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The snatch is a challenging Olympic weightlifting movement that requires strength, power, mobility, and high amounts of technique.

In this article we will discuss three (3) common snatch mistakes beginners, CrossFit athletes, and even experienced lifters make when snatching that can be detrimental to their overall success.

  • 3 Common Snatch Mistakes
  • Exercises to Improve Common Snatch Mistakes
  • How to Integrate Snatch Solution Exercises

Be sure to check out our Snatch Guide to review the key concepts and technical aspects of the snatch.

SNATCH / weightlifting & crossfit - YouTube

1. Hips Shooting Up in the Pull

Many lifers will lose positioning off the floor in the snatch (and clean), often due to trying to yank upwards onto the bar to accelerate it into the pull. If a lifter’s set up is incorrect, it can often send their hips shooting upwards, the balance shifting forwards, and create a slew of compensation mechanisms that will result in either a missed lift or technical errors.

Below are three snatch variations and accessory movements coaches and athletes can use to improve a lifter’s positional strength and awareness in the pull of the snatch, as well as help to stay balanced in the pull.

Pause Snatch

The pause snatch is a snatch variation that has a lifter perform a pause at some point throughout the pulling phase. This often is done either below the knee or just above the knee at the low thigh.

The goal of the pause is to increase isometric strength and coordination specific to the positions needed in the snatch pull, while also allowing coaches and athletes to pinpoint specific areas at which the pull breaks down.

Start by performing 3-5 sets of 2-3 reps of paused snatches (from the hang or floor), pausing 2-3 seconds each rep. Start with 60% of your snatch max and build.

The Power Position In the Snatch / Torokhtiy - YouTube

Slow Snatch

Similar to the pause snatch, the slow snatch is done to allow a lifter to feel the positions of the pull and to help diagnose at what point the hips shoot up, balance shifts forward, and the technical issues begin.

Initiate the snatch pull, almost in slow motion, taking 2-4 seconds to consciously slow the pull down. Once the bar reaches the high thigh, shift into full speed and finish the snatch.

Start by performing 3-5 sets of 2-3 reps of slow snatches using 60-70% of your max, and build.

Deficit Snatch Pull

The deficit snatch pull is a snatch pull, however the lifter is standing on plates or a 1-2 inch raised platform. In doing so, you increase the range of motion of the pull, placing greater emphasis on the set up positioning and leg drive.

This exercise will work the hamstrings, lower back, and positions necessary to keep the hips from shooting upwards in the snatch.

Start by performing 3-5 sets of 3-5  reps of deficit snatch pulls using 70-80% of your snatch max, and build.

2. Swinging the Barbell Out Front

Barbell looping, also known as swinging, is often created by a lack of vertical extension of the body. Many lifters will unload the hips onto the barbell, forcing the bar to bounce forwards off the hip and create a large, arcing movement of the bar. This ends in a large “S-Curve” motion, which impacts the receiving position of the snatch.

To fix this, the lifter must first understand the sum extension forces that are in play during a snatch. Both the knees and the hips must extend together and at the same rate to produce a vertical movement of the barbell while minimizing horizontal displacement.

Additionally, the lifter must then extend the torso and pull upwards onto the bar (after extension) with the elbows high to provide additional guidance and upward force onto the bar before pulling under into the squat position. Below are three snatch variations and exercises coaches and lifters can do to improve vertical extension, reinforce upper body engagement in the snatch, and improve barbell trajectory.

The SNATCH Manual / Weightlifting & Crossfit - YouTube

Hip Snatch

The hip snatch is a snatch variation that emphasizes the final explosion phase of the snatch. To do this, the lifter starts in the standing position with the barbell in the hip crease. The lifter will perform a short bending of the knees (1-2 inches) while keeping the arms straight, torso vertical, and bar in the hip crease. They will then violently stand upwards and perform a snatch, not allowing the chest to get pulled forward at any point in the movement.

Start by performing 3-5 sets of 2-3 reps of hip snatches using 65-70% of your snatch max, and build.

Block Snatch

The block snatch is done by setting a barbell on a pair of drop blocks, often so that the bar starts above or just below the knee. This, unlike the hang snatch, allows a lifter to get set up and reinforces proper balance in the snatch pull without adding fatigue (in the hang position the lifter must support the load longer). This means the lifter can spend all their energy achieving proper positions and power.

Start by performing 3-5 sets of 2-3 reps of block snatches using 65-70% of your snatch max, and build.

Muscle Snatch

The muscle snatch an exercise that can help a lifter develop the necessary strength, timing, and barbell trajectory for performing snatches. In beginner and intermediate lifters, the muscle snatch can be integrated within warm-ups, main snatch work, and accessory training to increase overall muscle mass, control, and vertical extension capacities of a lifter.

For more experienced lifters, the muscle snatch can be used to improve aggression during the pull and turnover phases of the snatch while also increasing power.

Start by performing 3-5 sets of 3-5 reps of muscle snatches using 40% of your snatch max, and build.

3. Weight Crashing Down On You

The snatch is a great exercise for developing power and is a beautiful example of strength, athleticism, mobility, and precision. In the situations where the snatch is crashing down onto a lifter, it’s often an indication of poor timing, lack of finishing the extension phase, and/or limited overhead strength.

Below are three exercises and snatch variations you can do to increase overhead strength, timing, and extension capabilities.

Tall Snatch

The tall snatch is a snatch variation that can be done to increase the timing and upper body mechanics following the full extension of the snatch pull. Often, lifters will be in a hurry to get underneath a snatch, often “diving/dropping” underneath the snatch rather than pulling under.

Lack of the third pull (which is what the tall snatch addresses) often results in the lifter diving their torso forward to save lifts, the lifter receiving the barbell overhead with bent elbows, and/or the lifter not feeling fast and confident in their abilities to pull themselves underneath a heavy snatch.

Start by performing 3-5 sets of 3-5 reps of tall snatches with the empty barbell, and build up in weight slowly. They key here is speed and precision.

Snatch Balance

The snatch balance is a snatch accessory exercise than can be used to increase both overhead strength, overhead squat abilities, snatch footwork, and timing underneath a heavy snatch.

Generally speaking, a lifter should be able to snatch balance 105-110% of their best snatch. If they cannot snatch balance that amount of weight on a routine basis, this may suggest poor overhead strength, lack of control and confidence underneath heavy snatches, and decreased speed underneath the bar.

Start by performing 3-5 sets of 2-3 reps of snatch balances with 80-100% of your snatch, working to be able to snatch balance 10% or more than you can snatch.

Overhead Squat

The overhead squat is a staple strengthening exercise for the snatch. Lifters who visibly struggle to assume a low and stable position in the overhead squat or underneath a snatch typically can benefit from including pause squats assuming they use the same snatch grip, foot position, and depth the do when attempting a snatch. Lack of mobility and overhead strength often can lead to shoulder, back, elbow, and wrist injury.

Start by performing 3-5 sets of 2-3 reps of overhead squats either from the rack or adding them into snatch complexes.

1.
Establish Position

Start with the barbell placed overhead, with the grip set wide.

The grip is typically taken with a snatch grip, however this can vary based on the goal, athlete’s mobility, and strength.

The key is that the barbell should be placed over the back of the neck, with the biceps in line with the ears. The wrists should be slightly extended, with the elbows straight and ribs pulled in (neutral spine).

2.
Begin Descent

As you begin to descend, be sure not to extend the lumbar spine, but rather keep the core braced and the hips neutral (as opposed to anterior or posterior tilting of the pelvis).

This squat should be patterned in the same manner a high bar back squat would.

3.
Maintain Control and Position

Once you have reached full depth (which can be slightly different for everyone), the hip crease should be slightly below the knees, with the full foot down.

The lifter should keep the core tight and be sure to actively push against the barbell to keep it into the correct positioning overhead (see step one).

4.
Drive Up and Stand

From here, work to keep the barbell overhead and the chest up as you ascend out of the squat.

Be sure to keep the core tight and actively push up against the barbell to aid in standing up from the overhead squat.

5.
Stabilize and Repeat

Once you have fully extended the knees and hips, stabilize the core and shoulders and repeat for repetitions.

Be sure to keep the upper back and shoulders stable by actively pressing upwards through the barbell.

Want More Snatch Training Tips?

Take a look at these top snatch training articles for more tips and programming notes to address common errors in the snatch!

The post 3 Common Snatch Mistakes (Plus How to FIX Them) appeared first on BarBend.

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Knee sleeves can be worn for a variety of reasons in a day-to-day setting, and in this article, we’re going to highlight knee sleeves efficacy in the gym. If you’re brand new to barbell training and strength sports, then you might be scratching your head wondering, “Why do some athletes wear knee sleeves when squatting and doing compound lifts?”

The question that usually then follows this initial thought is,

“Are knee sleeves worth it?”

In this article, we’re going to breakdown the ins and outs of knee sleeves and their main purposes. Knee sleeves can 100% be worth it, but one should understand why they’re being used. At the end of the day, knee sleeves are like other pieces of supportive strength equipment and should be used when needed, and never as a crutch. 

Are Knee Sleeves Worth It?

Knee sleeves are worth it in the gym if you need them for joint warmth and support in heavy lifts. Depending on what knee sleeve you use, they can also be useful for providing a light compression and confidence in lifts. Like with most supportive strength equipment, knee sleeves should only be worn with intent towards a specific activity/adaptation, and not used as a crutch, or as a means to solely create joint stability.

Photo by sportpoint / Shutterstock

In the gym setting, knee sleeves are typically worn for two major reasons, and these include:

  1. Joint Warmth
  2. Support

Obviously, one might have other reasons for wearing knee sleeves in the gym such as rehabbing an injury and so forth, however, this article will focus on the two main performance benefits knee sleeves can offer.

1. Knee Joint Warmth
  • Why they’re worn: Promote light compression and overall warmth of the knee joint.
  • Who can wear them: Recreational lifters, functional fitness athletes, and weightlifters.

Generally speaking, knee sleeves for joint warmth can be useful when working out because they tend to promote overall joint comfort and a light level of compression. These sleeves can be beneficial for athletes who have a hard time getting their joints warmed-up, have long rests in-between sets, or work out in cooler climates. The last thing athletes want is getting cool when moving frequent sub-maximal/maximal loads — it’s like taking a long break in-between shifts in any sport.

All knee sleeves will promote joint warmth and compression to some degree, however, sleeves that are designed specifically to promote knee joint warmth will typically be lighter in construction. Often times, these sleeves will be made with a 3mm or 5mm neoprene, or a spandex blend of materials.

So, are knee sleeves designed for joint warmth and light compression worth it?

Why do you need them? Are they worth it?
Working out in cool climates? Yes, they can be useful.
Knee joints take a while to get warmed-up? Yes, but use them sparingly.
Prefer a light support in a variety of workout settings? Yes, depending on your preference.
Long rests in-between sets? Yes.

In reality, knee sleeves that are designed solely for joint warmth can be worn in multiple settings without a huge drawback in respects to dependency. In layman’s terms, out of all the knee sleeves on the market — typically — wearing a very light sleeve will not create an association between sleeve use and lifting success (in other words, it usually won’t become a crutch for success). 

However, it’s always a good idea to objectively ask yourself every once in a while why you’re wearing a certain piece of equipment in the first place. A great example of this is using a piece of equipment following an injury, but then becoming reliant on it after you’ve recovered and healed. Ask yourself, do you need and are you using this type of knee sleeve to improve overall comfort levels and support confident movement patterns? If so, then they’re worth it.

2. Knee Joint Support
  • Why they’re worn: Support compression for the knee joint to promote stability and confidence.
  • Who can wear them: Recreational lifters, functional fitness athletes, powerlifters, weightlifters, strongman athletes.

Supportive knee sleeves come in multiple forms and are typically worn by strength athletes who desire extra support in heavy squats and Olympic movements. Knee sleeves designed for the purpose of support will generally come in 5mm and 7mm neoprene options, which then result in thicker, more resilient to stretching, and tighter sleeves.

When it comes to supportive knee sleeves, it’s a good idea to understand how their differences can impact certain activities. Unlike knee sleeves for joint warmth, these sleeves will be much more activity-specific. For example, a thicker 7mm neoprene sleeve is specifically designed to provide additional support in movements like heavy squats, as opposed to more versatile, lightweight sleeves.

From this point of view, it’s slightly easier to assess and decide if supportive knee sleeves are worth it.

Why do you need them? Are they worth it?
Do you plan to compete with knee sleeves? Yes.
Do you train heavy often for a strength sport? Yes, but use them sparingly and objectively.
Are you just beginning barbell training? No. Wait until your training is a bit more specific.

When it comes to knee sleeves and support, they should be used with a slightly more strategic plan. Similar to a lifting belt, knee sleeves can become crutches in some respects, and remaining objective with training in them and their use is one’s best bet to ensure they don’t fall down a dependency rabbit hole. 

So are supportive knee sleeves worth it? Yes — if — you compete in a strength sports, train heavy often, and need a sleeve for extra knee joint support. If you’re brand new to training, then opt for training without sleeves until you develop movement mechanics, foundational strength, and more direction in your training.

Wrapping Up

Knee sleeves are worth it, but there needs to be an understanding behind their efficacy and purpose. Sleeves can be extremely useful pieces of supportive lifting equipment and best serve their purpose when there’s a specific ask and application that accompanies them.

If you’re brand new to barbell training and are still building baseline strength and learning movement mechanics, then opt for naked knee training or use a very light sleeve for warmth. At times, adding supportive equipment too soon in training can decrease overall objectivity down the road.

The post Are Knee Sleeves Worth It? appeared first on BarBend.

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USA weightlifter Kate Nye is having an incredible year. On Tuesday, Nye was crowned the -71kg IWF Junior World Champion at the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) Junior World Championships with a record breaking performance. She swept gold all across the board and broke several records.

Nye Performance Recap
  • Snatch: 109kg — Gold
  • Clean & Jerk: 137kg — Gold
  • Total: 246kg — Gold

Nye’s snatch, while impressive, fell just shy of breaking the Junior World Record of 111kg, which is currently held by Sarah Ahmed. However, her clean & jerk was enough to break the Junior and Senior Pan American Records and American records, and her total of 246kg was good for the Junior and Senior Pan American and American records.

After her performance she told USA Weightlifting how massive it was to hit that 137kg clean & jerk.

“I’ve been wanting that for a while,” Nye told USA Weightlifting. “It’s 300 pounds so that’s pretty cool. I knew I had it in me I just had to be aggressive.”

Just last month Nye had another record breaking performance, too. Nye was crowned the -71kg Pan American Champion after going six-for-six and bringing home three gold medals. At the Pan American Championships she hit a 110kg snatch, 135kg clean & jerk, and finished with a 245kg total.

When we talked to Nye ahead of the Junior World Championships she told us how she had plans to hit more PRs in Fiji with her main goal of making the Tokyo 2020 Olympic team.

“I’m completely focused on that goal. You should expect me to try and do my best and attack some big totals at big international meets, Junior Worlds, Senior Worlds, and all of that,” Nye told BarBend last week.

Nye is proving to be a woman of her word, and she not only achieved her goals at the Junior World Championships, but came away victorious. As for what’s next for Nye? She’ll be competing for the U.S. at the Junior Pan Am Games in a few weeks.

Feature image from @usa_weightlifting Instagram page.

The post Kate Nye Crowned 71kg IWF Junior World Champion appeared first on BarBend.

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We are a few days into the IWF Junior World Weightlifting Championships, which are running from June 1st til June 8th, and Team USA is already making a splash. The latest athlete to make waves in the competition was none other than CJ Cummings.

Hot off of a massive performance at the 2019 Pan American Championships, Cummings has furthered his name as one of the best Junior Weightlifters on Earth and has brought home another gold and World Champion title for Team USA in the -73kg weight class. This makes him the first American to be named IWF Junior World Champion in four consecutive world championships (and to our knowledge, the first lifter from any country). 

Cummings’ Performance By the Numbers
  • Snatch: 145kg  — Silver
  • Clean & Jerk: 192kg — Gold/Junior World Record
  • Total: 337kg — Gold

In the IWF’s press release detailing Cummings’ performance, the lifter said, “I am extremely happy and excited for this year’s gold medal as never anyone from the USA had four Junior World Champion titles before. My next competition will be the Junior Pan-American Championships, which I also would like to win and build up my ROBI points to qualify for the Tokyo Olympic Games.”

Unfortunately, Cummings only managed to hit his opener for the day in the snatch, but he absolutely dominated the clean & jerk. His opener of 180kg was 5kg higher than the second place clean & jerk. On top of that, his 337kg total was 17kg over the second place finisher Paul Dimitrascu’s 320kg total.

In late April, Cummings brought home gold across the board at the 2019 Pan American Championships and shattered a remarkable 15 records. As he stated above, his next performance will be the Junior Pan American Championships, which is set to take place June 26-30th in La Habana, Cuba.

Three competitions within three months is phenomenal, especially performing at this level. With yet another gold-level qualifying event under his belt, Cummings is looking well on his way to potentially qualify for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Editor’s Note: BarBend is the Official Media Partner of USA Weightlifting. The two organizations maintain editorial independence unless otherwise specified on partner content.

Feature image from @usa_weightlifting Instagram page and photo taken by @zoomfiji. 

The post CJ Cummings Wins Fourth IWF Junior World Weightlifting Championship appeared first on BarBend.

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USA Weightlifting announced on Monday that the 2020 National Championships will return to DuPage County in Illinois. Next year’s National Championships will be a major event since it will be the final major national competition before the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

The 2020 USA Weightlifting National Championships will run from May 14th through May 17th at the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center in DuPage County. There is a brief and recent history at the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center serving as a host site. In 2017, the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center hosted the USA Weightlifting National Championships and most recently the 2019 USA Weightlifting Junior National Championships.

Pedro Meloni, USA Weightlifting Director of Events and Sponsorships, emphasized how wonderful of a location DuPage and the Westin Lombard is for everyone involved.

“DuPage is convenient for participants traveling to the Chicago area, and it’s great to have the competition just steps away from where participants are staying. We are thrilled that we are returning to DuPage,” Meloni said in the USA Weightlifting press release.

This announcement comes less than a year out from the 2020 National Championships, and Beth Marchetti, the Executive Director of the DuPage CVB and Sports Commission couldn’t be more excited to see USA Weightlifting return.

“On behalf of the nearly one million residents throughout DuPage County, we are thrilled to welcome back USA Weightlifting as they prepare for competition at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics,” Marchetti said in USA Weightlifting’s press release.

More USA Weightlifting News

Just last week, USA Weightlifting announced the qualifying totals for select 2020 national events. The National University & Under 25 Championships and National Junior Championships qualifying totals remained unchanged from the 2019 totals, however, the National Championships received a handful of changes to the qualifying totals.

On top of the national qualifying totals news, USA Weightlifting also recently announced their 2019 Pan American team. Ten athletes were named to the roster and have a huge opportunity ahead of them to continue to compete for a spot on the 2020 Tokyo Olympic team. The Pan American Games are serving as a silver-level qualification event and this event takes place only once every four years during the summer prior to the Olympics.

Editor’s Note: BarBend is the Official Media Partner of USA Weightlifting. The two organizations maintain editorial independence unless otherwise specified on partner content.

Feature image from @usa_weightlifting Instagram page.

The post USA Weightlifting National Championships Will Return to DuPage County in 2020 appeared first on BarBend.

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Romanian weightlifter Florin Croitoru has tested positive for three banned substances and has been disqualified from the 2012 London Olympic Games, insidethegames.biz first reported on Tuesday.

In addition to Croitoru, insidethegames.biz also reported on Monday that weightlifters Ruslan Nurudinov of Uzbekistan and Mikalai Novikau of Belarus have also been disqualified from London 2012 due to doping violations and are facing potential bans from the IWF. They were provisionally suspended in December and await an official IWF ruling. The details for each athlete’s disqualification from their retests at the 2012 London Olympics are below. 

  1. Croitoru’s samples from the London Olympics were reevaluated by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and came back positive with three substances including: metenolone, stanozol, and dehydrochlormethyltestosterone.
  2. Nurudinov, who most recently and notably won a gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, tested positive for dehydrochlormethyltestosterone.
  3. Novikau tested positive for dehydrochlormethyltestosterone and stanozolol.

Croitoru’s ninth place finish in the men’s -56kg class at the 2012 London Games will no longer stand, and he becomes the 55th weightlifter to test positive during the re-evaluation and re-testing of samples from the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing and the 2012 Games. In 2013, the 25-year old earned a gold medal at the European Championships due to all of the three medalists ahead of him — Valentin Hristov, Igor Bour, and Zulfugar Suleymanovwere — getting suspended following the Championships for doping.

On the topic of anti-doping news, earlier this month, the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) and the International Testing Agency (ITA) signed an anti-doping partnership agreement at the SportAccord convention in Queensland, Australia. This partnership was struck to further solidify and hone in on the importance of promoting and requiring clean weightlifting across the world.

Since that agreement, however, new doping scandals have surfaced including a report that cited more than 10 Indian weightlifters were asked to leave their national team’s training camp after testing positive for performance enhancement drugs.

Feature image from Jasminko Ibrakovic / Shutterstock. 

The post Three Weightlifters Have Been Disqualified from London 2012 Olympics for Doping appeared first on BarBend.

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Iranian weightlifter Mohsen Bahramzadeh showed off an impressive 197kg snatch in training, which as it stands, unofficially tops the current world record snatch standard of 196 kg.

However, Bahramzadeh didn’t even stop with the snatch. In his training he also displayed a seriously elite clean & jerk of 237kg, and more on that below.

Before the International Weightlifting Federation introduced new weight classes, Bahramzadeh competed in the 105kg weight class, and in 2013 won a bronze medal at the Asian Weightlifting Championships. Bahramzadeh, who will now compete in the -109kg class, is another Iranian weightlifter working to make a stronger name for himself in the IWF, and if he stays on course and keeps hitting these massive numbers in training he could very well be the first to break the current 196kg snatch world record.

Many athletes have been close to breaking the world record snatch of 196kg, but so far on the official platform no one has prevailed. Accordingly to and as pointed out by Weightlifting House on Instagram, China’s Yang Zhe and Armenia’s Simon Martirosyan are two weightlifters who have been tirelessly attempting to hit that mark, but no luck so far. If it’s not Zhe or Martirosyan who hit 196kg first, Bahramzadeh is showing promising signs that he could do it.

Bahramzadeh previously shared himself hitting a 237 kg clean & jerk. This is a huge lift too, especially since the current world record is only 240kg and held by Armenian weightlifter Simon Martirosyan. Martirosyan set the world record in the clean & jerk in the 109kg weight class at the 2018 IWF World Championships.

Martirosyan, before hitting the 240kg clean & jerk managed to pull off one of the heaviest hang cleans and jerks ever. In 2018, then competing in the -105kg weight class, he posted a video of himself crushing a massive 230kg, or 507lb hang clean & jerk.

[Check out the benefits and muscles worked in the clean & jerk]

Bahramzadeh’s most recent lifts show that he is very well on his way to either breaking one, if not two world records.

Feature image from @bahramzadeh_mohsen Instagram page.

The post Iranian Weightlifter Mohsen Bahramzadeh Hits A 197kg Snatch In Training appeared first on BarBend.

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On Friday, USA Weightlifting announced the qualifying totals for select 2020 National Events. Here’s what you need to know: 

  • National University & Under 25 Championships and National Junior Championships qualifying totals will remain unchanged from the 2019 totals.
  • National Championships receive a few changes to the qualifying totals.

Below, we’ve included all of the qualifying totals that have been provided for the 2020 National University & Under 25 Championships, National Junior Championships, and National Championships. We’ve also included their dates and relevant deadlines you should know. Weightlifters, it’s time to mark the calendars!

USA Weightlifting 2020 Competitive Season Qualifying Totals USA Weightlifting 2020 National Event Qualifying Totals 2020 National University & Under 25 Championships

Note, the National University & Under 25 Championships are held in conjunction with the National Junior Championships.

  • Event date: February 6-9, 2020
  • Event location: Alameda County Fairgrounds, Pleasanton, CA
  • Qualification dates: 1/6/19 – 1/5/20
  • Registration deadline: 2PM Mountain on Thursday, January 9, 2020

Men

Weight/ Category Qualifying/ Total
55kg 135kg
61kg 160kg
67kg 178kg
73kg 190kg
81kg 202kg
89kg 212kg
96kg 217kg
102kg 222kg
109kg 225kg
+109kg 227kg

Women

Weight/ Category Qualifying/ Total
45kg 85kg
49kg 96kg
55kg 113kg
59kg 128kg
64kg 134kg
71kg 139kg
76kg 143kg
81kg 146kg
87kg 148kg
+87kg 156kg
2020 National Junior Championships
  • Event date: February 6-9, 2020
  • Event location: Alameda County Fairgrounds, Pleasanton, CA
  • Qualification dates: 1/6/19 – 1/5/20
  • Registration deadline: 2PM Mountain on Thursday, January 9, 2020

Men

Weight/ Category Qualifying/ Total
55kg 135kg
61kg 165kg
67kg 183kg
73kg 195kg
81kg 207kg
89kg 217kg
96kg 222kg
102kg 227kg
109kg 230kg
+109kg 232kg

Women

Weight/ Category Qualifying/ Total
45kg 85kg
49kg 100kg
55kg 117kg
59kg 132kg
64kg 138kg
71kg 143kg
76kg 147kg
81kg 150kg
87kg 152kg
+87kg 160kg

2020 National Championships
  • Event date: May 14-17, 2020
  • Event location: TBA
  • Qualification dates: 4/14/19 – 4/12/20
  • Registration deadline: 2PM Mountain on Thursday, April 16, 2020

*2020 Qualifying Totals (changes in qualifying totals from 2019 indicated in italics.)

Men

Weight/ Category Qualifying/ Total
55kg 200kg
61kg 210kg
67kg 236kg
(-4kg)
73kg 265kg
(+5kg)
81kg 274kg
89kg 290kg
96kg 303kg
102kg 305kg
109kg 308kg
+109kg 311kg

Women

Weight/ Category Qualifying/ Total
45kg 120kg
49kg 137kg
55kg 159kg (+8kg)
59kg 166kg
64kg 177kg
71kg 185kg
76kg 191kg
81kg 193kg
87kg 194kg
+87kg 195kg

Editor’s Note: BarBend is the Official Media Partner of USA Weightlifting. The two organizations maintain editorial independence unless otherwise specified on partner content.

Feature image from @usa_weightlifting Instagram page.

The post USA Weightlifting Announces Qualifying Totals For 2020 National Events appeared first on BarBend.

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Weightlifters Lidia Valentin and Lasha Talakhadze were celebrated at the 2018 Lifters of the Year Award Gala in Georgia on Monday evening. The gala celebrated both of these athletes being named as the 2018 Lifters of the Year.

The gala brought together many notable people in the weightlifting community, and the evening was led by Dr Tamas Aján, the IWF President. The Georgian Weightlifting Federation hosted the event and gala. According to the IWF, Talakhadze and Valentin dominated the voting pool (which was upwards of 30,000 votes cast), with Talakhadze receiving 18,000 votes, and Valentin receiving around 13,000.

[Check out more on the IWF’s voting process for Lifter of the Year]

Super-heavyweight Talakhadze is no stranger to winning ‘Athlete of the Year’ awards and was recognized as Georgia’s ‘Athlete of the Year’ in 2017, along with the IWF ‘Athlete of the Year’. However, Talakhadze’s 2018 could arguably be his best season to date, as he not only set an official 220kg snatch all-time world record, but also set a new 477kg all-time total world record. This can all be added to his long list of career accomplishments including being an Olympic Champion, three-time World Champion, and four-time European Champion.

The other recipient of the prestigious award is Valentin, a Spanish weightlifter in the -75kg class. She is also an Olympic Champion, and has also been a two-time World Champion and a four-time European Champion. She competed in the -75kg class up until this year when the IWF introduced new weight classes. She is now recognized in -81kg class.

Both athletes spoke at the gala and expressed how thankful they were for the award, and the sport of weightlifting,

Vale“Having a leading role in women’s weightlifting and earning this honor is a dream came true. An event like this brings people together, I am so happy to be a part of it,” Valentin said at the event. “Next on my agenda is the World Championships, then competing on more qualifying events for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.”

“I hope I can make weightlifting even more popular in my country and motivate young people to choose this great sport,” Talakhadze told the crowd. “I am very proud of all the achievements of my team and grateful for their support. It is a wonderful feeling that the Award Gala takes place in my home country again and I can show the World how great Georgia and its people are.”

The evening celebrated two weightlifters who have reached the highest levels of success in the sport, and with the Olympics close around the corner, we can’t wait to see how their 2019 and 2020 competition seasons pan out.

Feature image from @iwfnet Instagram page.

The post Lidia Valentin and Lasha Talakhadze Named 2018 Lifters of the Year appeared first on BarBend.

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