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Hayden Lambert at Above Board.

Sometimes, any means to an end will do. Sometimes, well, the process is what matters.

We’ve always been fascinated with the drinks that the Australian industry dishes up, whether they tend toward the out-there, conceptual, transgressive end of the spectrum; or whether they’re more simple three or four ingredient affairs — drinks like this one from Above Board bartender and co-owner, Hayden Lambert.

Here we have asked Lambert to walk us through the conception of this drink. And given that he’s one of the country’s best proponents of the classically structured drink, we asked him to share with us the way he approaches his craft.

As told to Sam Bygrave

It’s called the Bananadrama. Originally it was called the Bananarama, but not many people liked the Bananarama as the name and that caused too much drama — so it became the Bananadrama. 

It was a little bit of an experiment in the bar with a couple of things: first was acidity, we only use lemon, lime and orange juice at Above Board, so it was an interesting way to bring in a different style of acidity that was, yeah, it was more controllable than lime and lemon juice. And then the other part of it was, we didn’t really have any mezcal, and people love tequila but Melbourne loves mezcal. 

We got a lot people asking for mezcal drinks. And I thought, well, I haven’t really played with mezcal, so we introduced a couple of things that weren’t really in the Above Board wheelhouse which were mezcal and verjus. You know, it was just a combination of the two.

We took an Old Fashioned-style structure, and we tried to layer the smoked lightness of mezcal on top of banana, or vice-versa.

The Bananadrama.

You’re like, banana and mezcal shouldn’t really go together… but then I thought Scotch has a lot of those smoky, bacon, butterscotch, banana ester flavours so what you’re kind of making is a makeshift Scotch whisky with a little bit of acidity — does that make sense? In my brain that’s how I was trying to layer it.

So we were just trying to create that kind of flavour profile, introduce that to our customers in an interesting and sometimes divisive way. Because I think, you know, we can produce drinks that taste amazing and I’m all for those drinks, but we also need to produce a drink once in a while that’s challenging. Not everything has to be challenging; you know, you don’t have to go to a bar just to be challenged.

The idea was a little bit of acidity through the verjus, and then a little dash of bitters to bridge the gap between the banana and the mezcal. Serve it over a big piece of ice, and then give it a lemon zest so it still has that aromatic aroma. That’s about it.

We conceive the idea, and then we present it to customers, and we present it to a very limited amount of customers. And we try to find the right match for customers — if it’s a sweeter style drink, then we’re not going to present it to someone who likes bitter flavours and vice-versa. You’re going to to try and find your customer. 

The thing we’re looking for is instant feedback, not verbal feedback because I think people lie — at Above Board it’s so simple, we’re half a metre away from our customer at any one time, and you can see when they’re liking the drink and when they’re not.

You need to work on it, you need to tweak it and you need to develop it, and then a lot of the time I think your imagination is a really great way to make drinks, but you need to be careful because your imagination can tell you that that’s been done, or that’s not going to work, so you self-audit yourself. You get to a point in your bartending career where the books and the stuff that you own are probably more of a collector’s item as opposed than actual reference item.

You need to have a solid base. And then you can work it into two different ways: you can take it back and make it simpler, or you could take it forward and make it more complex, and that’s where clarification comes in, or something like sous-vide, or in the rotovap, where you take it to the most progressive end of the scale. Because we’re not the most progressive bar, we don’t follow that all the way through; we’re working with the simplicity of three or four ingredients.  

The post Here’s how award-winning bartender Hayden Lambert develops new drinks appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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“Who they’re with as well makes a massive difference,” says Laura Roscioli, “because if they’re friends with whisky snobs or drink connoisseur, they can be very like ‘Oh, he doesn’t know what he’s doing.'”

You’ll find Laura Roscioli most nights either working the door at Eau de Vie Melbourne, or walking the floor and and demystifying the bar’s cocktail menu for guests.  When we put the call out for bar hosts with the most on social media, Roscioli came through highly recommended (by some highly commendable people). Here, she talks about how she goes about her role, and tells us that most guests, well, they just need some encouragement.

As told to Sam Bygrave

I’ve been working in hospitality for about seven years, but I’m from Adelaide originally. In Adelaide I worked in restaurants, but it was very much a casual situation; I moved to Melbourne three years ago, and I’ve been working at Eau de Vie now for two years.

When I first started [at Eau de Vie] I was mostly hosting. There’s usually a line on the weekends and you have bookings as well, so you have to go through the line and make sure no-one has got a booking so they don’t get upset when they get to the door. And you have to explain the process of waiting in line to everyone else that’s there.

Essentially it’s one in, one out. We have a licence that makes sure that everyone is sitting down at all times; we use liquid nitrogen and fire and it’s pretty dangerous if people are walking around. But also, the bar — once it’s full it’s really small, and we’re carrying around 10 drinks at a time so it’s better if people are still.

Usually we’ve got one section in the middle [of the bar] that’s relatively fast, where people come in for one drink and leave; so we say that usually you don’t have to wait longer than 15 or 20 minutes. And I’ll keep coming back to keep you updated, so people are okay about it.

Then I started working more on the floor and the door, because the managers do like to work on the door because it gives them more control over who is sitting where, they know what bookings are coming in and that sort of stuff. I still work on the door once a week, but mostly it’s on the floor — I float around and make people happy.

It’s hard to explain concisely: it’s a bar for people who love whisky; it’s a bar for people who know a lot about cocktails and it’s a bar for somebody who wants to try something new; it’s a bar for people who don’t normally drink cocktails and want to give it a go; it’s a bar for people who love taking Instagram photos; it’s a bar for tourists — they love it — a lot of people we have here have been returning for five or six years. It’s an occasion bar. It’s not really a stumble upon kind of place.

I genuinely think that [the most important thing] is making people feel not intimidated. I have to remember the first time I cam in here, I might have been just 18 — I came to Melbourne instead of schoolies. It was Victor Harbor or Melbourne. I came here with my best friend, and we went to all the nice bars — we were obsessed with old films, so we went to The Everleigh, to Eau de Vie, and those kind of places. We came here, and it was overwhelming. You come in and someone is using the trolley that has liquid nitrogen on it, it looks like you’ve just walked onto some kind of theatre production, all the bartenders are beautifully well-dressed, everyone speaks very eloquently, a lot of people have accents because they’re not from here, you get a drink with like fairy floss on top of it — you get a menu which is like a novel and it’s beautiful, but also it can be intimidating. Because clearly everyone knows what they’re doing. You’re not in a place that’s familiar. 

Sometimes people need a little encouraging, because they’ll be like, “Oh, I’ll just have a GIn & Tonic,” and it’s like, no no. You don’t have to worry about me thinking you’re stupid or anyone else, you can ask a question, say something that you like and we’ll give you something good.

It really depends on the person. I usually just gauge what they’re like. Who they’re with as well makes a massive difference, because if they’re friends with whisky snobs or drink connoisseur, they can be very like “Oh, he doesn’t know what he’s doing.” But [I’ll ask] what flavours do you like in general, do you feel like something sour or sweet or savoury or spicy, ask them things that they know. They give you a few things, then you choose two cocktails on the list that sound like they would enjoy, and they try it — and they feel better.

It’s a classic mistake that when you walk into a bar that the people on the floor don’t know how to make the drinks. When you’re explaining to people the menu, they ask to have a bartender come and have a chat. I know the menu like the back of my hand.

It’s common. Especially with whisky, when dudes are like, “Oh are you sure you know what you’re talking about?” Yeah, I wouldn’t be able to work here if I didn’t.  

The post Laura Roscioli: At Eau de Vie Melbourne, hosting is about managing expectations appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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Dean Buchanan. Photo: Supplied

We often field questions from people — whether they’re brands or bar owners or others from consumer publications — wanting to know who are the bartenders that are pushing boundaries, the guys and gals creating truly interesting drinking experiences. And one name we’ve had on the list of late? Dean Buchanan. 

Buchanan began working at the Perth outpost of Long Chim — where he is now the bar manager — under James Connolly, and since taking over the reins he has been busy pushing the drinks further along the progressive spectrum (we have, for example, in the past fielded a recipe from Buchanan that was all about petrichor).

So we wanted to know just what goes on for Buchanan on any given day at work. Here, lightly edited and condensed, is what his job involves.

7:00am: The beautiful sound of Queen’s We Will Rock You blasts (it’s my alarm tone) and I’m awake(ish)…

Unfortunately, my wife Vanessa is already well and truly at work by this stage so I usually wake up alone. I lay in bed for 10-15mins checking reports and emails from the previous night. I have a lot of people in the building requesting for things so I need to be on top of my replies nice and early, I also have a quick look on socials as you never know what happens overnight. James Connolly [Buchanan’s former boss at Long Chim] has usually sent me a meme or two by now as well.

7:25am: By this stage I’ve showered, brushed my teeth, and done my hair all while my alarm keeps going off every two minutes just in case I haven’t woken up.  

7:30am: April and Whisky have now heard me and begin begging for breakfast (these are our cats). They will have a blend of turkey and some dried things and I’ll have scrambled eggs and spinach on toast with a coffee. 

8:23am: I always enjoy the bus trip into work as it’s my part of the day where I get to do some reading and prepares me for the day ahead; I’m currently reading up on neuroenology – how the brain creates the taste of wine. It pretty much explains how the fluid mechanics of the wine in your mouth and the patterns of your breathing activate your sensory and motor pathways to create the taste of wine, and together with your central brain system for emotion and memory, generate the whole perception of wine pleasure. Science.

9:00am: Arrived at work. The first thing I do is check on the fermentation areas (hopefully nothing has blown up). We always have a large amount fruit wines, meads and various other funky stuff all at different stages of the fermentation process so daily love is a must! 

Currently we have a lot banana, jackfruit, sticky rice, plum, and mango wine that has been maturing for 250 days-plus; a variety of other native and seasonal wines etc. I then head to the loading bay to check on deliveries and sign any invoices that have been missed. 

Dean Buchanan. Photo: Supplied

10.20am: Head up stairs to Telegram Coffee (if you’re ever in the State Buildings you need to have a coffee here it’s good stuff).

10.30am: I start setting the bar up and crack on with prep; usually by 11am I will try take one or two quick meetings because as we open at 12pm there usually isn’t a lot of time. I try to pop up to Wildflower two or three times a week. That’s the next drinks menu I’ll be working on with the team up there, which will be heavily focused on native Australian ingredients and that lower ABV approach.

12.00pm: Lunch service is usually pretty good and busy — lots of sodas and wine and more prep. 

2:30pm: By now I’m usually working on some ideas for a drink concepts. Kaden — who is now my assistant bar manager — comes in to start and sees me taking photos for Instagram and says. “Ohh this is what you do all day long.”

He’s a super talented dude and together we talk super geeky stuff that would never make sense in a venue the size of Long Chim — but we still do the experiments anyway. Kaden has helped me create some of the drinks for Long Chim’s new menu where it is inspired by a journey through the streets of Bangkok. Some of the standout drinks are Banana & Cassia Bark wine, a sparkling jackfruit ferment, and a super tasty mace Martini launching soon.

3-4pm: I’ll be either in the office doing ordering, rostering, getting hounded by [Long Chim venue manager] Katie Chan for forgetting to do something or taking some late arvo meetings. 

5pm: Evening service begins and as most bars and restaurants at this time it’s usually pretty intense; the team is great and its always a good fun to be together. 

8pm: I usually take a dinner break; I used to only eat chicken rice and broccoli but I got over it after two years, and the food in the State Buildings is fantastic — we are lucky enough to be able to have a staff meal from Petition, Post or Long Chim. I will also try get a call or a few messages to Vanessa during this time as obviously I start to miss her a lot.

8:20pm: Back to service and making drinks and chatting to guests until around 10-10:30pm (depending on the night sometimes 12am or sometimes earlier).

10:30pm: I have arrived at my warehouse in the suburbs not far from my house this is where my side project base is. Working with some mates, we focus on extracting maximum flavour in numerous ways to create delicious liquid (more info to be released soon).

12:00am: Home, showered, feeling pretty good about the day and all ready to do it again.  

The post A Day In The Life of Dean Buchanan: Long Chim Perth’s bar manager on a long day at the office appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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NEGRONI WEEK 2019 – Venue registrations closing on 20 June

For the seventh year in a row, Campari and Imbibe Magazine are partnering to celebrate Negroni Week. This charitable initiative puts the power of fundraising into the hands of bartenders, their bars and Negroni drinkers all around the world.

Between 24-30 June 2019, participating venues will be donating a portion of their Negroni sales to support a charity of their choice, so there’s no better time to say “Cheers to charity”.  To participate, make sure to register your venue on www.negroniweek.com by 20 June.

At the end of Negroni Week, Campari Australia will match the donation to the nominated charity of the highest donating individual on-premise venue (in NSW/ACT, VIC/TAS, QLD/NT and WS/SA up to a maximum amount of $1,000 per region) to acknowledge and champion your invaluable efforts.

WHAT NEGRONI WEEK 2019 HAS TO OFFER

In the biggest series of events that Campari has held to date – some of Australia’s best and most innovative venues, bars, and restaurants across the country will be celebrating the revered Negroni’s 100th anniversary, featuring dedicated Negroni menus, in-venue activations, and special events.

The official Negroni Week 2019 launch party will kick-off on 24 June at Sydney’s Hilton Zeta Bar. From 6 – 9pm, 15 of Sydney’s best cocktail bars will serve their signature Negroni twists, with all sales being donated to charity. The event will also exhibit some amazing Campari artwork alongside contemporary interpretations of the Negroni created by Australian artists. One of these creative minds is award-winning Jamie Preisz (2018 Archibald Packing Room Prize winner). His Negroni masterpiece “Gliding Bloom Drift” will go into a sweepstake prize draw with all proceeds being donated to charity. Make sure you don’t miss this epic event.

With hundreds of bars and restaurants taking part in Negroni Week 2019 in Australia, Campari lovers will be spoilt for choice as to where to enjoy their favourite cocktail. Amongst many more, here are some venues that will be participating:

  • Sydney: Maybe Sammy, Big Poppa’s, Bulletin Place, Burrow Bar, Continental Deli, Door Knock, Earl’s Juke Joint, Caffe Bartolo, Matteo Downtown, Maybe Frank, Old Mate’s Place, PS40, Ramblin Rascal, This Must be The Place, Bistecca, QT Hotel, Rosetta Terrace, The Clock, Fratelli Fresh, North Bondi Fish, Salt, Meat & Cheese, Meat & Wine Co, Reccolab, Zeta Bar, Gazebo, The Imperial, The Rook and Sake Sydney.
  • Melbourne: Vue De Monde, The Everleigh, 1806, Bar Americano, Black Pearl, Berlin Bar, Union Electric, Gin Palace, Toff in Town, Lily Blacks, Neptunes, Beneath Driver Lane, Arlechin, Polly Bar, The European, Rosetta and QT Hotel. 
  • Brisbane: Death & Taxes,  Rooftop 11, Saville Row, Finney Isles, Cobbler, Donna Chang Dining & Boom Boom Room, Canvas Club, Hooch & Fellow and George Banks Rooftop Bistro 
  • Perth: State Building, Alfred’s Pizzeria, Bar Lafayette, Eyra Pound, Hains & Co., Maybe Mae, Mechanics Institue, Osteria Oggi, Strange Company, Tiny’s

For more information about participating bars and what events are happening near you during Negroni Week 2019 visit www.campariau.com or www.negroniweek.com.

Drink Responsibly

#N100, #Negroni, #Campari, #NegroniWeek

The post Venue registrations for Negroni Week 2019 close June 20th appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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Perth, get set for a winter Wednesday dedicated to the best in craft spirits. Back for its third year, the Indie Spirits Tasting is coming to The Flour Factory on Wednesday, 17th July from 5.30pm to 8.30pm. GET YOUR TICKETS HERE FOR THE EARLY BIRD PRICE OF JUST $35 (includes all samples, snacks and seminars)!

The event is presented by yours truly, Australian Bartender magazine, the country’s leading drinks mag for the bar industry, which gives you an inside track on the latest booze products to hit the market, direct from the backbar and the still, with a focus on handcrafted and locally-made hooch.

Also staged in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne, Indie Spirits Tasting Perth will feature over 25 exhibitors showcasing more than 100 quality craft spirits from grappas to gins, amaros, mezcals and more. There are also master distillers on hand to chat and free seminars hosted by Bartender magazine going deep into the world of indie spirits.

Tickets are just $55 (plus booking fee) and include access to all spirit samples, a hot dog and spirited seminars. EARLY BIRD TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW FOR JUST $35 (plus fees).

Indie Spirits Tasting Founder, David Spanton says: “It’s exciting to head back to Perth with such a fantastic range of Aussie brands and little-known craft spirits from around the world. We’re seeing the boom in gins but also categories such as vermouth, mezcal and interesting locally-made liqueurs. These events are growing each year – they are great for Perth and great for our industry as a whole.”

Here are all the amazing exhibitors that will be showcasing their wares on the night:

  • 3Two1 Drinks
  • Agave Love
  • Applewood Distillery/ Økar Amaro/ Carter’s Original
  • Cape Byron Distillery
  • Cerbaco
  • Enoteca Sileno
  • Four Pillars
  • Luxe Wine & Spirits
  • Melbourne Gin Company
  • Never Never Distilling
  • Prohibition Liquor
  • Proof & Company
  • Savant Spirits
  • Sean Valley Gin Company
  • Southtrade
  • The Pisco People
  • Think Spirits
  • Vanguard Luxury Brands
  • Whippersnapper Distillery

For more information about the Indie Spirits Tasting including stories, photos and brand profiles from the events in Sydney & Brisbane, click here.

The Indie Spirits Tasting events are proudly presented by the team at Australian Bartender magazine. Head to our website to read all the latest stories about cocktail trends, cocktail bars and the the best booze in the country.

If you’re interested in exhibiting in Perth or any of our other Indie Spirits Tasting events, please email david@spantonmedia.com

The post Perth, get set for the Indie Spirits Tasting on July 17 at the Flour Factory appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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Matt Whiley at Scout Sydney. He’s made the cut in the International Bartender of the Year category, and Scout Sydney has picked up a nomination for new international cocktail bar. Photo: Supplied

Every July, bartenders and cocktail mavens from around the world descend upon New Orleans for the drinkapalooza that is Tales of the Cocktail. And it is at the end of the six day festival each year that the Spirited Awards take place, recognising the best bars, bartenders, brand ambassadors and more from the USA and around the world.

They’ve just announced the top 10 finalists for the 2019 Spirited Awards, and four Australian bars have made the cut this year: the Black Pearl in Melbourne has picked up two nominations, Scout Sydney is up for best new international cocktail bar along with Maybe Sammy, whilst Maybe Sammy’s sister bar, Maybe Frank, has picked up a nomination for best international restaurant bar.

Take a look at the full list below.

AMERICAN CATEGORIES
American Bartender of the Year presented by Amaro Montenegro
Julio Cabrera – Café La Trova, Miami, FL
Kevin Diedrich – Pacific Cocktail Haven, San Francisco, CA
Ignacio “Nacho” Jimenez – Ghost Donkey, New York, NY
Julia Momose – Kumiko, Chicago, IL
Mary Palac – Paper Plane, San Jose, CA
Ezra Star – Drink, Boston, MA
Sother Teague – Amor y Amargo, New York City, NY
Masa Urushido – Katana Kitten, New York City, NY
Jillian Vose – The Dead Rabbit, New York City, NY
Christine Wiseman – The Broken Shaker, Los Angeles, CA

Best American Brand Ambassador presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation
Camille Austin, Montelobos Mezcal
Megan Breier, Beam Suntory
Kiowa Bryan, Spiribam Fine R(h)um Specialists
Jennifer Contraveos, Bacardi Limited
Tim Cooper, Fords Gin
Sebastien Derbomez, Hendrick’s Gin
Earlecia Richelle Gibb, St~Germain
Lacy Hawkins, The Bon Vivants
Vance Henderson, Monkey Shoulder
Johnnie Mundell, Beam Suntory
Trevor Schneider, Reyka Vodka
Natasha Sofia, Davos Brands

Best American Bar Team presented by William Grant & Sons
Amor Y Amargo – New York, NY
barmini by José Andrés – Washington, D.C.
Broken Shaker at Freehand LA – Los Angeles, CA
Clover Club – Brooklyn, NY
Dante – New York, NY
Herbs and Rye – Las Vegas, NV
Leyenda – Brooklyn, NY
Lost Lake – Chicago, IL
Nickel City – Austin, TX
Polite Provisions – San Diego, CA

Best American Cocktail Bar presented by Select Aperitivo Montenegro
Amor Y Amargo – New York, NY
Attaboy – New York, NY
barmini by José Andrés – Washington, D.C.
Best Intentions – Chicago, IL
Drink – Boston, MA
Julep – Houston, TX
Leyenda – Brooklyn, NY
Navy Strength – Seattle, WA
Pouring Ribbons – New York, NY
Trick Dog – San Francisco, CA

Best American High Volume Cocktail Bar presented by Grey Goose Vodka
Bitter & Twisted Cocktail Parlour – Phoenix, AZ
Half Step – Austin, TX
Harvard and Stone – Los Angeles, CA
Herbs and Rye – Las Vegas, NV
Jack Rose Dining Saloon – Washington, D.C.
Nickel City – Austin, TX
Occidental – Denver, CO
Sportsman’s Club – Chicago, IL
The Dead Rabbit – New York, NY
The Roosevelt Room – Austin, TX

Best American Hotel Bar presented by Altos Tequila
Broken Shaker at Freehand LA – Los Angeles, CA
Compére Lapin at The Old No. 77 Hotel & Chandlery – New Orleans, LA
Libertine Social at the Mandalay Bay – Las Vegas, NV
Midnight Rambler at the Joule – Dallas, TX
Sable Kitchen & Bar at the Palomar Hotel – Chicago, IL
The Hawthorne at the Hotel Commonwealth – Boston, MA
The Living Room at The Dewberry Hotel, Charleston, SC
The NoMad Rooftop Bar at the NoMad Hotel – Los Angeles, CA
The Normandie Club at the Hotel Normandie – Los Angeles, CA
The Sazerac Bar at the Roosevelt Hotel – New Orleans, LA
The Spare Room at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel – Los Angeles, CA

Best American Restaurant Bar presented by Woodford Reserve
Bar Agricole – San Francisco, CA
Better Luck Tomorrow – Houston, TX
Dante – New York, NY
Empire State South – Atlanta, GA
Gramercy Tavern – New York, NY
Kimball House – Decatur, GA
Nopa – San Francisco, CA
Otium – Los Angeles, CA
The Baldwin – Woburn, MA
The Rieger – Kansas City, MO
The Silver Dollar – Louisville, KY

Best New American Cocktail Bar presented by Elijah Craig Bourbon
Cafe La Trova – Miami, FL
Cleaver- Butchered Meats, Seafood and Classic Cocktails – Las Vegas, NV
Death & Co. – Denver, CO
Existing Conditions – New York, NY
Jaguar Sun – Miami, FL
Katana Kitten – New York, NY
Mr. Coco – Las Vegas, NV
Pearl Diver – Nashville, TN
Raised by Wolves – San Diego, CA
The Polynesian – New York, NY

INTERNATIONAL CATEGORIES

International Bartender of the Year presented by BACARDÍ RUM
Moe Aljaff – Two Schmucks, Barcelona, Spain
Lorenzo Antinori – Four Seasons Hotel, Hong Kong
Monica Berg – Tayer and Elementary, London, UK
Marcis Dzelzainis – Sager and Wilde and Fare Canteen, London, UK
Philippa “Pippa” Guy – The American Bar at The Savoy, London, UK
Vasilis Kyritsis – The Clumsies, Athens, Greece
Tess Posthumus – Flying Dutchman Cocktails, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Kelsey Ramage – PrettyUgly Bar, Toronto, Canada
Remy Savage – The Artesian at The Langham, London, UK
Matt Whiley – Scout, Sydney, Australia

Best International Brand Ambassador presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation
Georgie Bell, Bacardi Limited
Dickie Cullimore, Bacardi Liimited
Gareth Evans, Absolut Elyx
Martin Hudak, Mr Black
Daniyel Jones, The House of Angostura
Roberta Mariani, MARTINI & ROSSI
Joe McCanta, Grey Goose
Luca Missaglia, Italicus Rosolio di Bergamotto
Lauren Mote, Diageo Reserve Global Cocktailian
CoCo Prochorowski, Hendrick’s Gin
Meimi Sanchez, Havana Club

Best International Bar Team presented by The House of Angostura
Artesian Bar at The Langham – London, UK
Black Pearl – Melbourne, Australia
Fifty Mils at the Four Seasons – Mexico City, Mexico
Happiness Forgets – London, UK
HIMKOK – Oslo, Norway
La Factoría – San Juan, Puerto Rico
Licorería Limantour – Mexico City, Mexico
Lost + Found Drinkery – Nicosia, Cyprus
Connaught Bar at The Connaught – London, UK
The Old Man – Hong Kong

Best International Cocktail Bar presented by Maison Ferrand
Atlas Bar – Singapore
Candelaria – Paris, France
Le Syndicat – Paris, France
Native – Singapore
Satan’s Whiskers – London, UK
Swift – London, UK
Tales & Spirits – Amsterdam, Netherlands
The Old Man – Hong Kong
Three Sheets – London, UK
Two Schmucks – Barcelona, Spain

Best International High Volume Cocktail Bar presented by Beam Suntory
Baba Au Rum – Athens, Greece
Black Pearl – Melbourne, Australia
Callooh Callay – London, UK
Central Station Boutique Bar – Beirut, Lebanon
Dirty Dick – Paris, France
HIMKOK – Oslo, Norway
La Factoría – San Juan, Puerto Rico
Oriole Bar – London, UK
Panda & Sons – Edinburgh, Scotland
Schumann’s Bar – Munich, Germany

Best International Hotel Bar presented by Perrier
Artesian Bar at The Langham – London, UK
Beaufort Bar at The Savoy – London, UK
Charles H. at the Four Seasons – Seoul, South Korea
Fifty Mils at the Four Seasons – Mexico City, Mexico
Fragrances at The Ritz-Carlton Berlin – Berlin, Germany
Lobby Bar at The London EDITION – London, UK
Manhattan at Regent Singapore – Singapore
Punch Room at The London EDITION – London, UK
Scarfes Bar at the Rosewood Hotel – London, UK
The Bamboo Bar at the Mandarin Oriental – Bangkok, Thailand

Best International Restaurant Bar presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation
Danico – Paris, France
Hawksmoor Spitalfields – London, UK
Le Mary Céleste – Paris, France
Les Grands Verres – Paris, France
Maybe Frank – Sydney, Australia
Sexy Fish – London, UK
The Bon Vivant – Edinburgh, Scotland
Tippling Club – Singapore
Tjoget – Stockholm, Sweden
Zuma Dubai – Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Best New International Cocktail Bar presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation
Aperture – Montpellier, France
Drink Kong – Rome, Italy
Electric Bing Sutt – Beirut, Lebanon
Lyaness – London, UK
MAYBE SAMMY – Sydney, Australia
Punch Room at The Barcelona EDITION – Barcelona, Spain
Scout at The Dolphin Hotel – Sydney, Australia
The Donovan Bar – London, UK
The SG Club – Tokyo, Japan
Homeboy Bar – London, UK

GLOBAL CATEGORIES

Best Bar Mentor presented by BARSMARTS
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World’s Best Cocktail Menu presented by Wine & Spirit Education Trust
American Bar at The Savoy – London, UK
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Clover Club – Brooklyn, NY
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Lyaness – London, UK
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World’s Best Spirits Selection presented by Beam Suntory
Amor Y Amargo – New York, NY
Atlas Bar – Singapore
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Raised By Wolves – San Diego, CA
Rumba – Seattle, WA
Sexy Fish – London, UK
The Beaufort Bar at The Savoy – London, UK
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The post The Tales of the Cocktail Spirited Awards Top 10 is here appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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Sydney Bar Week 2019 approaches, folks, and this year there’s some 35 events in store over five huge days.

And the latest addition to the Sydney Bar Week timetable is the brand new event, The Bitters, Books & Bostons Market being held at Old Mate’s Place.

You’ll be able to get a look at (and buy) jiggers, beakers and glasses from the likes of BarGEEK, some very fine and proper glassware from Reidel, and a range of good reads, like the soon to be released All Day Cocktails by Shaun Byrne and Nick Tesar and books by Phil Bayly and Tomas Estes.

There’s barware from Cocktail Corner, and bitters from the likes of The House of Angostura, Wild Hibiscus Flower Co Bitters and Fee Brothers, and sippin’ tubes that don’t kill turtles from the eco-friendly folks at The Naked Straw.

There’s that with a whole lot more bar merch to be announced, and entry is free — just register to here to come along.

And if you’re coming to town with a load of bar merch — like the latest t-shirt you’ve made to pimp your bar — and would like some space to flog a few, get in touch with organiser David Spanton via email at david@spantonmedia.com ASAP. (Similarly, if you’ve got some bitters or shakers to be flung to the masses, flick David an email).

The Bitters, Books & Bostons Market is presented by Australian Bartender Magazine and forms part of the Sydney Bar Week line-up of events, which sees 35 events take place from the 14th to the 18th September — visit barweek.com.au to get a look at the full timetable. If you’re interested in being involved email david@spantonmedia.com ASAP.

The details:
What: Bitters, Books & Bostons Market
Date: Tuesday 17 September
Time: 10:30am to 1:00pm
Where: OId Mate’s Place, Level 4/199 Clarence Street, Sydney
Free entry: click here to get your free ticket.

Coming to Sydney Bar Week for the first time in 2019, the Bitters, Books & Bostons Market is where all our guests can try and buy a huge range of cocktail bitters, books, and bar equipment, as well as a range of bar swag and merch from the country’s best bars, all under one roof. 

The post The Bitters, Books & Bostons Market comes to Sydney Bar Week for the first time appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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It’s through these doors that you’ll open a new world of flavour. Photo: Alana Dimou

Inspiration comes from many places; creative types have tried to nail down the source of their muse since forever. But sometimes it’s as simple as asking the right questions.

“The drink came about when we were sitting at The Duke of Clarence having a really delicious Irish coffee,” says PS40’s bar manager Peter Seabrook.

“We just thought, what would happen if we turned it upside down?”

Well, we can tell you: you get a damn delicious drink. There’s hot and cold tempratures going on, a textural thing from the foam, and a nutty, citrus, moreish flavour profile that leaves you wanting more.

Which is just about all you could ask for in a drink, right?

Africola
    Ingredients
    Instructions
    1. Pour Wattle Cola first, then frozen Mr Black into the cola to reduce any foam that may occur.
    2. Charge off warm coconut foam into a warm vessel and then slowly layer on top.
    Recipe Notes

    Recipe adapted from PS40, Sydney


    The post PS40’s Africola is a hot and cold concoction that’ll keep you wanting more appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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    The Boulevardier is a drink whose specs will feel familiar to any of you who have enjoyed a Negroni or two: we’ve used equal parts bourbon, Campari, and sweet vermouth here (though the earliest reference to the drink has a slightly different measure of whiskey), and you’d be right in thinking that’s it’s a Negroni made with whiskey in place of the gin.

    But it doesn’t mean that this drink is a Negroni knock off. The prevailing origin story of the Negroni dates its invention to 1919 and one Count Camillo Negroni at a bar called Casoni in Florence, Italy, though there is some debate about the merits of this (some accounts trace the drink back before 1900, but we’re talking Boulevardiers here). And it appears the earliest written reference to the Negroni recipe is a drink called the Campari Mixte in 1929 with the famed equal parts ratio.

    The thing is, the Boulevardier gets a mention a couple of years earlier in Harry MacElhone’s 1927 book, Barflies & Cocktails. It was equal parts bourbon, sweet vermouth, and Campari, and so named for a socialite American who frequented the bar and owned a magazine called The Boulevardier (or so the story goes). That naming habit — and the drink’s formula — was apparently a regular thing for MacElhone, who would later invent another riff on the drink called the Old Pal, using rye, dry vermouth, and Campari, and name it for a sports writer he referred to as his ‘old pal’.

    It’s a nice bit of bartender bluster and banter, and it makes a great tasting drink.

    The Boulevardier
      Instructions
      1. Stir down all ingredients with ice, then strain over good block ice in an old fashioned glass (or serve it up — it's up to you).

      What’s in the drink?

      • Sweet spices, musk and bay leaf on the nose, with sweet vanilla, leather and straw evident.
      • On the palate there is spice, with notes of chilli and spearmint, soft charred oak, and mild anise.
      • There’s vibrant rye grain, and light spice and caramel on the finish.

      For more information contact your Campari Australia representative.

      The post The Boulevardier, an equal parts drink with gravitas appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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      Some spirits categories are pretty ill-defined when it comes to how they should be distilled and how the should be aged (hey rum, we’re looking at you there), but what makes a bourbon a bourbon is considerably clearer and pretty simple.

      Bourbon making differs from, say, Scotch whisky making, in a few ways: first, 51 per cent of the grains used must be corn; the remainder is often made up of rye, malted barley and wheat. Second, it can’t be distilled to higher than 80 per cent ABV, and third, it must be aged in new, charred oak barrels (which tend to be of the American oak variety, Quercus alba, though they don’t gave to be). To be labelled as “straight”, it must have been aged for a minimum of two years.

      Whiskey Cobbler
        Ingredients
        Instructions
        1. Stir with ice in a tin.
        2. Top with crushed ice and garnish with mint and fruit in season.
        Recipe Notes

        Adapted from Harry Johnson’s Bartenders Manual

        Kentucky Straight Bourbon is whiskey that has been distilled in Kentucky, aged for at least two years, and with a mash bill of at least 51 per cent corn.

        But don’t get too caught up in where bourbon is made. Contrary to some myth, bourbon can be made anywhere in the United States of America, though yes, there is a place in America called Bourbon, in the state of Kentucky.

        Willie Mae’s Julep
          Instructions
          1. Add all the ingredients to a chilled Julep cup, add crushed ice and swizzle.
          2. Cap with ice and garnish with a mint sprig, lemon wedge and icing sugar.
          Recipe Notes

          For the lemon honey, you can substitute 2:1 honey syrup, or to make it the Seymour’s way, mix together 300ml honey, 200ml water, 100ml Dom Benedictine, and the zest of three lemons. Leave for 24 hours, strain, and bottle.

          What is sour mash? This refers to the acidic residue of previous distillations, called backset, which is added to the new wort before being distilled. It ensures consistency and gives greater character.

          And unlike Scotch producers, by law bourbon cannot add any colour or flavour to the whiskey other than what comes through the distilling and ageing process (whereas you can get away with a hit of caramel colouring when making whisky in Scotland).

          That’s about it. It doesn’t mean that it’s simple to produce bourbon — there’s a myriad of factors that go into creating the delicious stuff in the bottle in front of you — but those are the basics.


          Four bourbons for your back bar
          Hudson Baby Bourbon
          The single grain bourbon is made from 100% New York corn, aged in small American oak barrels. It is a mildly sweet, smooth spirit with hints of vanilla and caramel. William Grant & Sons

          Elijah Craig Barrel Proof
          This limited release Small Batch, twelve-year-old Bourbon is bottled at Barrel proof and without chill filtering, preserving the natural flavours produced during the aging process. Think Spirits

          Woodford Reserve Distiller’s Select
          Pouring a rich amber colour, with aromas of dried fruit, mint oranges cocoa, vanilla and tobacco. The chewy, palate is rounded and smooth, with citrus, cinnamon, cocoa and spice notes leading to a silky smooth finish. Brown-Forman

          Russell’s Reserve 10 Years Old
          Sweet spices, musk and bay leaf on the nose. On the palate there’s spice, notes of chilli spearmint, oak, and mild anise. There’s vibrant rye grain, and light spice and caramel on the finish. Campari Australia

          The post Bourbon basics: how well do you know the spirit loved by hipsters and hillbillies alike? appeared first on australianbartender.com.au.

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