Loading...

Follow The Breast Cancer Society of Canada on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

1.  Who are you? Tell us about yourself.    

Currently, I am a PhD candidate at Western University, based out of St. Joseph’s Health Care under the supervision of Dr. Jeffrey Carson. We also work closely with surgical oncologist Dr. Muriel Brackstone. I am part of the Medical Biophysics graduate program at Western, where I focus on developing new imaging technology for clinical problems.

2. Why is the TBCRU Studentship Award important to you?

I have been a recipient of the TBCRU Studentship Award (supported by BCSC) since 2015. I’m honoured by their continued confidence in my research; the funds provided by this award allows me to focus on the critical research we are doing.

3. Tell us about your research. What are you doing and what problems do you hope to solve?

My work focuses on a specialized imaging technique called photoacoustic imaging and its use for breast-conserving surgery. On the technological side, I am working on overcoming limitations, so that the imaging will be more accurate. Secondly, I am applying this improved technology towards imaging breast tumours (after they have been removed) to ensure that the tumour was removed completely. Our goal is to eliminate the need for additional surgeries, which happen approximately 15% of the time when surgery is only partially successful. Currently, I am excited to be putting together my third (and hopefully final) imaging system incorporating everything I learned in the last few years. We hope to be testing this on clinical samples by Fall 2019.

4. Why is your research important? How can your research be applied in the real world?

My research not only advances our knowledge in the growing field of biomedical optics, but also has a direct impact on patient care. No one suffering from breast cancer should need to hear the disappointing news that they need an additional surgery because of remaining tumour tissue. The goal of our research is to render these extra surgeries unnecessary, sparing the patients an additional hardship and freeing up our healthcare system.

5. What inspired your research?

Our lab has been working on breast imaging for a number of years. Photoacoustic imaging is particularly useful for breasts because it can provide excellent soft tissue contrast. My project is a continuation of another student’s work, where he demonstrated that we can see great contrast between tumour and healthy breast tissue.

6. Why are you passionate about breast cancer research?

I have always been interested in health care, from both a clinical and research standpoint. When this project was proposed to me, I thought it was a great opportunity, and my interest in the topic has only grown from there.

7. Why do you think breast cancer research matters?

Breast cancer research matters because the people affected by breast cancer matter. Any goals or hopes that I have in my research really only matter because they are directly linked to improving patient care – to reducing the burden of this disease that affects friends, family, and coworkers.

8. What excites you about your work?

It excites me to be able to build devices from the ground-up, see them in action, and then watch as they directly improve someone’s care and comfort.

9. What do you see yourself doing in the future?

Once I complete my PhD, I hope to be working in Research & Development for a medical device/technology company.

10. What do you like to do when you aren’t working on research?

I have a number of hobbies! You can find me playing a number of sports like cycling, running, soccer and softball. I also enjoy tinkering with bicycles, running the audio and visuals at my church, and taking long backcountry hiking trips.

Support researchers like Lawrence Yip by considering a donation to the Breast Cancer Society of Canada. Find out how you can help fund life-saving research, visit bcsc.ca/donate today.

The post Lawrence Yip Is Advancing Knowledge In Biomedical Optics appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

1. Who are you? Tell us about yourself.

My name is Nathan Orlando. I’m a second year PhD student in the Department of Medical Biophysics at Western University working under the supervision of Dr. Aaron Fenster. Prior to starting my PhD at Western, I completed a Bachelor of Science with Honours in Physics at the University of Alberta.

2. Why is the TBCRU Studentship Award important to you?

I am very grateful for the support from this award. The funding goes a long way to offset the costs of our research and provides me with peace of mind and freedom to focus on my research.

3. Tell us about your research. What are you doing and what problems do you hope to solve?

Breast-conserving therapy involves the surgical removal of the tumour followed by lengthy radiation therapy. This is the standard of care for early-stage breast cancer, but is a lengthy process, leading patients who travel long ways to their treatments (rural patients), to choose mastectomy or even forgo radiation completely. Ultimately, this leads to poorer outcomes. My research is focused on an alternative form of radiation therapy where radioactive “seeds” are implanted directly into the breast to reduce treatment time to a single session. My research is aimed at developing a guidance system for permanent breast seed implantation. By developing a 3D ultrasound guidance system, we hope to make this a successful alternative treatment, improving access to this treatment for rural patients.

4. Why is your research important? How can your research be applied in the real world?

While permanent breast seed implantation has great potential to improve breast cancer treatment, currently it is challenging to perform. This has limited the opportunity to be used in Canada and around the world. With the development of our 3D ultrasound guidance system, we hope to make this procedure easier to perform, which will hopefully lead to wider-spread use. If adopted, this technique has the potential to ease the burden for rural patients, or patients who live outside major cities, increasing their access to breast-conserving therapy.

5. What inspired your research?

Roughly 15% of the Canadian population live further than an hour away from major cancer centres. For these women, the burden of 5-7 weeks of radiation therapy is high, as they often require extended time off work and need to commute multiple hours per day or live in a hotel for over a month. Permanent breast seed implantation has the potential to reduce this burden by reducing treatment time to a single visit. We saw this as a clear area of need and a problem that we could address with improved imaging. I am continuing the work of Justin Michael, a previous trainee also funded by the Breast Cancer Society of Canada, who did excellent work developing the initial imaging system.

6. Why are you passionate about breast cancer research?

I have always had an interest in both physics and medicine; the field of medical physics allows me to apply my background in physics to current clinical problems in medicine. Breast cancer is an extremely prevalent disease in Canada and around the world. I have had family members and family friends who have battled breast cancer, and sadly, not all have won. The possibility of improving breast cancer treatment serves as excellent motivation, making this an area of research I’m proud to pursue.

7. Why do you think breast cancer research matters?

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and it’s estimated that 1 in 8 Canadian women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. This is an extremely prevalent disease, and most people have a family member or friend who’s been affected. At this year’s Breast Cancer Society of Canada Mother’s Day walk I had the privilege of meeting several breast cancer survivors, as well as women still fighting breast cancer. Meeting these incredible women and hearing their stories really reinforces how important our research is. If our work can improve treatment or reduce the burden for these women, then it is worth doing.

8. What excites you about your work?

I love that every day brings a new and exciting challenge; no two days are exactly the same. Tackling problems that no one has solved yet is both exciting and rewarding. Studying a topic like breast cancer which affects countless women is motivating, and it’s exciting knowing that our research can make a real difference in the treatment of breast cancer.

9. What do you see yourself doing in the future?

After completing my PhD, I hope to complete a medical physics residency. My long-term goal is to work as a clinical medical physicist, where I can play a key role in the treatment of cancer. This will also give me the opportunity to continue my research on improving radiation therapy.

10. What do you like to do when you aren’t working on research?

When I’m not working on research, I enjoy listening to music, cycling, and playing or watching hockey. I’m a huge Edmonton Oilers fan!

Support researchers like Nathan Orlando by considering a donation to the Breast Cancer Society of Canada. Find out how you can help fund life-saving research, visit bcsc.ca/donate

The post Nathan Orlando wants to increase access to breast-conserving therapy. appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

1. Who are you? Tell us about yourself.

My name is Matthew Mouawad, I am a 5th year PhD student in the department of Medical Biophysics at Western University. I work under the supervision of Dr. Stewart Gaede, who is a Medical Physicist at the London Regional Cancer Program, and Dr. Neil Gelman, an imaging scientist at St. Joseph’s Hospital. Before my PhD, I completed an honours BMSc in Medical Biophysics at Western.

2. Why is the TBCRU Studentship Award important to you?

I was recruited to analyze data that came in from a clinical trial. The trial is investigating a radical change in the way we treat breast cancer patients, attempting to significantly reduce treatment time, and relieve the burden on patients. The TBCRU’s funding has been integral to the research we are doing.

3. Tell us about your research. What are you doing and what problems do you hope to solve?

In my previous post, I focused on the innovation of the clinical trial. However, a major part of this trial is investigating imaging biomarkers in an attempt to obtain metrics that will allow us to not only understand the biological response to high dose radiotherapy, but to potentially provide personalized, patient-centered care in the future.

One thing in particular that we want to understand is how early patients can be imaged after radiotherapy treatment. There are biological changes immediately after high dose radiotherapy that would negatively influence response assessment, but these are short-lived. In this study, we identified that by imaging at 2.5 weeks post radiotherapy, we could see clear signs of tumour regression.

4. Why is your research important? How can your research be applied in the real world?

Overall, the goal of our research is to minimize the physical and emotional burden on the significant number of patients who are diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. In the future, we hope to investigate ways of using radiotherapy to potentially eliminate the need for surgery. My research sets the stage for this type of study to be used successfully in the real-world.

5. What inspired your research?

Although the typical treatment course for early stage breast cancer is effective, it is much too long, and involves invasive surgery and 5-8 weeks of radiotherapy. The need to provide better care is what inspired this particular clinical trial. In addition, it was identified that better care could be provided using imaging, which my research focuses on.

6. Why are you passionate about breast cancer research?

I knew from an early age that I wanted to be involved and make an impact in the field of medicine and oncology. Breast cancer affects so many lives – both patients and their families. I knew that this project could lead to significant relief of the burden experienced by so many.

7. Why do you think breast cancer research matters?

This disease impacts the lives of so many women, as well as their family, friends, and others who surround them. Conducting breast cancer research on how reduce the burden caused by this cancer will affect a significant number of lives.

8. What excites you about your work?

I’m excited by the fact that my studies are the first of their kind, showing very promising results – we can potentially assess response as early as 2.5 weeks post-treatment! I am very excited that my work will play a significant role in future trials that modify the radiation dose so accurately, that one day surgery may not be needed at all.

9. What do you see yourself doing in the future?

I plan to continue to impact the field of oncology as a medical physicist.

10. What do you like to do when you aren’t working on research?

I nerd it up playing board games and Dungeons and Dragons!

Support researchers like Matthew Mouawad by considering a donation to the Breast Cancer Society of Canada. Find out how you can help fund life-saving research, visit bcsc.ca/donate

The post Matthew Mouawad wants to change how we treat breast cancer patients. appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

1. Who are you? Tell us about yourself.

My name is Vy Ngo and I am a PhD candidate in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Western University. I work under the supervision of Dr. Martin Duennwald. Before my graduate studies, I completed my BSc at McMaster University with a double honours specialization in biology and psychology.

2. Why is the TBCRU Studentship Award important to you?

Receiving this award is a great honour, as I am pioneering my lab’s first breast cancer project. The TBCRU Studentship has helped to fund important resources for my work and has opened new opportunities for me to learn and network with other TBCRU recipients and breast cancer researchers and community members.

3. Tell us about your research. What are you doing and what problems do you hope to solve?

I am investigating therapy resistance in breast cancer patients and designing a unique approach using small molecules to enhance breast cancer therapeutics. Tumors from some breast cancer subtypes are highly susceptible to therapy resistance and metastasis (the spread of cancer), which must be considered when choosing optimal treatment strategies. For example, HER2+ breast cancers make them more aggressive, with an increased likelihood of developing a resistance to chemotherapy. Additionally, these patients have higher rates of developing metastases, especially to the brain.

I have found that HER2+ breast cancer cells express high levels of a protein called Hsp90 and this is associated with reduced patient survival. In my previous work, I have also found a link between Hsp90 and Nrf2, a protein known to promote cancer cells and therapy resistance. I am looking into the dual inhibition of these proteins using small molecules along with existing anticancer agents, as a potential new treatment strategy for therapy-resistant HER2+ breast cancer. I hope that this will combat therapy resistance and metastasis and greatly improve the outcome for many breast cancer patients.

4. Why is your research important? How can your research be applied in the real world?

Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the greatest challenges in breast cancer therapy. My research aims to improve existing breast cancer therapies by targeting pathways that contribute to cancer cell survival during therapy. By assessing how effective HER2+ breast cancer therapies are, in conjunction with Hsp90 and Nrf2 inhibitors, we will provide important insights into the the improvement of treatment outcomes for HER2+ metastatic breast cancer and open new avenues for breast cancer treatment in general.

5. What inspired your research?

I started my graduate studies investigating Nrf2, which controls the cellular oxidative stress response. I quickly learned how big of a role it plays in protecting cancer cells against environmental stressors, including chemotherapy agents. After I discovered the link between Nrf2 and Hsp90, further work revealed certain breast cancer subtypes have high Hsp90, which is associated with lower patient survival. That led me to the question: will the presence of both of Nrf2 and Hsp90 during breast cancer therapy increase the efficacy of existing cancer therapeutics and prevent the rise of chemoresistance to improve treatment outcomes?

6. Why are you passionate about breast cancer research?

The Breast Cancer Society of Canada has done an excellent job over the years raising awareness for breast cancer and stressing the importance of breast cancer research. This, in addition to my preliminary findings, inspired me to pursue breast cancer research.

7.  Why do you think breast cancer research matters?

Despite advances in breast cancer research and increased awareness and prevention, breast cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Canadian women. There are still many obstacles that clinicians and researchers must overcome, meaning more research must be done to understand the disease.

8. What excites you about your work?

Research is about asking questions and exploring the unknown; as someone who enjoys solving puzzles and mysteries, I find that aspect of research extremely exciting. Breast cancer is a complex disease and much still needs to be explored. In addition, the translational nature of my project means that it has the potential to be applied in the real-world, such as improved therapies for breast cancer patients, which is exciting and important.

9. What do you see yourself doing in the future?

I plan to do a postdoctoral fellowship outside of Canada to gain international experience. One day I hope to pursue an academic career as a research professor, contributing to science and teaching the next generation of scientists.

10. What do you like to do when you aren’t working on research?

Outside of the lab, I enjoy cooking, baking, and exploring new foods. I am also an avid music fan, and love board games and escape rooms.

Support researchers like Vy Ngo by considering a donation to the Breast Cancer Society of Canada. Find out how you can help fund life-saving research, visit bcsc.ca/donate

The post Vy Ngo Is Investigating Chemotherapy Resistance appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

1. Who are you? Tell us about yourself.

My name is Owen Hovey; I’m a PhD student in Dr. Shawn Li’s Lab in the Department of Biochemistry at Western University. During my undergraduate degree at Carleton University, I spent three years in the biochemistry lab of Dr. Willmore and a year in Health Canada’s stem cell lab under the direction of Dr. Jessie Lavoie. Since then I have completed a Master’s degree at the University of Ottawa in Immunology. While working in the Pineault Lab at Canadian Blood Services during my Masters degree, I developed multiple skills that have helped me in the lab here at Western.

2. Why is the TBCRU Studentship Award important to you?

This award has allowed me to focus on my research and has been crucial in funding my research experiments. I’ve been able to begin my research on the mechanism of breast cancer metastasis at a cellular level.

3. Tell us about your research. What are you doing and what problems do you hope to solve?

Breast cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body (known as metastasis). An essential part of cell migration is a mechanism known as phosphorylation-switch or “P-switch”.  Many aggressive subtypes of breast cancer are missing components of the “P-switch” while maintaining migratory properties. We are working on identifying components that target the “P-switch” pathway and prevent the spread of breast cancer cells.

4. Why is your research important? How can your research be applied in the real world?

Approximately 90% of breast cancer-related deaths are a result of metastasis. Understanding how breast cancer metastasizes will help us target the correct proteins for inhibition. Our lab has already developed peptide inhibitors for Liver Cancer (DLC1), however, many breast cancer cells are missing this component, therefore, different targets need to be identified for many of breast cancer subtypes.

5. What inspired your research?

Dr. Li was influential in the selection of my research topic. Based on my previous research experience and my interests, we decided migration of breast cancer cells would be an excellent direction to pursue.

6. Why are you passionate about breast cancer research?

While I have not felt the impact of breast cancer within my family, I am very aware that this is a devastating disease. One of the teachers that had a major impact on me as a student suffered from breast cancer. Her influence and belief in me helped me to see myself as a capable learner despite a my previous academic struggles. Her determination and faith in her students helped us to believe in ourselves. I am saddened that she had to leave the teaching profession early to continue her fight against breast cancer. While I was fortunate to benefit from her teaching and guidance, her early retirement meant that many other students missed this learning opportunity.

7. Why do you think breast cancer research matters?

Breast cancer is a significant public health problem. It is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of death from cancer for Canadian women. These numbers alone make this disease a devastating loss to our society, as well as a personal loss on people’s lives and their family. Research is the only way to further understand this cancer, including how and why it progresses.

8. What excites you about your work?

I thoroughly enjoy pouring over large datasets, as they have great potential for revealing new targets and therapies for diseases. They are full of untapped potential for me to discover. I can focus in on potential targets to better understand what makes metastatic breast cancers unique.

9. What do you see yourself doing in the future?

The process of research excites and challenges me and has been my aspiration since my undergraduate degree. I hope to continue in academia to help solve cancer and other diseases by identifying potential therapeutic targets.

10. What do you like to do when you aren’t working on research?

When I’m not in the lab or reading articles, I enjoy baking, ice skating, attending yoga classes and participating in intramural sports at Western University a few times a week. While working on my Master’s degree I volunteered with Let’s Talk Science and found talking to young students about science challenging and invigorating. I’ve recently applied to join the Let’s Talk Science program here in London and will be helping with Let’s Talk Cancer in May, teaching high school students about cancer.

Support researchers like Owen Hovey by considering a donation to the Breast Cancer Society of Canada. Find out how you can help fund life-saving research, visit bcsc.ca/donate

The post Owen Hovey Studies The Migration Of Breast Cancer Cells appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

1. Who are you? Tell us about yourself.

My name is Nivin Nystrom. I completed my Bachelors of Science in Genetics at Western before joining the Department of Medical Biophysics Ph.D. program at Western, where I am carrying out my breast cancer research under the mentorship of Dr. John Ronald & Dr. Timothy Scholl.

2. Why is the TBCRU Studentship Award important to you?

Receiving the award has had a tremendous impact on the amount of time I can devote to my research. One of the scientists at Robarts often jokes that he had to take summers off during his Ph.D. so that he could work to make money for his tuition and living costs. I am delighted to have support from the Breast Cancer Society of Canada so that I can commit all of my time to research.


3. Tell us about your research. What are you doing and what problems do you hope to solve?

The goal of my research is to develop immunotherapy technology for breast cancer as well as imaging techniques to trial in clinical animals to test how well the immunotherapy works. Most immunotherapy research depends on activating or enhancing existing immune functions, whereas I am focusing on synthetic immune mechanisms such as “cytotoxic genes.” These are genes that are not naturally found in the body, but we implement them in our immune cells to give them new tumour-killing capacities against breast cancer.

4. Why is your research important? How can your research be applied in the real world?

Although immunotherapy marks a significant milestone in cancer treatment, current methods that focus on amplifying the natural immune system may cause adverse reactions in many patients that are difficult to control and have even led to some deaths in clinical trials. By focusing on synthetic immune mechanisms, like introducing a new killing mechanism into an immune cell, we try to avoid activating parts of the immune system that may cause severe reactions in patients. We hope that this treatment will one day become an option for breast cancer patients who may not benefit from, or are at risk with current treatment options.


5. What inspired your research?

I didn’t develop my research topic until about a year into my graduate degree when a significant paper came out that described new synthetic immune mechanisms against cancer. My supervisors and I discussed the paper at length and decided that although it was a challenging project, it was important to try and apply the technology towards breast cancer.

6. Why are you passionate about breast cancer research?

Before I got into my graduate research, I knew I wanted to work in the cancer field, since it has affected so many people around me. I thought it was important to focus on breast cancer because I wanted to understand better what these women would have gone through and wanted to play a part in helping improve the standard of care, however small it may be.

7. Why do you think breast cancer research matters?

Breast cancer research is important because it is the only component of the cancer research field that focuses entirely on women. Women are often underrepresented in clinical trials for other types of cancers, a bias caused by exclusion criteria integrated with these studies, and as a result, new cancer treatments coming out either have lower effectiveness or greater adverse effects simply because they have been mostly tested on male cancer patients. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Canada, and I am happy that organizations like the Breast Cancer Society of Canada have helped make it a major focus of research.


8. What excites you about your work?

I’m excited to work as part of a larger collaborative effort against breast cancer. The enthusiasm for the work we do is contagious, and it’s the main reason I love working on my research.


9. What do you see yourself doing in the future?

I hope to pursue medical school after I finish my Ph.D. next year.


10. What do you like to do when you aren’t working on research?

I practice Brazilian jiu-jitsu at least three times a week. It helps keep me grounded and focused.

Support researchers like Nivin Nystrom by considering a donation to the Breast Cancer Society of Canada. Find out how you can help fund life-saving research, visit bcsc.ca/donate

The post Nivin Nystrom’s Focuses On Immunotherapy Research appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

With one Mother’s Day Walk underway and another one coming up on May 12th, we wanted to share with you a few ways to prepare for a great 5K walk this weekend. Is this your first time walking with the Breast Cancer Society of Canada and other supporters who have been fundraising as well? Don’t worry, we are here to share some of our experiences and what you can expect.

What are we bringing this year?

  • A good pair of running or athletic shoes! Since we are all walking 5 kilometers, it is important to be as comfortable and as safe as possible. It is also helpful to wear a pair of socks that feel comfortable for the shoes you’ve chosen as well.
  • Don’t forget to be environmentally friendly and bring a reusable water bottle! Feel free to fill it with ice water or another kind of sports drink that you prefer. This also ensures you can fill it up as many times as you’d like throughout the day.
  • Our pink attire! Feel free to show your support for breast cancer research and wear some pink – we will be in our TBCRU t-shirts if you’d like to stop by, say hello, and ask us any questions about our research and why we are walking on Saturday.
  • Other athletic and weather appropriate clothing! We will be keeping an eye on the weather to ensure that we are properly clothed for any conditions that might happen on the weekend of our walk. We will also be wearing clothing that is breathable and doesn’t hold in moisture. If you need assistance in choosing clothing that is right for you,
  • A camera, to document all of our Mother’s Day Walk memories and share them with friends and family after a great day at the walk

How are we warming up and getting ready for the walk?

  • Warming up and stretching! We will be doing some simple stretches and rotations that focus on stretching the calves and shins. We want to avoid injury, and so stretching and warming up is a very important step to take before starting.
  • Keeping hydrated is key for participating in a longer walk. Drinking lots of water in training, during the walk, and after the walk is important for staying hydrated and for our overall health.
  • Getting lots of rest. It is important to rest and recover between training sessions, and to also be well rested for the day of. Prioritize your sleep to improve your overall health and performance on the day of the walk.

I hope this helps you get ready for the upcoming Mother’s Day Walk this weekend. If you’ve already been part of an earlier walk, let us know how it was and share your photos with the hashtag #MothersDayWalk and #ResearchMatters. If you have any further general questions, feel free to check out the Mother’s Day Walk Tips and Resources page.

Looking forward to a great upcoming weekend supporting an amazing cause!

Support researchers like these visit mothersdaywalk.ca and consider registering to walk or making a donation.

Author Bio:
Natasha Knier is an MSc Candidate in Medical Biophysics at Western University, and is currently supported by a TBCRU Studentship Award for 2018-2019.

The post Preparing for the Mother’s Day Walk appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Social media can be a very valuable tool for accessing a large network and sharing news and updates with others. When it comes to fundraising and sharing about the Breast Cancer Society’s Mother’s Day Walk, anyone can easily utilize social media to fundraise and support others who are participating this year! If you’re reading this, you likely already have access to a keyboard and the internet, both of which are the ingredients for getting involved in social media marketing and networking. It’s really that simple!

So what are some ways we can take advantage of the networks we have across various social media platforms to show support for breast cancer research? If you are planning to walk this year, here are some helpful tips I get you started on documenting your own Mother’s Day Journey:

1)    Participate in the social media campaign to highlight breast cancer awareness by sharing posts with the hashtags, #ResearchMatters and #MothersDayWalk. Using hashtags can allow your posts to be seen by a larger audience who is involved with similar content or may be searching for other users who are participating in the walk this year as well.

2)    Get creative and download a photo frame banner provided by the Breast Cancer Society of Canada to showcase why you are walking this year or to support your friends and family who are participating. You can download them from mothersdaywalk.ca.

3)    Share the online donation site on your own social media platforms! Did you know that you can search for specific individuals, teams, cities, or events? That means that when you share with your friends, they know exactly who they can search for and donate to in order to support your efforts towards this year’s walk. Use this Donate Now link to share.

4)    Engaging with the Breast Cancer Society of Canada on social media can not only help you stay up to date with the upcoming events, but it can also provide you with content to share with friends and family that comes directly from the organization. Did you know that the BCSC is active on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram? Why don’t you start by giving them a follow!
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BCSC
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/breastcancersocietyofcanada/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breastcancersoc/

5)    Lastly, consider creating your own content to share with your social networks. This is the perfect way to personalize your Mother’s Day Walk journey and connect with others. If you enjoy writing, you might consider blogging (like I am now) to share your story with preparing for the walk or why you are walking this year, or perhaps try taking photos to share your progress and keep lifelong memories.

I hope that after reading this you have been inspired to document and share more of your #MothersDayWalk journey with us and with your friends and family. Utilizing social media can be an excellent way to spread the word and increase your methods of fundraising as well. Let us know on one of our social media channels if you end up trying any of these tips – we look forward to seeing what you can create this year!

Support researchers like these visit mothersdaywalk.ca and consider registering to walk or making a donation.

Author Bio:
Natasha Knier is an MSc Candidate in Medical Biophysics at Western University, and is currently supported by a TBCRU Studentship Award for 2018-2019.

The post Mother’s Day Walk Social Media Tips appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The annual Mother’s Day Walk is an exciting event that is part of what makes the Breast Cancer Society of Canada so special and impactful. Since the very first Mother’s Day Walk in 1991, hundreds of people have come together to show their support and raise funds to one day end this disease. Want to know how you can help? Consider donating and raising funds for your Mother’s Day Walk or support your friends and colleagues who are walking!

The TBCRU trainees have been very creative and have had an enjoyable experience developing innovative ways to fundraise over the years. Just this past year, we held a TBCRU Annual Bake Sale at Robarts Research Institute to raise money in support of the Breast Cancer Society of Canada in October for Dress for the Cause! Katie, Olivia, Veronica and I were excited to organize this event alongside other TBCRU trainees to raise funds and to encourage our colleagues to get involved by wearing pink and eating delicious treats.

Some of the work that happened behind the scenes was creating promotional material (this was my main role), recruiting volunteers to bring in baked goods, designing a photo booth, and registering our team to contribute funds after the bake sale was completed. We were very happy with the outcome of our efforts and we were able to raise over $500 from this one event alone! It was a great way to not only fundraise for a cause that was important to all of us and our current projects, but also gave us an opportunity to interact with the greater community at Robarts Research Institute and share more about our work in breast cancer research.

So what are some ways you can fundraise for the upcoming walk? Whether you are participating in the Mother’s Day Walk or not there are so many ways you can show your support! If you’re looking for ways you can fundraise, you can check out a list of ideas right here.

While this list has a few ways to participate, feel free to be creative and think of ideas that work well for you! If hosting a bake sale or running an event seems like too big of a task, the Breast Cancer Society of Canada has thought of some easy and simple ways for you to raise $500 or more in just 10 days.

Lastly, if you are interested in organizing a fundraising initiative with your work like we did, there are opportunities for corporate sponsorship as well.

Fundraising can be an exciting and fun way to host events and gather support for yours or your friend’s Mother’s Day Walk. Ideas for fundraising are endless, and we hope that you’ll join us in preparing for this year’s walk!

Support researchers like these visit mothersdaywalk.ca and consider registering to walk or making a donation.

Author Bio:
Natasha Knier is an MSc Candidate in Medical Biophysics at Western University, and is currently supported by a TBCRU Studentship Award for 2018-2019.

The post Mother’s Day Walk Fundraising Tips appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Hello, my name is Natasha Knier and I am a TBCRU trainee, currently studying how breast cancer spreads to the brain. As a TBCRU trainee this year, I am excited and eager to document my process in participating in efforts towards the Breast Cancer Society of Canada’s annual Mother’s Day Walk for 2019.

My hope is that you will be able to share the experience of myself and other TBCRU trainees within the Robarts Cellular and Molecular Imaging Group (CMIG) as we fundraise, market, prepare, and ultimately participate in the walk this year.

From my lab, myself, Olivia Sehl (TBCRU Trainee), Veronica Dubois (TBCRU Trainee), and Katie Parkins (TBCRU Alumni) will be participating in efforts towards this year’s Mother’s Day Walk together. So why are we walking? As students working in breast cancer research, we are passionate about supporting fundraising and awareness efforts that highlight the important need for further research in this area, as well as showing support for the community of individuals who have been affected by breast cancer at any point in their lives.

To get us started, I thought I would introduce myself and my lab members, as well as the research that we are doing in breast cancer that is currently funded by the generous studentships from TBCRU.

As mentioned, my name is Natasha Knier, and I am an MSc Candidate in the Medical Biophysics program at Western University, supervised by Dr. Paula Foster. My project focuses on studying breast cancer that spreads to the brain using patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models by using a special magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to see which cells that spread to the brain die, which form new tumours, and which cells do not form tumours, but remain within the brain. You can read more about my project here. This is my first year participating in fundraising efforts for the Mother’s Day Walk this year, and so I am excited to be part of communicating my experiences with the walk.

Olivia Sehl is an MSc Candidate in Medical Biophysics at Western University, and she is also supervised by Dr. Paula Foster. Olivia studies immune cells, called macrophages, that promote the growth and spread of breast cancer. Her project involves the development a MRI technique to detect and quantify these cells. A major aim is to deplete tumor-associated macrophages to determine whether this impacts the growth and spread of breast tumors. Continue reading here.

Veronica Dubois is another TBCRU trainee that is currently an MSc Candidate in Medical Biophysics. She is co-supervised by Dr. John Ronald and Dr. Paula Foster at Western University. Veronica focuses on developing techniques to study a new kind of cancer therapy called chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy. This type of therapy involves collecting immune cells from a patient, attaching a protein that helps them to find and kill cancer cells, then placing these “trained” immune cells back into the patient where they can travel through the body and fight the patient’s cancer more effectively. You can read more here.

Lastly, Katie Parkins is a TBCRU Alumni who has participated in previous Mother’s Day Walks during her time as a TBCRU trainee. Katie is a PhD Candidate in Medical Biophysics at Western University, and is co-supervised by Dr. John Ronald and Dr. Paula Foster. Katie’s work focuses on combining iron based cellular MRI techniques with optical imaging to better track the fate of metastatic breast cancer cells in the brain and other sites throughout the body, with the overall goal of better understanding the mechanisms that lead to cancer metastasis and recurrence. You can read more about the research Katie did as a TBCRU trainee here. We are happy to have Katie on our fundraising team as her insights as a past trainee are extremely valuable to our organizational efforts.

We hope that you enjoyed hearing a bit about our plans to walk this year and how we are contributing to the important field of breast cancer research. If you are interested in joining us on our Mother’s Day Walk journey, you can easily register at mothersdaywalk.ca
Looking forward to sharing more about our time leading up to the walk, and we hope you follow along!

Support researchers like these visit mothersdaywalk.ca and consider registering to walk or making a donation.

Author Bio:
Natasha Knier is an MSc Candidate in Medical Biophysics at Western University, and is currently supported by a TBCRU Studentship Award for 2018-2019.

The post Meet the TBCRU Mother’s Day Walk Team appeared first on Breast Cancer Society of Canada.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview