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Fed up with those Saltwater Crocodiles infesting your nearby river? Chuck ’em on the barbie. Spent a bit of time in Asia and suddenly have a craving for dog? Go catch a Dingo. However, those animals are not particularly what you would call “cute”. Australia has its fair share of native cute animals, some of which are regularly appearing on a menu near you.

Koala Bear

Can you eat them? No.

Why not? All koalas are protected by Australian law and I learned that it is illegal to keep them as a pet in any country around the world. Supposedly Koala is on the menu within some discerning Chinese towns, and allegedly the meat has a feint taste of eucalyptus…

Emu

Can you eat them? Yes.

What does it taste like? Emu meat is similar in taste and texture to lean beef, but lower in cholesterol, fat, and calories. The tenderness of emu meat enables it to be prepared in a variety of ways. It is best prepared lightly grilled or pan fried.

Platypus

Can you eat them? No.

Why not? The platypus is highly toxic so it is in no way suitable for Human consumption. In addition, the platypus is also a protected species in Australia.

Common Wombat

Wombat

Can you eat them? No.

Why not? Although high in muscle and fat, wombats are a protected species so cannot be eaten Down Under. But why would you want to eat something as docile as a wombat anyway?!

This kangaroo was found at the Blue Mountains

Kangaroo

Can you eat them? Yes.

What does it taste like? I would say that kangaroo tastes like a cross between venison and buffalo meat. It has a wonderful gamey taste that adds a lot of flavour without being overpowering – perhaps because kangaroos feed on grass and shrubs. The texture of kangaroo meat is not quite as dry as deer but nonetheless leaner than buffalo.

I am not a big fan of exotic meats, in fact I find a lot of its sale and consumption disgusting. However, travel around the world opens up knowledge of new cuisines (and not just in Asia, as I did see guinea pig on the menu in Peru!). I would much rather enjoy these cute Aussie animals in the zoo rather than in a restaurant – but for meat like kangaroo and emu, there are people out there who enjoy this kind of thing and see it as no different to munching on chicken, for example.

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I had always wanted to visit Hainan island, which is marketed as the Chinese version of Hawaii. The climate is certainly the same as Hawaii, and the sheer amount of luxury hotels around Hainan is also similar to what you would find across the Pacific. But what is there to do on Hainan island for a mere backpacker?

Sanya Phoenix International Airport was my arrival point

I flew to Sanya from Singapore (with a short layover at Hong Kong Airport – didn’t bother going downtown this time), and I usually make the mistake of arriving at a new destination in the evening, which means more trouble and stress to find my way to the hotel or hostel. Not this time. I finally learned from my previous mistakes and made sure I knew what I was doing as I embarked on my tropical trip!

Haikou shoreline The icon of Hainan: Nanshan Temple

First impressions of Hainan were very good. I have been to other tropical parts of China, such as Xishuangbanna and even Guangzhou/Shenzhen, but never this island. What you need to know when you come to Hainan is that a lot of Chinese tourists use this as their ‘getaway from life’ kind of trip. Passports are expensive in China, but Chinese people can visit Hainan almost free of charge (minus airfare) as they don’t need a passport to get here.

Yalong Bay is the scene of many luxury hotels The St. Regis Hotel, Sanya

My cheap hotel was in Sanya in the south of the island, which is also where most of the luxury hotels are based, in particular around Yalong Bay, and Haitang Bay. I enjoyed experiencing the city life and had a walk along the beaches, although I did get the feeling that a solo backpacker was not particularly welcome near these luxury hotels. As far as I know, none of the beaches are private, but you still have to watch where you are going, as the resorts organise water sports activities for guests, and if you are not staying at that resort then you are unceremoniously ushered away if you don’t show your hotel key card upon request.

Pristine rainforest on Hainan island Monkeys were everywhere!

So if you’re not a millionaire, what can you actually do here on Hainan island? Well, what I found most fascinating was the rainforest in the centre of the island. I spent 2 whole days sweating profusely as I explored the Yanuo Tropical Rain Forest Resort, all the while watching my footing for poisonous snakes. Thankfully, I didn’t see any snakes, but monkeys are everywhere – I hate monkeys!

Qilou Old Street reminded me of Saigon

For culture, the Binlang Ethnic Village is a great place to stop at, to learn about the life and art of the minority Li and Miao tribes, and for food, drink, and general joie de vivre, Qilou Old Street was a main hang out of mine. I didn’t meet any other travellers to talk with (most people were rich, middle-aged holidaymakers) but I did enjoy the vibe at Qilou Old Street. There is a fairly good wildlife park here on Hainan island, too, as well as many shopping centres – but, again, unless you have lots of money there may not be any suitable souvenirs or memorabilia to take back to your hostel.

I will plan to go into more detail about these places when I get a more stable internet connection! 

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I had always wanted to visit Hainan island, which is marketed as the Chinese version of Hawaii. The climate is certainly the same as Hawaii, and the sheer amount of luxury hotels around Hainan is also similar to what you would find across the Pacific. But what is there to do on Hainan island for a mere backpacker?

Sanya Phoenix International Airport was my arrival point

I flew to Sanya from Singapore (with a short layover at Hong Kong Airport – didn’t bother going downtown this time), and I usually make the mistake of arriving at a new destination in the evening, which means more trouble and stress to find my way to the hotel or hostel. Not this time. I finally learned from my previous mistakes and made sure I knew what I was doing as I embarked on my tropical trip!

Haikou shoreline The icon of Hainan: Nanshan Temple

First impressions of Hainan were very good. I have been to other tropical parts of China, such as Xishuangbanna and even Guangzhou/Shenzhen, but never this island. What you need to know when you come to Hainan is that a lot of Chinese tourists use this as their ‘getaway from life’ kind of trip. Passports are expensive in China, but Chinese people can visit Hainan almost free of charge (minus airfare) as they don’t need a passport to get here.

Yalong Bay is the scene of many luxury hotels The St. Regis Hotel, Sanya

My cheap hotel was in Sanya in the south of the island, which is also where most of the luxury hotels are based, in particular around Yalong Bay, and Haitang Bay. I enjoyed experiencing the city life and had a walk along the beaches, although I did get the feeling that a solo backpacker was not particularly welcome near these luxury hotels. As far as I know, none of the beaches are private, but you still have to watch where you are going, as the resorts organise water sports activities for guests, and if you are not staying at that resort then you are unceremoniously ushered away if you don’t show your hotel key card upon request.

Pristine rainforest on Hainan island Monkeys were everywhere!

So if you’re not a millionaire, what can you actually do here on Hainan island? Well, what I found most fascinating was the rainforest in the centre of the island. I spent 2 whole days sweating profusely as I explored the Yanuo Tropical Rain Forest Resort, all the while watching my footing for poisonous snakes. Thankfully, I didn’t see any snakes, but monkeys are everywhere – I hate monkeys!

Qilou Old Street reminded me of Saigon

For culture, the Binlang Ethnic Village is a great place to stop at, to learn about the life and art of the minority Li and Miao tribes, and for food, drink, and general joie de vivre, Qilou Old Street was a main hang out of mine. I didn’t meet any other travellers to talk with (most people were rich, middle-aged holidaymakers) but I did enjoy the vibe at Qilou Old Street. There is a fairly good wildlife park here on Hainan island, too, as well as many shopping centres – but, again, unless you have lots of money there may not be any suitable souvenirs or memorabilia to take back to your hostel.

I will plan to go into more detail about these places when I get a more stable internet connection! 

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Backpackerlee by Backpackerlee - 3d ago

A ride along the Golden Circle tourist trail in Iceland reveals the breathtaking Gullfoss Waterfall where traversing a narrow path provides close-up views of the massive, two-tiered waterfall below. In winter the view is spectacular when the waterfall freezes over into undulating waves of glistening ice. On sunny days, however, visitors are treated to thousands of rainbows, which are a natural reaction with the clouds of spray from the tumbling falls.

Gullfoss Waterfall is a part of the famous Golden Circle Route in Iceland. Its distance from Reykjavik is about 113km (70 miles). From the capital, follow the ring road east for about 54km (33 miles), then turn off for route 35. Follow that route until you reach a big parking lot next to the visitors’ centre. Entry to Gullfoss is totally free and can be visited 24/7/365. I did think about visiting independently, but for the equivalent of around £50, I took a Golden Circle minibus tour to Pingvellir National Park, Gullfoss, and then finally up to the Geysir hot springs. The morning began pretty dull and drizzly (typical for Icelandic mornings) but did brighten up a lot in the early afternoon.

Regardless of the weather, Gullfoss is by many considered one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Iceland. It is situated in the upper part of the Hvita river and what makes it so striking is that the water cascades down in two stages, one 36ft high, and the other 69ft, into the long crevasse below. We were told by our tour guide that this crevasse was created at the end of the Ice Age by a catastrophic flood. There are viewing vantage points all the way around the perimeter of the falls so you can get so many amazing shots, and while dark weather does add a classic gloomy mood to the ambience, I am glad that my visit to Gullfoss Waterfall was in good weather.

All members of my tour group (including two Singaporeans that I chatted to a lot on this day) admitted that these falls were super beautiful, and although I have seen many other waterfalls in the world, including the Blue Nile Falls in Ethiopia and Iguazu Falls in Brazil, there was something so enchanting about Gullfoss; the double cascade of water is amazing to see in person (and the sound is incredible, too!) and even in the cold Icelandic weather I didn’t mind getting sprayed from these mighty falls!

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Who remembers when the southern beaches of Thailand were sandy castaway shores, devoid of civilisation? Nope, me neither. While tourism is obviously good for the local economy, how many of these potential visitors will actually realise that most of the beaches they see in the advertising look nothing like that in real life?

The Thai longboats of the Andaman coast are an iconic sight – but is this the view you will see when you get here?!

In my travels around South East Asia, I always look forward to returning to Phuket and Krabi in particular to enjoy a few days relaxing on the sand. I am not one for sunbathing usually, but the tropical ambiance of southern Thailand really makes me forget my troubles and just go with the flow. Before I began travelling, people told me that shimmering turquoise water and golden sands would be waiting for me at these Thai beaches.

Crowds can be a problem

In reality, as I found out to my cost years later, you will be very lucky to enjoy Thai beaches without the crowds. The water may be turquoise (and warm), but you have to share it with hundreds of other revellers, many of whom are usually drunk in my experience, and to make matters worse, it is not the Thai longboats that dot the shore, but ugly motorised speed boats that take these intrepid revellers island-hopping.

Finding a spot on the beach – especially as a solo traveller – can be a somewhat haphazard affair. Especially in Phuket, I found that it is near impossible to spend any quality time enjoying the views, and most of the beaches are not full of golden sand anyway; dead leaves, pebbles, and of course litter are such a curse in southern Thailand that I wonder why the authorities haven’t tried to do more about it by now.

That said, don’t be put off by coming to the beaches of Thailand. Some of them are closely related to what the advertising claimed. In particular, Bamboo Island near Krabi springs to mind. I find that western Thai beaches (Phuket, Koh Lanta, Krabi, Koh Phi Phi) are more crowded than their eastern counterparts (Koh Samui, Koh Kood), and the eastern beaches are perhaps slightly more highbrow in the type of visitor using them – although this doesn’t mean any less visitors!

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Iceland is such a beautiful country full of amazing scenic wonders, but the one thing that really struck me during my visit was that Icelandic cuisine sure is a bit strange! Whether it is served up as street food or part of a more fulsome meal, you can find weird and wacky things to eat here, from fermented shark to sour ram’s testicles!

Lundi (Puffin Meat) Hangikjot is very popular Hakarl is an Icelandic national dish

Hangikjot is the Icelandic term for smoked meat, and you can find this delicacy on every street corner in some shape or form. The smoked meat usually is either lamb, mutton, or horse, and is usually boiled and served either hot or cold in slices. It takes its name from the old tradition of smoking food in order to preserve it by hanging it from the rafters of a smoking shed.

Fermented Shark (otherwise known as Hakarl) is the national dish of Iceland and consists of a Greenland shark or other sleeper shark which has been cured with a particular fermentation process and hung to dry for four to five months. Kæstur hákarl has a strong ammonia-rich smell and fishy taste, which often puts foreigners off from eating it. For Icelandic residents, however, it is readily available in grocery stores and eaten throughout the year.

Puffin (Landi) is another form of meat that the carnivorous Icelandic people enjoy to eat. While not regularly served up as street food (though may be nice in a wrap), puffin meat uffin can both be boiled in milk sauce or smoked.
Personally, I’ve only ever tried smoked puffin and it’s a proper delicacy, found in restaurants all over the country.
Puffin is a national dish in the Westman Islands, where the largest puffin colony in Iceland is.

Hardfiskur Whale kebabs Laufabrot

Hardfiskur is another popular street food from Iceland. It is simply dried fish, usually cod or haddock, and is extremely high in protein. It comparable to Biltong from South Africa. Icelanders eat tonnes of Hardfiskur every year with butter on top, as the texture of the fish is very dry and the butter makes it softer. You need to chew each bite very thoroughly before swallowing it!

Minke Whale is consumed by the bucket load in Iceland, but it has never been considered endangered. Whale meat can both be eaten raw or cooked. Whale meat is red meat, similar to a beef steak, but softer and leaner – and often described as a cross between beef and tuna! You can find whale pieces as street food in the form of sushi, and even whale kebabs!

Laufabrot is a traditional kind of Icelandic bread originating from the northern but now eaten throughout the country. It is a round, very thin flat cakes with a diameter of about 6 inches, decorated with leaf-like, geometric patterns and fried briefly in hot fat or oil. Laufabrauð can be bought in bakeries or made at home, but for tourists to Iceland, it is best served fresh from the street vendors!

Fiskisuppe Skyr Gellur (otherwise known as Cod’s Tongues)

Fiskisupa, when fresh off the stove, can be a godsend during those sub-zero Icelandic winters summers. This fish soup is most commonly cream-based and tastes delicious when sprinkled with small herbs and vegetables. You just have to enjoy Fiskisupa with some Laufabrot!

Gellur is another disgusting – yet popular – street food from Iceland, and is basically the muscle tendons from behind Cod tongues. They are fleshy, white, and very, very slimy. As street food, you can find Gellur in fishmongers used to have them, although they are not common. Gellur reminds me of Jellied Eels from British street food.

Skyr is an Icelandic cultured dairy product with the consistency of strained yogurt but has a much milder flavour. It is technically classified as cheese, although widely regarded as yogurt. Skyr has a slightly sour dairy flavour, with a hint of residual sweetness. It is traditionally served cold with milk and a topping of sugar.

Pylsur

Pylsur Ein med ollu Hotdog is my wildcard for the best street food in Iceland. It comes from a hotdog stand in Reykjavik (Baejarins Beztu) and is very famous as even ex-president Bill Clinton bought a snack here a few years ago during a visit to the city. If you want to go the whole hog and order a “traditional Icelandic hotdog” then you need to ask for “everything”: fried and raw onions, ketchup, sweet mustard, and whatever else on offer. Baejarins Beztu is very famous and popular so expect to wait in line for your dog. If you aren’t visiting Reykjavik and are stuck in other parts of the country, well…you’ll have to make do with sheep’s testicles and fermented shark! 

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Backpackerlee by Backpackerlee - 2w ago

The latest tourist attraction has opened recently in Dubai, known as The Dubai Frame. This is an observatory that gives fantastic views all around the Emirate. However, is this one giant tourist attraction too far, even for Dubai?!

As an observer of this giant attraction being built over the past couple of years, I was always a bit “meh” about the whole thing. After all, this is Dubai, where the air quality is usually very poor (hazy) and the cost of tourist attractions here is often astronomical. Would The Dubai Frame fall into these stereotypes?

Located in the Zabeel Park area, The Dubai Frame stands at 150 metres tall and is 93 metres wide. The design is actually a pair of towers that are linked by the observation bridge atop. At the foot of the Frame, there is more hospitality units and a Museum.

The views from the observation bridge are admittedly incredible (including the glass floor!), and it is much more spacious up there than you would imagine. Yet as always with Dubai, you really need to visit on a very clear day to get your full money’s worth, as otherwise the Arabian haze will obscure your views over the Emirate.

One impressive niche with The Dubai Frame is that it attempts to enhance the guest experience by presenting Dubai in a journey of time. At mezzanine level, there are displays and projections that reflect Dubai of old and tells a story of its evolution through time. Once you arrive on the observation deck, it is time to marvel at contemporary Dubai, taking in its panoramic 360 degree views. On the way back down in the elevator to mezzanine level, guests are treated to an exciting illusion of time travel, to experience what Dubai might be like in the second half of the 21st century.

In February, 2018, tickets were still only available to purchase at the attraction entrance itself. You cannot purchase tickets online as this present time (unlike for the Burj Khalifa, where it is actually cheaper to buy online in advance). At 50AED for adults and 20AED for children, an experience at The Dubai Frame is certainly not cheap, but then again, it is not wildly expensive either when you consider it costs 6 times as much at the Burj.

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In this part of Saigon’s District 1, there are two parallel streets: Bui Vien and Pham Ngu Lao. While both are on the cheap and nasty side, Pham Ngu Lao caters more to foodies, whereas Bui Vien is a pedestrianised street where it seems anything goes: massages, sex, drinking… no wonder so many backpackers in Saigon head down here!

If you Pub Street in Siem Reap or Khao San Road in Bangkok were bad, then you’ve seen nothing yet. Bui Vien Street in Saigon is one of the most dirty and tacky areas I have seen in any South East Asian city. While I saw nothing illegal going on or being sold, I nevertheless came to understand the reason why so many backpackers – of all ages – descend on Bui Vien after dark to enjoy themselves (in more ways than one).

Nearby Pham Ngu Lao is a much better option if you’re in need of some classic Vietnamese street food such as Banh Xeo or even some Pho, and I did consider dashing two blocks away to this comparative haven in Saigon’s District 1. Yet part of travelling is to get out of your comfort zone and experience things you haven’t seen or heard before. Fancy unhealthy cocktails? You can order them here at the bars. Fancy a massage? You can get easily one here at Bui Vien Street. Fancy a bit more than a massage? You can also get that here, too, if you’re that way inclined.

As a solo traveller, I am sometimes uneasy about spending time drinking with strangers, but on other occasions I am more than willing to enjoy a pint or two and people-watch during the day (or check Instagram where available). At Bui Vien in Saigon, I tried to enjoy myself at both times of the day. In the sunlight, Bui Vien is awash with construction vehicles and workmen repairing shop fronts and broken lamp posts, and that in itself is enough to ask the question: “why am I drinking here?”! Yet at night, your dignity takes a step downward when you realise that a peaceful drink before heading home to your hostel is perhaps not something that you can achieve easily at Bui Vien.

Or maybe I’m just getting older?…

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Backpackerlee by Backpackerlee - 2w ago

Using your Jordan Pass to experience the best this country has to offer will mean trips to both Petra and Wadi Rum. But fear not, because as far as journeys go, travelling between the two is relatively simple.

Getting from Petra to Wadi Rum needn’t be done on horseback…

As of December, 2017, there is currently just one bus per day from Petra to Wadi Rum that leaves at 06.30 and costs 7JD. The trip departs from Wadi Musa Bus Station and generally takes slightly less than 2 hours powering down the Desert Highway. Tickets should be booked through your hotel at Petra, and the bus will then collect you from your hotel directly in the morning. The bus arrives at the Wadi Rum Visitor’s Centre and Rum Village and returns to Wadi Musa for visitors travelling on to Petra (departure at 08.00 or 09.00)

If minibuses are not your thing, then consider taking a taxi. Taxis to and from Petra cost around 30JD. The journey is most of the time on a higher altitude road and is pretty much interesting. Temperature may be slightly lower than the plains and you could see the original Bedouin camping on the mountains. Takes 2 to 2.5 hours. Request your taxi guy to take to Wadi Rum visitors centre and he should help you in connecting to the camp where you’ve made your booking. I am told a reliable company to book with on this journey is Bedouin Roads, who offer good-priced private taxis to Wadi Rum not only from Petra but also from other destinations in Jordan.

Sunrise at Wadi Rum

The seemingly hassle-free journey between Petra and Wadi Rum is a fantastic addition to your Jordanian itinerary. If it is within your budget, then consider spending a night camping in a Bedouin tent in the Wadi Rum desert. Not only does this give you extra time at Wadi Rum, but also allows you to appreciate more the sights and sounds – just remember to wake up early for the return journey (oh, and to catch the Arabian sunrise, of course…).

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Never has South East Asia been receiving so many tourists. While larger cities like Bangkok, Singapore, and Saigon may get the lion’s share of attention, there are many smaller, less-travelled cities in the region offer far more in the way of experiencing authentic South East Asian hospitality – the most recommended of which I have listed in this article.

Chiang Mai’s Loy Krathong festival

Chiang Mai is a northern city in Thailand and is a firm favourite with travellers in their escape from the city lights of Bangkok. You cannot find any beaches in Chiang Mai, rather it is a city for culture, and, perhaps surprisingly, nature. Whatever your budget, Chiang Mai will be enjoyed.

Like a throwback to yesteryear!

Hoi An is very much an ancient town, and is located within the central area of Vietnam. Although this sleepy town does not have a train station or an airport (Danang is the drop off point), it nevertheless provides a great insight to Vietnamese culture.

The Imperial Tombs of Hue

Hue is also situated in Vietnam and is not too far from Hoi An, making the pair of cities easy to visit in one itinerary. The main point of interest in Hue is the Imperial Tombs, but the city is also known for its tasty food!

The view of Luang Prabang atop Mount Phousi

Luang Prabang is arguably the most visited place in all of Laos, and it is not hard to see why. It has astounding natural beauty all around, especially with the Mekong River close by, and Mount Phousi looming large at all times. Luang Prabang is also a great place to se Buddhist monks receiving alms.

Classic Burmese architecture

Mandalay was once the most famous city in Myanmar, then went through a period where it was ‘forgotten about’ by travellers, but thankfully is now enjoying a resurgence. A much more sleepy city than Yangon, Mandalay has many treasures to explore – and monks are never too far away!

Sisowath Quay, Phnom Penh

Phnom Penh is situated in the southern reaches of Cambodia and is often visited before an overland border crossing into Vietnam (enroute to Saigon). This city – the Cambodian capital – has quite a lot to offer travellers, especially those who are interested in its local cuisine and culture.

You havent travelled until you’ve stood here

Siem Reap is located in the centre of Cambodia, around a 4-5hr drive from Phnom Penh. It is known of course for being the site of the Temples of Angkor, which all travellers surely must see at least once in their lifetimes. Siem Reap, however, is a very cheap and easy city to visit even if temple-trampling is not your thing.

Sihanoukville

Sihanoukville is situated on the coast of Cambodia facing out to the Gulf of Siam and is undergoing a major renaissance in tourism. Although the beach itself is the main draw, Sihanoukville is a charming seaside town with extremely friendly locals.

Day or night, Yangon is interesting

Yangon is, for most visitors, the entry point to Myanmar and is probably the best city in the country to get used to Burmese contemporary culture (Mandalay best for history). For all the traffic and noise in Yangon, it nevertheless retains that vibe of yesteryear which makes visiting so interesting.

Yogyakarta Train Station

Yogyakarta in central Java, Indonesia, has long been known as backpacker haunt, and is also the launching pad for the 1hr drive to Borobudur temple at Magelang. However, the town itself should be explored in detail, as there is nowhere better in Indonesia to be accepted into the community as a tourist.

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