Loading...

Continuing with the topic I opened up in the last post about how influential Henri Cartier-Bresson was to me, I would like to introduce you another one of the photographers who has inspired my work and my street photography in terms of candid and decisive moments found in daily life and people: Louis Faurer.

Louis Faurer (Image retrieved from http://www.billjayonphotography.com)

American photographer born in 1916, Louis Faurer explored and captured life mainly in New York over the 1950's. Fascinated with the night lights, he experimented with reflections to create multiple exposures and blurred images to create new aspects to the final composition and a magical aura to the subjects. Even though Faurer was an avid candid and street photographer, he hardly had the same recognition as his fellow colleagues from that period of time, probably due to Faurer's incomes coming mainly from fashion photography, where he worked for Vogue, Elle, Glamour or Harper's Baazar. Nonetheless, his street work was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Arts in two exhibitions: In and Out of Focus in 1948 and The Family of Man in 1950. Also, he had several solo exhibitions over that decade in New York galleries.

Recently, in 2016, the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson funded a new solo exhibition for his candid photography, which I had the privilege to visit at its opening in my hometown Granada, Spain. I will never forget how all that wonderful collection of prints in front of my eyes made me fall in love with street photography and how, in that very moment, I decided that was the kind of photographer I wanted to become. If you would like to have a look at some of Faurer's photographs, please visit his Artsy profile.

"Original art emanates in the mind ... and lessons society's confusion from self indulgence, avarice and greed to trust, hope and love" - Louis Faurer
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Every person in the world has someone who serves as inspiration, not only at a personal level, but also as a professional reference. I would take the risk to assure every professional or amateur photographer has a list of others to look up at. I, of course, consider myself to be included in that group and I would like to introduce the photographers I admire and I wish to become with my own vision. 

Henri Cartier-Bresson (Image retrieved from http://erickimphotography.com/blog)

I should start off with who I believe was, and is, the greatest Street photographer of all times: Henri Cartier-Bresson. He was a french photographer born in 1908 and he is considered to be the father of this specific genre of photography. His motto was to capture in camera the decisive moment, that precise scene in front of your eyes that will vanish within seconds and which dragged your attention on the first place, as Henri understood that a photograph can fix eternity in an instant . He mastered how to look for these moments and how to capture them with his Leica camera. 

Cartier-Bresson worked all around the world, including France, India, Spain, Germany, Czech Republic, Poland, China, Hungary, Belgium and United States, where in 1947 founded the well-known photographers agency Magnum Photos along with Robert Capa, David Seymour, William Vandivert and George Rodger. In the words of Cartier-Bresson, "Magnum is a community of thought, a shared human quality, a curiosity about what is going on in the world, a respect for what is going on and a desire to transcribe it visually". Having photojournalism and documentary photography as main genres, Magnum Photos is probably the most desired and prestigious place a photographer nowadays would love to be.

If you want to have a look at some of Cartier-Bresson's most iconic and influential photographs, please visit his Magnum profile. In following posts, I will introduce you to more photographers who are my source of inspiration to continue this wonderful and passionate profession.

"To take a photograph means to recognise, simultaneously and within a fraction of a second‚ both the fact itself and the rigorous organisation of visually perceived forms that give it meaning" - Henri Cartier-Bresson
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

First Name Last Name Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Although I don't consider myself a geek person, as a photographer I need to have equipment to do the photography work you can see in the different projects I have done so far. So just for you to know me a little bit better, I have decided to write a post on the gear I use to shoot my street photographs. 

Nikon D5500

That above is my beloved Nikon D5500, a digital APS-C sensor released in 2015. It is not a full frame camera, just middle range, however I cherish its features and its light-weighted body, which allows me to carry it casually in one hand while walking around the streets, looking for the next shot, and lift it quickly to frame the image. It is very fast and reliable, its battery can last for three days shooting and its tactile screen makes my life way easier when changing certain settings or looking through the menu. The screen is also mobile, so it can rotate to use Live View when looking through the viewfinder gets tricky. Even though it's not a video-camera, its recording features in Full HD are impressive for someone new to video like me, so I can start learning with it. I don't like to position myself in the eternal discussion between Canon or Nikon, I just based my decision when buying this model by checking the functionalities and I couldn't be happier with the result.

My lenses

I am not quite a big gear spender as I truly believe any device is good enough if learnt how to use it and have an intention behind the subjects shot in the final image. As you can read in my post New Year, new goals, I built a pinhole camera out of cardboard, no fancy electronics, and anyone can build one and photograph with it without spending a fortune on equipment. That's why I only have three lenses, one being the kit lens which came with the camera body, a 18-55 mm f3.5-5.6. I also have worked with the telephoto lens 55-300 mm f4.5-5.6 for far shoots and more recently I purchased my 50 mm f1.8, which I fell in love with instantly. 

Nikon FE

Lastly, I bought a second-hand analogue camera, the Nikon FE, released at the end of 1970s. I am still working with it so there are no projects in the gallery to see the result, but I hope to have at least one ready as soon as possible this year. I started using film cameras when I was a kid, so now it was the time to go back at it and experiment with film, not only with the Nikon FE, but also with the pinhole and disposable cameras.

"Life, as it unfolds in front of the camera, is full of so much complexity, wonder and surprise that I find it unnecessary to create new realities. There is more pleasure, for me, in things as-they-are" - David Hurn
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

First Name Last Name Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I have recently added a new project to my gallery and the online shop which moves away from Street Photography, as it focuses mainly on nature but with a different aesthetic to classical Landscape Photography. "Oneiric Nature" invites the viewers to take a relaxed walk through a calm and dreamy scenario, losing themselves into the images.

The technique I followed to complete this project does not differ much from my usual Street Photography style regarding the camera work, even though I tried to shoot in low light conditions to give a dark feeling. What I changed was the digital post-production on Adobe Lightroom, fading the details so the edges would vanish and slightly merge together to add the desired dreamy look to the images. 

The reason why I decided to do this project away from Street Photography is just because I love nature. Long walks around the forest or by a riverside are like a therapy to release myself from stress and rejoice from the beauty of natural wonders. I wanted to give the images the fading look as, unfortunately, it is most probably those landscape will disappear due to the human action destroying the environment, remaining in my memory like a dream I once had.

Ten of the photographs included in this project are available for purchase and delivery at the Prints Shop.

"Emotion is really the only thing about pictures I find interesting. Beyond that it is just a trick" - Christopher Anderson
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

First Name Last Name Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

After having "disappeared" for quite a long time due to moving to a new and different country, Denmark; I am glad to announce that I am back again to get the most out of this new year 2018. Even though I am not quite a New Year's Resolutions kind of person, I need to take my photography to new and exciting levels I cannot wait to put in place.

I have few new projects I am working on, experimenting with pinhole cameras and film photography, and exploring how to develop my street photography along with discovering my most artistic way of expressing my ideas with more intimate images. I hope I will have all these projects ready as soon as possible to showcase them in here and write about them and the process I followed to complete the new series.

My handmade pinhole camera

The last big news I want to share in this blog post is that I have finally decided to sell some of my images as prints worldwide. You can now purchase a selection of my photographs from anywhere in the world and get them deliver right to your door. I have included a section called "Prints Shop" on the left hand side of this site which will lead you to the prints available. I hope to keep adding more photographs as it develops, so remember to keep updated through my Facebook Page, Twitter, Instagram and blog subscription (sign up below). Happy New Year 2018!

"Photography is the beauty of life captured" - Tara Chisholm
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

First Name Last Name Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

As you may know, artistic projects which relate to painting, sculpture or photography, need to come with a so called “Statement”, a brief or long description of the project itself, so the viewer, curators at galleries, jurors from awards and magazine editors can understand and put into the artist’s context the whole series. Saying that, the blog posts in the weeks to come will explain my projects you can find in the website.

This week, I would like to introduce the project “Hidden Souls”. In this series, the main subject is always the human presence, even though no human being is ever physically in the image. One of the characteristics of street photography is the use of people, as we tend to find attractive viewing what others do and how they behave. However, in this project, I didn’t want to have a person, but objects and places full of humanity left behind by us. We leave a very deep and wide trace in our environment, more than any other living creature in the planet, without even noticing.

My intention with these photographs is to invite the viewer to think about what we are missing every day because we are too busy to pay attention to our surroundings, abandoning our presence in form of daily objects, full of solitude and sadness, shouting silently in despair while waiting for us to look back at them, so they won’t be alone any more. Somehow, I believe these feelings are very common in our society nowadays, and I wish you can relate while viewing this project.

“The work of a photographer is to reveal hidden things” – Matt Black
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

First Name Last Name Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In the previous post, Project “My Europe”, I introduced a long term project about Street Photography in European Union countries, including 10 different countries I travelled across in June 2017. Well, as many fellow photographers may agree, sometimes a photographer goes somewhere on assignment and the creative bulb turns on and there is another project willing to come alive. That’s the case of the project “Eros”, the Greek word for “Love”.

Amor

This series was born in my head thanks to the photograph above about a couple walking in front of me holding hands while I was in Madrid, Spain. At first, I thought about including it into the “Spain”  part of the “My Europe” project, however, as I looked at the image deeply, I came to understand there was something else in it and that it had to go on an individual series. And that “something else” was the simple love gesture we all recognise worldwide: holding hands.

It was that symbol of love and care the one which stroke me to take the shot, not the couple itself nor the individuals. The idea was starting to form in my mind and I decided to look for that loving sign everywhere I went, to show and share the love, no matter the country or culture.

Milovat'

Once again, my technique here is very simple, as I always look to shoot for what called me to the scene first. In this case, I focused on the hands from a rear view, as closed as I could get. Not only I looked for couples no matter the gender but also for parents with their children, as holding hands with kids has the meaning I wanted to share. In post-processing, I chose to have the whole series in black and white, so colours will not distract viewers from the main subject. Each image is titled with the word “love” in the language of the country where the photograph was taken, emphasising its worldwide meaning.

In an even more isolated society, where we prefer to interact online than face-to-face with real people, this gesture takes a lot of relevancy and my goal is to shout out for meaningful relationships, without making a difference between culture, religion, genre and language, as love is Universal.

“In my search for photographs, I have come to realize that the best pictures are surprises, images I subconsciously seek but do not recognize until they suddenly appear” – Constantine Manos
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

First Name Last Name Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Storytelling is an essential feature in photography. We shoot to tell something and share it into the world. An image can be powerful on its own, but it also needs a background for the viewer to understand the image and put it into the context the photographer wants. Sometimes this task is very easy, when documenting conflicts, however most of the time we have to “write” the story we see in it. I like Street Photography because it allows me to imagine what the subjects I am photographing were, are or will be doing, who they are and what kind of story they may have behind and upfront in the future. I think this behaviour is innate to human nature; we want to see what others do and create situations and feelings into the subjects we view.

All of that is what comes to my mind when I photograph people in the streets like the image above. An old couple, spending their day at the beach covered by the shadows of their umbrella, the gentleman in the scene touching his wife’s back in a sign of love, trust and care. Seeing such a meaningful scene made me wonder about their youth, and if they ever thought they will still love each other at an older age. I imagined them when they met, probably during the Spanish Dictatorship in the 60’s. At that time, beginning a relationship was a lot different from nowadays. It wasn’t even allowed to hold hands in public if the couple wasn’t married. I think of them, young and in love, raising their children and growing old together. Time passing by; but their love for each other remaining intact.

That subtle gesture, so simple and yet so powerful, made me wonder how my generation sees and feels love and if we will ever be able to build such a strong relationship to last for years. In the world we are living in, where we are emotionally disconnected from each other despite being “connected” 24/7, this image gives me hope and a reason to follow their steps.

 

This is a short story I wrote for a contest submission. It’s a great exercise to do as a photographer and artist, diving deeply into what the photographs alone mean and the impact they can have on someone. I am not a writer, but I believe in the importance of putting thoughts into words to remember them and developing other sides of the creative process.

“Photography helps people to see” – Berenice Abbott
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

First Name Last Name Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I know there are many articles and blog posts about what Street Photography is in a general sense, however I would like not only to highlight its original meaning in the history of photography and its practice, but also what it actually means to me personally and how it helps me to understand and view the world around me.

Marseille

There are many definitions of the term “street photography” and some of you may agree with one or another. Personally, I like and definitely agree with the one given by the great street photographer David Gibson, which you can find in an interview to the online magazine Amateur Photographer here. For David Gibson, “the term “street photography” can be applied to any photographs taken in a public space, with or without the inclusion of people, which are entirely natural, and not set up”. In my opinion, this is the classical definition of it, the one followed by the greatest photographers of the XX century like Henri Cartier-Bresson, Louis Faurer or Robert Frank, among others. I pursue this way of looking at street photography in my work and projects: Hidden Souls, Lost in Translation, Homeland, Eros and My Europe.

Furthermore, I consider street photography one of the most complete areas of photography, as it can involve and cross many other types as far as it remains true to its spontaneous nature: documentary, fine art, travel, minimal, black and white, night and portrait. Like David Gibson says: “for me, not setting up images really is the crucial thing. I’m a bit of a purist in that sense. I get a bit agitated when I suspect a photographer has set something up. I think it’s cheating. I like to think that the people who do it get found out”. Street photography is so versatile that the whole work of a street photographer can be very wide and diverse, but let’s not forget a street photography project on its own has to be consistent, while the overall gallery can include all these other elements. For example, I merged documentary, travel and black and white into “My Europe” project; minimalism and abstract in “Lost in Translation” and conceptual fine art in “Hidden Souls”. Street photography allows creativity to expand in many ways, exploring the streets with a different eye and mind every time.

“Photograph what is closest to you and the things you enjoy and have an interest in. Make the whole process as fun and as least difficult as possible” – Trent Parke
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

First Name Last Name Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Keeping up with the same subject I opened on my last blog post Project “Hidden Souls”, I would like to continue explaining the actual projects you can find in this site. This week, it’s time for the Lost in Translation project Statement. Ready?

In this project, my main goal is to experiment and discover minimalism in Street Photography, using abstraction techniques like negative spaces, black and white images and deep lights and shadows. I would say this is the more technical project I have done so far in terms of composition. You will find strong lines and colours, following the well-known rules of composition every photographer and artist learn about.

We tend to see the world around us as a whole, everything being linked and connected magically. Following this idea, my goal here was to isolate objects, nature and situations from their environment, putting them in the spotlight on their own, without anything interrupting the public from the main character. The reason I chose the title “Lost in Translation” is because I think thanks to the isolation of the object, its context disappears, floating in the void, lost forever.

“Dig in, follow your instincts and trust your curiosity” – Susan Meiselas
Subscribe

Sign up with your email address to receive news and updates.

First Name Last Name Email Address Sign Up

We respect your privacy.

Thank you!

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview