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Treat House

Location: New York
Size: 11-50 Employees
www.treathouse.com

Treat House started as a charity bake sale put on by the two young sons of the company’s founders. With its mission to “spark joy in the world” while giving back, the brand specializes in unique, hand-crafted sweets that blend childhood nostalgia with sophisticated adult favors. The company strives to treat its employees right and empower their staff in providing exceptional client service.

Treat House currently partners with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society by donating a portion of proceeds to support blood cancer research and treatments.

Currently Hiring

Multiple Positions

The Communications Store

Location: New York/London
Size: 100-200 Employees
www.thecommunicationsstore.com

The Communications Store works is a global strategic brand building and communications agency that works with the world’s most innovative brands and start-up pioneers. Based out of London, the firm recently launched its US offices in New York and works with fashion, beauty, and luxury lifestyle brands.

The company prides itself on it’s commitment to fully sustainable business and driving positive economics, social, and environmental impacts.

Currently Hiring

Account Director (Fashion)
Account Manager (Fashion / Luxury Lifestyle / Beauty)
Account Executive (Beauty)

The post Worthwhile Brands: Treat House + The Communications Store appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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Q: How much detail should I include in my LinkedIn profile? Should I copy and paste my resume, or provide shorter descriptions? A:

To best answer this question, it’s important to first understand a few key things about LinkedIn’s platform and why it differs from your resume:

  • People scan your LinkedIn profile just as (if not more) quickly as they do a resume. Lengthy descriptions will be difficult to read, particularly if a user is on a mobile or tablet device.
  • Your formatting options are limited on LinkedIn’s platform. There is no use of italics, bold or underline, and no additional colors to separate sections the same way you might on a resume/Word document. What looks good on a resume may not display well on a profile.
  • Recruiters use LinkedIn for multiple reasons: to source potential candidates, and also to cross-reference the profile with the resume of a candidate already in consideration. Assume hiring managers are viewing your profile well after the interview, and that the message is consistent.
  • Your profile (if public) is visible to a much broader audience than your resume. Unless you opt to block specific individuals or make your profile private (non-visible), you cannot hide your profile from specific audiences – such as your coworkers or supervisors.

The LinkedIn profile should not be a copy and paste of your resume. The best approach to creating a strong profile is to think about who will be reading it, what they will be looking for, and what kind of message you want to get across to them.

Think of your profile not as a duplication of your resume, but as your online business card. The profile should provide a concise and impactful overview of your background that piques the interest of hiring managers and entices them to start a conversation. This conversation can lead to the resume and a more detailed (targeted) discussion around your relevant skills, experience, and accomplishments.

In other words, the profile should not include the same amount of detail as the resume, just a high-level overview of who you are and what you bring to the table. This includes:

  • A professional-looking photograph. A formal headshot isn’t necessary, but do aim for a straight-on shot that clearly shows your face.
  • An accurate and descriptive headline that speaks either to your current position (if you’re passively or not publicly looking), or the type of role you’re targeting.
  • A brief bio (1-3 paragraphs) in the Summary section.
  • Concise job descriptions for each of your roles (1-2 paragraphs), possibly with a few supporting points around your key contributions.
  • Outline of your Education and Training (degrees, courses, certifications, etc.).
  • Relevant Volunteer work or Professional Affiliations
  • Additional information allowed by LinkedIn – such as Publications, Patents, Presentations, and other Projects.

Your LinkedIn profile is the cornerstone of your digital brand presence and builds visibility among recruiters, peers, and potential employers. Aim for thoughtful, concise content that summarizes your experience level, qualifications, and skill sets, while keeping in mind the broad range of potential contacts you are reaching.

Final Tip: Customize your Profile URL for a professional touch, and include a link on your resume, cover letter, or website.

What Next?

A solid resume is the key to landing the job interview. Check out our suite of resume and branded content services.

Do you need help crafting an impactful digital brand presence? BRS offers professional design services to help you create fresh, creative, and professional websites, infographics, logos, and business cards to complement your resume and other job search marketing materials.

The post How Much Detail Should My LinkedIn Profile Include? appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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“Should I include [X experience] on my resume?” is a phrase I hear often when interviewing job seekers and career changers during the resume building process. The truth is, related experience will always be the key determinator hiring managers are looking for. But don’t overlook the skill sets and attributes that – while not directly related to the position you’re seeking – can still add value.

These might be things that suggest underlying skills and qualities that can benefit any job – things like leadership, work ethic, creativity, and ability to focus under pressure. While these might seem like the sort of broadly applicable terms everyone includes on their resume, the strategy lies in illustrating these attributes with specific context. In other words, what activities are you participating in that have helped you build these qualities?

And those activities can range from personal hobbies to leadership positions, athletic activities, or other professional/non-professional achievements.

Here are a few examples and how you can spin them to speak directly to the value they bring to an employer:

Competitive Athletics

Adding competitive athletics or athletic training to your resume suggests that you possess valuable attributes like leadership, work ethic, and commitment. It takes extreme commitment, time management, and focus to train as a varsity or collegiate athlete, a marathon runner, or participate in competitive fitness competitions (i.e. Spartan Race, Iron Man, Tough Mudder). An employer might look favorably upon someone with that skill set, with the assumption that such work ethic would be reflected in professional performance.

Athletic Leadership

For similar reasons as above, it can be useful to include athletic activities in which you held a leadership role – such as a team captain or trainer role. Again, these activities emphasize leadership potential and work ethic. Leading an athletic team requires many of the qualities it takes to direct a team in a professional setting and may give a candidate the extra boost they need to stand out.

Scouting Experience / Military Training

Much like athletics, earning an Eagle Scout or similar designation required extensive time, commitment, and training, and can speak to qualities like leadership, resourcefulness, work ethic, and time management skills. The same holds true for military experience.

Diversity Training

While this in itself is an area where more jobs are opening up with a specific focus on advancing diversity and inclusion in the workplace, this and other types of HR training can be valuable for managers of all different background and industries. Diversity and inclusion have become a key topic of discussion, and it can only benefit candidates to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to managerial and cultural trends.

Sommelier Training / Certification

This is something I’ve seen more than once on a resume, and often with job seekers who have no affiliation whatsoever with the food, beverage, or hospitality spaces. Why? Because training for a certification (and especially master designation) as a sommelier is notoriously difficult. It requires extensive and tedious study, followed by a rigorous examination. Someone with these types of credentials definitely exhibits commitment, dedication, ability to retain a high volume of detailed information, and grace under pressure.

Political / Humanitarian / Environmental Canvassing

Ever been stopped by one of those folks on the street asking if you “have a moment to talk about the environment”? Canvassing for donations may seem like an entry-level job, but those who succeed do so because they are incredibly personable, articulate, and convincing in their presentation. In other words, they have exceptional interpersonal and communication skills.

Crisis Management

For some, this may be a component of their job – particularly in communications. But even if you’ve volunteered with an organization dedicated to crisis or disaster relief, chances are you’ve demonstrated that you can lead under pressure, take direction, respond quickly and effectively to unexpected circumstances, and work well in unstructured or stressful environments. Additionally, you may have had to do all these while dealing with highly emotional individuals, which speaks to the qualities of a strong and diplomatic leader.

Job seekers I speak to often have difficulty looking objectively at their own experience and skill set and extracting the points they feel are worthwhile. My suggestion? Enlist the assistance of a friend or colleague to help you narrow in on what things to highlight – and where your outside activities may actually be helping you build skills that strengthen the quality of work you do in the office.

Ready to make a change? Our 360-approach to personal brand building will give you the expert tools you need to stand out in today‘s ultra-competitive and digitally-driven job market. Learn more.

The post 7 Non-Traditional Skills that Set Your Resume Apart appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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FOOD52

Location: New York
Established: 2013
Size: 50-100 Staff

Launched in 2013, Food52 is a groundbreaking and award-winning kitchen and home brand. Their goal is to support, connect and celebrate their community of cooks and home enthusiasts, with emphasis on eating thoughtfully and living joyfully. In addition to providing unique recipes, culinary content, and events, they also feature an e-commerce shot offering innovative products, housewares, and accessories.

Food52 has been named the best food website by the James Beard Foundation and IACP, and was recognized in 2016 as one of the fast-growing companies in New York City by Crain’s New York Business.

Currently Hiring:

Account Manager
Content Developers & Editors
Customer Care Director
Food Stylist
Senior Software Engineer
UX Designer
VP, Marketing
VP, Partnerships & Strategy

THE CITIZENRY

Location: Dallas
Established: 2013
Size: 50-100 Staff

Celebrating the people behind their products, The Citizenry offers a selection of high-quality handmade goods and home decor designed by artisans from around the world. With a mission of reinventing the way consumers shop for global artisanal goods., they work with makers to create limited edition kitchen and bath products, textiles, furniture, decor, weaving in elements of the cultures that inspire them.

The Citizenry sums up their values in that “We dream big, work hard, and dare greatly because life is too short to spend time doing work that doesn’t make a dent in the world”. The company offers perks and benefits including flexible vacation policies, onsite food and beverage, product discounts, health and wellness benefits, and an open office space in downtown Dallas.

Currently Hiring

Acquisition Marketing Director
Copywriter & Editorial Director
Designer / Art Director
E-Commerce Intern (Summer 2018)

The post Worthwhile Brands: Food 52 & The Citizenry appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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Q:

I’m actively searching for a job in another state. How can I mention in my resume and cover letter that I’m open to relocation without getting overlooked?

A:

Hiring managers are heavily concerned about the logistics, costs, and time required to hire and transition an out-of-state candidate.  For that reason, they tend to favor local candidates who can potentially fill the role more quickly. This also creates a situation of less risk to the candidate, if the role does not work out. The exception may be a high-level or niche position that is difficult to fill, in which case hiring managers are more open to scouring other markets to find qualified talent. But for most people, that isn’t always the case. So how can you increase your chances of consideration?

Communicate that Relocating is a Priority

Position your relocation as a priority, and discuss it as if it’s already in progress. In other words, you plan to relocate regardless of whether you receive the job offer, and that can instill confidence. This doesn’t mean you have to be packed and on your way, but do communicate to the company that picking up and putting down roots in another city is not an issue for you – in terms of time, cost, and transition. Unless it’s stated, don’t ask if the role provides relocation assistance (compensation), as most do not.  If it’s clear that you are already planning on making the move, and it’s not dependent solely upon you getting the job, hiring managers will feel more confident in your ability to make a swift transition.

Get Specific on Your Timeline

When broaching the subject of relocation in your cover letter, provide a definitive timeline around your availability so that there are no uncertainties. You can try saying something along the lines of:

“I’m currently in the process of relocating to New York City, and can be available to interview with 1 week’s notice, and to start in the position within 3 weeks.”

Companies that consider out-of-state candidates primarily want to be assured that it’s going to be a smooth and fast transition, as it’s a likelihood that they need to get someone into the position and up to speed fairly quickly. If you understand and can speak to their concerns in your resume and cover letter, you have a valid shot at being considered.

Bonus tip: if possible, change the location on your LinkedIn profile to reflect the market to which you’ll be relocating.

Reflect the Local Market on Your Resume

On the resume, a physical address is ideal, even if you use a friend’s that you can justify as a temporary “residence”. But if that’s not possible, instead of listing out your full address, you can denote the cities you’re targeting in your contact information line. For instance:

JANE SMITH

Los Angeles | Chicago | (617) 312-7892 | jane.smith@gmail.com

or

JANE SMITH

California | New York | (617) 312-7892 | jane.smith@gmail.com

Your primary objective is to communicate the message that you’re serious about moving and can do so fairly seamlessly. Companies understand that hiring an out-of-state candidate is an investment on both ends, so it’s even more important that you really communicate your interest in the role and the organization, and why you feel you’re an excellent fit. Not every company will necessarily require an immediate transfer, and in some cases, particularly with very niche and high-level roles, they may be openly recruiting out of state candidates to widen their own talent pool, and perhaps even offer relocation assistance. It will depend upon the level and specialization of your role, and relocation compensation is typically stated within the job description. I don’t advise asking for it unsolicited.

Out-of-state job seekers will commonly face the challenge of competing against local, accessible candidates. Position yourself for the best results by doing your research, preparing your story, and communicating your ability to meet the immediate needs of the role.

What Next?

A solid resume is the key to landing the job interview. Check out our suite of resume and branded content services.

Do you need help crafting an impactful digital brand presence? BRS offers professional design services to help you create fresh, creative, and professional websites, infographics, logos, and business cards to complement your resume and other job search marketing materials.

The post Discussing Relocation in Your Resume & Cover Letter appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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Applicant tracking systems (ATS) and job boards alike utilize keyword-driven search functionalities to evaluate resumes and assess a candidate’s potential fit. While you can’t always control your job title, you can determine how you are depicted on paper, and to a degree how your resume will be received by such technology. Will you pass, or will you fail?

Creative companies may think they’re giving a nod to their unique working culture or “flat hierarchy” by providing employees with abstract titles – like “Chief Happiness Officer,” and in some cases no job title at all. The problem with this? While it sounds innovative on paper and interesting on LinkedIn, no recruiter is searching job boards for a “Chief Happiness Officer.”

Give yourself a new title.

Some companies may take issue with how you publicly represent your role at the organization, so it is always best to do some research. Chances are, the job title won’t list on any official documentation until well into the interview process, and as long as you’re not misrepresenting yourself, it’s likely this will only be an issue on official legal documents, such as a contract or background check form.

Let’s follow our “Chief Happiness Officer.” This person leads Startup XYZ’s human resources department and is responsible for creating a positive culture that enables the company to attract and retain top talent. As the “Chief” their role denotes that they are an executive, and probably not the person doing the day-to-day functions of an HR associate, such as payroll processing and benefits administration. Their responsibility is higher level and involves things like HR strategy, team leadership, and communication with other members of the executive team.

So comparable titles with a much higher search value (i.e., more common) might include:

  • Director of Human Resources
  • Director of Corporate Culture
  • Employee Relations Director
  • HR Strategist
  • HR Business Partner.

If you’re not sure which titles are most searchable, utilize LinkedIn’s search feature or a job engine like Indeed to conduct a query for yourself.

What if you can’t change your job title?

As stated above, some employers may take issue with modifying your job title, for legal or other reasons. If that’s the case, you need to make clear in other parts of the resume what your title entails. So if you’re stuck with “Chief Happiness Officer” on the resume, utilize the first line of that job description – the most likely line to be read – to describe in “lay terms” the basis of your position. For example:

“Serves as a strategic internal HR business partner to the agency’s executive team, with responsibility for developing and executing companywide programs focused on building culture, talent acquisition, and employee engagement.”

Despite the abstract title, it’s pretty clear what this person does, and they’ve utilized keywords absent from their job title to describe themselves in the job summary (HR, talent acquisition, strategic), so they’re increasing the chances their resume will make it through the filter.

You can take the same approach in the summary section, or by adding a title/headline to your resume, such as:

DANA LEAVY-DETRICK

Director of Human Resources

What if you don’t have a title at all?

For resume and LinkedIn purposes, you need to create one – and a good practice would be to keep it as close as possible to conventional job titles in your field. Not sure what those are? Look at companies that are comparable to yours, and search for individuals in similar roles to understand how they are being regarded in the industry. This is not the place to be creative – save that for your cover letter or bio. Your title should be easily searchable and include the most common terms that relate to your job function.

If you’re not getting hits on an otherwise good resume, your job title may be to blame. Employing a unique job title may be a good conversations starter in the interview, however, the main function of the resume is still to pre-qualify you and get a foot in the door for that initial discussion. If your job title omits the key phrases or words most relevant to your role, you may be getting passed over in searches that you would otherwise be qualified for.

Do a search for relevant titles at your level and within your field. Look at how your peers and competitors are describing themselves, and consider whether changing your description can potentially improve the performance of your resume in relevant search queries.

What Next?

A solid resume is the key to landing the job interview. Check out our suite of resume and branded content services.

Do you need help crafting an impactful digital brand presence? BRS offers professional design services to help you create fresh, creative, and professional websites, infographics, logos, and business cards to complement your resume and other job search marketing materials.

The post Are Your Job Titles Helping or Hurting Your Resume? appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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Q: How long should I wait to follow up with a potential employer after a job interview? A:

Whether you just had a phone conversation or an in-person meeting, your immediate priority should be to follow up with a thank you letter to the interviewer(s) thanking them for their time, and also reaffirming your interest in and qualifications for the role. And then – you wait and see, eagerly monitoring your inbox and phone for a return response initiating next steps.

Often I get approached with the question of how soon is too soon to follow up on the interview.

Best case scenario:  You complete the interview and the hiring manager gives you somewhat of a definitive timeline of when you can expect to hear from them – “by next Monday” or “we’ll be done interviewing by the 15th” – allowing you a metric by which to gauge your follow up response.

In most cases, however, you’ll receive a more vague cliff-hanger of a response along the lines of, “It was great meeting you – we’ll be in touch shortly,” of “I’ll circle back after I discuss your resume with the team”.  This type of generalized response doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re out of the running, just that you’ll have to work a little harder to gauge the timeline of the process.

Here are a couple general rules of thumb in regards to following up after the interview:
  • If a timeline is given, be sure to respect that timeline.  If the timeline approaches and you still haven’t heard back, give them a 1-2 day buffer to still reach out to you.  Plenty of hurdles come up, including administrative hold ups, or unexpected absences.
  • If no timeline or sense of next steps is given upon exiting the interview, allow at least 4-5 business days (a week) before following up, as it’s likely that they are interviewing additional candidates and haven’t yet made a decision.  Over-eagerness bordering on impatience will not do anything positive for your chances.
  • Normally, if a candidate is being strongly considered, or in the final steps before making an offer, it’s likely that the hiring manager will provide you with some expectation of next steps and when you can expect to hear from them.  However, it doesn’t always work that way.  If no timeline is given, but you’re left with a distinct impression that they want to move forward, or extend an offer, again, allow roughly 4-5 business days before following up.
  • Remember that HR manager and recruiters don’t always have answers, as they’re subject to the approval of upper level decision-makers. Particularly if you are aggressively approaching your job search, or actively interviewing, give yourself a timeline of when you will pull the figurative cord on the opportunity in the interest of not missing out on other potential interviews or offers. Positive feedback is never definite – anything can happen between the time you walk out the door and the offer letter.

In each case, the point of a follow up is twofold: it’s an opportunity for you to reaffirm your interest in the role and why you feel you’re a strong fit, and also to maintain presence on their radar as they’re moving through the hiring process.  Try this:

Hi Dana –

Thank you again for your time on Tuesday.  I want to reaffirm my enthusiasm in being considered for the role, and confidence in my ability to bring a lot of value to the team.  I look forward to next steps – is there any additional information I can provide on my end to help move the process forward?

Thank You,

Matt Smith

Ending the outreach on a question gives them an extra push to respond to you, versus a “simply checking in” letter.

The key here is to be slightly aggressive, but in a tactful way that respects the fact that the hiring manager, no matter how swiftly a response they may have promised you, is a busy person likely handling multiple job openings, and many factors outside of their control can arise and inadvertently slow down the process.
 

What Next?

A solid resume is the key to landing the job interview. Check out our suite of resume and branded content services.

Do you need help crafting an impactful digital brand presence? BRS offers professional design services to help you create fresh, creative, and professional websites, infographics, logos, and business cards to complement your resume and other job search marketing materials.

The post How Long Should I Wait to Follow Up After a Job Interview? appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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The Career & Job Search Roundup is a weekly summary of top advice, resources, and content focusing on career transition, job searching, and personal brand development – expertly curated by the BRS team.

Is it Time to Make a Career Change? (Forbes)

If you’re feeling consistently stagnant, dissatisfied, or as though there’s no longer room for advancement or growth, it may be time to consider a career transition. High-potential leadership coach Jill Hauwiller discusses how her clients know it’s time to move on, and how to evaluate whether the time is right to make your own move. Read More

Networking is A Lot Like Dating – How to Be Good at Both (HuffPost)

Brooklyn Resume Studio’s own David Wiacek teams up with dating coach Lenina Mortimer to talk about how to navigate awkward conversations, push yourself out of your comfort zone, and master the art of small talk – so you can get the most out of your next networking event (or date)! Read More

Four Phrases that Stifle Your Efforts to Transition Back into the Workforce (Apres)

Understanding your value and having a clear strategy for achieving your goals is key to reentering the workforce, and doing so on terms that work for you. But the way in which you speak about your objectives also matters, and can hold you back. Avoiding these nagging thoughts and phrases will help you move through the career transition process, and find an opportunity that aligns with your professional and personal goals. Read More

10 Resume Mistakes That Can Age a Jobseeker (Business Insider)

Agism is a challenge that even the most highly qualified professionals face as they advance in their career and job search. Condensing your experience may not always be the answer – but there are a few tweaks you can make to your resume and profile to give it an updated look and feel, and ensure that you’re positioning yourself competitively in today’s job market. Read More

What Next?

A solid resume is the key to marketing yourself and getting success out of a long-distance job search. Check out our suite of resume and branded content services.

Do you need help crafting an impactful digital brand presence? BRS offers professional design services to help you create fresh, creative, and professional websites, infographics, logos, and business cards to complement your resume and other job search marketing materials.

The post Career & Job Search Roundup (8/16/17) appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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The Career & Job Search Roundup is a weekly summary of top advice, resources, and content focusing on career transition, job searching, and personal brand development – expertly curated by the BRS team.

Navigating Midlife Career Transition (What’s Next)

Changing careers in your 40s and 50s can be a daunting prospect, and agism in the job market poses even greater challenges for mature job seekers. Career experts weigh in on how to plan for a transition, resisting the urge for a “quick fix”, and when to call in “the pros”. Read More

How to Brand Yourself – Without Bragging (Forbes)

Candidates often make the mistake in their resume, the interview process, and in their job search is general of being too modest and not “bragging” about their accomplishments enough. The primary rule of personal branding is to be able to tell your story in a way that describes your unique value, but doesn’t sound unnatural or over-bloated. Career expert Liz Ryan provides some tips on how to brag modestly and create a strong brand. Read More

How to Turn Your Fashion Internship into a Career (NYLON)

Arrive early. Master the art of the follow up. Use your time wisely. Reflect on what you did well, what you could do better, and how you can improve. Fashion industry pros share their top tips for acing your internship and turning it into a job offer. Read More

26 Careers That Offer the Most Job Security (Business Insider)

Decent salaries, low unemployment rates, and longevity – these careers were ranked the best jobs for 2017 – and those expected to see the most robust growth in coming years – by U.S. News. Read More

What Next?

A solid resume is the key to marketing yourself and getting success out of a long-distance job search. Check out our suite of resume and branded content services.

Do you need help crafting an impactful digital brand presence? BRS offers professional design services to help you create fresh, creative, and professional websites, infographics, logos, and business cards to complement your resume and other job search marketing materials.

The post Career & Job Search Roundup (8/9/17) appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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A solid resume is the foundation of a successful job search, but your ability to ace the interview is the real determinant in whether or not you receive the offer. Interviewing is challenging for so many of us because it’s a context in which we’re not used to talking about ourselves and our strengths. Some of my clients go so far as to say that they feel boastful, or as if they’re bragging, and the fear of making a negative impression squelches their confidence and causes them to hold back on key information.

As I always say, “the interview is not the time to be modest.”

Whether it’s a lack of confidence, a lack of practice, or you’ve been out of the job search game for some time, there are a few easy tips you can employ to make sure your interview performance is top notch.

Practice Your Pitch – Focus on Clarity & Getting Your Point Across

Jeff Reynar, Facebook’s head of engineering in New York, recently told Business Insider he looks for candidates who show up prepared to speak about both their successful projects and their challenges. And that comes through in the confidence with which candidates deliver their answers.

Practicing your pitch not only prepares you to speak confidently, but knowing how you want to frame your answers will help you speak more slowly, clearly, and ensure you’re not flustered in trying to get your point across.

“Make sure you can talk really concisely about what you’ve done in the past, what particular accomplishments you had by doing it, why you chose to work on those things, and come with great stories that illustrate how you might be a great fit [for the company’s mission],” Reynar says.

Treat the Interview Like a Two-Way Conversation

One of the most important aspects of a great interview performance is whether you can treat it like a two-way conversation, versus strictly being reactive and responding to questions.

Turn the tables on the interviewer. Pose questions that will ultimately provide you with deeper insight into the company’s values, culture, and challenges. Ask the interviewer to speak about their own career path and experience with the organization, if they’ve hired candidates from the same college or university that you attended, or what makes someone successful in the company or environment. 

And with that in mind…

Ask the Right Questions to Gauge Culture Fit

Candidates often make the mistake of approaching the interview as a one-sided conversation in which the employer is evaluating their potential and fit. Really, the interview is just as much an opportunity for you to assess whether the organization’s mission and culture align with your own goals and interests. I have yet to meet a candidate who was willing to take higher pay or flexible hours in places of a good working environment.

How do you gauge culture fit during the interview? Ask thoughtful, intelligent questions to gauge how the company views its employees, what those relationships look like, how individuals are treated in a team setting, and what the leadership style looks like. Browse social media ahead of time to see what kind of content the company puts out – are there photos or highlights of previous company gatherings? Do they speak positively of high performers, or publicly introduce new hires to the organization?

First impressions are everything in the job search process, and that holds true in the interview more than any other context. Take the time to practice responding to typical and atypical interview questions to gauge your confidence, know what you’re looking for in a company culture and how to communicate why that’s important to you. Come prepared to ask intelligent, probing questions that show your interest and alignment with the company’s values.

What Next?

A solid resume is the key to landing the job interview. Check out our suite of resume and branded content services.

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The post 3 Quick Tips to Improve Your Interview Performance appeared first on Brooklyn Resume Studio – NYC Resume Writer & Career Consultant.

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