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In this day and age, the general expectation for females is to be completely hairless, especially during the summer. However, we should be conscious of the damage that hair removal can cause to our Earth. For example, disposable razors create a large amount of waste and deplete nonrenewable resources. In particular, approximately 2 billion of disposable razors end up in landfills every year. Furthremore, conventional shaving creams contain surfactants, hormone-disrupting fragrances, and potentially carcinogenic colors; they also generally come in cans that contain foam-producing propellants like propane or isobutene. In this article we will discuss the most vegan and eco friendly hair removal options that will help you to remove the unwanted hair.

Eco friendly hair removal options 1. Stainless Steel Razor

Probably the most common method of hair removal is shaving.  Therefore, the beauty industry has made millions of dollars by taking the classic male razors adding some pink packaging. There are hundreds of different options to pick, but mostly they all have some sort of plastic on them.

The solution would be switching to metal razors is not only environmentally friendlier, lasting longer and not clogging landfill, but it’s also financially better. Spending money on cheap razors year after year adds up. For example, the Unisex Safety Razor from Biome is a lifetime purchase, with only the blade needs replacing once worn. All Biome’s reusable safety razors and blades are 100% plastic free and designed to last for life.

2. Epilating

Epilating is my favourite method of removing hair when it comes to legs; everything else I shave, but I epilate my legs once or twice a week. It hurts the first couple of times, but it gets better fast and it’s well worth it! An epilator is essentially 50-ish powered tweezers, all into one tool. The little tweezers open and close at a high-speed, plucking your hairs out as you glide the tool down your leg.

Epilating has its advantages: it doesn’t require any cosmetics and it pulls the hairs from the root and you can therefore remain hairless longer, and it doesn’t require as much time and effort as shaving or other methods. In addition, the more you epilate, the less your hair will grow back. However, you need to be careful about the brand of your epilator as Braun, the most popular brand of epilators, is owned by no other than Procter & Gamble, a corporation that tests on animals. They own brands like Gillette, Venus, and CoverGirl, only to name a few. For this reason, picking an electronics brand like Panasonic or Philips is, in my opinion, ideal. I’ve never had a problem with my Panasonic one and I highly recommend it.

3. Sugar Waxing

Waxing for hair removal has been around for centuries, and for good reason. With one proper treatment you can remove hair for between three to six weeks! Sugaring is a waxing process that’s been around since 1900 BC, using sugar as the sticky wax agent instead of synthetic products. Even though I’ve heard mixed reports, there’s a significant amount of claims online that sugaring is less painful and better for sensitive skin. It is something you are also able to do yourself.

All you need is:

1 cup of white sugar

2 tablespoons of lemon juice

2 tablespoons of water

Mix them together and heat them up! Careful not to overcook otherwise it will turn into rock. Then use the paste to wax off your hair. For more details you can read this article

3. Laser Hair Removal

One of the vegan and eco friendly hair removal options is the laser. it’s a big investment and the results will only be visible after several sessions and weeks, but I believe it’s well worth it in the end. There’s also the option of doing this at home using a technology called IPL. IPL devices are increasingly common, and effective.

4. Nontoxic Shaving Cream

Shaving cream is generally used for shaving beards but can be used for any area. If you need to shave your legs or armpits, you can use coconut oil as shaving cream. If you’re after an actual shaving cream, try to avoid the mainstream brands which are filled with chemicals and palm oil. There’s a long list of non-toxic and affordable shaving creams/bars available from Flora & Fauna or Lush Cosmetics. My personal favourite is Lush D’Fluff Strawberry Shaving Soap; which is a reasonable $12.50, will last and doubles as moisturizer with cocoa butter.

To sum up, there are many vegan and eco friendly hair removal options, you just need to find out which one is more suitable for you. I hope this cruelty-free and eco friendly guide was helpful! If you have any more suggestions, feel free to leave a comment. Don’t forget that you can read more blog posts about natural beauty on Attitude Organic!

Written by Sabrina Licata from Attitude Organic

The post Most Vegan and Eco friendly Hair Removal Options appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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Attitude Organic by Attitudeorganic - 6d ago
Fashion’s dirty secret: plastic in fashion and its microfiber pollution

The entwined obsession with plastic and fast fashion has finally merged into plastic in fashion. As the oceans and wildlife drown in plastic waste, our fashion choices are fuelling the destruction of the seas. Fashion is the main culprit in the release of the oceans invisible polluter -microfibers. There is an estimated 1.4 million trillion microfibers that are poisoning the oceans. Microfibers from fashion is the industry’s invisible toxin.

Where do microfibres from fashion come from?

We find this invisible pollutant in the garments we wear. As we check the labels of clothes, it is very likely that we read polyester. Polyester is derived from petroleum and in its most simplest form is a plastic thread. As plastic in fashion accelerates, the consequences of our clothing become apparent within the natural world. As Friends of the Earth reports, one load of washing could release up to 17 million microfibers into the water system. Furthermore, The Guardian reports that up to 40% of these microfibers from fashion manage to get through the water treatment facilitates, straight into rivers and oceans.

The impacts of microfiber pollution from plastic in fashion

Furthermore, once these fibres reach the ocean and rivers they absorb other pollutants such as motor oil, pesticides and harsh industrial chemicals that have also leaked into the oceans. Plankton and fish then ingest these polluted microfibers. Once ingested by animals, bioaccumulation occurs up the food chain, where the toxicity of these microfibers increases. Scientists have found fish for human consumption full of these microfibers. In addition, the scale of this problem is much larger than once thought. We find these fibres in the deepest depths of the oceans and also within the air we breathe.

Your recycled plastic clothing is perpetuating the impacts of the microfiber crisis

Moreover, as fashion is littered with many unwanted truths, many brands promote the use of clothing made from recycled plastic bottles. Initially this seems a great way to reuse and reduce plastic waste. However, these garments are shedding plastic pollution straight back into the oceans. As these garments are being washed they release more microfibres back into the water systems. It seems there is no escape from the plastic in fashion and its microfiber pollution.

So what can we do to reduce our microfiber pollution? Remove plastic

A key way to reduce your microfiber pollution is to reduce and then eliminate all plastic consumption. So watch out from food packaging to your clothing choices. Check out alternatives to plastic packaging to find out more on reducing your plastic consumption.

Wash at low temperatures

Washing your clothing at low temperatures helps in reducing the amount of microfibers shed.

Use a Guppy bag

The company claims that by putting your laundry into these bags when washing, we release less microfibers into the water system.

Use a front load washing machine

Top loading washing machine causes 6x more microfiber shedding than a front load washing machine.

Become fashion smart

The best way to reduce your microfiber pollution from fashion is to stop buying these polluting materials. For example, instead of a polyester fleece opt for a wool fleece. This reduces your microfiber output and reduces your impact on ocean pollution.

By Esme Bourne

The post Plastic in fashion appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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I hope you guys enjoy that interview serie a much as I did! Here is the fifth and last ethical fashion blogger I will introduce to, Laura! (At least the last for now!)

I love she balances sustainability and lifestyle. I definitely believe that there is no compromise to be made! Keep reading and let me know in a comment if you wish to see more interviews on the blog!

1) Introduce yourself in a few words.

Laura Botero, also known as Ecostyle Blog, Colombian native, that beautifully brought my two biggest passions together- fashion and nature. I use my online presence to bring goodness into both these fields by promoting a conscious and sustainable lifestyle.

2) What does ethical/sustainable fashion means to you?

Sustainable means to treat the planet as if we were planning on staying because there is “NO PLANET B.”

3) According to you, what is the main aspect of that movement and what should we fight for as a priority?

Definitely plastic pollution is the main aspect we need to fight.

4) When did you start changing your shopping habits?

I’ve always had a great respect for nature. It’s been difficult to read about how human beings are harming the environment, so I started about 5 years ago and decided to created Ecostyle to bring awareness to environmental issues. I want people to understand that they can live a sustainable life without compromising their lifestyle.

5) How is your closet at the moment?

Honestly my closet at the momento is full of basic garments, easy to mix and match, and mostly in neutral colors, I am very minimalist when it comes to fashion as you can see in my instagram @ecostyleblog

6) If you had to give an advice to someone who want to start changing its shopping habit what would it be?

Quality over quantity. Ask yourself if you really need it before you buy it. Think about the repercussion that every item you buy will have in our environment.

Did you like that interview? If yes, you should read Rosa‘s, Amma‘s and Oorja‘s!

The post What does Ethical Fashion mean? Meet Laura appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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I hope you enjoyed reading Rosa‘s, Amma‘s and Oorja‘s interview. I really did! I loved comparing their definions of ethical fashion and put their ideas together to precise what is mine.

To go even further and gather even more information about what ethical fashion could and does mean, I interviewed a fourth ethical blogger. Let me introduce you to Leena! I appreciated a lot that she actually raises capitalism issues. I find it important to remind that ethical fashion is not another fashion trend but also a brand new fashion consumption model. Keep reading to find out more!

1) Introduce yourself in a few words.

My name’s Leena and, for the longest time, I thought my life had to be this linear path where every step is strategically planned. When I realised that I shouldn’t be afraid of this sense of drifting, I discovered many things to be passionate about; including sustainable fashion. And this is how driftedanew.com was born.

2) What does ethical/sustainable fashion means to you?

By definition ‘to sustain’ means to make something last longer and for me, that lies at the very core of what sustainable fashion is trying to achieve. Sustainable fashion is not about buying linen trousers with a crazy price tag on it. It’s about changing our relationship with fashion itself and every single item that lies in our wardrobe. Once we understand our personal style, what works for our bodies, how to take care of our clothes, we’ll start being more sustainable about fashion.

It’s also about changing our relationship with Capitalism – understanding our impulses to buy and changing our perception of how a brand adds value to our lives. It’s about being aware of the impact that our fashion decisions have on the planet, and the people and animals who live on it.

3) According to you, what is the main aspect of that movement and what should we fight for as a priority?

I think our priority should be on education. The more people can join this movement the better. It’s going to sound cliché but that doesn’t make it any less true: Thousands of us doing this imperfectly is better than a handful of us striving to achieve ‘sustainable perfection’.

Films like The True Cost have changed the game for the ethical fashion industry and so have documentaries like the Blue Planet. And the reason for that is that they educate people and change people’s lives on a large scale.

So the more we talk about it, the more we encourage each other to engage with ethical fashion in whatever way we can; the closer we are to a more sustainable world.

4) When did you start changing your shopping habits?

I was always into vintage and thrift shopping, but, funny enough, conscious shopping for me was triggered by the Youtube algorithm. Youtube kept suggesting this video on my feed and if there’s one way for me to describe this video is that it looked liked clickbait. It was called “The richest criminal in the world” and had the most random image on it.

Finally, I gave in and watched the video in the hope that YouTube would just stop plastering this video all over my feed. The video was enlightening but I was also in disbelief. I refused to believe that that’s what our world was like.

So, I wasn’t completely sold yet.

A few weeks later I watched The True Cost. I cried my eyeballs out and, right there and then, my sustainable fashion journey started.  

5) How is your closet at the moment?

My closet is a mish-mash of old fast fashion clothes I’ve had for years, a number of thrifted items and clothes from brands like People Tree, Komodo and Organic Basics.

Brands who adopt fair trade, eco-friendly fashion and who strive to be transparent with their customers are always my go-to. I love them because they’re affordable and still tick all my boxes in terms of ethics.

If I want to splash out on something special, such as a beautiful sundress I would probably turn towards The Reformation or Mother of Pearl; but a lot of my wardrobe is thrifted because wearing second hand is the next best thing to being naked. Mother Earth will love you for it.  

I am in the middle of building a colourful capsule wardrobe. I used to think capsule wardrobes were not meant for me because of how neutral-coloured everything tends to be, and I’m the kind of person who’s not happy unless they dress like the pride flag (I am definitely exaggerating), but I’m finally applying my knowledge of colour theory to build the perfect colourful capsule wardrobe. I’m loving it so far.

6) If you had to give an advice to someone who wants to start changing its shopping habit what would it be?

Avoid going to the shops for a little while. Let fast fashion get out of your system. It’s hard at the beginning and the likelihood of you caving in is high. If you do cave in, it’s fine. We all do and I certainly did.

Second, stop trying to do it all at once. Rome was not built in a day. It starts with something as simple as trying to reduce your fast fashion consumption. Learn from other people’s experiences and mistakes, it will help you to know what to expect and help you discover more ethical brands. At the moment, our market is saturated with fast fashion brands, so it’s important that we give exposure to more conscious brands and celebrate them!

The post What does Ethical Fashion mean? Meet Leena appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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Linen is that raw looking fabric you want to wear every time summer rolls around. Linen has quickly become one of the most popular natural fibres on the block, dressing celebs such as Beyoncé and Gwyneth Paltrow. It’s no surprise linen has become so popular, and it’s certainly not just for the celebs and Instagrammers. But the big question remains: how sustainable is linen?

How Sustainable is Linen? What is Linen?

Linen is one of the most biodegradable and stylish fabrics in fashion history. Linen fabric is made from the cellulose fibers that grow inside of the stalks of the flax plant fibers. Therefore, it is fully biodegradable. It is natural colours include ivory, ecru, tan and grey. Linen can withstand high temperatures, making the fabric generally perfect for lounging on a tropical island. It absorbs moisture without holding bacteria.

Linen Is Older Than You Think

The process of growing flax and turning it into fabric hasn’t changed much in the past several thousand years. The earliest dyed flax fibers belong to a prehistoric cave in the Republic of Georgia and date back to 36,000. The linen wrappings of 3000 year old mummies survive to the modern day.

Linen Production Process

The flax plant grows best in cool, damp conditions and grows well on relatively poor soil. Flax requires a small fraction of the water that cotton requires, and uses very little fertiliser, if any.

Flax goes through a long process before it becomes the lovely fabric we call linen. The production process has a vocabulary all if its own to describe what takes place at each stage. Flax seeds are planted and it takes about one hundred days before they are ready to harvest. The plant is ready to harvest once it has flowered and begun to turn brown.

Next, the flax is then “retted”. This means that it is put in water and left to rot before it is taken out and dried. During the retting process the flax fibres begin to separate themselves from the woody stem.

The flax is “beetled” in the next stage. Beetling consists of beating the flax with a wooden mallet to loosen and separate the fibres. There is no complicated chemical process. Just pound it and comb out the fibers. The modern method is the same, though large machines perform it.

Why Linen is so sustainable

To summarize, these are the main characterises of this sustainable fabric:

  • Growing flax requires less water than cotton.
  • There is very little waste with flax; other part of the plant, like the seeds, produce linseed oil or flax seeds for consumption.
  • Linen typically requires fewer pesticides, herbicides and fungicides than cotton. However, organic linen is completely free from pesticides!
  • The durability of linen means it lasts longer than other materials.

From today onwards you know how sustainable is linen and I strongly recommend you to buy linen clothing. The feeling of linen is lovely, the texture and softness is unique, and the fact that it just gets better with age makes me want to hang on to my linen pieces forever. If you want to know more about sustainable fabrics, you should definitely read our article The Most Vegan and Sustainable Fabrics

Written by Sabrina Licata from Attitude Organic

The post What is Linen and How Sustainable is Linen? appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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Plastic is durable and flexible, but it is made from heated carbon and other materials that are not good for the environment. Most noteworthy, It is non-biodegradable and cannot be recycled as well. Plastic is undoubtedly most popular synthetic non-biodegradable material present in most of the things around you. In a previous article we talked about glitters and how dangerous they are to the environment as they takes hundreds of years to break down.  Whether it is your car, your mobile phone, the computer or even your furniture, life without plastic seems unimaginable! Although plastic it has quickly become a staple in our everyday lives, there are eco friendly alternatives to plastic packaging that we can use to at least lessen its negative impact on Mother Earth.

Alternatives to plastic packaging 1. Glass

The first alternative to plastic packaging is glass. It is made from sand, that can be replenished. A long time back, most of the bottles were made from glass. From milk bottles to baby feeders, all were made from glass. However, with the changing times, glass has given way to plastic due to its sturdy and lightweight qualities. However, a collective effort must be made to realize the harms that we are causing ourselves by living with toxic plastic around us. On the other hand, glass is a non-toxic material that can be recycled. It is susceptible to breakage but is nevertheless worth the damages.

2. Reusable Shopping bags

Most supermarkets offer plastic bag alternatives today. Some of it have patterns and some reusable packaging are printed with the establishment’s name. These reusable bags come in canvas, cotton, hemp, leather, fiber, and woven plastic. For example, the nylon ones can be folded up into a pouch and small enough to suit in your pocket. Above all, the good point about avoiding plastic bags is you don’t have much to accumulate and stock in your cupboards.

3. Liquid Wood

Another eco friendly alternative to plastic packaging is the liquid wool. It is one of the byproducts of paper mills. It holds a great future for being the new biopolymer or bioplastic. If you feel the material created by liquid wood, then you wouldn’t notice a difference between the two and the only major difference being that liquid wood is 100% biodegradable. In order to make biopolymers, you would need to mix lignin (a byproduct of paper mills) with water and then expose it to a high pressure and temperature to produce a composite material that can easily be molded just like plastic.

4. PHB Biocomposites

PHB biocomposite is a material that consists of bacteria. It is gradually emerging as the new and perfect biodegradable foil. This material is basically the better version of PHM (polyhydroxybutyrate) which is a final product of the natural fermentation of various kinds of bacteria. It has a close resemblance to the man-made synthetic polypropylene. Furthermore, this biodegradable material is less flexible than plastic, however, it has a great scope in biomedical, packaging and agricultural industries.

5. Edible six-pack ring

Saltwater Brewery in America have developed a material for their six-pack rings which is not only biodegradable and compostable, but also edible. The rings, made from wheat and barley waste, are natural by products of the beer-making process. animals that may come into contact with the refuse can safely eat this packaging.

6. Stone paper

Another alternatives to plastic packaging is the stone paper. It is a term that describes a number of different formulas for making paper that have one key ingredient in common: calcium carbonate (waste stone rock, marble and tiles) rather than tree fibre. It is durable, oil and tear resistant, and waterproof which makes it perfect for packaging. However, it is noticeably heavier than traditional paper.

7. Mushroom based material

Packaging made from mycelium, a mushroom root can now replace the Plastic packaging. The fibers in the mushroom bind agricultural waste into an alternative kind of foam. Agricultural waste products such as rice hulls, cotton hulls or wheat chaff are placed in a mold and then injected with mushroom spawn. About a week later, the mushroom root has completed its growth using the agricultural waste as an energy source. The final product looks like foam and acts like foam without being as harmful for the environment as foam.

8. Bagasse

Furthermore, among the alternatives to plastic packaging there is the Bagasse. It is a by-product of sugarcane processing. Due to its malleability and stickiness, it can be easily moulded into packaging suitable for food delivery and food service – similar to polystyrene. Unlike polystyrene, it’s certified biodegradable and compostable, and being a by-product, much more sustainable to produce.

To conclude, plastics is one of the biggest challenges the world is facing right now. Consumers are increasingly aware of the damage that plastic has to our environment. In fact, many companies have already limited the use of plastic. For example, in London the First Plastic Free Supermarket opened.

From today onwards, next time you go shopping try to avoid the use of plastic in order to protect the environment.

Written by Sabrina Licata from Attitude Organic

The post Alternatives to plastic packaging appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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The hustle and bustle of life today has seemingly made stress inescapable. A Gallup Poll from late 2017 found that nearly 80 percent of Americans feel stress at least once during the day. The World Health Organization recently declared stress a “World Wide Epidemic.” Failure to manage stress could have severe health implications.

Fortunately, at Utama Spice, we focus on providing products and tips to help achieve a healthy mind and body. That’s why we’re here to give you some of our favorite tips and methods to help reduce stress.

What Happens When We’re Stressed?

“Stress” is a broad term and hard to define. According to the American Institute of Stress, there hasn’t been one definition that is globally accepted. Although the closest definition is something that causes “physical, mental, or emotional strain or tension.” When we suffer stress, we tend to go through a couple of common stages.

The first is the “Alarm Stage,” which causes our body to go into “fight or flight” mode. Our brain releases chemicals and hormones, such as cortisol, that ramps up our heart rate and blood pressure. After this, we move into a ‘Stage of Resistance’, where our body becomes adaptive to the situation and begins to resist it. The last step is the ‘Exhaustion Stage’, where our cells die because our body has used all of its adaptive energy.

This infographic from Healthline also helps outline some of the common physical responses our body has when stressed. The American Institute of Stress has also noted numerous emotional and physical disorders linked to stress, which can include:

•          Anxiety

•          Depression

•          Heart Attack

•          Hypertension

•          Stroke

•          Immune System Disturbances

What Causes Stress?

Many people suffer from everyday stress, which occurs due to the pressures of life and daily responsibilities. Others suffer from stress that is brought on by an unexpected negative change, such as losing your job or finding out that a loved one is sick. You could also suffer stress as the result of a traumatic experience. Post-traumatic stress disorder is an example of this.

According to the American Psychological Association, the top seven causes of stress in the United States are:

1.         Job Pressure

2.         Money

3.         Health

4.         Relationships

5.         Poor Nutrition

6.         Media Overload

7.         Sleep Deprivation

If you wish to reduce stress, it’s imperative that you understand what’s causing it in your life. Some factors are in your control. For instance, you can control your diet and how much sleep you get per night. If these factors contribute to your stress levels, it’s best to make improvements in these areas.

Other areas are not so easy to control. For example, the train that you take to work each morning is running behind. Although there’s nothing you can do to make the train arrive any quicker, you still become stressed. It’s this type of stress that you can seek to reduce through various tools, products, and methods.

Essential Oils Can Help Reduce Stress

One of the best ways to help reduce the effects of everyday stress in your life is through the use of essential oils. You can use essential oils in two ways. The first is putting the oil into a diffuser, which then releases particles into the air that you breathe. The second is applying the oils topically.

Lavender essential oil is one of the best ways to reduce stress. One study in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that those who inhaled lavender before completing a stressful task performed better than those who didn’t. Another study from the International Journal of Nursing Practice found that lavender was useful in reducing work-related stress. Lavender has a natural calming effect and can help you sleep better as well.

If you suffer from stress, consider adding a diffuser to your bedroom and office. Add a few drops of lavender to the diffuser, and run it throughout the day. You can also run the diffuser about an hour before bed to help you sleep. If you suffer from stress-induced headaches, hypertension, anxiety, or depression, you could apply a few drops of lavender oil to your temples or wrists to help lessen the symptoms. 

Other essential oils that could prove useful in fighting stress are bergamot and lemongrass. One study found that bergamot boosted positive emotions and lowered cortisol levels. Researchers have also found that exposure to lemongrass could reduce anxiety and tension “immediately.”

One of the best ways to reap the benefits of these essential oils is through a blend. Although you can purchase the above oils in pure form, you could also buy pre-mixed blends. These are easier to use and can maximize stress reduction. Consider something like our Deep Calming Essential Oil Blend

Other Tips To Help Reduce Stress

While improving your routine and adding essential oils to your daily regiment could help reduce stress significantly, there are a few other tricks that we like using whenever we start feeling stressed. One method that works for us is to start keeping a journal. Whenever we are feeling particularly stressed, we take time to write down what we are thankful for. This forces positive thoughts and allows us to connect with our spiritual self.

We’ve also found that practicing mindfulness can go a long way toward reducing stress. Effective mindfulness practice can keep you in the moment. It may seem counterproductive to stop what you’re doing for something like yoga or meditation, especially when you’re busy. Being able to take the time to do so could help you reenergize and refocus while boosting your self-esteem.

About Utama Spice

At Utama Spice, we believe in the power of natural products and energy. We have been working with natural products for more than 20 years as we saw that herbal knowledge and traditions were quickly being forgotten in favor of products that contained dangerous chemicals.

Since then, we’ve sought to provide our customers with natural products and tips to improve their physical, mental, and spiritual health. We invite you to check out our News Section to learn more!

In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog.

The post What Is Stress And How Can We Help Reduce It? appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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Attitude Organic by Attitudeorganic - 2M ago

Have you ever heard about minimalism? For me it has been a beautiful journey on rediscovering what life means. Minimalism is a term that has converted into a trend nowadays of learning to live and express anything with the least number of objects or clutter. That is why it is also an expression of art and it is present in our daily lives.

Sometimes we go through our lives without consciously thinking of all the material things that we are slowly piling in our homes. People in general make material items a reward of some kind because we work for a job most of the time to get paid in order to get the big house to just fill it up with stuff we don’t need.

I was watching a documentary about minimalism the other day (it’s on Netlfix if you want to watch it too, it’s called Minimalism) where they discuss that they made a study about the use of space of the average family inside a house. The results where that most of the space used was the kitchen and the private rooms where people sleep.

So, what does this tell us? That society has changed our mindset to pursue these material things, to work so that you can have 3 cars, the big garage, the big house, the huge backyard, several living rooms or dining rooms. And many people pursue this dream, working hard to just fill up their lives with material things that they will not use in spaces they will not use either!

For me this was very interesting because I said, they are right! I do not need to focus my life on proving my economic status with a certain car, house, or life. I just need to do what makes me happy and focus on keeping the things that bring joy to my life.

So… a few months ago I started a blog to start to share my message on how we can start a more sustainable and happier journey to declutter our closets which is a great way to start decluttering your life. I swear I was the type of person that at first would not resist going to sales and shopping for the latest trends. And yes, I love fashion, I love to be stylish but I’ve slowly been more drawn to thinking more about each purchase with a capsule wardrobe mindset. A capsule wardrobe is a small collection of essential items that don’t go out of fashion.

If you are looking to start decluttering your life here are some tips where you can start small but steadily:

  • Organize your closet – Start a capsule wardrobe
  • Organize your house – Keep the things that are practical and essential
  • Find an activity that brings you joy and meditation – It can be running, reading, walking 30 minutes every day, for me it’s yoga it just completely clears my mind and makes me feel lighter and calm.
  • Get rid of stereotypes about materialism – Read more about minimalism, subscribe to wellness blogs, follow people that bring a positive message to your life, stop wasting time feeling bad about not having the perfect life that others may presume to have.
  • Learn more about sustainable practices – The amount of waste that is generated from daily consumer goods from the plastic bags at a supermarket to the toxic waste that producing clothing makes is just unbelievable. Did you know it takes over 300 years for a plastic bag to decompose? Or that fast fashion brands pay around $3 USD per day to their workers just to offer you cheap and disposable clothes? Once you start learning more and more of the horror of the waste we are making to the world, you might have a more minimalist mindset of feeling bad about consuming things you don’t need or can substitute. For example, start using organic cotton bags to carry your groceries, start buying secondhand clothing instead of new, start using more organic products that don’t use pesticides that harm the world and pay fair wages to their workers, and the list could just go on and on.

I am a firm believer that most important thing that will help you to declutter your life is to change your mindset. If you teach yourself to change your mindset and be grateful for what you already have, you will be on the right path of learning to live with less in your life.

Living with less does not mean to force yourself to live with 10 items in your wardrobe, the change can be as little or as big as you are comfortable with because remember that the minimalist mindset focuses on keeping the things that bring you joy. So if having a 50 item wardrobe brings you joy, that is fine, focus on decluttering other aspects of your life like toxic relationships, unnecessary decorations or items from your home, focus on filling your life with moments that make you feel happy, find activities that reflect who you are, try volunteering, joining a book club, helping a neighbor, overall challenge yourself to build unmaterial things that will overall replace the urge of consumerism in your life.

I hope this post has inspired you in some way to challenge yourself to a more sustainable lifestyle where you will learn to cherish everything more and compare yourself less to others.

If you enjoyed this post give me a follow on Instagram and subscribe to my newsletter for a free capsule wardrobe guide and monthly e-mails with an ethical fashion mindset.

This is a Guest Post written by Natalia from Marmag Creation

Natalia is an ethical fashion blogger from Mexico sharing her perspective of how to become a more conscious shopper. At Marmag Creation you will find many topics related to ethical fashion, minimalist lifestyle and travel tips with a conscious mindset as well as handmade clothing made with natural fibers.

Start Declutering Your Life With Our Selection Of Items

The post How To Declutter Your Life appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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Were you looking forward the third interview of ethical fashion bloggers as much as we did? We already learned about Rosa’s and Oorja’s definitions and ideas about ethical fashion but we wanted to give you even more.

Sooo let us intorduce you to Amma. We love that she puts the emphasis on the role of governments and big corporations in the ethical fashion movement. Will you recognise your own values in hers? Keep reading to figure it out!

1) Introduce yourself in a few words.

My name is Amma Aburam, I’m Ghanaian and French and I’m passionate about sustainable and ethical fashion.

2) What does ethical/sustainable fashion mean to you?

To me ethical and sustainable fashion equals a fair fashion industry which takes into account the impact it has on people and the planet. Especially, by making sure that the impact is socio-economically and culturally as healthy and positive as it can be.

3) According to you, what is the main aspect of that movement and What should we fight for as a priority?

First, we should fight for workers rights and good working conditions. Fashion is about people and the most important people in the industry are those who make our clothes, without them we would not have the clothes, so they deserve to work and live in dignity.

Second, we need to fight big corporations and get political. Corporations do the most harm to the planet through their production processes and need to know that we as consumers are not happy with that.

Then policy makers need to be influenced in order to set up tighter laws to regulate corporations and to hold citizens accountable.

4) When did you start changing your shopping habits?

Two years ago after watching Andrew Morgan’s The True cost documentary. It drastically changed my relationship to clothes and fashion. I didn’t shop for three months after watching it.

5) How is your closet at the moment?

My latest clothes obsession is clothes swapping because it allows me tonever acquire more than I need. I’m able to get clothes by giving awaywhat I have already/no longer need so I’m never in excess.

I buy from sustainable brands what I truly adore or can’t find second hand. For my favourite brands, check out my brands page here.

My main concern is how do we create a true circular economy in fashion.

6) If you had to give an advice to someone who wants to start changing their shopping habits what would it be?

It would say: educate yourself as much as possible. We all know about sweatshops but how much do we actually know? Educating yourself on the details of how horrific the negative impact of fast fashion is on people and the planet will certainly not leave you unchanged. You will want to do something about it!

Then, shop second hand/vintage! It’s the best!

So how did you like Amma’s definition of Ethical Fashion? Is it close to yours? Let us know in a comment and do not forget to check her blog.

The post What does Ethical Fashion mean? Meet Amma appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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One hundred and fifty thousand tonnes of plastic waste ends up in the oceans every year, according to the European Union. Supermarkets produce a huge amount of waste with unnecessary packaging. However, some chains have taken small steps towards reducing their impact on the planet such as Morrisons, which recently reintroduced paper grocery bags in the vegetable aisle for customers to use for their fresh produce.

But one supermarket in Belsize Park in North London has taken it one step further by ditching plastic and packaging in its mission to become Britain’s first zero-waste supermarket.

Thornton’s Budgens, a community supermarket in Belsize Park, is the first plastic free supermarket in the UK that launched plastic-free zones and has pledged to become virtually plastic-free by 2021.

First Plastic Free Supermarket

Over the past 10 weeks, Thornton Budgens who owns the Budgens franchise, has already converted over 1,700 product lines to non-plastic packaging on its journey to make the store virtually plastic free within three years.

Andrew Thornton hopes that this move would challenge other supermarket chains such as Sainsbury’s and Tesco to fight against plastic and turn their store in plastic free supermarkets. He also believes that as soon as all the supermarkets will tell the big producers such as Coca-Cola or Heinz to stop sending their products in plastic, the change will come very quickly.

The innovations of the Plastic Free Supermarket

Different kind of innovations concern the packaging of the products. In particular, self-packed product includes fish which was previously wrapped in paper and place in a plastic bag. Bread it bakes itself or buys from artisan bakers used to go in a bag with clear film. It will now place these in a mixture of paper and compostable clear bags. It has been experimenting with semi-transparent wax paper for cheese, that it buys in big blocks and used to wrap in clingfilm.

Other innovations include netting made of beech for some of its produce. It is claiming plastic-free on packaging that is at least 99% plastic free, such as glass bottles that have plastic labels or a seal in the lid.

Paper

Whilst the supermarket is ditching the plastic, it is not going zero-waste just yet as for many products grocery bags made from cellulose, a structural component of the cell walls of green plants, have replaced plastic bags in the store.

Vegan Zero Waste Store

Whilst the supermarket might be keen to reduce the amount of plastic heading to landfill, it is not a dedicated vegan store as it will still be selling meat, eggs and dairy products. Thankfully, a zero-waste vegan store, Hetu, is on a mission to help Londoners to live a more ethical and sustainable lifestyle in Clapham Junction, so be sure to check it out.

We hope you liked the article and we recommend you to read our blog post about the Eco-Friendly Packaging

Written by Sabrina Licata from Attitude Organic

The post Britain’s First Plastic Free Supermarket opens in London appeared first on Attitude Organic.

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