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I’m on a Paper Theory roll at the moment!  I’ve enjoyed making and wearing the LB Pullover this year, and the Zadie Jumpsuit had its christening this week on holiday in South Africa. It was lovely to wear!  The other pattern I’ve made is the Kabuki Tee.  It’s a loose, boxy, oversized tee pattern, designed for woven fabrics.  I’d admired the large sleeves and front detail, with the opportunity to play with direction with stripes or other patterns.

Wearing my new Kabuki Tee on a beach walk

This first garment is a plain, I bought some grey chambray earlier in the year with the Kabuki in mind.  It’s probably a little stiffer than would be preferable, but I like the way it keeps the boxy shape of the design.  All the edges were overlocked after sewing the relevant seams to keep it all neat and tidy inside, and I topstitched the armhole/sleeve seams.

Topstitched seam detail

It’s a relatively quick pattern to make, the instructions, as with all the other Paper Theory patterns are pretty straightforward.  To make sure that there wouldn’t be any holes or inclination to tear once the corners on the front and back were snipped to allow for rotation and insertion of the sleeves, I interfaced that area with a scrap of fine sheer fusible.  It just gives a little more stability to the fabric that’s going to be weakened.

I’ve worn the tee twice on my holiday in South Africa, and it’s been really comfy to wear.  Hubby doesn’t like the oversized armholes, says  need slimmer sleeves, but I like the look.  I’ve also made a version in viscose, just to see how it looks in a much more drapey, fluid fabric.  But I haven’t managed to wear that one just yet, so pics are non-existant!

I dragged the other half to a fabric shop to stock up on fabric to refill my suitcase (having emptied it of loads of stuff I brought out for friends and family) and picked up a black and white wide stripe linen that will either be another Kabuki or possibly another LB Pullover.  I’m liking the idea of stripe manipulation…

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After seeing the #SewBibs hashtag on Instagram earlier this year, I decided that would be the push I needed to make myself a pair of Burneside Bibs. I’ve had the pattern and fabric for ages, just never got round to getting them sorted. Well, I still haven’t!

The bibs I’ve finally made are for Daughter no 2, and it’s a Burdastyle pattern, surprise surprise. She’d like the pattern for a while and wanted me to make it before Christmas, but that wasn’t really good timing. The fabric is a lovely green organic stretch cotton twill (probably not most recommended for this pattern, but who cares) from Fabworks, and they still have stock.

I traced the 38 and toiled in a sturdy fabric. I had a feeling the skirt would need to be longer, it is a petite pattern afterall. The toile revealed it needed a fair bit more in the length, I added 10cm, and to take a little out on the upper skirt/waistband pieces. I took in the sides from the top of the waistband to just above where the pocket opening ends by 0.75 cm each side, effectively going down a size. The construction is straightforward. The front and back bib pieces are doubled, attached to the waistband and then the skirt.

Facings and underlaps provide support for snaps, but you could use buttons instead, which is what I ended up doing. Actually, as this fabric stretches so well, we could have made the buttons decorative instead of functional! Buttons were used instead of snaps because althou I have a box of different ones, I didn’t have nough pieces to put together 6 of the same snap! I think I need a clear-out of that box. There also waasn’t time to order more snaps, and we decided buttons form the stash would work just as well.

The insides are all overlocked & I used double rows of topstitching. The pinafore comes together pretty quickly and Burda’s precise instructions are easy to understand. I have a feeling I might be making more of these in the future.

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It hasn’t taken me long to make another pair of StyleArc’s Teddy Designer Pants.  I had a 3m length of black herringbone linen that I bought from Croft Mill ages ago that had been destined for a jumpsuit, but now has made the perfect pair of black linen Teddy Pants.

Teddy Designer Pants from Style Arc

The fabric is a soft, drapey linen, but has good body.  It also attracts every last bit of fluff, dust and feathers…  It was narrower than linen usually is, so I used more meterage than I had done with the green pants.  I had hoped to get another of the Kana’s Standard jackets I made last year out of the remaining fabric, but it’s looking unlikely.  The pants are pretty much the same as the green ones, apart from an adjustment in the back.  I darted the back waistband in line with the trouser darts to take out 2x 0.75cm and enlarge and extend the darts a centimetre and a bit.  The back fits better now, and has less opportunity to “grow” as the day goes on.  I had noticed with the green pair that I was pulling them up more later in the day, so this little adjustment will sort that out.

I changed the order of work, once the front pleats were constructed and basted in place, the centre front was sewn from the base of the zip approx. 5cm.  I had cut the front trouser pieces with the fly facing “grwon-on”.  Basically, the fly facing pattern piece was taped to the centre front of the trouser piece, marked the centre front line with tailor’s tacks and went from there.  The whole fly zip went in like a breeze and looks better finished too.  Then I attached the pocket bags to the side seams and then sewed the front and back trouser pieces together.  It was a pain in the whatsit trying to do the zip after having sewn the side seams first the last time.

I didn’t alter the length in the end, I’ve decided I like them as they are and I have enough cropped trousers anyway.  I can imagine this pattern will be fabulous in a wool suiting or crepe for the winter too.  I have a feeling that I’ll be buying something to make another summer pair when on holiday!

Maybe a patterned pair next time?  Stripes??

Here’s another shot of that pleat, just for luck.

This pattern’s USP, the pleat and cocoon leg shape
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A blog post!  Finally!  You guys have probably been wondering what on earth happened, radio silence for ages now!  Well, I’ve had my head down making kid’s clothes for a friend, and to help me to clear out those stash boxes of left over fabrics, and the weather lured me out of doors!  We had such beautiful, unseasonally hot weather at the end of February that I just couldn’t resist the siren call of the allotment!

It was luck that I hadn’t, to be honest, because now, at the beginning of March, I’m ready to sow seeds and plant stuff.  Even if the weather has reverted to it’s usual windy, rainy self.  So, now that the inclement weather is back, I’m back in the sewing room!  Last week I had a proper sewing day and made 7 Rowan Tees by Misusu Patterns!  It’s a free pattern for kids.  I traced the sizes from the 98 or 3 year old, up to the 7 year old & raided my stash of leftover ponte, double jersey and quilted jersey.  I made 3 of the smallest size, and randomly chose fabric and other sizes so I’d have enough for growing into, as well as fitting the older kid.  Those were all the remains of the fabric after making Toaster Sweaters, Talvikki Sweaters and the LB Pullover.  I’m very happy with my little pile, and will be distributing them amongst 3 kids.

But back on the sewing for normal humans – grown ups!  I suddenly realised that daughter no 2 would be home this weekend for the week – reading week at uni, and I’d promised a bunch of toiles ready for fitting!  Some patterns were ready to toile, others still needed to be traced – oops!  So I’ve made a start with a pair of shorts, and today cut the toile for a dungaree dress, 115 from Burdastyle April 2017, and traced and cut the toile for the blouse, 111 from February 2018.

Dungaree dress 115 Blouse 111

I also cut a top for my mum from her favourite Burda pattern (the fifth one this year!) and decided to experiment with viscose and the Kabuki Tee from Paper Theory.  I toiled that pattern in February in the size 18, but decided I could afford to size down one.  So, we’ll see if it works in viscose!  I’ve seen plenty of cotton, nani iro, double gauze and linen versions, but ot viscose.  Fingers crossed…  By the way, has anyone seen the announcement that Tara is releasing a new pattern – a jumpsuit – either this week or next?  I’m waiting with baited breath for this one, I really like the look of it when she made a version last summer.  Let’s just say I’m on tenterhooks, waiting to pounce and hit that “pay now with PayPal” button as soon as it’s live! *edit* it’s live!  Here’s the link if you’re remotely interested…

Fifth version of Mum’s favourite top pattern to be made this year. Kabuki Tee in viscose. Mad or inspired?

It’s due to rain tomorrow, so instead of getting really, really muddy, I’ll stay indoors and start sewing those toiles!  I already have the fabric for the Burda patterns, so if I get those made up next week after fitting, it’ll be a good stash bust.  I also found the #sewbibs hashtag on Instagram this week, a good push to make that dungaree dress, and possibly to finally trace and toile the Burnside Bibs for myself??  I already have the fabric for those too…  It would tie in nicely with the other hashtag, #sewthatpatternnow.  And of course, #makeyourstash.  But I’ve been doing that one for a while now, and I’m only making very slow inroads into the stash boxes!  Mostly because I keep hoarding the leftovers!  Send help…

View this post on Instagram

My first daffodil! Well, Narcissus, really. So pretty!

A post shared by Anne W (@newstreet.cuttinggarden) on Mar 5, 2019 at 5:47am PST

I’ll leave you with a picture of the Narcissus blooming on my allotment last week, before Storm Freya hit and flattened them, so I cut them and brought them indoors.  My first harvest from the cutting garden this year!

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As promised – the woven version of the Paper Theory LB Pullover.  But not just one – two!  For once, the amazing top I saw in my head has actually lived up to expectations!  I cut the same size in this as I did for the striped ponte version, but I’ve added length to the front along the bust line.  This should result in a dart – which I did not want, so I rotated it to the hemline and removed the dart width from the side.  So now I have length, and no dart!  Yippee.  But I’m thinking I could have added another centimetre or two and it wouldn’t have hurt.

LB Pullover from Paper Theory in herringbone wool and silk blend

The pattern is otherwise the same as the last one, with the exception of the collar/neckband.  This time it’s cut on the bias, which looks pretty nice with the herringbone.  The fabric, to remind you, is a silk and wool herringbone in sage green and ecru that I found in a local charity shop.  It’s really lovely to wear, soft, with great drape and warm too.  What’s better, I pop it in the washing machine with no problems!  I love wearing this top with my Birkin Flares, and it’s just as good with my Peppermint Wide Leg Pants.  It’s simple, clean and minimal.  Perfect.

The length in the front is better, but could be adjusted again

Version two is a fabric that’s been lurking in the stash since about 2006…  I’d been patting this particular fabric in my local fabric shop everytime I went in, but not buying it because it was expensive, and what was I going to make with a silk fabric that looked like a chunky wool weave?  Then it was down to the last metre and a bit and I had to make a decision, grab it or lose it forever.  Naturally I grabbed it.  But what to make?  That’s why it’s been sitting for so long, but this pattern got me thinking and I decided to use it up.  No, it’s not the most practical fabric in the world, but can I just say, it’s warm and snuggly and I love it!  And most people think it’s a knit, or wool!

LB Pullover with narrow collar in woven chunky silk

There wasn’t enough fabric to ut that nice big floppy collar on the bias, so I opted for the narrower band, which gives a finish more like a wide crew neck on a tee.  I cut it on  the straight first, because, unlike the taller collar, there is no mention of needing to change the grainline for a woven.  It didn’t fit…  So I cut strips of bias the required width, stitched them together until it was loong enough for the pattern piece and started again.  It was still too short!!  AAAAHHHHH  I wasn’t going to add more bits of bias, you’d seen it and it would look messy.  And I couldn’t cut more, there wasn’t enough fabric!  So I stretched the bias.  It was on the back that I had the problem, so I ignored the shoulder markings and stole a bit of the front band for the back.  It works ok and looking at it, you can’t see a problem.  I checked the pattern pieces against each other, and there it is, the narorw band is shorter than the wider one.  I even double checked on the printed pattern, just in case I’d traced the wrong size, but nope.  So be careful if you’re making the narrow band top, your fabric might not have the give that mine did!

I will be making more of these, but with a little more length added in the front.  It’s not that I notice it when wearing, only when I look in the mirror or see these photos.  The front definitely needs a bit more depth!  I’m looking forward to making some woven versions in summer fabrics and shorter sleeves – linen and cotton tops would be lovely to wear in the warmer weather.

I had hoped to be running up a blue fleece version this week, but the remnant I have is just too short, so I’ll have to make something else with it.  The downside of getting fabric you didn’t specifically order/buy!  I guess it will have to be a kid thing.

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