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Food for Agile Thought’s issue #197—shared with 22,468 peers—delves into agile decision making when there is no apparent right answer; we are inspired by a saboteur’s manual to check our projects for similar indications and we go back to a classic on agility from 1972. (Yes, there is life before the Manifesto.)

We also learn about the opportunities that a recent pre-packaged management fad bears for UX folks; we check a flowchart on product prioritization, and we get a better understanding on what companies believe product managers do all day.

Lastly, we applaud Marty Cagan on yet another encouraging video on the challenges product menschen face every.

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #196?

The Essential Read Marty Cagan (via Mind The Product): Product is Hard

Marty Cagan reflects on why Agile and Lean won’t solve all your problems and to how to get your product right anyway.

Agile Decision Making & Scrum Roman Imankulov (via Doist): Principles for Decision-Making in a Flat Organization

Roman Imankulov shares his experience on agile decision making: How to decide with a group of people when there is no obvious right answer.

We don’t try to reach consensus […] as an end in itself. We use consensus-building as a tool to get to the best technical (and sometimes procedural) outcome when we make decisions.

Kai Gilb: The Happy Project Saboteur

Kai Gilb provides an intuitive list of means, approaches, and mental models on how to kill any project.

(via Harvard Business Review): Evolution and Revolution as Organizations Grow

Another proof that ‘Agile’ is not a new concept—see phase 5—without even mentioning the term: an article by Larry E. Greiner from 1972, republished in 1998 as a ‘classic.’

Training, Workshops, and Events

Date Class and Language City Price
Sep 03–04, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; English) Hamburg €1,499 incl. VAT
Sep 17–18, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; Englisch) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Oct 08–09, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; German) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Oct 15–16, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; German) Hamburg €1,499 incl. VAT
Oct 29-30, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; English) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Nov 04–05, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; German) Leipzig €1,499 incl. VAT
Nov 12–13, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; German) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Nov 19–20, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; English) Hamburg €1,499 incl. VAT
Nov 27–28, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; English) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Dec 03-04, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; German) Hamburg €1,499 incl. VAT
Dec 10-11, 2019 PSM I Training (German) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Dec 17-18, 2019 PSM I Training (English) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT

You can book your seat for the training directly by following the corresponding links to the ticket shop. If the procurement process of your organization requires a different purchasing process, please contact Berlin Product People GmbH directly.

Product & Lean Jared Spool (via Medium): Customer Centricity — The Management Fad We Can Hop On

Jared Spool believes that customer centricity opens the door for UX leaders to promote and spread critical UX strategies.

Christine Itwaru (via ProductCraft): Flowchart: Should We Build This Feature?

Christine Itwaru created a decision support model to help with answering the old question: shall we build it?

Hiten Shah (via Product Habits): How 51 leading tech teams define the Product Manager role

Product Habits analyzed 51 job postings from tech companies in Silicon Valley for what tasks companies are hiring product managers.

Join 1,450-plus Agile Peers on Youtube

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Do Not Miss Out and Learn about Agile Decision Making: Join the 5,550-plus Strong ‘Hands-on Agile’ Slack Community

I invite you to join the “Hands-on Agile” Slack Community and enjoy the benefits of a fast-growing, vibrant community of agile practitioners from around the world.

If you like to join all you have to do now is provide your credentials via this Google form, and I will sign you up. By the way, it’s free.

Last Week’s Food for Agile Thought Edition

Read more: Food for Agile Thought #196: Internet Trends 2019, Agile Coach Types, Alignment & Shared Understanding, Roadmap Agility Checklist.

The post Food for Agile Thought #197: Agile Decision Making, Project Sabotage, Agile in 1972, Customer Centricity Fad appeared first on Age of Product.

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Food for Agile Thought’s issue #196—shared with 22,452 peers—discovers seven agile coach types; we learn about the difference between ‘Agile Transformation’ and ‘agile transformation’ by following Avanza’s success story. Moreover, we warm up to the idea that there might be an alternative to stable teams in the age of self-selection.

We also learn about the confluence of lean, agile, and Design Thinking; we get our hands on a checklist for the state of agility of the product roadmap, and we are tempted to follow the idea that nobody owns anything in a product made by a team. Or not?

Lastly, we applaud Mary Meeker for releasing another edition of her epic Internet Trends report. For free.

Did you miss last week’s Food for Agile Thought’s issue #195?

The Essential Read Mary Meeker (via Bond): Internet Trends 2019

Mary Meeker released the 333 pages-strong 2019 edition of the Internet Trends report. Download it for free.

Source: Bond: Internet Trends 2019

Author: Mary Meeker

Agile Coach Types & Scrum Els Verkaik: 7 types of Agile Coaches

Els Verkaik categorizes agile coach types by looking at the coach’s preferred behavior. Check whether you’re a Viking or an Evangelist.

Viktor Cessan: agile transformation at Avanza: a case study

Viktor Cessan released an ebook on how he helped Avanza— Sweden’s largest stockbroker and brokerage firm—take on the challenge of agile transformation.

Julien Lavigne du Ca (via InfoQ): Continuous Reteaming: Adopt Self-selection and Start Moving People to the Work!

Julien Lavigne du Cadet discusses how he initially led a team of ~20 people from a static structure to something a lot more dynamic where reteaming happens quarterly.

Training, Workshops, and Events

Date Class and Language City Price
Jul 23-Jul 24, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; English) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Aug 13-Aug 14, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; German) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Sep 03-Sep 04, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; English) Hamburg €1,499 incl. VAT
Sep 17-Sep 18, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; English) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Oct 08-Oct 09, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; German) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT
Oct 15-Oct 16, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; German) Hamburg €1,499 incl. VAT
Oct 29-Oct 30, 2019 Professional Scrum Master Training (PSM I; English) Berlin €1,499 incl. VAT

You can book your seat for the training directly by following the corresponding links to the ticket shop. If the procurement process of your organization requires a different purchasing process, please contact Berlin Product People GmbH directly.

Product & Lean Jeff Gothelf (via Mind The Product): Lean, Agile, & Design Thinking Jonas Downey (via Signal vs. Noise by Basecamp): Nobody really owns product work Mattias Skarin (via Crisp): The Product Roadmap Agility Checklist

Source: Crisp: The Product Roadmap Agility Checklist

Author: Mattias Skarin

Berlin, 2019-07-06: Liberating Structures 4 Scrum

Join us for an exciting day of practicing Liberating Structures for Scrum in Berlin, on July 6th, 2019. We will be exploring several microstructures, weave them into strings and apply those to Scrum events like the Daily Scrum, the Sprint Review, or the Sprint Retrospective. The workshop language will be English.

Image from amazonaws.com

The workshop is well suited for beginners of Liberating Structures if you already have a basic understanding of Scrum roles, events, and artifacts. (However, I would not recommend the workshop to those who are unfamiliar with both Scrum and Liberating Structures.)

The workshop fee includes lunch and beverages. The regular ticket is € 89 incl. 19% VAT. There is a limited number of Early Bird tickets available at € 69 incl. 19% VAT. Lastly, if you are a regular attendee of the Hands-on Agile meetups, you might be eligible for a discount of up to € 30. (Get your loyalty card at the next Hands-on Agile meetup on June 13th, 2019.)

Get your ticket: Liberating Structures 4 Scrum — From Daily Scrum to Sprint Review (Berlin, July 6th, 2019.)

Join 1,450-plus Agile Peers on Youtube

Now available on the Age-of-Product Youtube channel:

Do Not Miss Out and Learn about Agile Coach Types: Join the 5,450-plus Strong ‘Hands-on Agile’ Slack Community

I invite you to join the “Hands-on Agile” Slack Community and enjoy the benefits of a fast-growing, vibrant community of agile practitioners from around the world.

If you like to join all you have to do now is provide your credentials via this Google form, and I will sign you up. By the way, it’s free.

Last Week’s Food for Agile Thought Edition

Read more: Food for Agile Thought #195: Amazon Agility, DevOps Phenomenon, Empowered Product Teams, Fear and Sandboxes.

The post Food for Agile Thought #196: Internet Trends 2019, Agile Coach Types, Alignment & Shared Understanding, Roadmap Agility Checklist appeared first on Age of Product.

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TL;DR: Scrum Master Problem Dealing — The Survey Results

Scrum Master Problem Dealing: We all know it; changing the way we work is extremely difficult. It requires us to find novel solutions to wicked challenges, to deal with cultural baggage (‘the way we do things here’) and to bring along the people needed to make a change successful. And yet, this difficult challenge is a core responsibility of Scrum Masters: How can your organization work effectively with Scrum if it is not considering the entire system?

But how do Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches go about this? What strategies do they use to change the system? Who are their most important allies? And what else can we learn from them?

We teamed up with The Liberators to identify what works in the field. We gathered both quantitative as well as qualitative data from a survey completed by over 200 participants.

Scrum Master Problem Dealing: Key Findings

We managed to obtain responses from 201 Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches from organizations of varying sizes, varying levels of Agility and varying industries. These are our key findings:

  • The most common successful strategies involved bringing people together to solve problems. Although it may sound obvious, it underscores how important it is to build networks and groups of people that can drive change together — you can’t do that on your own;
  • The use of politics — building coalitions, using existing power structures and finding sponsors — is considered a successful strategy in organizations that score low on Agility, regardless of their size;
  • As organizations become more agile, politics make way for the use of metrics, bringing people together and using facts and arguments to persuade and drive change;
  • Team members, management and stakeholders, are considered the most useful allies by participants. Surprisingly, and contrary to what we expected, other Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches are far less likely to be considered allies. External consults are rarely considered to be useful allies and/or worth building relationships with.

Agile Transition – A Manual from the Trenches

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About The Survey

Our sample consisted of 119 Scrum Masters and 82 Agile Coaches. On average, participants indicated a 4.4-year experience in their role and over 15 years in their industry in general.

The survey managed to attract responses from a wide variety of organizations, of varying sizes (92 large, 86 medium and 32 small), from various sectors (153 IT-oriented, 48 non-IT).

On a scale from 1 to 10, the average self-categorized level of Agility of the companies was about halfway (4.8). We used an online survey — Google Forms — to invite these participants to share with us the strategies that worked for them. Please note that the choice of the survey software may have influenced the outcome as not all organizations authorize the access of Google applications from company networks.

Scrum Master Problem Dealing: Most Common Strategies

We invited participants to categorize their successful strategies according to a predetermined set, while also adding a more detailed description afterward. Ranked from most to least frequent, we found the following:

Strategy / Solution Used By (%)
Brought people together to solve the problem 82.1%
Educated people 52.2%
Used measures/metrics to make the effects of the problem visible 47.8%
Used arguments and facts to persuade 42.8%
Changed the structure or process 32.8%
We used politics (e.g. finding allies, forming coalitions, pressure) 22.4%
We brought in experts 18.9%
We used technology / software 12.9%

Most common allies according to participants of our surve.y (N=201)

It is clear that the most effective strategy for our participants is to bring people together to solve the problem. Over 82% reported an approach in this category. Although it may sound obvious, it underscores how important it is to build networks and groups of people that can drive change together — you can’t do that on your own.

The most effective strategy for our participants is to bring people together to solve the problem

Involving leadership is particularly relevant here, as mentioned by many participants in this category. Several participants reported success by bringing together members from the leadership level in ‘transition teams’ or ‘Agile Working Groups’ that resolved organizational impediments beyond the control of individual Scrum Teams. One participant shared how this team used an ‘Impediment Backlog’ populated by the teams, effectively turning them into the stakeholders of these transition teams.

Other successful strategies are education (52%), the use of metrics/measures to make visible the impact of impediments (48%) and the use of facts and arguments to persuade (43%). One participant provided an excellent example of these strategies as “visualizing, showing where the impediments affect the whole system’s flow and then working with all of the stakeholders to come up with a solution.”

Another good example of these strategies was described as “articulating a Deficit of Done, which shows the impact of the external problem (e.g. an impediment or dependency) on the team’s ability to create increments of production quality.”

Interestingly, the use of technology or software, the use of (external) experts and politics were not considered as successful, or at least not often used successfully.

“We created an ‘Agile Working Group’ containing a small number of 1st/2nd tier leaders who were passionate about growing agility. This group (5 members) focus on either directly assisting to remove the impediments or taking it to senior leaders.”
Scrum Master Problem Dealing: Most Useful Allies

We can’t change the environment of Scrum Teams on our own. We need help from allies that can create space for new ways of working, for people to break through traditions and habits — technological, procedural or political. We invited participants to select their most useful allies from a provided set of options:

Most Useful Allies (%)
Team Members 34.8%
Sponsors (C-level or senior management) 24.4%
Business stakeholders 12.4%
Other Scrum Masters or coaches 9.0%
Line Managers 8.0%
Engineering Managers 7.5%
External consultants 2.0%
Owner/founder 2.0%

Most common allies according to participants of our survey. (N=201)

Team members are by and large the most important ally of Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches in changing the environment of Scrum Teams, as reported by over a third of our participants (35%). One participant described this as moving “the conversation and authority to where the information is. Those who have the most intimate understanding of the issue, often also have the most effective suggestions for durable solutions.”

After team members, the most important allies are sponsors in leadership positions (25%) and business stakeholders (13%). One interesting finding is that only 9% of participants consider their colleagues (Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches) to be allies. We would’ve expected this to be higher.

A very small number of participants (2%) considered external consultants to be useful allies

Furthermore, a very small number of participants (2%) considered external consultants to be useful allies. As most organizations employ external consultants of one kind or another, it would be interesting to explore why. But the survey doesn’t provide us with data to do this. Perhaps consultants don’t frequently work with Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches enough. Moreover, given the temporary nature of their engagement, they might not be considered a good investment when seeking long-term allies.

When all is said and done, finding the right allies can be a challenging task, especially in larger organizations. One participant described this as “going into the jungle” and explains a strategy of asking “Who knows the most about X?” to move up or around the organizational hierarchy to find key allies.

Scrum Master Problem Dealing: Differences between Organisations

We also employed more advanced statistical magic to explore if the use of strategies and allies depended on factors such as experience and/or the size and agility of organizations.

We found that politics is used more frequently to enact change in less Agile organizations. As agility increases, so does the use of facts and arguments to persuade to drive further change. This seems to fit with the empirical process that underlies Agility; gather data to validate assumptions and make decisions based on what you learn. But to change organizations towards such a mindset, politics may be necessary initially. An interesting additional observation is that more Agile organizations tend to bring people together more frequently to drive change.

We found that politics is used more frequently to enact change in less Agile organizations. As agility increases, so does the use of facts and arguments to persuade and drive further change.

We also found that as people become more experienced in their role, they increasingly rely on the use of metrics to enable change. They also focus more on educating others. The survey doesn’t tell us what ‘educating’ looks like, but one can certainly hope that the use of metrics is an important strategy to educate others.

The size of the company did not significantly influence the use of strategies or allies.

So What Does this Mean?

In the end, the results from our survey bring us back to the principal question of any transformation: what pattern is driving change successfully? Do we need a visionary leader believing that Agile is the right way to go, initiating a top-down change initiative? Or do we need to foster a bottom-up approach from the trenches until it delivers data that proves Agile’s usefulness before the organization embraces it fully? Or shall we engage in the agile pincer movement that combines both approaches — top-down as well as bottom-up — to bypass potential incumbents of the middle management and make change happen?

The results from our survey suggest that participants feel that ‘engaging in politics’ is a helpful strategy during the early stages of agility. But as agility increases, so does the reliance on metrics and shared sense-making to create an increasingly Agile-friendly culture. This supports the pragmatism of the Agile pincer movement as a means of change, where bottom-up change is empowered by top-down support. Our results also show how critical the support of management and leadership is in any change initiative to become an agile organization.

The results from our survey suggest that participants feel that ‘engaging in politics’ is a helpful strategy during the early stages of agility. But as agility increases, so does the reliance on metrics and shared sense-making to create an increasingly Agile-friendly culture.

The purpose of our survey was to explore what strategies Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches use to help organizations work more effectively with Scrum. We used broad strokes, both in the questions and the analysis, to identify interesting patterns. We’d love to explore these further. What kind of politics are used? What kind of metrics are used? How are people finding allies? When and why does the shift from politics to data occur? We hope to answer these questions in future research.

Conclusion: Scrum Master Problem Dealing — Future Research

In the future, we would love:

  • Exploring cultural differences in the use of strategies;
  • Exploring why it is that Scrum Masters don’t consider other Scrum Masters and/or Agile Coaches as important allies;
  • Delving more deeply into what kind of internal politics work. The use of politics often has a bad smell associated with it. But many kinds of politics, like the building of coalitions, finding allies and building connections, are vital to change efforts.

How do you solve problems outside of your control, how do you approach impediments within your organization successfully? Please share with us in the comments.

All illustrations are by Thea Schukken.

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Scrum Master Problem Dealing — Related Content

Liberating Structures for Scrum (1): The Sprint Retrospective.

The Scrum Guide Reordered

The post Survey Results: Scrum Master Problem Dealing appeared first on Age of Product.

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TL;DR: Liberating Structures 4 Scrum Workshop

Join us for an exciting Liberating Structures Scrum workshop on July 6th, 2019 in Berlin. We will be exploring several microstructures, weave them into strings and apply those to Scrum events like the Daily Scrum, the Sprint Review, or the Sprint Retrospective. The workshop language will be English.

The Liberating Structures 4 Scrum workshop will take place at the Alte Kantine Wedding on Saturday, July 6th, 2019, from 9 am to 5 pm.

Liberating Structures for Scrum

Created by Keith McCandless and Henri Lipmanowicz, Liberating Structures cover a set of easy to learn, yet powerful ways to collaborate as a team—even as a (very) large team by Scrum standards—, overcoming traditional communications approaches like presentations, managed discussions, or another disorganized brainstorming at which the loudest participants tend to prevail.

Liberating Structures are well suited to improve the level of engagement among participants of Scrum events, thus stimulating the kind of outcomes that are necessary to create learning organizations. Liberating Structures also provide an excellent toolbox to handle Product Backlog refinements or improving the Definition of Done of an engineering organization.

Lastly, Liberating Structures are my tool of choice when large groups of participants come together for retrospectives, self-selection of teams, or figuring out where to go next.

The LS 4 Scrum Workshop

The workshop is well suited for beginners of Liberating Structures if you already have a basic understanding of Scrum roles, events, and artifacts. (However, I would not recommend the workshop to those who are unfamiliar with both Scrum and Liberating Structures.)

If you like to get a first impression on what we will be working, check out Hands-on Agile Meetup group or the articles on Age-of-Product.com related to Liberating Structures for Scrum.

The workshop fee includes lunch and beverages.

If you are a regular attendee of the Hands-on Agile meetups, you might be eligible for a discount of up to € 30. (Get your loyalty card at the next Hands-on Agile meetup on June 13th, 2019.)

Miscellaneous Issues

Attendees can return tickets for reimbursement until Friday, June 21st, 2019 until 6 pm CEST.

With attending the Liberating Structures 4 Scrum Workshop on July 6th, 2019, you also agree that the workshop provider might use any photo or video taken during the workshop for community or commercial purposes.

Liberating Structures 4 Scrum Workshop — Related Content

Liberating Structures for Scrum (1): The Sprint Retrospective.

The post Liberating Structures 4 Scrum Workshop — From Daily Scrum to Sprint Review. appeared first on Age of Product.

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Welcome to the Scrum Guide Reordered Download Page

The Scrum Guide Reordered Download is based on about 90 percent of the text of the 2017 Scrum Guide, extending its original structure by adding additional categories.

For example, you will find all quotes that can be attributed to the role of the Scrum Master in one place. While the Scrum Guide is mainly focused on the three roles, five events, and three artifacts, I aggregated quotes on specific topics as well, for example, on self-organization, finance or technical debt.

The Background of the Scrum Guide Reordered

The Scrum Guide Reordered resulted from my preparation to pass Scrum.org’s Professional Scrum Master III certification.

While the Scrum Guide Reordered Download does not answer all questions you might have immediately, I found it very helpful to identify the patterns and principles used throughout the Scrum Guide. Moreover, it is a great tool to start meaningful discussions with your peers. If you like to give it a try, I recommend, for example, the issue of technical debt and Scrum.

But see for yourself by downloading your copy of the Scrum Guide Reordered:


The Scrum Guide—Reordered

Download the free Scrum Guide—Reordered which allows you to get a first understanding of Scrum-related questions quickly.

While it does not answer all questions you might have immediately, you will find it very helpful to identify the patterns and principles used throughout the Scrum Guide. Moreover, it is a great tool to start meaningful discussions with your peers.

By filling out this form, you explicitly consent to three things:

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The Scrum Guide Reordered Download — Related Posts

Hiring: 38 Scrum Master Interview Questions To Avoid Agile Imposters

Download the ’Scrum Anti-Patterns Guide’ for Free

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