nearly always a resounding “YES”.

The summary section of your resume is prime real estate — it’s the first thing a hiring manager will read, and it sets the tone for the rest of the document. You can use this section of your resume to create a compelling brand message that speaks to your most relevant skills, experience, and qualifications.

What is a Summary on a Resume?

The summary statement on a resume is typically 3-5 lines, in paragraph or bullet point format, used to introduce you as the candidate to your reader. The summary communicates key information such as your level of experience, your area of expertise, and your most marketable skills.

Think of it as your elevator pitch – how would you concisely summarize your role and skill set to someone you just met?

Do You Need a Summary on Your Resume?

While it’s not required that you include a summary statement on your resume, it is recommended. The summary statement functions as your branding message – and you can easily tailor it depending on the role you’re targeting and the required skill sets.

Without a summary statement, hiring managers will look directly at job titles, and potentially miss out on key information that may qualify you for the role. It’s also an excellent way to inject important keywords into your resume and optimize it for scanning by an Applicant Tracking System (ATS).

So, how do you write a great summary statement for your resume?

How to Write the Perfect Summary Statement

An effective resume summary statement should highlight your most valuable qualifications in a way that is both impactful and concise.

Use these questions to create an outline that will help you craft your resume summary statement:

  1. What type of work are you targeting? Be specific about the role, company, and level.

Example: With 6 years of experience, I’m targeting a mid-level account executive role within a large PR agency that works with travel and tourism companies.

  1. What are the top 5-10 skills required for the position? Refer to the job description for guidance. These are the most likely keywords that hiring managers and ATS will scan the resume for.

Example: Public Relations, Account Executive, Client Relationship Management, Media Opportunities, Strategic Communications, Media Research, Brand Storytelling

  1. What brand message do you want your audience to take away from the resume? This is the overall brand message that should resonate throughout the rest of the resume.

Example: “I’m an accomplished communications professional with a solid track record of building strategic media opportunities for clients across multiple industries.”

  1. What other skills will make you successful in this role? While these skills may not be directly related to the role, they may add additional value and set you apart from other candidates.

Examples: Certified Project Manager; Experience Training and Mentoring Staff; Exceptional Writing Skills; Passionate About Travel

  1. What sets you apart from other candidates with a similar background?

Examples: “I’ve been consistently promoted, and my work has been published in major media outlets”; or “I’ve built a strong network of media and client relationships”.

  1. Now piece it all together using the steps above.

Accomplished PR professional and account executive with over 6 years of experience working with global brands in the travel and tourism space. Solid track record of managing communications strategies, crafting brand stories and identifying media opportunities that build brand visibility and engagement. Blends exceptional writing skills with experience training and mentoring junior associates. Brings a robust network of industry and media relationships, along with the ability to establish deep client relationships.

Now let’s look at four more examples of great summary statements, and why they work.

4 Brilliant Examples of Resume Summary Statements

Your resume summary should begin with a powerful opening statement that grabs your reader’s attention. Each of these examples is concise, detailed, and follows the steps outlined above to highlight the candidate’s experience and qualifications.

Marketing Manager summary example:

Results-oriented marketing specialist with experience creating integrated programs and brand strategy across digital, search, display, mobile, and social platforms. A high-level strategic thinker with strengths focusing on marketing, branding, account and vendor management, business development, research and analytics, relationship building, strategy, and planning. Proven team facilitator who leverages negotiation and relationship management skills to effectively mobilize cross-functional groups to achieve goals on time and on budget. Approaches projects with an understanding of a customers’ business to be able to tailor creative solutions and growth strategies. Proficient in Google Analytics, AdWords, Omniture, Visible Intelligence, Sysomos, Radian6, and Spanish.

Digital Marketer summary example:

Over 10 years of experience crafting innovative communication strategies across print and digital media. Strengths focus on writing, editing, research, and project management, with expertise creating engaging content for diverse audiences. Approaches projects with passion and enthusiasm, demonstrating a strong work ethic and an appreciation for creative collaboration. Well-versed in AP and MLA style, HTML, social media platforms (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube), and content management systems.

Design Director summary example:

Design Director with extensive experience guiding the development of global product lines and seasonal collections for luxury fashion brands. Excels at forecasting and adapting trends to fit within the brand image. Experience coordinating cross-functional teams and managing relationships with outside vendors, manufacturers, and strategic retail partners. Proven track record of delivering successful collections for private label, licensed lines, and brand collaborations.

Digital Media Executive summary example:

Digital media executive focused on driving revenue through the sale of integrated marketing solutions combining digital, mobile, video, print and events. Proven success in generating qualified leads, identifying potential opportunities, and closing large, complex deals. Establishes and grows account relationships across multiple industries (telecom, financial, technology, insurance, retail and luxury goods). Delivers solutions that meet clients’ key business needs while driving the highest level of client service.

Download the DIY guide to writing your resume summary.

Or work with us.

In Conclusion

The summary statement is an important marketing tool and sets the overall tone for your resume. As a rule of thumb, you should tailor the statement to match each job description you apply to so that it’s speaking to the exact skills and qualifications required for the role.

Creating a strong statement that articulates your strengths, skills, and experiences can make the difference between a resume that gets overlooked and a one that makes it into the short-list pile.

The post 4 Brilliant Resume Summary Examples appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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In today’s digitally-driven job market, it’s more important than ever to build a strong personal brand presence that communicates your story across all relevant social and online profiles. And your personal brand isn’t limited to just the online space – it also includes your resume, cover letter, and any other materials you might be using in your job search. The idea is that your personal brand is a cohesive portfolio of materials a candidate can use to market themselves to a particular audience and create visibility in a saturated job market.

Building a strong personal brand begins with something called the “branding funnel” – which illustrates the different pieces of the brand building process, and how they influence and connect to one another.

Allow me to illustrate with this elaborate technical drawing:

The idea is that any public representation of yourself that you put out there on any platform is influenced by this process, which you really only need to do once unless you have multiple areas of focus you’re pursuing or multiple audiences. Each step leads to the next to help you make informed decisions.

The Who/What/Why of Your Personal Brand

The starting point is essentially answering the primary questions that drive your job search, and your brand identity: Who are you? What do you do? Why do you do it/is it important? This is the core of your brand message, what you want your audience to know and retain about you.

Target Audience

We’ve spoken before about how you need to have a defined target audience to whom you are trying to appeal in your search, whether it’s the CEO, the departmental decision maker, such as a Creative Director, or the hiring manager. Once you understand the Who/What/Why you can tailor your brand message to speak to the appropriate audience.

Tone

Knowing who your audience is will then determine what tone of voice your personal brand should have. Are you trying to convey a more creative, edgy appeal, or would your audience relate better to a more professional, corporate style of communication?

Reusable Components

Now you can start to craft the different components of your personal brand around your branding message, your target audience, and your desired tone. The basic components I cover in the course include things like an impactful headline, a long and short-form summary or mini-bio, and visual elements such as a profile photo or logo. The idea is to create a consistent library of content that you can go back to adapt and adapt to fit multiple platforms.

Platforms

Now that you have your content, you need to use the information you have to determine which platforms are most appropriate for building out and carrying your personal brand message. Is it social media, LinkedIn, a personal website? Think about your target audience, where they’re apt to be looking for or engaging with you, and what will appeal to them.

Every public representation of your brand should be consistent and built upon intentional design decisions, wherein each step is validated by the last. This is the user experience end of it, and it relates just as much to building out your own brand, as it does to building a Fortune 500. This will help you not only establish your personal brand presence, but also provide you with a method to self-evaluate as you make changes moving forward.

Your brand is both a deep reflection of you (what you do, what you care about, etc.), as well as a flexible strategy to guide you through your job search marketing efforts. Let us know how we can help.

Photo Credit: Michal Krul of Flickr

The post How to Build a Strong Personal Brand appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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Q:

How long should I work for this company? Is it better to gain experience – and potentially promotions – working for one company, or would my resume benefit from diversifying my experience and working for a number of different organizations? Will I be considered a “job hopper”?

A:

It depends.

In my experience as a recruiter and resume writer, the longer you stay at one company, the more difficulty you may have marketing yourself in your search. This is not a set rule, just an observation, and really depends upon your background and level.

Despite opportunities for advancement, after a certain number of years, staying at the same company can make a candidate look too comfortable, and lacking in career advancement versus someone who is looking for new opportunities or challenges.

On the flip side, not staying at a company long enough may give off the impression that you’re a “job hopper”, making hiring managers question whether the investment in hiring you will provide a return.

Showing Progression on Your Resume Can Be a Value-Add

That’s not to say there isn’t value in moving up through a company. Progressing through multiples roles, exploring other departments or functions, and increasing your responsibility can add value to your resume if that story is communicated effectively. At the same time, employers want to see both diversity and relevance. A well-rounded candidate has worked for different organizations, but still has experience that’s directly relevant.

Job Hopping is Often Perceived as a Red Flag By Hiring Managers

These days, it’s common for people to stay at a job no longer than 2 years, but less than a year can be a negative mark. Remember, hiring is an extremely costly investment, and companies are less likely to take a chance on someone who has a track record of jumping ship.

Everything on a Resume Comes Down to How You Frame It

Whether you spent years at one organization or moved around between companies, what matters is how you frame the experience.

  • Did it add value in some way?
  • What was the impact?
  • What did you learn, and why is it important to the person/organization you’re trying to appeal to?

If you left a position because the company reorganized, or you were presented with a more strategic opportunity to advance your career, this might be something to discuss in your cover letter.

  • And if you built your 20-year career in the same organization?

Talk about why that was a positive experience both for you and your employer. There is value in someone who shows longevity and is essentially a brand evangelist. Use this as a case study for why it’s important to align yourself with a company where you can build a future.

Make your story work for you.

Need help crafting a powerful narrative and positioning yourself for the next level?

Contact us to learn how we’ve helped thousands of other candidate reframe their experience for better results.

The post Q&A: How Many Years Should I Stay at a Company? appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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The goal of a resume is to showcase your most relevant skills and experience, based on the job description or target opportunity. Ideally, these qualifications come through loud and clear in your Experience, Skill Sets, and Training.

Something job seekers may not realize is that most job descriptions are more of a “wish list” of attributes, a framework for the perfect candidate, and not necessarily a must-have checklist. Most people will have some of the qualifications, and other attributes that – while not required – position them as a strong candidate for the role.

So what skills or attributes should you highlight on your resume that can bring additional value, even if they’re not directly related to the position?

A good resume is all about highlighting directly relevant skills and experience, while also showcasing the factors that set you apart from other candidates. Those factors will vary based on the candidate, the industry, and the job. Read the job description for the role, envision the ideal/typical candidate for the role based on what they’re looking for, and then figure out what ELSE you bring to the table that’s unique. How does that add value, why is that important?

Unique Attributes that Stand Out on a Resume:
    • Outside Leadership Experience. Something like an Eagle Scout designation is impressive to highlight because it’s extremely difficult to achieve and requires significant commitment and leadership skill.
    • Unique skills that speak to your personal qualities. I once highlighted a candidate’s Sommelier certification as it’s a notoriously rigorous test (that most people don’t pass on the first try), and that requires an incredible ability to memorize a high volume of detailed information.
    • Entrepreneurial Experience. This can go both ways, but someone who has experience starting, running, and growing a business offers a much broader portfolio of skill sets than someone who has specialized in one thing. The difference is how you frame it. Some company may question whether a serial entrepreneur will be happy working for someone else, while others see it as indicative of commitment, hard work, ingenuity, and creative drive.
    • Athletic Accomplishments. For the same reasons as the leadership examples cited above, athletic accomplishments show impressive work ethic, dedication, and commitment. A marathon runner is not someone who gives up easily in the face of challenges, nor will a varsity athlete shy away from collaboration and teamwork.
    • International Experience. Someone who has lived and/or worked in other parts of the world understands the importance of cultural nuances. This can be important in managing diverse clients, team members, or working across geographic markets. The ability to speak to different cultures is a valued skill, even in a non-global role.
    • A Specialization. I look at thousands of resumes a year, and it’s rare to see someone with a linear career and progressive job titles that make sense. So someone that has dedicated their career to a specialty and really developed themselves as a subject expert in that area strikes me as focused and impressive. The downside? It may limit you from broadening your search to other overlapping areas.
In Conclusion

The “golden trifecta” of a perfect candidate and exceptional resume means having an exact match of experience, skills, and training. However, don’t overlook the non-traditional things that can bring value to a team or organization. What makes you unique as a candidate, and as a person, and how can you weave that into your narrative alongside your other relevant qualifications?

The post Beyond Experience: What Stands Out on a Resume? appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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“Should I include [X experience] on my resume?” is a phrase I hear often when interviewing job seekers and career changers during the resume building process. The truth is, related experience will always be the key determinator hiring managers are looking for. But don’t overlook the skill sets and attributes that – while not directly related to the position you’re seeking – can still add value.

These might be things that suggest underlying skills and qualities that can benefit any job – things like leadership, work ethic, creativity, and ability to focus under pressure. While these might seem like the sort of broadly applicable terms everyone includes on their resume, the strategy lies in illustrating these attributes with specific context. In other words, what activities are you participating in that have helped you build these qualities?

And those activities can range from personal hobbies to leadership positions, athletic activities, or other professional/non-professional achievements.

Here are a few examples and how you can spin them to speak directly to the value they bring to an employer:

Competitive Athletics

Adding competitive athletics or athletic training to your resume suggests that you possess valuable attributes like leadership, work ethic, and commitment. It takes extreme commitment, time management, and focus to train as a varsity or collegiate athlete, a marathon runner, or participate in competitive fitness competitions (i.e. Spartan Race, Iron Man, Tough Mudder). An employer might look favorably upon someone with that skill set, with the assumption that such work ethic would be reflected in professional performance.

Athletic Leadership

For similar reasons as above, it can be useful to include athletic activities in which you held a leadership role – such as a team captain or trainer role. Again, these activities emphasize leadership potential and work ethic. Leading an athletic team requires many of the qualities it takes to direct a team in a professional setting and may give a candidate the extra boost they need to stand out.

Scouting Experience / Military Training

Much like athletics, earning an Eagle Scout or similar designation required extensive time, commitment, and training, and can speak to qualities like leadership, resourcefulness, work ethic, and time management skills. The same holds true for military experience.

Diversity Training

While this in itself is an area where more jobs are opening up with a specific focus on advancing diversity and inclusion in the workplace, this and other types of HR training can be valuable for managers of all different background and industries. Diversity and inclusion have become a key topic of discussion, and it can only benefit candidates to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to managerial and cultural trends.

Sommelier Training / Certification

This is something I’ve seen more than once on a resume, and often with job seekers who have no affiliation whatsoever with the food, beverage, or hospitality spaces. Why? Because training for a certification (and especially master designation) as a sommelier is notoriously difficult. It requires extensive and tedious study, followed by a rigorous examination. Someone with these types of credentials definitely exhibits commitment, dedication, ability to retain a high volume of detailed information, and grace under pressure.

Political / Humanitarian / Environmental Canvassing

Ever been stopped by one of those folks on the street asking if you “have a moment to talk about the environment”? Canvassing for donations may seem like an entry-level job, but those who succeed do so because they are incredibly personable, articulate, and convincing in their presentation. In other words, they have exceptional interpersonal and communication skills.

Crisis Management

For some, this may be a component of their job – particularly in communications. But even if you’ve volunteered with an organization dedicated to crisis or disaster relief, chances are you’ve demonstrated that you can lead under pressure, take direction, respond quickly and effectively to unexpected circumstances, and work well in unstructured or stressful environments. Additionally, you may have had to do all these while dealing with highly emotional individuals, which speaks to the qualities of a strong and diplomatic leader.

Job seekers I speak to often have difficulty looking objectively at their own experience and skill set and extracting the points they feel are worthwhile. My suggestion? Enlist the assistance of a friend or colleague to help you narrow in on what things to highlight – and where your outside activities may actually be helping you build skills that strengthen the quality of work you do in the office.

Ready to make a change? Our 360-approach to personal brand building will give you the expert tools you need to stand out in today‘s ultra-competitive and digitally-driven job market. Learn more.

The post 7 Non-Traditional Skills that Set Your Resume Apart appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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FOOD52

Location: New York
Established: 2013
Size: 50-100 Staff

Launched in 2013, Food52 is a groundbreaking and award-winning kitchen and home brand. Their goal is to support, connect and celebrate their community of cooks and home enthusiasts, with emphasis on eating thoughtfully and living joyfully. In addition to providing unique recipes, culinary content, and events, they also feature an e-commerce shot offering innovative products, housewares, and accessories.

Food52 has been named the best food website by the James Beard Foundation and IACP, and was recognized in 2016 as one of the fast-growing companies in New York City by Crain’s New York Business.

Currently Hiring:

Account Manager
Content Developers & Editors
Customer Care Director
Food Stylist
Senior Software Engineer
UX Designer
VP, Marketing
VP, Partnerships & Strategy

THE CITIZENRY

Location: Dallas
Established: 2013
Size: 50-100 Staff

Celebrating the people behind their products, The Citizenry offers a selection of high-quality handmade goods and home decor designed by artisans from around the world. With a mission of reinventing the way consumers shop for global artisanal goods., they work with makers to create limited edition kitchen and bath products, textiles, furniture, decor, weaving in elements of the cultures that inspire them.

The Citizenry sums up their values in that “We dream big, work hard, and dare greatly because life is too short to spend time doing work that doesn’t make a dent in the world”. The company offers perks and benefits including flexible vacation policies, onsite food and beverage, product discounts, health and wellness benefits, and an open office space in downtown Dallas.

Currently Hiring

Acquisition Marketing Director
Copywriter & Editorial Director
Designer / Art Director
E-Commerce Intern (Summer 2018)

The post Worthwhile Brands: Food 52 & The Citizenry appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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