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Basketball Immersion Podcast by Chris Oliver - 4d ago

Rebounding is an emphasis, more than a drill. You must emphasize it everyday to develop the habit of boxing out, and offensive and defensive rebounding. We use a rebounding drill occasionally to maximize that emphasis.

The Rebound Game can be played 3-on-3, or with any variation of the number of players. The game continues until the first team scores. The first shot does not count. Scoring is based on the first team that scores the second shot. This is a competitive drill, where above technique, competing is emphasized.

Credit to Matt Woodley and the Drake men’s basketball program for inspiring this drill.

Here are some other rebounding drills on the membership website:

Self Toss Offensive Rebound to Competitive

Offensive Rebounding Intensity Drill

Self-Toss 1-on-1 Offensive Rebounding

5-on-5 Closeout Rebounding into Two Trips

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In this week’s basketball coaching conversation, former college head coach Paul Hewitt joins the Basketball Podcast to discuss the basketball coaching profession.

Hewitt is currently a scout for the Los Angeles Clippers. He is best known as a college basketball coach. He has been the head coach at Georgia Tech, George Mason and Siena University.

His head coaching career started at Siena where he revived a program that had been dormant since the mid-90’s and molded it into one of the best in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference. In 11 seasons at Georgia Tech, Hewitt went to the NCAA Tournament five times, played for two ACC championships, made one final four and played for a national championship.

Having won over 300 games, Hewitt also, twice served as an assistant coach for USA Basketball’s Under-18 team at the FIBA Americas U18 Championship, and was head coach for the 2011 USA Basketball Under-19 team.

Quotes:

“It’s certainly easier to find the talent than it is to find out the character . . . we decided . . we’re going to draft kids that are high in character, who love the game . . and see where it takes us.”

“We can develop talent. We’re coaches . . but what’s the difference in the guy that has great talent and translates that into having a great career and the guy that has great talent but never seems to quite make it?”

“When you look at the best players out there, the ones that are constantly vying for championships – the one thing they have is a tremendous love for the game . . they worked on their craft, they were extremely competitive people.”

“Communication is king . . If a guy’s engaged in practice . . that tells me so much about that young man. It tells me how engaged that person is in that possession or task . . it tells me how enthusiastic that person is and . . it tells me just how intelligent they are.”

“What’s becoming even more important now, as the NBA becomes a more free-flowing, offensive game is being able to read situations . . what’s his decision making like?”

“[When] a kid comes in the gym . . I always notice what are they working on first . . are they coming in just launching 3-pointers or are they coming in and they have a warm-up routine that involves ball-handling, involves shooting in close, involves the basic things that happen in a game?”

“You’ve gotten back to the roots of the game. Guys are just learning how to pass, cut, move without the ball, defend on an island, and try to figure it out themselves.”

“The idea that kids aren’t playing as much 1-on-1, 2-on-2, 3-on-3 . . certainly has hurt their mind development . . they don’t understand the nuance of the game because they’re waiting for somebody to tell them what’s right and what’s wrong as opposed to discovering it on their own.”

“Dribbling the basketball, being able to drive the ball and make a decision off the dribble is huge.”

“Dribble, shoot and pass. Those things are so basic. It’s something in the NBA that you spend a lot of time on because of the spacing on the court.”

“The amount of ball movement, the amount of driving to set up the pass – I think we could do a better job as college coaches at all positions.”

“When [players] feel like you’re teaching them . . they’re going to rebound a little harder, they’re going to defend a little more . . all the selfless stuff, they’re going to be more willing to do . . I don’t think you can put a price tag on what it does for moving you toward success as a team.”

Click below to listen in if you listen on:

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On Stitcher

On Libsyn

Breakdown:

1:00 – Introduction
2:00 – Character in a Team’s Success
5:00 – Knowing Players More Deeply
9:00 – Things in Practice that Separate a Player
10:00 – Communication
12:30 – The NBA Game
14:00 – Preparing and Scouting
15:00 – Is NCAA adapting to the New Modern Style?
16:30 – Looking to the Habit of Players
17:30 – How Much that Player Wants to get Better
19:00 – Being Professional
21:00 – Coach-led One-on-One Practice
22:00 – Talking about Fiba 3-on-3 Basketball
25:00 – Figuring out Player’s Skills during One-on-One
27:00 – Ball Mastery
28:00 – Differences between the Draft Process in Sports
33:30 – Player’s Worth and Recruitment in different Sports
37:00 – Player’s Value in the Marketplace
38:00 – Corruption in Basketball
41:00 – Coach Untold Stories
42:00 – Being a Model
43:40 – Things that College Coaches can do to be Better
45:00 – Evaluated based on Wins and Losses, Not on the Development
46:00 – Teaching Players how to get Better
47:30 – Final Thoughts

Paul Hewitt

Bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Hewitt

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The baseline inbound series we call In and Out is used to score with an advantage, and if not, to safely inbound the ball into an end action. 

“IN” means the player who is on the wing, screens in for the player at the post.

“OUT” means the player who is in the post, screens out for the player on the wing.

Some common reads, sleepers, counters and end actions are diagrammed as well as demonstrated through game footage of my team.

Learn more about baseline inbound concepts that can help your team better execute.

How we Teach Inbound:

3-on-3 Baseline Inbound Break Down

Teach Baseline Inbound Using a Games Approach

Tips to Improve your Inbound:

How to Improve Your Baseline Inbound Plays

Passing Tips for the Basketball Inbound Passer

Sleeper Options on Baseline-Out-of-Bounds Plays

Other Inbound Series I Have Used:

Holy Cross Baseline and Sideline Inbound

Army Baseline Inbound Series

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In this week’s basketball coaching conversation, Morristown West basketball coach Jonathan Smith discusses applying Basketball Immersion concepts to high school basketball coaching, with the creative mind behind Basketball Immersion, Chris Oliver. Coach Smith is the high school basketball Head Coach at Morristown West High School in Morristown, Tennessee. 

Basketball Immersion concepts like BDT, Zero Seconds, games approach to coaching and others are well suited high school basketball, and for all levels of coaching.

Jonathan Smith Quotes:

“One of the most vulnerable places for a defender is the closeout . . we teach our kids attack the closeout every chance we can.”

“I think that’s one of the gray areas . . kids struggle with is – ‘How do I apply this – what I just learned – to a live situation.’ So, the connection is a key part to our practices.”

Chris Oliver Quotes:

“The best players are the ones who get better on their own.”

“Any drill should be solving a problem but it should be game-specific, game-like and performed at game speed. That’s the 3 Gs of drill design.”

“The reason that we would do a drill is that we want to make very specific coaching points that aren’t happening in our 5-on-5 . . [For example] our players haven’t been doing something well individually in 5-on-5.”

“In this games approach to coaching, coaching points are still being made. The discipline and teaching are still there even though the format is different.”

“When we play 5-on-5 . . it’s learning time. And that’s the agreement I have to have with my players.”

“We waste so much time with on-air drills . . for positive transfer to the game, positioning has to be understood . . the defense or the offense has to be there to give context.”

“[The games approach] is messier. That’s the challenge for you as a coach to understand . . your players are getting value from it even though it doesn’t look perfect.”

“Understanding what the help is doing is so important to running good offense . . your players don’t need to look at their teammates, they need to look at the defense.”

“There’s not a wrong decision if it’s made for advantage reasons . . If they did it and it created an advantage, then do your players know how to take advantage of that situation.”

Learn more about the Seven Things I would do as a High School Coach from this free download here:

The Seven Things Coach Oliver Would Do as a High School Basketball Coach

Click below to listen in if you listen on:

On iTunes

On Google Music

On Stitcher

On Libsyn

Breakdown:

1:00 – Introduction
2:00 – Reaching Out to Coach Chris
3:00 – Practice Schedule
4:00 – Individual Workouts
5:00 – Mixed Drill
6:00 – Doing Practice on their Own
8:00 – “Repetition without being Repetitive”
9:00 – Basketball Decision Training or BDT
11:00 – Live 1-on-1 and Enhancing it
13:00 – Decision of 1-on-1
15:00 – Dribble Limits
16:00 – 2-on-1 Drive and Kick and Closeouts
17:00 – Words that Empowers our Players
18:00 – 3 G’s of Drill Design and Solving a Problem
19:00 – Emphasizing Transition
20:00 – Starting 4-on-4 Practice
21:00 – Starting of Coach Chris Practice
23:00 – Applying Body Pressure instead of Arm Length
25:00 – Correcting Player During Drills
26:30 – Competitiveness and Correcting Players
28:30 – Closeout Rebounding Drill
31:00 – Offensive Breakdown of Coach Chris
32:00 – Idea of Connection and 4-on-4 Offensive Breakdown
34:00 – Timing
35:00 – Positive Transfer and Execution of Drills
36:00 – Perception of Back Screen and Reading the Skip Option
37:00 – Players not to Look on Back Screens
38:30 – Creating Advantage
39:30 – Film Watching
41:30 – Focus on Individual
42:30 – Continuing to Correct and Looking for their Progress
44:30 – Value of Video
45:30 – The Power of Facebook
46:00 – Conclusion

Links:

Jonathan Smith

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jsmoooth33?lang=en

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As we build our podcast following please take the time to support the Basketball Podcast. Our goal is to openly share as much useful basketball coaching info to stimulate your coaching.

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In this week’s basketball coaching conversation, Sacramento Kings assistant coach Bryan Gates joins the podcast to discuss NBA player development, offense and defense. Bryan Gates enters his tenth season in the NBA and third season in his return to Sacramento after serving as an assistant coach for the Minnesota Timberwolves last season and the previous five seasons in a similar capacity with the New Orleans Pelicans. He entered the NBA coaching ranks with the Kings during the 2009-10 season following a highly-successful three-year stint as a head coach in the NBA D-League with the Idaho Stampede.

Quotes:

“A close out is a closed stance and you have to control the ball for a second.”

“I get kind of tired of people talking about ‘defense is just all energy’ and this kind of stuff . . It’s a big part of it but there’s some serious technique to it.”

“You can’t do passing drills enough at any level.”

“At any level, you have to dictate and you have to tell your team what shots you want and where you want to get them.”

“When you are in the help position, your feet are still moving . . just so you can react and get out [on the closeout].”

“If you are a deny team, you can’t be a ball pressure team. You just can’t get beat in denial.”

“My defensive philosophy is, ‘You can’t catch every rain drop.’ . . Take away something . . tell your team how the other team is going to score.”

“You can’t work on passing enough. The Utah Jazz pass the ball 360 times a game. If you’re going to do something that amount of times, you may want to work on it once in awhile.”

“You can challenge your guys and put them in a situation at any level.”

“As assistant coaches we have to remember that our head coaches have multiple people that want to talk to them as much as we want to talk to them.”

“The best way to get a head coach’s attention is write him a note and leave it on his desk . . send him a text . . and don’t get upset if they don’t reply to you immediately.”

Click below to listen in if you listen on:

On iTunes

On Google Music

On Stitcher

On Libsyn

Breakdown:

1:00 – Introduction
2:00 – Making Shooting Drills More Random
3:00 – NBA Players don’t like to Pass in Shooting Drills
5:00 – Knowing Coach Gates
6:00 – The Shot Clock
7:00 – Guard Your Man
8:00 – Closeouts Stands and Controlling the Ball for a Second
9:30 – Value Your man and Understanding on the Offensive End
11:00 – Closeouts
13:00 – Quicking
14:30 – “3 feet” and Controlling the Ball for the First Second
15:30 – Arrive on a Catch
16:30 – One-way Closeouts
17:30 – In Denial Teams One Pass Away
20:00 – “You can’t catch every raindrops”
21:00 – Defensive Guy
23:00 – Whispers in His Head
25:00 – Passing Drill in the NBA
27:00 – Passing Concepts
28:30 – Having a 5-and-0 Practice
30:00 – NBA are more Player Driven than Coach Driven
31:00 – Compete at a Higher Level at Practice
33:00 – Never Post Time on Practice
34:00 – Ideas of Being an Assistant Coach in the NBA
35:00 – Write Head Coach a Note, Text, Email
36:00 – Best Assistant Coach is Trying to help Head Coaches
37:30 – Helping Head Coach as Possible
38:00 – Assistant Coaches to Coach a Game
40:0 – Conclusion

Links:

Bryan Gates

Bio: https://www.nba.com/kings/roster/bryan_gates

Subscribe and Review:

As we build our podcast following please take the time to support the Basketball Podcast. Our goal is to openly share as much useful basketball coaching info to stimulate your coaching.

How to leave a podcast review at iTunes

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