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Batman on Film by Team Bof - 1d ago
NIGHTWING #61 review by James Armstrong

SYNOPSIS: Blüdhaven is burning! Ric Grayson and the Nightwings are helpless against the rampage of Burnback. Will they be able to pull themselves together as a team in order to prevent Blüdhaven from becoming ash? Confronted with their most dire threat yet, Ric and the Nightwings must find a way to come together if lives are to be saved.

The “City Ablaze” story concludes in NIGHTWING #61 and once again this series didn’t quite stick the landing.

The “Harm’s Way” story under Benjamin Percy showed promise as a crazy, cyberpunk adventure but was cut short due to Nightwing taking a bullet in BATMAN #55. Likewise, “Knight Terrors” kept me interested with the now renamed Ric Grayson being a lazy squatter seemingly out of the hero game. However, his turnaround against the Scarecrow didn’t have, for lack of a better word, any real oomph.

I get more spoilery than normal in this review but if you’re okay with that read on.

In NIGHTWING #61  Grayson and Colleen Edwards, codename Nightwing Gold, are confronting a massive, fiery creature that has cornered Melissa Stapleton, daughter of a comatose police captain. Acting on a hunch, or more accurately one line of dialogue, the Nightwings suspected her of being behind a recent string of arson attacks against police stations.

Our fiery new villain, nicknamed Backburn, felt inconsistent. It has been setting fires at police stations across Bludhaven but in the end, the creature just wants to rest. It’s hard to balance Backburn’s motivation to carry out aggressive behavior and then reveal that all it wants is to be put down.

Maybe instead of police stations, Backburn’s arson attacks should have been random acts. Then the Nightwings realize that Melissa Stapleton was nearby each crime scene. That way, there’s more than just a hunch to tie her to the case and Backburn’s reason for following her wraps up better.

If it seems as if I’m too hard on this storyline it’s only because post-Rebirth Nightwing stories featuring Raptor, Blockbuster, and Guppy all seemed to conclude so well.

But, at a minimum, if someone were to stumble upon this issue it’ll reinforce their knowledge of stop, drop and roll. Although, if you’re going to use a fire extinguisher aim for the base of the flame. That may not apply to fire monsters, though …

I’ve been mildly miffed with the NIGHTWING series rotating between different artists. This time I have to say it worked for the better. The art was done by Ronan Cliquet and, to me, had shades of KNIGHTFALL, which I very much appreciated. The cover was done by Kyle Hotz (isn’t it swell that someone with the last name Hotz got to draw a fiery cover) and is equally beautiful.

Finally, this issue had the “My name is Ric Grayson” intro at the beginning. I understand that Grayson’s name change still needs to be promoted and that every comic should treat the reader like it’s their first comic. But it still sounds like the intro to a CW show and that just bugs me.

“City Ablaze” didn’t quite click with me but the beautiful art made it worthwhile. – James Armstrong

GRADE: C+

The post NIGHTWING #61 Review appeared first on BATMAN ON FILM.

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Batman on Film by John Bierly - 1d ago

SYNOPSIS: “The Fall and the Fallen” part four! Batman has been defeated by Bane’s minions and chased out of Gotham. As a last-ditch effort to save his son from the lonely fate of being Batman, his father from another universe, Thomas Wayne, a.k.a. the Flashpoint Batman, is taking Bruce to the far ends of the Earth to try to give him the one thing that will cause him to give up crime-fighting for good.

The last time Bruce Wayne rode beneath a sweltering sun across the savage sands of the deadly desert that lies between civilization and Talia al Ghul’s kingdom of Khadym, his travel companion was his longtime lover and recent fiancée, Selina Kyle (in issues 33-35, collected in Vol. 5: The Rules of Engagement).

But that was so, so many miles and emotions ago.

After what seemed like the surest of things thudded to a heart-rending halt, Bruce (along with unlikely allies including Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot) uncovered a conspiracy in which Bane was calling shots all across Gotham City from the bowels of Arkham Asylum (which, unlike the Alamo, actually has a basement). The Devil of Santa Prisca’s chief lieutenant in these shenanigans was none other than “Flashpoint” Thomas Wayne, another dimension’s Batman who helped Bane connect Bruce to a mind-melting machine that sends his psyche sailing through a series of hellish “Knightmares” that challenged everything he ever thought he knew, felt, wanted, and was.

When Batman busted out, he promised to bring his own army to Arkham to battle Bane’s. Instead, he punched Tim Drake in the face (after already having landed knuckles across Jim Gordon’s noggin), faced Bane alone, and apparently got his back broken again. I guess. I think.

It’s been a while since we’ve been able to know with confidence when or where we are in these pages, and writer Tom King likes it that way. I do, too, though I understand why some of you are losing your patience. I know many readers felt the “Knightmares” issues dragged on too long, and the two-part crossover with THE FLASH that punctuated them didn’t help matters much. On the other hand, there’s not a single “Knightmares” issue that I don’t consider a modern classic.

Keeping with recent tradition, BATMAN #73 offers no resolutions. It begins with Thomas Wayne (wearing his own version of desert Bat-gear) riding across those same savage sands, his son’s limp body draped across the back of a saddle attached to ropes that are dragging a coffin. If you’re wondering whom the coffin is for, you’re asking the wrong question.

On and on they ride, as Thomas sings “Home on the Range.” Ninjas attack, but they’re no match for Batman’s dad (who, in his mind, is The Batman). Are they the League of Assassins? Not quite. (Same clan, different vintage.) And when Bruce eventually regains consciousness, he asks Thomas if this is a dream.

“Yes, son,” Thomas answers through a sun-baked smile. “But not yours.”

It’s not hard to guess what Thomas wants. It’s easy to figure out the “where” and the “why.” But, as always, the devil’s in the details, or, in this case, the dialogue. Thomas’s words to Bruce are firm but fatherly. His goal is all about family.

And he’s also way, way out of his Bat-damn mind.

Joëlle Jones drew this book’s previous trip to Khadym in a stunning display of magnificently memorable artistic majesty. Mikel Janín takes the reins this time, recreating the feel of Jones’s desert vistas beneath his instantly recognizable, uniquely handsome characters. From Bruce’s stubble and stupefied reactions to the warm, weathered lines around Thomas’s smile and eyes, Janín is equally comfortable giving us familial intimacy and what-the-fudge impossibility, sometimes in the same frame. The jagged layout of an action sequence yields palpable violence and electric energy.

From pink- and purple-hued dusks to orange, yellow, and reddish afternoons, Jordie Bellaire’s colors give the imagery a dreamy sense of depth. She colored “The Rules of Engagement,” too, and she’s the secret sauce that brings these stories together. Her skies go right up to the edge of being surreal, which is perfect for this story, and she adeptly makes a nighttime campfire feel warm and inviting as it puts out just enough heat and light to keep shadows at bay. She’s a master.

Once again, don’t expect Bane’s defeat or Bat’s reunion with Cat or anything else resembling an end to the madness King’s meting out. In fact, this issue promises that Bruce Wayne’s situation is only getting weirder and worse.

As usual, I’m here for it. – John Bierly

GRADE: A+

The post BATMAN #73 Review appeared first on BATMAN ON FILM.

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SUPERMAN: YEAR ONE #1 Review by Chris Clow

SYNOPSIS: From the burning world of Krypton to the bucolic fields of Kansas, the first chapter of SUPERMAN: YEAR ONE tracks Clark Kent’s youth in Kansas, as he comes to terms with his strange powers and struggles to find his place in our world. DC BLACK LABEL is proud to present the definitive origin of Superman as rendered by the legendary comics creators Frank Miller and John Romita Jr.!

Frank Miller’s track record with the Man of Steel has been…spotty in the past, to say the least.

The most prominent work that the writer has featured the character in was his 1986 classic The Dark Knight Returns, which contorted arguably the most iconic and prototypical superhero into a symbol of illegitimate authority that served a sole purpose as an obstacle for Batman to overcome.

While I have issues with the distorted perceptions that book has created about Superman for the people who have only ever read that one comic book in their lives, ultimately that’s fine. After all, DKR is a Batman story. In fact, the majority of Miller’s work that has featured some kind of appearance from Superman is, primarily, restricted to Batman stories. DKR‘s two sequels feature some kind of Superman appearance, as does an issue of Miller and Jim Lee’s ill-fated All-Star Batman and Robin, the Boy Wonder.

Previously, the one sole Superman story Miller contributed to was as an artist, one of many in the feature story from the anniversary issue Superman (vol. 1) #400, written by Elliott S. Maggin.

So, given Miller’s prior uses of the Superman character, and the fact that he’s primarily known by both the initiated and uninitiated comic book reader for his reputation embracing harder-edged, darker, and sometimes overly gritty stories (that can border on camp in some cases), the idea of Miller writing Superman — even an alternate, non-DCU Superman — might be a little off-putting.

That’s where Superman: Year One comes in, giving the Man of Steel the DC Comics origin treatment that Miller himself defined along with artist David Mazzucchelli in 1987’s Batman: Year One. With a lot of question marks going into the first issue of Superman: Year One concerning Miller’s questionable capacity for the more optimistic attitude that the Man of Steel is primarily known for, doubt about the writer’s ability to represent the original superhero properly is only natural when considering his previous body of work.

Well, I started to become convinced by this first issue and its philosophy on young Clark Kent when his Pa was driving him to his first day of high school. Pa gave some classically sage wisdom, telling him he shouldn’t think he’s better than other people.

“I’m not better than anybody, I know that,” Clark says. “I’m just better at doing stuff.”

A strange wave of relief came over me.

In addition to being, perhaps, the most in-depth single-issue look at Clark’s childhood and adolescence in a good long while, there’s a downright shocking level of purity to this young Clark that I certainly wasn’t expecting as a jaded, outright doubter of Miller’s ability to represent Superman. Never have I been so delighted to be proven wrong, because not only does Clark show a pivotal amount of empathy for the people around him, but cruelty — in this case, depicted through the prism of Smallville High’s contingent of bullies — also baffles him and forces him not simply to stop it with power, but to alleviate the suffering of the bullies’ various victims.

That service was really appreciated, and Miller even managed to build up Clark’s eventual constitution concerning truth and justice in a way that surprised and charmed me. Still, Miller did manage to creep in a moment that was more traditionally “Miller,” but thankfully it was only a fleeting moment that gave way to a better scene about halfway through this book.

It didn’t take long, though, before this version of arguably the most oft-told origin story in the history of comics took a swerve that is unique. After Clark leaves Smallville, a lot of versions of the origin have him traveling the world in some way in order to get an education. A lot of versions of the origin have him go off to college. In 2004, Mark Waid chose for Clark to fly around the world and gain experiences in both tranquil and dangerous parts of the world firsthand, while more recent other media adaptations see him wander around aimlessly or just emerge instantaneously at age 30 wearing his iconic cape.

Miller’s solution to Clark’s pre-Superman world exploration is different, but it also has me a bit nervous, and that nervousness that I feel as a reader is actually also shared by at least one other character in the story. I don’t really want to divulge it because it’s a pretty major story beat, but suffice it to say that this has the potential to get the character to the same heroic destination via a very different narrative path. That’s definitely exciting, but also, strangely, philosophically concerning.

At times, it did feel like the writing was trying a little too hard in places to be folksy or relatable, but thankfully this sense was drowned out by the solid character work that the issue as a whole manages to accomplish. Still, issue #1 of Superman: Year One absolutely did its job. It showcased a version of the character that I, frankly, wasn’t sure Frank Miller was capable of portraying as a writer, but this is by far the most humanistic and tender single issue I have ever read that has Miller’s name at top billing.

Much of that feel, of course, has to do with the artistic team. John Romita, Jr. is no stranger to Superman, having worked on several issues of the character’s main comics title with both Geoff Johns and Gene Luen Yang. While some readers have maintained a strange obstinacy toward Romita’s tenure since going DC exclusive, the thing that I’ve always appreciated about his work is his ability to imbue everything he works on with the emotion that the work intends you to feel. Because of that, Superman: Year One #1 feels positively joyful in all the right places, due in no small part to Romita’s pencils punctuated by strong lines and a vibrant color palette.

I’m charmed, curious, and a little worried. None of these are bad things to feel after reading a number one issue. Beyond all of that, though, I’m relieved to be able to say that not only does Superman: Year One seem interesting, but it seems that the Last Son of Krypton is — thankfully — in good hands with this creative team.

Here’s hoping that the issues to come are just as truthful, yet unexpected as this one. – Chris Clow

GRADE: A

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Batman on Film by Garret Grev - 1d ago

SYNOPSIS: After being off-planet for so long, the Justice League must try to pick up the pieces of their lives—but Lex Luthor has other plans. If he has his way, he’ll show all of humanity that the Justice League will never be there in the world’s time of need!

I’m a big fan of roller coasters. The higher the heights and the faster the speed the better. When a good roller coaster is giving you all its got it’s a huge adrenaline rush and I’m smiling and screaming and laughing, but you don’t get to those thrills without setup. You have to make the slow climb up the hill, you hit flat parts in the track that line up the next jarring twist or series of ups and downs. Those sections are equally important to the experience, if not as impressive when compared to the moments that blow you away.

Justice League #26 is a bit of the slow climb or the flat section of rail that inevitably is setting you up for the next rush. It’s good and it’s necessary, but coming off of the last few issues of the title it feels a little dull. That’s not to say that writer James Tynion IV and artist Javier Fernandez aren’t delivering a fine performance. In fact, this issue plays into Tynion’s strengths without leaning into some of his weaker tendencies.

Tynion typically does well with narration and big speeches and this issue delivers both. Martian Manhunter kicks things off giving the reader an overview of what has taken place on Earth since JL #25. People are turning towards actions of pure self-interest, inspired by Luthor’s worldwide message on the impending doom of existence and laying the blame at the feet of the League. In his absence, urban legends of a mysterious cloaked figure are being spread by everyday people whose actions have turned villainous. Manhunter details his investigation into each case, searching the minds and hearts of these people and the segment serves as a strong introduction to the storyline and solid character work for J’onn.

Later, Superman addresses the House of Heroes where Justice League members from across the galaxy have gathered to hear his plan on how to save existence. We get a full page of Superman being Superman, leading and influencing countless heroes to band together for the cause of justice. The speech reinforces the larger narrative at play and is a great Cliff’s Notes for the reader while giving the character the spotlight and his central role in the as the epitome of heroism in DC’s expansive multiverse. Tynion nails both of these passages.

It’s also in the House of heroes where Fernandez really gets to show off his skills. There are so many characters presented you could spend hours just staring at these panels and taking note of who all is present. He presents a strong grasp on detail even in the widest and most packed scenes. Fernandez makes the wise choice of keeping the background settings fairly underdeveloped and atmospheric, allowing all the characters to pop off the page and impress the breadth of the gathering upon the reader.

Not everything is as strong in the issue, unfortunately. The World Forger we encounter here feels like a different character from the one that was attempting to preemptively punish potential evil-doers and rewrite the minds of the Justice League to turn away from true justice. There is a lengthy sequence focused on Hawkgirl and Mera leading the reader through the research, planning, and training of the league members that are somewhat interesting but drags on too long.

Oh, and the cover stating “The Death of Starman?!” Is completely misleading and barely touched on in the story itself.

Every big thrill ride requires its set up. Not every issue can be a 70 mph drop through a blackened tunnel with strobe lights flashing in your face. Still, the switch from Snyder and Jimenez’s work on the previous issues is noticeable, especially after the thrilling end to the “6th Dimension” storyline. Justice League #26 is a good addition to the series but falls shorts of the previously reached heights. – Garret Grev

GRADE: B

The post JUSTICE LEAGUE #26 Review appeared first on BATMAN ON FILM.

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BATWOMAN — starring Ruby Rose as Kate Kane/Batwoman — will make its debut on The CW television network on Sunday, October 6, 2019 at 8PM ET/7PM CT.

The premiere episode will re-air the next two nights (Monday/Tuesday October 7/8) at the same time.

Stay tuned to BOF for our full coverage of BATWOMAN — “postgame shows,” news, and episode reviews — starting in October. – Bill “Jett” Ramey

Batwoman | First Look Trailer | The CW - YouTube

The post The CW Releases BATWOMAN Premiere Date & Time appeared first on BATMAN ON FILM.

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HISTORY

THE BATMAN was conceived in 2013 when Ben Affleck signed on to play Batman in BATMAN v SUPERMAN and was officially announced in 2015 prior to BvS‘s release in 2016.

Under the direction of Ben Affleck, the script for THE BATMAN was co-written by Affleck and DC’s Geoff Johns, with BvS scribe Chris Terrio doing a polish.  Deathstroke (Joe Manganiello) was to be the film’s main villain.

After the critical and box office disappointments of BvS and JUSTICE LEAGUE in 2017, Affleck left the project; though it was not announced that he would no longer star in the film as Batman until early 2019.  Affleck retains an “executive producer” credit on the film but has no creative input.

In February of 2017, it was announced that Matt Reeves would write and direct THE BATMAN and would be a completely new film than the one developed under Affleck.

In January of 2019, it was announced that THE BATMAN would be released on June 25, 2021.

On May 31, 2019, it was officially announced that Robert Pattinson had been cast as Batman/Bruce Wayne in THE BATMAN.

CAST & CREW

Matt Reeves will write, direct, and produce THE BATMAN.

Matt Reeves – Writer/Director/Producer

Robert Pattinson will star in the film as Batman/Bruce Wayne.

Robert Pattinson – Bruce Wayne/Batman RELEASE DATE

THE BATMAN is currently scheduled to be released on June 25, 2021.

THE ROGUES’ GALLERY

As of June of 2019, there has been no confirmation of which villains would be in THE BATMAN, though it is strongly rumored that the film will include: The Penguin, Catwoman, Two-Face, The Riddler, Mad Hatter, and Firefly.

PLOT & TONE

According to Matt Reeves, the writer/director is planning on THE BATMAN being a “noir-driven, detective version of Batman that is point of view driven.”

In THE BATMAN, Bruce Wayne/Batman will be 30 years old — give or take — a year or 2.  While not a rookie, he also will not be in his Dark Knight prime.

FILMING

THE BATMAN is currently set to beginning filming in early 2020 in the UK (most likely Warner Bros. Studio UK outside of London).

TRAILERS/VIDEO

Coming Soon

POSTERS/ONE SHEETS/IMAGES

Coming Soon

CONNECTION TO OTHER DC FILMS

THE BATMAN will not be connected in any way to Ben Affleck’s Batman from BvS and JUSTICE LEAGUE.  It is a total reboot of the franchise and not a prequel to BvS/JL.  It also will not have any ties to Todd Phillips’ JOKER starring Joaquin Phoenix.

LINKS

BOF’s Coverage of THE BATMAN

THE BATMAN Official Website (Coming Soon)

THE BATMAN on Facebook (Coming Soon)

THE BATMAN on Twitter (Coming Soon)

THE BATMAN on Rotten Tomatoes (Coming Soon)

THE BATMAN on IMDB

THE BATMAN on Box Office Mojo

Matt Reeves’ Official Twitter

The post BOF’s Everything About THE BATMAN Page appeared first on BATMAN ON FILM.

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Batman on Film by Bill "jett" Ramey - 3d ago

Welcome to the first BOF Mailbag of June 2019.  And a belated Happy Fathers Day to all my fellow Dads!

Thanks for all the questions and make sure to keep those cards and letters coming.

Lots of questions about Matt Reeves’ THE BATMAN, so let’s get to ’em! – Bill “Jett” Ramey

What sort of time table do you think it’ll be until we start hearing more specific casting details for the rest of the cast (I.e. Catwoman, Alfred, Gordon, main villains)? #BatmanOnFilmMailbag

— Jonathan Brady (@virgiltheart1) June 16, 2019

JETT SAYS: I’m hearing that additional casting is imminent.

Do you see THE BATMAN taking place over a few months like THE LONG HALLOWEEN or making it shorter and taking place over a few days?

JETT SAYS: Well, we’ve had a Batman film that took place over the course several months/a year and that was the last solo one, THE DARK KNIGHT RISES, so going that route isn’t something new.  With that said, I’d have no problem if THE BATMAN did take place over, say, a year ala TLH.

I suspect we’re getting some sort of mystery that Batman is trying to solve and it’s going to lead him to question several Batman villains.  If so, it would probably work better if the narrative takes over a little bit of time, not, like, in one day/night.

Hey there Jett! What would you prefer? The new suit being inspired by the first comic book appearances, or all black with the yellow oval like the ones in the 80s/90s? (I believe it could happen if they wanted to cash in on the nostalgia factor, but on the other hand, Matt Reeves probably wants to do something unique following his own vision.)

JETT SAYS: I’d love to see a Bat-suit based on those early 1939 appearances of The Bat-Man in the comics, but modernized, if you will.  The yellow oval returning to the movie suit would be cool too.  And yes, I agree that Matt Reeves will go with something fresh and new in which we haven’t really seen on film yet.

And the cowl/cape/boots/gloves/etc. MUST stay black!  No blue Batman, please.

Your fancast of the rumoured villains to appear in the film? #BatmanOnFilmMailbag

— Kyle Parry (@KyleParry1985) June 16, 2019



JETT SAYS:
Man, I’m not good a fan-casting to be honest, but I can definitely see Andy Serkis as The Penguin.

Does the possibility of half a dozen members of Batman’s rogues’ gallery appearing in Matt Reeves’ film worry you or do you think it could work within the context of a whodunnit that needs multiple suspects?

JETT SAYS: Alex, it doesn’t worry me in the least — even if they’re more than 6 villains in THE BATMAN.  Most of the villain roles in THE BATMAN are minor ones in terms of how much screentime they’ll get, so all’s good.

Keep in mind that BATMAN BEGINS included 6 villains — the fake Ra’s Al Ghul, the real Ra’s Al Ghul, The Scarecrow, Mr. Zsazz, Joe Chill, and Carmine Falcone — and didn’t feel overstuffed.

I keep hearing a rumor about Macaulay Culkin playing Joker. What’s your two cents on that and do you think Mr. J. will make a cameo in the upcoming film? Cheers! #BatmanOnFilmMailbag

— Paul Alan Dixon (@PaulAlanDixon) June 16, 2019

JETT SAYS: Nothing I’ve seen (casting calls) or heard suggests that The Joker will be in THE BATMAN.  With Todd Phillips’ JOKER starring Joaquin Phoenix coming out later this year and Jared Leto’s version of the character kinda/sorta still existing (in the periphery) in any DC movie featuring Margot Robbie’s Harley Quinn (BIRDS OF PREY, for example), I don’t think it’s time to introduce yet another live-action movie Joker just yet.

I do think that if Reeves indeed plans on a trilogy, then The Joker must show up in one of the 3 films — I just don’t think it’ll be in THE BATMAN.

As far as Macaulay Culkin as The Joker, I think this nothing but a BS rumor based on nothing but the fact that he’s really a really skinny and weird cat.  To me, it reeks of the same sort of fan nonsense when Crispen Glover was “rumored” to be in the mix to play The Joker in THE DARK KNIGHT.

When will Condiment King, Kite-Man and some other D-list villains appear in a Batman movie? They could be used in TV news reports and not actually shown fighting with Batman.

JETT SAYS: Look, I have a soft spot in my heart for the silly Batman villains that have appeared in the comics over the course of Batman’s 80-year history, obviously (i.e. Crazy Quilt).  But some of these — like Condiment King — simply can not be used in a live-action movie that’s meant to be serious.

That being said, I’m sure some of these sorts of members from Batman’s rogues’ gallery could be adapted for a serious, live-action Batman film and not come off as being nothing more than a goof.

Why didn’t Reeve casted someone who look like Affleck cause Patterson don’t and he’s playin a prequel?

If Reeves’ new Batman works, do you think Warner Bros./DC wipe the slate clean and use this rendition [of Batman] for any potential “DCEU/shared universe” films WAY down the line?

JETT SAYS: I doubt it — and I don’t say that as someone who isn’t a fan of Batman mixing it up with superpowered beings or the shared cinematic universe thing.

From what I know and have heard, WB isn’t bullshitting when they say they are less focused on the shared DC universe on film deal and simply interested in making good, solo, standalone movies based on DC characters.

They tried, things didn’t work out all that well (and we know all the reasons, but let’s not rehash all that BS again), and they are done.

If THE BATMAN is truly the beginning of a new Batman on film trilogy, it’s going to be at least a decade from now before it’s completed.

Think about that for a second.

It’ll likely be 2029 — TWO THOUSAND AND TWENTY-NINE! — when THE BATMAN 3 (or whatever it’ll be called) bows.

So, I don’t see a 43-year-old Robert Pattinson — who just spend a decade of his life playing Batman — continuing on in a new Justice League movie.

Plus, even it such a film is WAY down the line, you’d have to start building towards that NOW.

Not happening.

Can we not simply enjoy all DC on film endeavors going forward in the post-BvS/JL world and not worry about trying to make it all “connect?”

Hello Jett.  I have been thinking of ways the new Batman films may be able to differentiate themselves from the previous incarnations and thought of an idea. What if 4-5 villains were introduced in the first film and some of them play a role in more than 1 film?  Perhaps someone (The Joker?) can have a role in all 3 films — assuming it’s a trilogy. We’ve always had new villain(s) in subsequent Batman films for the Burton/Schumacher/Nolan movies and this can be something new. What do you think, can it work? (via email)

JETT SAYS: Hamad, I dig what you’re suggesting here sir.

While I don’t think The Joker will be in THE BATMAN (see above), the “seeds” of him already existing can certainly be planted in film one.

Of course, I’d point out that The Scarecrow (Cillian Murphy) kinda played that “connective tissue” role in THE DARK KNIGHT TRILOGY — but admittedly, in cameos in TDK and RISES.

But yeah, I’m with you man, good idea!

Do you think we’ll see Bruce living in Wayne Manor in The Batman rather than a lakehouse or penthouse in the city?#BatmanOnFilmMailbag

— Robin’s Nest (@HarlowC) June 16, 2019

JETT SAYS: I’m pretty sure that Bruce Wayne and Alfred will be inhabiting Wayne Manor in THE BATMAN with The Batcave existing underneath and that’s ALL we’ll see in the film.

Also, in theory, he’s probably got a penthouse in downtown Gotham with a mini-Batcave in there somewhere.

And I’m quite sure that Bruce Wayne owns a lake house connected to yet another mini-Batcave because, well, he’s Batman, to hell with that BvS/JL nonsense.

@BATMANONFILM Hey Jett, I remember before Begins you’d get questions asking if Keaton would return. Both Bale and Affleck have had fans want them to come back. If you had to rank them, which Batman do you think fans have had the hardest time letting go of? #BatmanOnFilmMailbag

— James Armstrong (@Jamzarm) June 16, 2019

JETT SAYS: James, without a doubt it’s Michael Keaton.  Even today you have fans wanting MK to play the aged Bruce Wayne in a BATMAN BEYOND movie.  What ironic about the love for Keaton’s Batman is that his casting was almost universally bashed by fans back when it was announced in 1988!

With Bale, it’s different because his Batman story ended with THE DARK KNIGHT RISES with his Bruce Wayne riding off into the sunset (or Italy) living happily ever after with Selina Kyle.

As far as Affleck, while he had his supporters (which again is ironic due to how his casting caused a fanboy meltdown when announced back in 2013), his Batman wasn’t beloved like Keaton and Bale and was not accepted overall by the audience.

While both Bale and Keaton’s places in Batman history is solid, Affleck’s will barely register and, I believe, will end up a blip on the Batman on film screen.

Do you think it’s possible Reeves and WB will refrain from confirming who the “main villain” is since it’s supposed to be a detective story?

JETT SAYS: Absolutely and I hope that’s the case.

What do you think the chances are more films like the JOKER are made — assuming it’s successful? If someone came with, as an example, a creative and unique one-off take on BATMAN BEYOND, do you think WB would be willing to make it during time Reeves has Batman locked down (presumably over next decade for a trilogy)?

JETT SAYS: I know that Warner Bros. wants to do more of these one-off DC films like JOKER, so the more successful it is, the more likely that it’ll happen.

As far as a BATMAN BEYOND movie running concurrently with Reeves’ THE BATMAN series, I don’t see that happening as BEYOND wouldn’t be a one-off as they’d want more than a single film, probably a franchise.

Bill, The Joker and Robin weren’t mentioned for the first film.  Do you think they’ll be in the 2nd one?

JETT SAYS: As I said on the last BOF Vlog, both Robin and The Joker are very important to the Batman mythos and history and I think they have to be included at some point for a Batman film series (or trilogy of movies) to be considered “definitive.”  So yes, I think we’ll see both characters at some point in Reeves’ trilogy.

Would it be a good idea for Reeves to do his entire trilogy without The Joker?

JETT SAYS: See the previous question/answer.

This one is comic related, Have you heard anything on whether Geoff Johns and Gary Frank have started work to finish volume 3 of BATMAN: EARTH ONE or whether it’s on the back burner?

JETT SAYS: I haven’t heard anything about that one in quite some time, to be honest.  I know they started it and I assume it’ll be released at some point.  When that actually happens, I have no idea.  Heck, DOOMSDAY CLOCK hasn’t been released on-schedule, so take that for what you will.

The post The June 2019 BOF Mailbag #1 appeared first on BATMAN ON FILM.

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Swamp Thing episode three, “He Speaks,” continues the show’s trend of brilliantly adapting the source material and honoring the horror genre.  This episode was truly a wonderful watch.

With every episode, my issues vanish, cheesy dialogue and bad jokes of the pilot are things of the past.  “He Speaks” proves that you need to be patient with character development and character arcs as Swamp Thing is evolving right before our eyes.

While I really enjoyed the last episode, I will admit I did get a bit nervous that this Swamp Thing was going to be too far of a departure from what I have come to love about the character.   Those concerns disappear as Derek Mears is at the top of his game.  Mears proves to be more than just a stuntman, as I really believe he is Swamp Thing in that costume.  I had my concerns that Swamp Thing would be turned into a monstrous brute but with every second he is on screen it was like watching Alan Moore’s work come to life.  His voice, the compassion, his vocabulary, the control of the Green, it is damn near definitive.

The virus is spreading fast and the CDC is losing faith in Abby.  Caregivers are falling ill and antibiotics are barely keeping patients alive.  Abby seemly at the end of her rope decides she needs Alec’s notes and breaks into his lab.  This is where the show flexes its muscles.  This scene is best described as the perfect combination of Candyman and Swamp Thing, supernatural superhero horror at it’s finest.  Proving that the writers have done their homework and Swamp Thing is, in fact, DC’s version of a green Socrates.  The sympathy and the empathy that Swamp Thing had for his foe is a thing of beauty, proving to be more than muscle and a deep growl.  This felt like it was pulled from the pages of Moore’s Saga of the Swamp Thing.

Avery Sunderland is not as powerful as he led us to believe.  It’s actually Maria who is not only the money but also the person who is in charge behind the scenes.  Avery might be the face with the political connections but Maria is clearly in control.  It seems that their daughter’s death has taken a real toll on Maria leaving Avery with the opportunity to make some shady moves.   Thing’s are starting to collapse around Avery and he is starting to lose his cool.  He has Jason Woodrue in the hospital trying to find a way to cover his tracks from a medical standpoint keeping CDC and the government off the scent.

Swamp Thing continues to impress with every episode.  The SPFX, gore, and horror are top notch and will rival anything on the silver screen.  The twists and turns will keep any fan of suspense on the edge of their seat.

Swamp Thing and Abby are starting to form a relationship that will make any Swamp Thing fan proud.  Sure other DC couples steal the spotlight, Lois and Clark, Bat/Cat, Ollie and Dinah but there is a certain charm about Abby and Swampy, that impossible love that is building.

Great scares, wonderful suspense, body horror, true to the source material and a love story, Swamp Thing is proving to be more than just a horror show.  It is really building something.  I even have my mainstream reality TV watching girlfriend into this show.  It is really starting to become must-see TV every Friday! – Peter Verra

GRADE: A

#SaveSwampThing

The post SWAMP THING Episode #3 Review appeared first on BATMAN ON FILM.

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Batman on Film by Bill "jett" Ramey - 4d ago

Via his Instagram, JOKER director Todd Phillips has posted a new image of Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix) transforming himself into The Joker.  Check it out…

View this post on Instagram

Finishing touches.

A post shared by Todd Phillips (@toddphillips1) on Jun 16, 2019 at 9:50am PDT

I’m pretty sure I know at what point in the film takes place — he’s getting ready for something BIG.

JOKER hits theaters on October 4, 2019.  CLICK HERE for all of BOF’s JOKER coverage. – Bill “Jett” Ramey

JOKER - Teaser Trailer! - YouTube

The post Todd Phillips Posts New JOKER Image appeared first on BATMAN ON FILM.

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Warner Bros. Home Entertainment has moved up its physical release date for BATMAN: HUSH on 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack, Blu-ray Combo Pack, and the DC Universe streaming service on August 6, 2019. The film retains its Digital release date of July 20, 2019CLICK HERE to order your copy.

The movie centers on a shadowy new villain known only as Hush, who uses Gotham’s Rogues Gallery to destroy Batman’s crime-fighting career, as well as Bruce Wayne’s personal life – which has already been complicated by a relationship with Selina Kyle, aka Catwoman.

BATMAN: HUSH will be available on 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack ($39.99 SRP) and Blu-ray Combo Pack ($24.98 SRP) as well as on Digital ($19.99 HD). The 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack features an Ultra HD Blu-ray disc in 4K with HDR and a Blu-ray disc featuring the film; the Blu-ray Combo Pack features the film in hi-definition. The 4K Ultra HD and Blu-ray Combo Pack include a digital version of the film.

Bonus features include the all-new DC Showcase animated short, Sgt. Rock; a fascinating featurette focused on Selina Kyle/Catwoman entitled Batman: Love in Time of War; an Audio Commentary featuring executive producer James Tucker, director Justin Copeland and screenwriter Ernie Altbacker; a sneak peek at the next DC Universe Movie, Wonder Woman: Bloodlines; and two episodes from The Batman/Superman Hour.

"Batman: Hush" trailer - YouTube

The post BATMAN: HUSH Released Date Moved Up a Week appeared first on BATMAN ON FILM.

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