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Last time you cooked fried chicken did your scenario look like this? You bring out the platter of fried chicken to a crowd of hungry friends as they look in delight for that juicy bite of fried chicken. But secretly you’re cringing inside not sure if the chicken is fully cooked inside?

That’s where sous vide fried chicken comes in. With your Anova Precision Cooker, you don’t have to worry if the chicken is underdone…ever! It’s cooked to perfection every time. If you’ve got a party, you can even cook the chicken ahead of time, and fry it right before your guests arrive so it’s nice and hot. Less stress (and less time in the oil!) is always best, so go get some birds, beers, and fry up a fried chicken feast!

Sous Vide Fried Chicken What you’ll need:
  • 2 whole chickens
  • Salt and pepper
  • Buttermilk
  • Pastry flour
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground mustard
  • Canola, peanut, or vegetable oil for frying
Directions:
  1. Set Anova Sous Vide Precision Cooker to 155°F / 68.3°C.
2. Break down chicken into individual pieces. Salt the chicken heavily. This will create a brine while it’s cooking to help keep it as moist as possible. 3. Bag white meat and dark meat separately, as each will cook for different time. 4. Place dark meat in water bath and sous vide for two hours. After two hours, add white meat and cook for one hour, leaving dark meat in too. Finishing Steps: 1.  Heat at least 4″ of oil in a pot or dutch oven to 400°F / 204°C. 2. Take your pastry flour and add your spices, mix. 3. Dredge your chicken in the buttermilk and then the flour. If you like it extra crispy, dredge it in the buttermilk and flour a second time to make an extra thick coating. 4. Fry until the coating looks good, usually about 2-3 minutes. It’s literally as simple as that. If it looks good, it’s done! Time to Eat! Dig in! Find the full recipe for sous vide fried chicken, available on the Anova Recipes Site and the Anova Culinary App. And don’t forget to get your greens in. Check out this tasty walnut and pear salad here, which goes perfectly with fried chicken. 

The post No More Undercooked Fried Chicken appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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The best part about homemade bread? Eating homemade bread. Worst part? Having to find that perfect spot in your kitchen to proof your bread properly. Proper proofing requires temps of around 80°F / 27°C, much hotter than most our homes. With the Anova Sous Vide Precision Cooker you can prep your bread bake like a pro!

If you live in an area like me where you deal with some pretty cold winters, sometimes your house isn’t as suitable for proofing as you’d like it to be. Sure you could try to use your oven proof setting but you’re looking at around 160°-180°F at the lowest! That’s not proofing, that’s slow cooking! Just follow these easy steps for some of the best homemade bread you’ve ever had.

Bonus? Four real ingredients. No fillers. No nasty stuff. Just flour, water, salt, and yeast.

Proof Bread Perfectly with your Anova Precision Cooker - YouTube
This is how we do it What you’ll need (makes 1 loaf):
  • 500g flour
  • 360g water
  • 10g kosher salt
  • 2g instant yeast
  • 1 dutch oven with lid
Directions:

1. Set your Anova Sous Vide Precision Cooker to 95°F / 35°C.

2. Measure out 360g water and add 2g of instant yeast. Transfer into a resealable ziplock. Place in 95°F / 35°C bath for the yeast to start working. This will take around 10-15 minutes.

3. While your yeast and water is working, in another bowl measure out 500g of flour and mix in 10g of kosher salt.

4. Once the yeast has activated (you’ll see bubbles!) combine your water to your dry ingredients and mix well by hand until in a round shape, but still loose. Place in a glass bowl. It can look a little wet at first but we’ll give it time to proof and will be adding a bit more flour later.

5. Set your Anova Sous Vide Precision Cooker to 80°F / 27°C, our optimal proofing temperature. You can add some cool water to bring temp down quicker if needed.

6. Float your bowl directly on top of the water bath. The weight of the dough will submerge the bowl a few inches, surrounding your dough with the perfect temp needed to proof! Proof 1-2 hours until dough doubles in size.

Time to bake!

1. Preheat your oven to 475°F / 250°C with dutch oven inside. Preheat for 30-45 minutes. You want your dutch oven to be very hot.

2. Remove dough from bowl, shape into a round loaf, adding small amounts of flour as needed to get into a nice shape.

3. Carefully remove dutch oven from oven, place bread dough in the dutch oven, put the lid on, and return to the oven to 30 minutes. At the 30 minute mark, remove the lid and bake for 15 more minutes until golden brown!

  FAQ’S

What if I don’t have a scale to measure grams?

When baking, measuring by weight will help get repeatable consistent results, but here are some estimations of the ingredients by volume:
  • 4 cups of flour
  • 1.5 cups of water
  • 1.5 teaspoon kosher salt
  • .75 teaspoon instant yeast

Where does the bowl of dough go?

Float the bowl right on the surface of the water! The bowl will submerge a couple of inches from the weight of the dough, and be surrounded by the water.

Why does the dough seem REALLY wet?

This is a dough with a lot of water. If you find it hard to manage, add a small amount of flour (a few pinches at a time) until manageable.

Do I have to have a Dutch Oven?

A stock pot with a lid will work in a pinch!

 

The post How to proof bread with your Anova Precision Cooker appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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Whether you’re bringing a single dish to a potluck or hosting a full-on feast for family and friends, your sous vide is a guaranteed ace up the sleeve over the upcoming 4th of July weekend.

We’ve rounded up some of our favorite cookout recipes (both traditional and with modern twists) to get you off to a solid start. Think all-American BBQ classics, but forget anything and everything about all the times they’ve wound up too bland, burnt, and dry to have anyone heading back for seconds. Check them all out below.

  BBQ Chicken Sandwiches Treat everyone to some tender and seriously tasty bird. Get the recipe here.   Honey Miso Butter Corn This just in: corn on the cob no longer the boring side dish at local BBQ. Get the recipe here.   German Potato Salad ‘Taters never tasted so good. Get the recipe here.     Classic American Dogs Would it even be a BBQ if we didn’t let the dogs out? Get the recipe here.   Better Deviled Eggs Don’t let the name throw you off – these eggs are heavenly. Get the recipe here.  

The post Red, White, and Sous Vide: 4th of July Recipes appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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I remember the first time I saw someone take a picture of their food. It was probably around 2004 and I was suffering through an uninspired date night with my future ex-girlfriend at a French-influenced restaurant in downtown Santa Rosa called “The Brasserie”. The entrees arrived at the table next to us and I watched as a woman at the table reached into her purse and with the guilt and precision of a seasoned shoplifter, pulled out her BlackBerry and snapped a picture of her artfully prepared chicken. As she slid her phone back into her purse, she glanced over at me and grinned. “Ugh”, I groaned.

I always figured the term “food photography” referred to a professional marketing or advertising process. A company like McDonald’s taking a Big Mac, and giving it a plastic induced makeover just to get dummies like me to believe that what I got in the drive-thru might just resemble that perfect looking burger on TV. After all, why bother taking a picture of food if not to get someone to buy it? Even as I taught myself to cook and spent several years being lied to by friends and family when I asked, “How was it?” it still never occurred to me to take a picture of what I had made. After all, I didn’t own a professional camera and I wasn’t selling Big Macs. Furthermore, I thought the term “we eat with our eyes” was the dumbest thing I’d ever heard as no matter how hard I stared at a picture, I was still hungry.

Enter Facebook. Enter Insta and the 16-megapixel phone camera. Enter the golden age of FOMO irony where we’ll miss the concert, just to ensure we get a video of it that we’ll never watch again anyway. I didn’t start taking pictures of my food to share with other people. In fact, when I started snapping the occasional picture of my overcooked chicken or my heaping pile of rigatoni, it was just to remind myself what I had made so I could have ideas the next time I found myself wandering the aisles of the grocery store. But that all changed the first time my plate of pasta accidentally stumbled into the perfect lighting that existed next to my kitchen window for a few hours each evening. I remember looking at the picture on my phone and hardly believing my eyes. This, was my Big Mac.

Several years later, I now regularly take pictures of my home cooked dishes and post them at The Roybal Supper Club on Facebook and Instagram. With my small handful of followers, I’m not an “influencer” nor am I selling anything – but I enjoy sharing my food in pictures that replicate how it appeared in real life. And I only use my phone to take the pictures, I still don’t own a camera and I don’t use lighting contraptions or Photoshop. But I do have a few principles that have greatly improved the quality and feel of my otherwise amateur home cooked and home shot pictures that you can use too:

#1: Lighting

In my opinion, lighting is the SINGLE most important element in photographing your food. And it’s often the most overlooked. Bad lighting, especially bad indoor lighting, can ruin a shot of your dish even when all other things are dialed in. As you’ll notice in most of my food pictures, I prefer diffused lighting which is lighting that reduces both bright glare and harsh shadows. Here are a few tips for letting the right light shine through:

  • Find your spots. Every home has at least one good spot inside, and one outside where the lighting is best (depending on the time of day – more on that later). To start, I suggest making a cold dish (salad, crudo, etc.) and walking it around to a few areas near your kitchen, taking a picture at each. Hold your eye rolls folks – you only have to do this once as you’ll know by looking at your pictures where your best spot it. Look for places near indirect natural lighting or windows. These shots were taken on my kitchen island which is about 5 feet from a window that faces north, creating indirect, natural light. I use the blinds to control just how much brightness comes through.
  • If it’s dark out and you’re shooting inside, consider indirect lighting from different light sources. During the winter months, I’ve found my coffee table to pick up a great combination of light between the kitchen ceiling lights a few feet away to the left, and the TV straight ahead.What appears to be modernist blue accent lighting is actually just my television!
  • For outdoor shots, look for areas that aren’t in direct sunlight and consider what you’ll be placing the dish on and how that will look under your plate. On our East facing covered front porch, we have a little brick retaining wall which serves as my favorite surface to photograph on due to the indirect light. It’s not uncommon for my neighbors to be outside when I’m snapping my pictures prompting me to yell, “you don’t see this!”

As the seasons change it may be dark or light out at dinner time, depending on what time of year it is. This is all the more reason to “find your spots” so you’ll always have a place to go when you churn out that awesome looking dish.

#2: Angle

This may seem obvious here’s the rub: there is no “right” angle. My favorites are straight on/down, or at about a 45-degree angle. But depending on the dish, I will also sometimes shoot directly from the side. Here are a few things to consider about the angle you’re shooting:

  • Does the dish have height dimensions? If so, what angle best represents them?
  • If you’re not shooting directly down, what’s in the background?
  • Do you really want a dusty patio table serving as the backdrop of your beautiful beet and pearl couscous salad?

Shoot them ALL. Often, I will quickly snap several different angles of a dish and then choose the one I like after I’ve eaten. Notice how differently this dish is represented with each different angle.

  #3: Filters One of the most common questions I get about my food pictures is what filters I use. Personally, I believe filters should be used to re-implement what’s lost when a picture is taken (not to make the picture something it never was in real life). Because I don’t rely heavily on them, I only ever use the filters in Instagram and I never use the premade filters and always use the “edit” function to make my own adjustments. So depending on what editor you’re using, the terminology may vary but here are my go-to edits:
  • Contrast – contrast will accentuate the bright and further dim the shadows. I use this sparingly but it is especially useful in helping a white plate “pop” against your food.
  • “Structure” – structure has an effect similar to “sharpening” and will accentuate texture. But beware – when overused, it can make some things such as sliced steak, appear to be stringy or dry (when it’s really not). I use this filter in lower lighting or anytime a picture has “softened” the dish in a way that’s not representative of how it actually looked.
  • “Warmth” – the way I explain it, increasing “warmth” leans the image to gold/yellow and decreasing it leans it blue. I usually use this to correct the overall tint of the image and find it especially useful in conjunction with contrast in correcting the color of a white plate.
  • “Saturation” – the most abused filter around. Ever seen someone have watermelon radish on their plate and it’s glowing neon pink? That’s saturation. Too much of it. I use this very minimally but it’s very helpful in correcting color dull.
  • “Vignette” – another overused filter, we’ve all seen pictures where the dish looks like it’s surrounded by a mysterious dark ring. However, when used lightly and in the right applications, it can add a subtle shadow to the perimeter of the dish, making the dish itself more prominent in the overall picture.

Here you can see the difference these basic filters can make. In the first image (the original), the bright white plate has photographed dull and slightly yellowed. The purple flowers are shadowed and the vibrant green asparagus/lemon/mint puree has a slight brownness to it. In the filtered picture, all of these have been corrected. Having taken the picture, I can tell you the edited picture is much more representative of how the dish actually looked.

And that’s about it. If you were hoping for a Master Class on food photography here, you didn’t get it. But then again, I am just a regular guy with a day job and no training or education in cooking, plating or photography. This is good news however as it means if I can do it, anyone can improve the look of their food in pictures. Now go have your Big Mac moment!

The post How to take killer food pics for the ‘Gram appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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If you are a sous vide enthusiast the term “wagyu,” probably has your mouth watering as it’s celebrated for its melt-in-your-mouth texture and heavy marbling. However, it is also the most expensive beef in the world. But do you really know why you are dropping all those dollars for a steak?

Wagyu means “Japanese cow” and it refers to four native breeds: Japanese Black, Japanese Brown, Japanese Shorthorn, and Japanese Polled. Japanese A5 Wagyu is the highest grade that Wagyu beef can achieve and is typically reserved for cattle who are fed the best foods, like corn and grain and have had exceptional care during their raising. A5 refers to the grading and marbling of the beef, and A5 is the top of the charts. Less than a tenth of a percent of beef produced in the world is A5 Wagyu!

I have been lucky enough to find a great source for A5 Wagyu. I didn’t think there was such a thing as too much A5, but when I look in my freezer and realize I still have more, I’m starting to believe there could be such a thing as too much, but I know the perfect way to cook it, and I’m gonna tell you! But first, a little exploration into my discovery of my favorite food.

I love sushi and my favorite type is toro, the fatty belly of the tuna. I would search high and low for otoro (most fatty) and chutoro (medium fatty). Then a long time ago, I realized A5 Wagyu was the otoro of beef, with so much delicious fat. So I started on my quest for A5 wagyu, but seeing the cost (often upwards of $200/lb) made it difficult to acquire. Turns out a family friend is in the industry and the rest is history, so I’m able to buy in bulk at an amazing price, because of that, it allowed me to try cooking A5 Wagyu with every method available.

I’ve made A5 Wagyu steak tartare, cooked it over an open fire with charcoal, on a Himalayan salt block, straight on a cast iron pan, sous vide, as thin slices, as thick blocks, as cubes, and as a whole 1.5″ steak and tried every cut: everything from ribeye, NY Strip, short ribs, brisket, etc.

What’s ironic is people who like the precision that sous vide gives when cooking other meats, all of a sudden somehow believe because the high cost of the meat, their skills magically have become greater when cooking an expensive A5. So they say, just sear it on a pan. Well, when you sear an expensive cut or a cheap cut of meat you run the risk of it still being raw on the inside or overcooking it.

The precision that my Anova provides me allows me to guarantee 129°F end to end, meaning the meat and marbled fat throughout the meat is heated just to that “melt in your mouth butter” stage, and helps ensure I don’t accidentally under or overcook the expensive wagyu. The meat doesn’t “disappear” when you SV it.

So ignore the false information about not SV’ing A5 wagyu and feel comfortable when you sous vide it to know you’re reducing the chance of you messing it up and still getting a perfectly cooked steak for the money you spent!

Here’s my recipe for the best bites of beef ever

1. Set Anova Precision Cooker to 129°F / 53.9°C

2. Season steak with salt and pepper.

3. Place steak in resealable ziplock or vacuum bag.

4. Place in water bath and sous vide for 2 hours.

5. Remove from the water bath, and pat steak dry.

6. In a hot skillet, sear steak for 30-45 seconds on each side.

7. Slice, serve, eat and upload pics to Instagram!

The post Don’t Chance Your A5 Wagyu to Traditional Methods appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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It’s the NBA Finals Game 6. Our hometown Warriors are in a do or die situation. It’s time to learn how to cook the nemesis into wicked-tender submission. Learn how to #sousvidetheraptors below. Sous Vide Raptor

1. Acquire raptor. Don’t ask how. Just do it. Get a time machine. That’s not our problem.

2. Season Raptor with salt, pepper, garlic powder, and a little Curry powder.

3. Heat Anova Precision Cooker to 129°F or 53.9°C for those of you above the border, which if is the case you have already stopped reading.

4. Place Raptor in a large Ziplock bag. (Prob bigger than they actually sell, but this is a fake recipe).

5. Sous Vide for 48 minutes for maximum tenderness.

6. Hire Klay Thompson to to incinerate a net with back-to-back-to-back 3 pointers and sear Raptor over the open flame.

  And finally, Go Warriors!

The post Sous Vide Raptor appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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Parenting is hard and often comes with little appreciation. But some of the smallest things can feel like the biggest rewards–something as simple as cooking your daughter’s favorite meal or winning a “golden spatula” on a daddy/daughter camping trip.

To celebrate Father’s Day, we caught up with two dads who are conquering cooking and making lasting memories along the way with the help of their Anova Precision Cookers.

Meet Floris

Ever since my daughter could formulate her opinion on food (about 2.5-year-old), she’s been asking for two things on her birthday: my spareribs and chicken drumsticks. Both take a long bath with the Anova, 36 and 12 hours respectively.

This past May on her 6th birthday, she helped with marinating, rubbing, and sealing the bags. Once the chicken drumsticks were seared, she called all twelve of  her friends playing in our garden and said: “Kids, stop playing, get over here, because my dad finished the drumsticks and we don’t want the adults to find out before we’ve had at least one each”. Then, they all ran towards the BBQ!

Here’s the recipe to my daughter’s favorite drumsticks!

Measurements are for 20 drums. I quickly rinse the drumsticks with water and let them dry while making the marinade. In the bag, I add soy sauce, a knob of grated ginger, and a couple of cloves of minced garlic. Stir it a little and then add in the chicken. Seal the bag, then shake the bag around so all the chicken is covered.

Warm up the bath for 60C/140F and then place the bag of chicken into the bath for about 8-12 hours. I typically make the chicken the day before. Once the chicken is done, I dunk the bag in cold water to cool it down and then leave it in the fridge.

Before serving, I warm up the chicken for 20 minutes with the Anova. The finishing touch is a quick sear on a fire starter when I heat up the coals for my ribs. Once the flames start I put a grill rack on top and put 2-3 drumsticks on, turning them after 20 seconds. The skin gets nice and crispy and the meat gets a little color.

Meet Doug, the “Golden Spatula” winner

A few weekends ago I was at a daddy/daughter campout, with 20 girls between the age of 4 and 11 and about ten dads. A big part of these campouts is the “Golden Spatula” prize, where the dads from each cabin compete to create the best campfire meals – a competition our cabin is famed for losing every year. Despite the fact that I am a notoriously terrible cook, I was determined to change that.

I grabbed my old cast-iron skillet and picked up a big stock pot from Goodwill on the way up, along with some avocado mayo and some nice Costco ribeyes. A few hours before dinner I set the Anova to 133 degrees, sprinkled the ribeyes with salt and pepper and used the water-displacement method to lower them in. That’s when I learned one of the other dads had made the same recipe- I’ll admit I was relieved to have someone experienced on-hand.

It was beautiful. The Anova had cooked the steak just a shade south of medium rare, while the mayo gave it a perfect sear, with amazing color and crunchiness in all the right places. It tasted as good as it looked. This was far and away the best food I’ve ever made. We devoured the rest of the steaks immediately, saving one to make when the judges came by (mainly to see the looks on their faces when that mayo went on).

The result: the next morning, I had dads from other cabins coming up to me all through breakfast asking about sous-vide cooking, and wondering if the rumors were true that we’d put mayonnaise on ribeyes. Oh, and together with another dad’s excellent slow-cooked Italian beef, our cabin won the coveted Golden Spatula.

We Love You Dads!

Floris and Doug are just a couple of dads that have earned bragging rights that will be shared for a lifetime with their daughters.This Father’s Day, join Floris and Doug and share your cooking success stories below in the comments section. Go ahead, brag a little bit. You deserve it!

We bragged about these Dads, now we want to brag about you! Open your ios Anova App, enter your best sous vide recipes, and we’ll feature the best in an upcoming email!

Oh and by the way. Happy Father’s Day from Anova.

   

The post We’re giving Dad a platform to brag. Check out their stories! appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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A few weekends ago I was at a daddy-daughter campout, with 20 girls between the age of 4 and 11 and about ten dads. A big part of these campouts is the “Golden Spatula” prize, where the dads from each cabin compete to create the best campfire meals – a competition our cabin is famed for losing every year. Despite the fact that I am a notoriously terrible cook, I was determined to change that.

This spring I decided it was time to break out my Anova sous vide and try something new. This would be exactly the third time I’ve ever cooked with it, so I’m no expert by any means – I knew I’d need some help. Fortunately, between the recipes on the Anova website and the helpful folks at the r/sousvide subreddit, I had lots of advice and encouragement to draw from. Ultimately, I decided to go big: mayonnaise-seared ribeyes!

I grabbed my old cast-iron skillet and picked up a big stock pot from Goodwill on the way up, along with some avocado mayo and some nice Costco ribeyes. A few hours before dinner I set the Anova to 133 degrees, sprinkled the ribeyes with salt and pepper and used the water-displacement method to lower them in. That’s when I learned one of the other dads had made the same recipe – I’ll admit I was relieved to have someone experienced on-hand.

A bit over 2 hours later, while the girls were running around playing games, we pulled the ribeyes out, patted them dry and hit them with more salt and pepper. While some of the dads pulled some coals to the side of the fire and got my skillet screaming hot, I spread a thin layer of mayo on the first ribeye – that got more than a few raised eyebrows.

All doubts disappeared the second the first steak hit the skillet. The sizzling sound drew immediate oohs and ahhs from the crowd. It crusted up in less than a minute, while I bravely sacrificed some arm-hair to spread mayo on the exposed side. I flipped it, gave it a quick sear and we gathered around to see what we had created.

It was beautiful. The Anova had cooked the steak just a shade south of medium rare, while the mayo gave it a perfect sear, with amazing color and crunchiness in all the right places. It tasted as good as it looked. This was far and away the best food I’ve ever made. We devoured the rest of the steaks immediately, saving one to make when the judges came by (mainly to see the looks on their faces when that mayo went on).

The result: the next morning, I had dads from other cabins coming up to me all through breakfast asking about sous-vide cooking, and wondering if the rumors were true that we’d put mayonnaise on ribeyes. Oh, and together with another dad’s excellent slow-cooked Italian beef, our cabin won the coveted Golden Spatula.

The post Meet Doug, an #anovafoodnerd dad who won a major award! appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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There aren’t many things better than enjoying a platter of perfectly prepared BBQ with friends and family. Smoky, tender meat just falling apart and moisture dripping down your chin. It’s great. But what if there were a way to make it even better? Grab your trusty Anova Precision Cooker and unleash the secret to superior ‘cue.

Meet these smoky sous vide nerds below and see how they dish up better BBQ using the best of both worlds.

Russel Wong; San Francisco resident and works next door to Anova

“Smoke for flavor, sous vide for precise doneness/tenderness and texture.” BBQ is all about low and slow, with sous vide being even lower and slower. I feel I’ve been able to combine the best of both worlds to get the best results by using my Anova in conjunction with my pellet grill. Here’s my method:
  • Season before smoking
  • Smoke as low as possible, around 150°F-180°F
  • Don’t let the meat’s internal temp exceed the target sous vide bath temp when you’re smoking (either before or after)
  • SV temps depends on what you’re cooking but a good general rule of thumb for tougher bbq meats (brisket, beef ribs, short ribs, etc) – 132°F-165°F for 24-48 hours depending on the texture you prefer
  • Finish under a broiler to get the crust back
  • For more smoke, better crust, ice bath, then chill so you can smoke again back to sous vide bath temp, you can season again before this step too if you want.
One of my favorite meats to cook sous vide and BBQ is pastrami. You can find that recipe here: https://recipes.anovaculinary.com/recipe/sous-vide-pastrami Darrin Wilson; Clearwater, Florida “Don’t let anyone tell you that sous vide is only good for steak!” I immediately fell in love with sous vide BBQ (including grilling AND smoking) and started experimenting and testing all kinds of meats and processes. Below are some of the “basics” of sous vide BBQ I have learned over the last three years:
  • Don’t let anyone tell you that sous vide is only good for steak! I have done many different kinds of meat, even some exotic stuff, using these methods combined.
  • Don’t be afraid to experiment! Trying to make some things like pork butt or brisket at different times and temperatures using sous vide can totally change the way you think about barbecue!
  • Make sure you use a good guide or recipe. Although I encourage you to experiment, sous vide is not very good when you just try and “Wing it” so you should still use some basic rules.
  • Some things will come down to “Personal Preference”. Sometimes there is no “right or wrong” answer, it is just preference and a matter of opinion. I always suggest trying things multiple ways until you find what works best for YOU.
  • You can do Sous Vide BBQ without a grill or smoker! Believe it or not, there are many recipes out there that can help you get very close to real bbq taste by using the sous vide and your oven!
Head here to check out my famous sous vide and smoked chicken! https://recipes.anovaculinary.com/recipe/sous-vide-and-smoked-chicken   Michael Audo, recent sous vide and smoke convert from Iowa City, IA “I’ll never do brisket another way.” So I’ve been a pretty avid user of the electric smoker over the last 5 years or so. Mastered the art of the pork butt, beef ribs, turkey breast, and St Louis ribs. Time and time again though, I failed in my mission to properly create the mecca of smoked meat…the brisket! After doing a little research I decided that the Anova was going to be where I made my last stand. I had only 2 endgames; a perfect brisket or I was done…never to attempt one again. I took the plunge and bought a 9-pound hunk of beef. After a good coating of Oklahoma Joe’s brisket rub, I threw it in a 132° bath for 50 hours. Upon removal, on Saturday morning I gave it a quick ice bath and a fresh coat of seasoning before tossing it in the smoker for 4 hours of hickory smoke at 235°. It did not disappoint. Everything and I mean everything, from the taste to texture, to color was absolutely perfect. Had some BBQ snob friends over and they said it was the best homemade brisket they had ever had. Long story short…I’ll never do brisket another way. You need this brisket in your life. Here’s the recipe: https://recipes.anovaculinary.com/recipe/sous-vide-and-smoked-brisket-1   Matt Pittman, Award Winning Pitmaster from Waxahachie, TX “Sous vide plus smoke is the ultimate combo!” I am as hardcore of a BBQ man as you can get. I also love my Anova, so why not combine the two and take BBQ to the next level? I love smoking chuck roasts because they are a very economical way to make dinner. A decent size chuck roast only runs you around $15 and is a much cheaper alternative to buying a whole brisket and the end result is very similar. I prefer to smoke the meat first for a couple of hours, then place them in the sous vide until they are fall-apart tender. This also helps the smokiness permeate throughout the protein. The thing I love about this method is that I can meal prep on a Sunday and have quick and delicious meals all week. I can smoke several different types of meat, chill them in my refrigerator and then drop them in the sous vide the day I want to serve them. Peep that chuck roast recipe here! https://recipes.anovaculinary.com/recipe/sous-vide-smoked-chuck-roast-tacos Thanks to our crew of #anovafoodnerds who shared their secrets to smoky sous vide success. Be sure to head to recipes.anovaculinary.com if you’re seeking more sous vide inspiration.

The post BBQ & Sous Vide – The Best of Both Worlds appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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BBQ is all about low and slow, with sous vide being even lower and slower. I feel I’ve been able to combine the best of both worlds to get the most convenient and consistent results by using my Anova Precision Cooker in conjunction with my pellet grill. I started out with a stick burner and managed overnight brisket cooks before and while it was spectacular, it was a lot of work. So I switched to a pellet grill, which was even easier, because it was temperature controlled. As some may know, smoke doesn’t penetrate all the way through things, so a majority of the smoking time is just getting the meat tender, which my Anova does better than anything.

With traditional methods, I could do it, but there’s always that accidental moment where the fire was too hot, it was still in for too long and caused it to dry out, or the uneven shape of the meat had one side dry and one said good. Chicken wings which are pretty good grilled come out super moist and so tender when sous vide first. Even with a brisket, everyone loves the point, because of the fat, but for a lot of people, the flat ends up getting to dry. So people do tricks like cooking it fat side down. Well the laziness in me realized that I could combine smoking with sous vide to be even lazier and get better results. With the Anova wifi functionality, I can remotely check the temp and change the temp if I wanted to. Smoke for flavor, sous vide for precise doneness/tenderness and texture. I tend to smoke first, because cold, moist, raw meat tends to take smoke better and because it’s more convenient to me. Being able to smoke in the beginning, ensures that the meat never exceeds my target sous vide temp, because I’m smoking at 150°F-180°F and it takes a while for meats to get above 120°F internal at those temps.

The bad thing is, you don’t get the traditional bark, unless you finish it properly. If you have time, you can ice chill the meat, then refrigerate after SV, then bring back up to temp by smoking again. This will give you killer bark, and a stronger smokiness, but requires a little more work and timing coordination. I’m usually too lazy by then. Here are my secrets for sous vide BBQ success:
  • Season before smoking
  • Smoke as low as possible for 6-8 hours at 150°F-180°F
  • Don’t let the meat’s internal temp exceed the target sous vide bath temp when you’re smoking (either before or after)
  • Sous vide temp depends on what you’re cooking but a good general rule of thumb for tougher bbq meats (brisket, beef ribs, short ribs, etc) – 132°F-165°F for 24-48 hours depending on the texture you want your meat to be like.
  • Finish under a broiler to get the crust back
  • For more smoke, better crust, ice bath, then chill, so you can smoke again back to SV bath temp, you can season again before this step too if you want.
If you wanna check out one of my favorite sous vide BBQ recipes, head here to serve up my homemade sous vide pastrami!

The post How to Combine Sous Vide and Smoke for the Best BBQ Ever appeared first on Anova Culinary.

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