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In this week’s basketball coaching conversation, learn about the matchup based offensive and defensive coaching philosophy of Carleton head coach Dave Smart. Smart has architected one of the most dominant dynasties in collegiate sport history. He served as the head men’s basketball coach at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario from 1999 to 2019, where he led the Ravens to thirteen of the team’s fourteen U Sports national championships in men’s basketball.

Since taking over the Ravens program in 1999-00, Smart won 92 per cent of his games against Canadian opposition between 1999 and 2019. He led the Ravens to a Canadian men’s record of 87 consecutive wins in league and playoff games, from 2002-2005. Smart has been named the Canadian Collegiate Basketball Coach of the Year a record eight times, and the OUA conference coach-of-the-year awards thirteen times.

Dave Smart’s incredible success at the Canadian university level has provided him with several opportunities to work at the national level. In 2012, Smart was named the assistant coach of the Canadian Senior Men’s Basketball National team by head coach Jay Triano. In June 2013, The Development Men’s National Team completed a sweep of the Four Nations’ International Invitational Tournament with a perfect 9-0 record in registering three victories over each of the United States, Latvia and host-nation China.

All Access Carleton Basketball Practice with Dave Smart - YouTube

Additional Notes from Dave Smart

Coaching Thoughts from Dave Smart

Ideas from the Basketball Super Coaching Clinic 2018

Dave Smart Carleton Basketball Offense Lessons

Quotes:

“Everything we do is based on the individuals and the match-ups . . you’re not only looking at what the offense can and can’t do but what the defense can and can’t do against that offense.”

“We’re really all about covering their actions and the individuals in those actions. We don’t need to know what they’re running . . we just need be able to see what each individual does and doesn’t do.”

“Our defense is based on the individual players and what they like and don’t like doing.”

“Part of what I like about what we do defensively is that it forces all of our players to constantly play in their weakness which allows them to get better.”

Q: What are the weaknesses that you look for in a player?

A: The first thing is ‘Where do they struggle to pass from?’ If you can’t pass at a high level, you can’t play.

“[Passing] on target, on time is the key to winning and it is the key to losing if you can’t do it.”

[On defensive closeouts] “When you’re too laissez faire about it, they’re going to be sloppy and not very good at it; when you’re too technical about it they’re going to be robotic about it and they’re not going to do it quick.”

“Everybody shoots different . . but there are certain base mechanics that every single . . high level shooter has.”

“In my mind, it’s got to be development or competitive and you can develop within the competitive . . show [the technique] to them and then let’s get them to do it as fast as they possibly can.”

“Make them compete and make them figure it out on their own.”

“People underestimate how smart these kids are and how easy they find learning.”

“There’s no situation where you shouldn’t be gang rebounding . . so it should be easy to get into whatever lane you need to get into [in transition] . . so we dictate lanes.”

“We get wide open threes and we get them because we’re always diving guys and, if you don’t go with them, you’re going to give up layups.”

“Once they walk on the floor, everybody knows who our shooters are, who our penetrators are, who our post match-ups are. If they don’t like it. Fix it. Train. They fight to get in those spots . . so they’re always developing.”

“If they can’t handle the fact that they’ve got to earn it, they’re not going to be ready for life. Now, how we say it to the university guys and how we say it to the grade 4s is very different.”

“I think competition is extremely important and it’s important within your team, too.”

“I have one of my assistants just worried about spacing. So, in anything we’re doing, he is locked in on our spacing.”

“We want to always have more offensive rebounds than the other team we’re playing and we want to shoot a higher percentage than the team we’re playing. When you’re trying to do those two things, it’s not easy.”

“We want to get a ton of offensive rebounds . . the only way you can do that is if you’re taking shots that everybody on your team expects to be taken.”

“Our shot selection is dictated on who is good at what. And you earn it.”

Click below to listen in if you listen on:

On iTunes

On Google Music

On Stitcher

On Libsyn

Breakdown:

1:00 – Matchup Defense
5:00 – Focusing on Individuals
8:00 – Analytics
11:00 – Help and Rotation Concepts
13:30 – If you can’t pass, you can’t play.
15:30 – Defense is built around passing ability of opponent
22:00 – Defensive Calls
23:00 – Teaching on a Close Out
28:30 – Is Defense Age Appropriate?
33:30 – Middle Drive Run and Jump
36:30 – Defend Off the Ball Screening
38:00 – ADVERTISEMENT (Dave Smart Program)
39:00 – Ball Screen Defense
42:00 – Actions that they Struggle with
44:30 – Post Defense
50:30 -Things He Emphasizes in Transition
53:00 – Dictate Matchups
54:30 – Running Players to the Dunker’s Spot
56:30 – Talking about “Spacing”
1:03:00 – Working on Spacing
1:04:30 – Shot Selection
1:12:00 – Sharing his Knowledge
1:15:00 – Conclusion

Dave Smart:

Website: www.davesmartbasketball.com

Subscribe and Review:

As we build our podcast following please take the time to support the Basketball Podcast. Our goal is to openly share as much useful basketball coaching info to stimulate your coaching.

How to leave a podcast review at iTunes

Go to the iTunes page of the Basketball Podcast.

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-basketball-podcast/id1398261897?mt=2


Click the View in iTunes button.
View in iTunes
At iTunes, click the Ratings and Reviews tab.
Select Ratings and Reviews
Rate the podcast using 1 to 5 stars.
Submit a brief honest review.

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Google Play

https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Ivp7oie246e53yiitcdumpg5viq

Stitcher

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/basketball/the-basketball-podcast?refid=stpr

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The post The Basketball Podcast: EP50 Dave Smart Part 2 appeared first on Basketball Immersion.

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In this extended video you will be able to follow how we teach our ball handling and dribbling drills including kill the grass, steal the ball and, our in and out dribble series. The video will provide what we teach, how we teach (the teaching points and explanations), and how we develop the concepts.

Teaching Progression at Camp

This is how we introduce these skills and drills in a group camp setting. In our regular team practices we incorporate kill the grass and steal the ball with, and without BDT, in short bursts to develop, maintain and refine ball handling and dribbling competencies.

  1. Side Dribbles
  2. In and Out Series in space, followed by into shots and with BDT
  3. Kill the Grass
  4. Kill the Grass with BDT
  5. Steal the Ball
  6. Steal the Ball with BDT
  7. COBA Drill in Reverse

For more information and examples of each ball handling and dribbling drill check out this How to Series:

How to Teach Players to Handle Defensive Pressure

Additional Camp Teaching Series Videos:

Teaching the Back Pivot

Teaching BDT

How to Teach the Stab Dribble

Teaching Shooting: Camp Series

Teaching Side Dribbles: Camp Series

Teaching 3-on-2 Shooting: Camp Series

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In this week’s basketball coaching conversation, learn the competitive coaching philosophy of Carleton head coach Dave Smart. Smart has architected one of the most dominant dynasties in collegiate sport history. He served as the head men’s basketball coach at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario from 1999 to 2019, where he led the Ravens to thirteen of the team’s fourteen U Sports national championships in men’s basketball.

Since taking over the Ravens program in 1999-00, Smart won 92 per cent of his games against Canadian opposition between 1999 and 2019. He led the Ravens to a Canadian men’s record of 87 consecutive wins in league and playoff games, from 2002-2005. Smart has been named the Canadian Collegiate Basketball Coach of the Year a record eight times, and the OUA conference coach-of-the-year awards thirteen times.

Dave Smart’s incredible success at the Canadian university level has provided him with several opportunities to work at the national level. In 2012, Smart was named the assistant coach of the Canadian Senior Men’s Basketball National team by head coach Jay Triano. In June 2013, The Development Men’s National Team completed a sweep of the Four Nations’ International Invitational Tournament with a perfect 9-0 record in registering three victories over each of the United States, Latvia and host-nation China.

All Access Carleton Basketball Practice with Dave Smart - YouTube

Additional Notes from Dave Smart

Coaching Thoughts from Dave Smart

Ideas from the Basketball Super Coaching Clinic 2018

Dave Smart Carleton Basketball Offense Lessons

Quotes:

“One of our big things is: it’s impossible to be special at something if you’re not having fun doing it . . in order to be special at basketball you’re going to have to redefine what your fun is.”

“I want them [players] to be successful that minute . . so that they’re putting everything they have into getting it done . . and working as hard as they can in the moment. . . You’re not going to get there if you don’t push the envelope.”

“With really good coaches, practice doesn’t end when practice ends; practice ends after you’ve spoken to all the kids you feel who’ve had a struggle that day.”

“I still think, deep down, most of these kids want to . . have relationships and want to have close connections with their team but they’ve never been given the opportunity.”

“When you make it clear that the way they [talented but self-centered players] are acting is disrespecting their friends, they tend to want to stop disrespecting their friends, they tend to want to change.”

“We encourage it [players to coach each other] but it has to be done the right way . . it has to be done on things that everybody controls.”

“I get very upset when there is not positive or negative reinforcement after every possession in practice . . the leaders on the team . . are expected to care after every single possession. Good or bad they need to care.”

“Without caring, you are really bad at leading.”

“I just think we’ve done a really, really good job of teaching players to own their own confidence and . . not allowing a coach to own it and certainly, not allowing anyone on the other team to own it, not needing to fake it . . “

Q: What is the one thing that stands out that you think coaches could improve the most?

A: Accountability. How you establish that accountability is based on your personality . . if you want to sustain success, you have to have accountability all the time.”

“You can’t run a practice with drills that you think will look good in practice and think that that’s going to translate over to the game.”

“If players aren’t put into uncomfortable situations constantly in your practice environment, they’re not going to react well to uncomfortable situations in a game. There’s always going to be uncomfortable situations against anyone good.”

“I think you need to separate what is development, and they do it at a speed that is only development . . if you’re going to do it at full speed, then it’s a competition.”

“When you graduate university, if you’re not a competitive person you’re almost in worse shape than you would’ve been 20 years ago. Yet, we’re trying to teach people competition isn’t the most important thing.”

“Our guys know their roles . . we just establish roles so early . . I think everybody needs to be good at roles in order to play at the highest level.”

“If you don’t know how to be a role player, it’s going to be really difficult to be successful at the highest level.”

“When we go into games, we don’t spend a lot of time on what people run . . but we’re really all about how we cover each individual.”

Click below to listen in if you listen on:

On iTunes

On Google Music

On Stitcher

On Libsyn

Breakdown:

1:00 – Coaching human being to be better in so many ways
2:30 – What is Fun
4:00 – Don’t like using or talking about the word “PROCESS”
8:00 – Explaining to people his Philosophy
10:00 – Finding Ways to Win
12:30 – Talking about Evil Players
14:50 – Behavior Change
16:00 – “Better than everybody else”
18:30 – Types of People you Coach
24:00 – Never Loses to the Bad Teams
25:00 – Player Led Leadership
30:00 – Player Development
33:00 – “Reactionary” Coaching
35:20 – Mini Conversations
38:30 – Consequences for Players
40:30 – Consequences of Winning and Losing in a Drill
43:00 – What has Most Impacted his Success
46:00 – The Need for Accountability
49:00 – Philosophy of “There is too much…”
51:15 – How Many Shots in Practice
53:00 – Competition-Based Practices
56:00 – Slow Learning
1:04:00 – Things that helped them succeed against Division I Teams
1:08:00 – Conclusion

Dave Smart:

Website: www.davesmartbasketball.com

Subscribe and Review:

As we build our podcast following please take the time to support the Basketball Podcast. Our goal is to openly share as much useful basketball coaching info to stimulate your coaching.

How to leave a podcast review at iTunes

Go to the iTunes page of the Basketball Podcast.

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-basketball-podcast/id1398261897?mt=2


Click the View in iTunes button.
View in iTunes
At iTunes, click the Ratings and Reviews tab.
Select Ratings and Reviews
Rate the podcast using 1 to 5 stars.
Submit a brief honest review.

Subscribe iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-basketball-podcast/id1398261897?mt=2

Google Play

https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Ivp7oie246e53yiitcdumpg5viq

Stitcher

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/basketball/the-basketball-podcast?refid=stpr

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The post The Basketball Podcast: EP49 Dave Smart Part 1 appeared first on Basketball Immersion.

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In this week’s basketball coaching conversation, European professional coach Pascal Meurs join the podcast to discuss moving away from preprogrammed drills and applying analytics in simple ways. Meurs is a professional basketball coach with experience at the highest level in Belgium, The Netherlands, France and Luxembourg.

Most recently Meurs was the Head Coach of T71 Dudelange, one of the most successful Basketball clubs in Luxembourg that plays in the Total League. In addition, Meurs has completed his prestigious FIBA Europe Coaching Certificate. This lead to the opportunity to do an internship in the United States under the wings of NCAA coach Phil Martelli at Saint Joseph’s University.

Pascal is an expert in advanced basketball analytics with a Phd in mathematics. As a skilled speaker on coaching clinics, he has been invited to three different continents.

Video:

Basketball Coach Pascal Meurs - Prepare your Players to Make Decisions - YouTube

Quotes:

“Basketball . . is not pre-programmed . . and it is impossible to . . program our players for every decision.”

“We have to make our players smarter and we have to prepare them to make the right decisions on the court. We cannot have drills where there is . . no decision.”

“It is not the drill that makes the difference, it is the what you as a coach . . do with the drill. How you use it on a daily basis and what you ask from your players.”

[Has cross teaching offense and defense at the same time helped your development as a coach?] “Without a doubt . . it is something you have to grow in . . it is quite a challenge . . you learn by doing it.”

“I really dislike a stationary start to a drill . . it kills every intensity of the drill and, on top of that, it’s not game-like. I really want to have a dynamic start.”

“I don’t want to have the ball in one of my players’ hands where he starts shaking his shoulders for 3 or 4 seconds before he even thinks about attacking.”

“In my defensive drills, the defense has to make up from a disadvantage . .

“As a team we have to make a defensive philosophy . . every coach has a playbook for his offense but I think it’s even more important to have a defensive playbook . . for instance, what should I say for which moment?”

“Some of the things I like to keep track of [during the game] . . is the number of deflections. Either, as a team, you combine for enough deflections or you didn’t . . you take away the gray zone.”

“We had a team where the more passes we gave in an offense, the more chance we had to end up with a bucket . . it is up to you as a coach to explain it, to show it so it is clear to everybody.”

“Defending harder, going harder for a rebound . . you have to be able to quantify it . . and help players to understand what you are talking about.”

[On the limitations of some statistics] “In regular stats, we don’t take into account the concept of pace . . the number of possessions you have in a game . . that concept of pace determines a lot about stats.”

“There is a difference between playing rushed and playing fast . . the less talented teams tend to play rushed.”

“We need to think what is the most efficient for our team . . I believe that within a season you have different periods where you play differently.”

“When you are struggling with your confidence . . that is also the moment where you should rely more on your set offense to create those good shots.“

“For me it’s very important . . to have a wide view over coaching and over different leagues. You have to pick up things everywhere.”

“I can’t convince my players by the numbers only . . it is making things as simple and as clear as possible and combine it with some video.”

Click below to listen in if you listen on:

On iTunes

On Google Music

On Stitcher

On Libsyn

Breakdown:

1:00 – Why He Doesn’t Like PreProgrammed Drills?
2:20 – Things that we can do to Make our Players Smarter
4:00 – Alternative to the 11-Man Drill
5:40 – Passing Drill is Primary in their Era
7:15 – Teaching Players How to Relate Practice to the Game
9:00 – Things to do to Help Players Train Defensive Decision Making
11:00 – Loads for Learning Drills
13:00 – Assessment Dictates Tomorrow’s Emphasis of the Drill
14:30 – Development of Coaching Both Side at the Same Time
16:30 – Doing a Lot of 1-on-1
18:30 – Limit a Defender to Emphasize Offense/Defense Decision Making
20:00 – Traditional 1-on-1 Drills, Limiting in terms of Development
21:47 – Creating Game Situation
23:00 – Decision Making Off the Ball on 1-on-1 Progressions
24:00 – Twice a Day Program
25:00 – Starting 5-on-5 on a Stationary
26:50 – Defense: Intensity and Communication is Important
29:40 – Terminology Used in Recovery on Ball Screen
31:30 – Personal Stats that He Valued as a Coach
33:00 – “The more passes, the more chances to have buckets”
36:00 – Defending Harder
37:30 – Other Ways we can Measure Playing Hard
39:00 – Pace
42:30 – Win Games by Playing Slower
44:00 – Pace and Efficiency in Offense
47:00 – Decision Making on doing Faster or Slower Pace of Playing
49:00 – Analytics Coaches are Missing out On
50:50 – Marry The Analytics with Video
52:30 – Things to do when Self-Scouting
54:00 – Closing Remarks Advice to Coaches
56:00 – Conclusion

Pascal Meurs:

Bio: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pascal_Meurs

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PascalMeurs?lang=en

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pascalmeurs/

Website: https://www.pascalmeurs.com/

Subscribe and Review:

As we build our podcast following please take the time to support the Basketball Podcast. Our goal is to openly share as much useful basketball coaching info to stimulate your coaching.

How to leave a podcast review at iTunes

Go to the iTunes page of the Basketball Podcast.

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-basketball-podcast/id1398261897?mt=2


Click the View in iTunes button.
View in iTunes
At iTunes, click the Ratings and Reviews tab.
Select Ratings and Reviews
Rate the podcast using 1 to 5 stars.
Submit a brief honest review.

Subscribe iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-basketball-podcast/id1398261897?mt=2

Google Play

https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Ivp7oie246e53yiitcdumpg5viq

Stitcher

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/basketball/the-basketball-podcast?refid=stpr

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In this week’s basketball coaching conversation, one of the most innovative minds in basketball brings his approach and philosophy to the basketball podcast as Vance Walberg shares some ideas on the dribble drive offense. Vance Walberg’s Dribble Drive system has evolved into an offensive attack adopted, and adapted, with thousand of coaches of all levels all over the world.

Walberg has coached at all levels of basketball including time in the NBA, NCAA and high school. He has also been a clinician who has travelled the world influencing coaches at all levels. In the NBA, he has served as an assistant coach for the Sacramento Kings, Philadelphia 76ers and Denver Nuggets.

Walberg’s first college experiences was at Fresno City College, where his teams went 133-11 with four Central Valley Conference titles and a California Community College championship in four seasons. Walberg got his first NCAA Division I head coaching opportunity in 2006 when he was hired at Pepperdine. Walberg’s other NCAA experience was as an assistant at UMass, where he stayed for two seasons before getting his first NBA job.

Quotes:

“When I was starting my career, I went and watched a lot of different coaches . . I did that for 15-20 years . . and it was probably the best thing I’ve ever done.”

“Every time you shoot you want three points . . so if I’m taking it to the rack I want to go hard, I want to initiate contact, I want to try to get the and-1 or I’m going to drive, kick out and get the open three.”

“On our scouting report we always check does 5 . . look to take charges? If they do, we know our 5 man is going to get a lot of lobs.”

“That’s what I like about dribble drive – it’s teaching them how to play, it’s not teaching them how to run plays.”

“When you get somebody a triple gap, the advantage is yours . . when you open up a triple gap you make an average player a good player, a good player a great player and a great player unstoppable.”

“What I want my players to understand, is if you catch it standing I expect you to shoot . . I want go-and-catch action not catch-and-go action.”

“The only time I want you to dribble is when you think you can beat your guy. If you can’t, you pass, you cut.”

“The advantage of a 4-out offense is that you have a single post so that you’ve got one side you can really attack . . the advantage of a 3-out offense is that you have bigger gaps.”

“Offensive rebounding for us is real critical. We have a set way that we go to the offensive boards depending on where the ball’s shot – if it’s shot strong side or if it’s shot weakside.”

“When you shoot shots that are close in . . I think height has a lot more to do with the rebound . . but I think when you shoot threes . . it’s a longer shot, longer rebound, I think heart and hustle has a lot more to do with the rebound than height.”

“If you can really drive it, you’ve got to learn how to be able to hit that open three.”

“If you can really shoot it and you can’t drive it . . there’s two options you have: one, obviously is you want to learn how to drive . . but I think good shooters have to learn how to cut.”

“People want instant success with it . . each year, you’re going to see how much better your players are going to get.”

“You like threes, you love lay-ups . . I really want to make sure . . if you’ve got 20 threes up, I expect 40-45 into the rack. . . I think one of the biggest things you’ve got to make sure happens is that you win that free throw battle.”

Click below to listen in if you listen on:

On iTunes

On Google Music

On Stitcher

On Libsyn

Breakdown:

1:00 – Started of his Dribble Drive Offense
2:40 – Evolution of the Game
3:30 – Seeing Elements in Teams Playing Nowadays
4:30 – Depth of his Teaching
5:40 – Mistakes Coaches Made with the Dribble Drive
7:00 – Teaching Points of what is a Good Shot at the Rim
9:20 – Things that Allow to Ability to Attack the Weak Side
11:00 – Spacing to the Corners and Triple Gaps
14:00 – Advice to Coaches to their Drills and System
16:30 – Other Thoughts on Dribble Drive
17:30 – Empowering the Weak Side
19:15 – Outlets for Trouble
21:00 – Emphasizing Dibbler Countering
23:30 – Talking about Rockets and their Plays
24:30 – Progression of Teaching Dribble Drive at Different Levels
26:00 – Best Defense Against Dribble Drive
28:00 – Switching at Dribble Drive
31:00 – Running Dribble Drive in Zones
32:00 – “Two-Sets” Concept
35:00 – In-Depth Offensive Rebounding Rules
39:00 – Favorite Technique in Creating Triple Gap
41:00 – Favorite Entry Action
42:30 – Things to Emphasize if his Team Don’t Have a Lot of Shoot
44:00 – Dimensional Players
45:30 – His Favorite Drills and it’s Changes
48:00 – Do Some People Sacrifice Primary Transition in Dribble Drive?
49:40 – Dribble Drive with Transition is Primary Offense
52:00 – Running Dribble Drive as a Main Offense in NBA Level
53:00 – Scouting Opponent
55:00 – Players Make Their Own Reads to the Opponents
56:00 – Things the He Charting
57:00 – Suggestion and Advices to Learn Dribble Drive
58:00 – Conclusion

Vance Walberg:

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vance_Walberg

Website: https://www.championshipproductions.com/cgi-bin/champ/auth/2254/Vance-Walberg.html

Subscribe and Review:

As we build our podcast following please take the time to support the Basketball Podcast. Our goal is to openly share as much useful basketball coaching info to stimulate your coaching.

How to leave a podcast review at iTunes

Go to the iTunes page of the Basketball Podcast.

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-basketball-podcast/id1398261897?mt=2


Click the View in iTunes button.
View in iTunes
At iTunes, click the Ratings and Reviews tab.
Select Ratings and Reviews
Rate the podcast using 1 to 5 stars.
Submit a brief honest review.

Subscribe iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-basketball-podcast/id1398261897?mt=2

Google Play

https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Ivp7oie246e53yiitcdumpg5viq

Stitcher

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/basketball/the-basketball-podcast?refid=stpr

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The Wide Basketball Offense starts with five players on the perimeter. Various entry actions cue a screen away that can be used as a primary scoring action, or as a flow into our Quick and Dribble At actions.

Learn more about those actions here:

The Quicks Offensive Concept

Dribble At Play

In addition to game footage of the Wide Offense, you will see a full practice where I taught the Wide Offense to a team of 14-15 year old players. These players had never been taught any parts of this offense so it is completely representative of initial first time teaching. The clinic is broken down into parts to make it easier to watch, but all the videos combined represent almost two hours of teaching.

Video #1: Wide Offense Initial Teaching


Video #2: Wide Offense Game Footage

Video #3: Wide 5-on-5 Slow Learning

Video #4: Offense on Air

Video #5: 3-on-3 Wide

Video #6: 3-on-0 Situations

Video #7: 4-on-0 Situations

Video #8: 5-on-5 Pressure Releases

Video #9: 5-on-0 to 5-on-5

Video #10: 3-on-0 Ball Screen Situations

Video #11: Session Debrief

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In this week’s basketball coaching conversation, Brendan Suhr joins the podcast to discuss coaching development. Coach Brendan Suhr is viewed as one of the most respected figures in basketball with nearly 30 years as a coach and executive in the NBA and 13 seasons as a coach at the collegiate level.

Suhr has been a part of some of the most historical basketball teams of all time while winning back-to-back NBA Championships with the Detroit Pistons “Bad Boys”, as well as the 1992 “Dream Team” who won the Gold Medal for the United States at the Barcelona Olympic Games. He developed his “Servant Leadership” mentality while working as an Assistant Coach under Hall of Fame coaches Chuck Daly, Hubie Brown and Lenny Wilkins.

Ten years ago, Suhr also founded Coaching U, a coaching, leadership and learning company, that is a technology and live event business that focuses on individual and team development. He also is a consultant to the National Basketball Players Association serving to help current and retired players in the areas of coaching and leadership.

Suhr is also the founder and president of the speaking and consulting firm Off the Court, Inc., a business that features his skills as a keynote speaker, executive coach, author, and consultant for the last 25 years. The Gallup Organization has certified him as a “Master Strengths Coach”, one of only 5 people in the world who shares that distinction.

Quotes:

“The reason I’m coaching right now is because of Hubie [Brown] . . he was a teacher first . . so I think as a high school coach my recommendation would be: be a teacher first.”

“I think a lot of times, at the high school level, . . [coaches] are more concerned about developing a system than about teaching fundamentals.”

“The thing I’m most disappointed with in colleges is the level of coaching . .I see college coaches in the States and they do the same thing every year . . there’s no innovation, there’s no new teaching.

“In the NBA, we used to say the lifespan of a good play that we ran was two weeks . .then you’d better come up with a counter or something new.”

“Our job [as coaches] is to take the players where they can’t take themselves.”

“I coach the best coaches in the world, I teach the best coaches in the world, I go around the world teaching but I am on a journey to learn . . I learned more basketball in the last 10 years than I knew when I was winning world championships [in the NBA].”

“The most important part of coaching . . the art of coaching is . . the communication, the development of trust.”

“One of the great things you have to have if you’re going to be a good coach is . . credibility . .that when you teach something you teach it right, when you tell them something, it’s right.”

“It is one of the great ways to engage people . . let other people’s opinions count.”

“How can they [NBA coaches] get a team ready to play in three days? The best teams . . teach the whole method . . teach kids how to play.

“The transfer of learning from a drill to 5-on-5 is almost non-existent.”

“Take your first three or four days of practice and teach all your fundamentals . . then after that teach 5-on-5 play . . because that’s how we play . . and kids today don’t know how to play.”

“College basketball is the most over-coached, under-taught game in the world.”

“If you’re well coached, in theory, it doesn’t matter what the other team does.”

“How do I get my players to perform under pressure? You don’t do . . drills. Guys want to see it real time, 5-on-5.”

“When you’re a player, at any level, . . it’s all about ‘me’ – how many shots am I getting, how many minutes am I getting, et cetera . .you know when you’re a coach it’s never at all about ‘us’- it’s about the 12-14 players on the team.”

“Are you willing to sacrifice? Are you willing to do things that might even make you uncomfortable to really get better? Because it’s not going to be a smooth ride . . coaching is a suffering business.”

Click below to listen in if you listen on:

On iTunes

On Google Music

On Stitcher

On Libsyn

Breakdown:

1:00 – Introduction
2:00 – Things that Coaches are Missing
3:30 – Teacher First and Teaching Leadership
5:30 – Things Coaches Have to Keep in Mind in NBA Level
8:00 – College Level
10:30 – Preservation than Innovation; Service
11:30 – Value of Mentorship
14:30 – Certification
15:30 – Coaching is a Nice, Positive Term
16:30 – Art of Coaching
20:30 – Learnings from Hubie Brown
22:00 – Concept of Teaching
25:00 – Informality of Coach Education
26:00 – Passion Component
27:00 – Steve Kerr Likes “Joy”
28:30 – Biggest Tip He Got from Hubie Brown
29:45 – You Need to Have Credibility
32:00 – Advertisement (Dave Smart Program Video)
33:30 – What Do You Do When You’re Wrong?
36:30 – Putting More Effort in the Team
37:30 – The Way Coaches Practice
39:00 – Believing the Whole Method
42:00 – Working on Every Facet of the Game
43:00 – Teaching All Fundamentals Before the 5-on-5 Play
44:00 – Preservation vs Innovation
46:00 – Fear of Coaches
48:00 – Believing to their Head Coach
51:00 – Making Decision
53:00 – Practicing, Teaching and Drawing Up the Plays
56:00 – Hardest Things As Players Transition into Coaching
58:30 – Talking about Players
1:00:00 – Highlights for Coach U Podcast
1:01:30 – Commitment that You Really Need Have to Learn
1:02:40 – Coaching is a Suffering Business
1:04:00 – Conclusion

Brendan Suhr:

Bio: https://coaching-u1.teachable.com/p/brendan-suhr-s-phd-in-coaching/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/brendansuhr

Website: http://coachingulive.com/

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As we build our podcast following please take the time to support the Basketball Podcast. Our goal is to openly share as much useful basketball coaching info to stimulate your coaching.

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Build up drills are drills that develop gradually by increments. One drill leads to the next in a progression. Build up drills are great for initial learning, and to get a consistent high number repetitions. The danger with build up drills is that they are often very blocked and scripted. This means that mental effort is not heightened and players essentially learn to memorize the drill, and complete it mindlessly because there is no novel stimuli or challenge.

Developing fundamental basketball skills by adding Basketball Decision Training (BDT) to build up drills creates novel repetitions each repetition for a player. On each repetition a player must think because a decision about whether to shoot, pass, drive or move are cued by an active participant in the learning process. Instead of being blocked and mindless, a player is faced with random and mindful applications of skills.

This is an often misconstrued idea that BDT training sacrifices fundamental skill development. The fact is that BDT shooting is first, and foremost, a footwork drill. Every physical execution of a decision in basketball starts from the feet. Once the perception and decision have been made, the feet, execute the skill application.

In a shooting example, we refer to this as “fighting for your feet.” We want players to as quickly as possible, with whatever footwork you believe in as a coach, get their feet in a position where they can shoot, drive, pass or move. After the footwork gets applied, BDT shooting emphasizes the application of shooting, dribbling, passing and movement skills just like any other shooting drill. The difference is all these fundamental skill applications are preceded on every repetition by a novel, unscripted perception and decision.

Fight for your Feet Basketball Shooting Footwork - YouTube

Not sure what BDT is? Check out these two blogs:

Learn How to Use Basketball Decision Training

The Comprehensive Guide to Basketball Decision Training

BDT shooting is in fact a part of a bigger build of to small-sided games, and competitive play, as it bridges the gap between on-air practice, and practicing offense vs. defense. I wanted to share an example from the Acadia University women’s basketball team of building up BDT shooting drills. The best part about sharing has been that what I have shared gets both adopted, and adapted. Since I widely shared the BDT shooting concept with coaches a few years back, there have been many coaches who adopted and adapted the concept.

Head coach, Len Harvey, and his team adopted, and adapted BDT into some build up shooting drills that highlight how BDT can be used in your practices and skill development workouts. In his four years at Acadia, Coach Harvey has had great success, having won his conference and played in the national final eight tournament two times.

How does Acadia women’s basketball use BDT?

They start with two player BDT. Acadia starts with a progression from two players stationary, to two players moving, which is common to most teams that use BDT. What is different is that they build it up to three and four player BDT.

It is important to note that they don’t do the same thing every day. Even though they use the term build up to describe these drills, some days they follow the natural progression from two, to three, to four, and some days they jump to the end, or stay entirely with two player BDT. This often depends on the emphasis and time limitations on that day’s practice. It also ensures that players are constantly challenged to think as they cannot memorize any aspect of the drills.

Basketball Decision Training Build Up Shooting Drills - YouTube

Coach Harvey uses these build up shooting drills to work on specific fundamental skills, and decisions, that happen in their offense. As you can tell by watching the video, the drills become progressively more game-like in the application of game and team specific actions. Adding passing and cutting, penetration reaction, multiple player movements, and allowing the receiver to shoot the catch all involved not just the shooter, but the off the ball players as well in the perception-action coupling process.

Thanks to Len Harvey, and his team for sharing these examples of BDT build up drills.

Follow @AcadiaCoachLen

Interested in more ideas on building BDT concepts into your individual and team practices and workouts? A number of video examples, and how to guides, are available on the membership website. Stimulate your learning today by adding BDT to your coaching toolbox.

Get Access to Full Year Video Learning

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In this week’s basketball coaching conversation, Charlotte 49ers assistant coach, and former professional head coach, Aaron Fearne joins the podcast to discuss sending five players to the offensive boards in his “Tagging Up” offensive rebounding system. The podcast covers team and individual offensive rebounding tactics and techniques. Defensive transition is discussed in the context of this system to give you real insights into a stimulating idea.

Fearne joins the 49ers coaching staff after spending the last nine years as head coach of the National Basketball League’s Cairns Taipans, which plays in Australia’s top professional league.

In his nine seasons at the helm of the Taipans, he coached in 264 games and guided them to three appearances in the NBL playoffs. In 2011, he led the team to an appearance in the NBL Finals. In 2015, he coached the Taipans to a record 21 wins and another appearance in the league finals while garnering NBL Coach of the Year honors. In 2017, he guided the Taipans to a second place finish in the regular-season and a trip to the NBL semifinals.

Prior to becoming head coach, Fearne spent seven seasons (2001-08) as an assistant coach for the Taipans. During that time, he also served as the head coach of the Cairns Taipans Academy, which is a junior development academy which he created. Boston Celtics center Aron Baynes and former NBA player Nathan Jawai came out of the Academy.

Video Examples:

Aaron Ferne Tagging Up Basketball Offensive Rebounding System - YouTube

Quotes:

“I had this mindset of being really physical on the offensive glass and coming up with extra possessions.”

“We’re just going to send everyone to the glass but there needs to be some rules.”

“When the shot goes up, you’ve got to get on the front foot and you’ve got to go make contact with the guy that’s defending you . . that’s really, really important – that you get on the front foot and everybody is on the front foot.”

“The feedback that I got back from players and coaches . . [was] it just simplifies things. The shot goes up, tag up on your man over the high side and let’s compete for the offensive rebound.”

“Guys do not block out . . but you’ve got to have the discipline not to run past him . . .you’ve got to just basically hit him and drive him in . . it does become a very physical contest.”

“We played a fairly deliberate style of game . . it’s a lot easier to offensive rebound when you have that internal feel of when shots are going up.”

“Your predictability on shot selection needs to be at a high level but it should be no matter what defensive transition system you’re running.”

“When we went to the tag up system . . our defensive transition points allowed got better, our offensive rebounding numbers went up so we got extra possessions . . consistently we were pretty good . . at containing you and not giving you easy baskets.”

“It makes you have to be physical . . you’ve got to block out, you have to be competitive offensively . . you’re probably not going to be a great defensive rebounding team . . if you don’t practice against it every day.”

“With the fast-paced teams, if you go the other way and you’re retreating they just come at you with more speed because they’ve got more room . . I’m trying to cut your space down because I’ve got more players up the floor on their matchup earlier.”

“A lot of guards are not great at blocking out and now we’ve put you in a position where you have to block out every time.”

“The other little dynamic to it is . . if you were in that 50/50 contest and you couldn’t quite come up with it, well then try and hit it out . . or hit it out across the sideline or baseline generally, just kill the possession. Now we can get set and contain you.”

“The danger is if you don’t all commit to it . . it’s got to be 100% commitment every possession.”

“Try to force your man into a position where he’s out of position.”

“It’s all about rebounding preparation and forcing the defense into disadvantaged positions . . we’re trying to scrum you in to cut down your space.”

“I would want my son or daughter to be coached hard. A lot of them don’t understand how hard kids get coached internationally.”

“How do you get better if you’re not challenged?”

Click below to listen in if you listen on:

On iTunes

On Google Music

On Stitcher

On Libsyn

Breakdown:

1:00 – Introduction
2:00 – Tagging Up System
5:00 – Being on the Front Foot
9:00 – Transition Defense
11:00 – Exposing his System in NCAA Games
12:40 – Communicating in Transition
15:30 – Adjustments in the System
17:20 – Creating Advantage with Possessions
19:00 – Teaching Separation with the Player
21:00 – Struggle with the System
23:30 – Their Hands during the Scrum
24:30 – 14-Second Reset on FIBA
25:30 – Concept of Predictable Shots
27:00 – Controlling Phase
28:30 – Over Obsessions with Matchups
31:30 – Aggressive Players in Youth Development
33:00 – Female Teams who used the System
35:00 – Creating Danger for Them
36:30 – Game Plan
37:30 – Danger with the Scrum
38:30 – One-Hand Rebound
40:00 – Teaching Specific on Size Disadvantage
41:00 – Spacing the Outlet
42:30 – Commitment to the System
44:30 – Offensive Rebound used in the System
48:00 – His Kids Playing Basketball in America versus in Australia
51:00 – Holding Accountable
53:00 – Empowering of the Weak Side Players
56:00 – Conclusion

Aaron Ferne:

Bio: https://charlotte49ers.com/coaches.aspx?rc=692&path=mbball

Twitter: https://twitter.com/aaronfearne14?lang=en

Subscribe and Review:

As we build our podcast following please take the time to support the Basketball Podcast. Our goal is to openly share as much useful basketball coaching info to stimulate your coaching.

How to leave a podcast review at iTunes

Go to the iTunes page of the Basketball Podcast.

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-basketball-podcast/id1398261897?mt=2


Click the View in iTunes button.
View in iTunes
At iTunes, click the Ratings and Reviews tab.
Select Ratings and Reviews
Rate the podcast using 1 to 5 stars.
Submit a brief honest review.

Subscribe iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-basketball-podcast/id1398261897?mt=2

Google Play

https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Ivp7oie246e53yiitcdumpg5viq

Stitcher

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/basketball/the-basketball-podcast?refid=stpr

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This one-on-one drill is used to work on finishing moves at the rim, using angled dribbles to create or maintain an advantage in one-on-one situations and to work on getting the ball to floor quickly on drive decisions.

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