Loading...

Follow ADDadultstrategies on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

There are many different ways to look at ADHD:

Some people deny that it exists. The fact that they have no idea what they are talking about does not deter them.

Some people say it is an executive dysfunction problem. I think that is one part of ADHD.

Some focus on the neurotransmitters (norepinephrine, dopamine), some on structure (basal ganglia, cerebellum), and some on networks (connecting amygdala, hippocampus, frontal cortex, cerebellum). I think it is all of these.

Some see it as a disease or disorder. Some see it as a variation of normal. Others see it as a gift. I am not one of those. I see it as a difference which, since it causes so many problems, is a disorder. I also believe there is an abrupt significant difference between us ADHDers and the vanillas, not just a gradual change on a curve.

Dr. William Dodson, an expert on ADHD who I highly respect, has a different view from mine, regarding the basic symptoms and dysfunctions:

“three defining features of ADHD emerge that explain every aspect of the condition:
1. an interest-based nervous system
2. emotional 
hyperarousal
3. 
rejection sensitivity”

from dr dodson  on the three main features of ADHD

More good Dr. Dodson links

I see ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder, highly genetic, present from conception, with differences in the networks, structures, and neurotransmitters. To me, the main issue is lack of control of focus, and that our “focus center” is not turned on in the same way as the vanillas. This basic feature causes a number of problems, which themselves cause other problems or symptoms, such as rejection sensitivity due to shame and low self-esteem, for example, which is caused by our frequent screwing up and the resulting criticism from others and from ourselves.

doug

@addstrategies  #adhd  #add  @dougmkpdp

Sometimes it drives me up the wall. Or beyond.

What is it really, ADHD?

You think what about ADHD?

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Can A Month Matter in ADHD?

The research show that kids who are born in August have higher rates of ADHD than those born in September.
The strong implication is that starting school when you’re younger makes you susceptible to a diagnosis of ADHD. This makes sense, because you will be more immature than your classmates. Does your immature behavior cause you to get diagnosed with ADHD, or, do the social and intellectual difficulties you’re having cause you to behave in such a way that you get the diagnosis?  In either case, wouldn’t this likely be a misdiagnosis.
It is too easy to jump to conclusions. Maybe kids born in August have had higher exposure to certain viruses, or perhaps mothers pregnant in December had more or different infections? Or maybe there’s some other correlation?
But the implication of the effect of immaturity is probably valid. So I wonder how many of these kids were misdiagnosed because of their immaturity and did not actually have ADHD?  The study ended when the kids were between six and eight years old, so they might have outgrown their ADHD diagnosis.

I suspect that a good diagnostic evaluation would have differentiated those with true ADHD from those who were just immature and not behaving or performing appropriately.

I was always the youngest, or second youngest in my class. Before the fourth grade, I was average and nondescript. I clearly had symptoms of ADHD starting in the fourth grade., but not obviously before. That seems a little strange. After that I did well scholastically, and poorly behaviorally, no longer average nor nondescript. Til college, when I hit the brick wall scholastically.

Were you the youngest?

doug

Multiple Bonus Links:

 @addstrategies  #adhd  #add  @dougmkpdp

Children with ADHD tend to have problems in school. Duh.

Did your ADHD show early?

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

ADHD Medication Side Effects

I didn’t get much sleep tonight. Took a long time to realize I still had my Daytrana patch on.

One of the two side effects of the patch is that if I don’t take it off early enough I’ll have trouble sleeping. I’ve been working on this problem.

I’ve been using the strategy of setting my iPhone alarm for 5:10. Unfortunately, this hasn’t worked very well. When the alarm rings, instead of thinking, “Oh,  I have to take my patch off.“ I think “Oh, I have to turn the alarm off.“

But I improved the strategy. I set the alarm now for 5:10 and also for 5:15. Now when the 5:10 goe off, I’m somehow that the 5:15 is coming and that I need to take off the patch. That’s working.

Usually.

The Point: If you can identify that something is a problem, you can come up with a strategy.  If your first strategy doesn’t work, you can come up with another one.  Your life can be better.

Related Note:  The second side effect of the Daytrana patch is red welt where it was when you take it off.  Goes away in a day or two, doesn’t hurt, itch or burn, no problem.

doug

@addstrategies  #adhd  #add  @dougmkpdp

As I was saying -. What was I saying?

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Bee Gee Diagnosed at 68! Wow! I feel I’d love to talk to this person… being 51 and eagerly awaiting diagnosis it occurs to me that perhaps there are a few positives with late diagnosis. Sure we have all heard about the grief over lost opportunity “what I could have been if someone had recognised this in me”.. but a distinct positive has started to crystallise for me…. perhaps not being diagnosed meant that we clumsily found our own expert solutions to help us navigate the world without having the label of ‘broken’… two and a half weeks ago I read something about adult ADHD in women… I’ve been reading ever since… talking to people and learning so much about myself… I felt at first elated, then broken, then confused over recent weeks. … so ‘broken’ is part of being self identified as ADHD.. and I imagine is a big part of it for many people… so perhaps those of us who are diagnosed late in life have a special role in communicating how it feels to be an ADHD person… because we now have the comparison of “what I thought I was” vs “what I have realised I am like”… and perhaps with that experiential distinction as an adult we are better equipped to point to strengths and solutions rather than labels and deficits …    
Doug Puryear bee gee – you have many good points here. we do need to grieve the lost possibilities, but not spend much time or energy on it. I don’t think it as broken, but different in a way that makes life harder. and yes, I had many strategies before I ever knew I had ADHD or that they were strategies. and I think getting the right diagnosis, even if its ‘at last’ is a great thing.
Bee Gee For me it has meant that I have a reason..when I do those little things which I know are rude.. drifting off, interrupting etc. a few years back when I thought my cognitive difficulties were due to inflammation from auto immune stuff I turned up to have my hearing tested. I had made the appointment that morning and had been given the address and directions over the phone. The address was in a street I know very well in a suburb I have lived in for most of my life. when I arrived there was no record of the appointment. There was discussion about ringing and booking so she phoned her bookings person and they said they hadn’t spoken to me or booked me in. I was feeling really like I was in the twilight zone.She asked to see my referral.. the referral was for a different place … when I was given instructions about where the place was my mind leapt to ‘know already, don’t need to listen’ and told me that it was the place my dad went to to get his hearing aid… it wasn’t. Silly me. Anyway those mind thwarting moments of being sure but being wrong which I had gotten used to continued and always seemed worse when having an RA flare. it is only since a friend told me she had just been diagnosed with adult ADHD and she explained how it is often missed in girls and why that I started to really go through my life and look at it through this lens. I recognised so much of myself. Every new bit of information seemed to colour in the detail of my vague life. I’ve now realised that what happened was I built some very successful skills to mask and deal with the ADHD but when I got sick those tricks and work around started to fail. I know this because these same little things used to happen a lot when I was little and right up until my teens… but I guess I just thought I was really misunderstood and/or teachers, parents, other kids were just being mean.
Doug Puryear bee gee. that sounds just right. would it be ok with you if I posted these comments on the ADHD blog? they would be good.
Bee Gee  sure

An Autobiography: Life with ADHD.

Thanks, Bee Gee. doug    @thebullyonline #bully #bullying #thebullyonline Quote O the Day: “Where is my phone?
Oh, there it is. Thank you, honey.
Now, where is my wallet?
Ah, I found it!
Now, where’s my phone?”
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Isn’t technology wonderful?

If you have recently subscribed to this ADHD blog, you are most welcome here. I hope you will find it useful and enjoyable. And I hope you will make comments. I love the comments.

But:
I’m no longer sending individual welcoming messages, because I’ve suddenly been flooded with new subscriptions. At first, I was delighted, but I quickly realized that they were fake. Spam.

Question O the Day number one:

What in the hell is going on?

The links below give some information, but I don’t totally understand them.  That’s nothing new.

Apparently, this has been happening for some years. I was totally unaware. (I recently wrote a pretty good song- “We’re over the hill, out of the loop, and our warranty has expired.”)

Strategy:

Don’t believe everything you read. Especially these days, when lying has become routine, facts no longer matter, and half the posts on Facebook are from the Russians.

Question O the Day number two:

What are they getting out of this?

Question O the Day number three:

Do you think having ADHD makes us more naïve, gullible, vulnerable, and susceptible to scams?

Quote O the Day:
Trust everyone and always shuffle the deck.

Links:

Spam     from Margret

Spam sign-ups

@addstrategies  #adhd  #add  @dougmkpdp

What?

I do not appreciate it

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I wish you each a very Merry Christmas, happy Hanukkah, and whatever else you may wish to celebrate, and a very blessed, joyous, productive, low stress new year.

People ask me, “Are you ready for Christmas?”  I always reply, “I am never ready for Christmas.”

But actually, I am ready this year. No more shopping on December 24.

I suggest next year you buy your Christmas presents in November.

And that when you unwrap your presents, carefully keep notes of who sent what so you can thank them, and also so that you may return the things you want to return.

And try to use moderation in your eating and drinking. I have noticed that moderation in my drinking is essential to keeping moderation in my eating.

I am hoping to keep my weight gain to 6 pounds. I can lose 6 pounds in two months. I can gain 6 pounds in one evening.

Thank you for your support this year and keep the comments coming.

Best wishes

Doug

Bonus Link for Christmas

Procrastination

Santa’s addicted. too.

@addstrategies  #adhd  #add  @dougmkpdp
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

With ADHD comes a lot of challenges – geographical, legibility , technology,—.

I had an iPhone 6. The screen was cracked, but I was used to that. Charging was slow and it didn’t hold a charge well, especially with my music, although the readout said the battery was 85% healthy.

I indulged myself and got a new 8. I soon had a problem. It wouldn’t ring when someone called me and wouldn’t give the swoosh sound when I sent a message.

I spent a long time last night trying to fix this. I googled the problem and found some solutions. I made adjustments in notifications  and in sounds and in the mail folder. I finally got it to vibrate.

That was not good enough, so I called Verizon tech today. The gentleman spent a lot of time patiently going through all the different settings with me. The result of this was that it not only didn’t ring or swoosh, it also no longer vibrated. No indication that I was getting a call or sending an email.

I was either going to have to follow his suggestion and call back and get a higher ranked tech, or was going to have to drive to the Verizon store and try to find an associate who could fix it for me. Either seemed a time-consuming hassle.

There is a sound control switch on the side of the phone. It silences the ringers and other sounds and you just get vibration as a signal. This is good for when you’re in church or at the movies, for example. You push it down to silence the phone and there is a little orange patch that shows you it’s on silent. You push it up to get the sound back on when you leave the church or the movies, if you can remember to.

In my spare time, I googled again, putting in a different phrase.

Well, turns out, that’s the way it was on the 6. On the 8, just the opposite. And no color indicator of which setting it’s in. I had it turned off.

Wish I had found that out sooner. Anyway, it’s working now.

And that, folks, is life with ADHD and technological challenge.

Doug

PS: The volume buttons on the 8 are hard to use. And it has no jack for headphones. You have to buy a separate attachment for headphones, and then you can’t charge it and use headphones at the same time. That’s what I used to do while driving when I had my 6.  But it charges fast and holds a charge longer. There is no other benefit I’ve found yet. Well, the screen is not cracked, yet.

yes, that’s right, ADHD.

@addstrategies  #adhd  #add  @dougmkpdp
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
This ADHD post is too long. As you’ll see, that’s kind of the point. We flew from Santa Fe to Dallas to visit our new foster great-grandchild. Yay! But: Checking in, I left one of our bags at the security checkpoint. We nearly left without it except I thought maybe I heard my name called.  But when I went over, they were calling  “ Burger. Burger,” so I told them the bag wasn’t ours. They couldn’t read my printing on the tag. It was Puryear, not Burger. But we got the bag. The flight was OK. We got turned around in the Dallas airport and couldn’t find baggage claim. By the time we got there, all the passengers and bags were gone. Then I saw our bag sitting in the airline office. I went in and said, “This is ours,“ and walked off with it. No questions, no ID. Nothing. Then we had a long cold walk with our bags, outside the building, to the pick up area for the rental car shuttle.  Then we waited. Then the shuttle took us on a very long ride to the office. No problems there. We had a  very very very long ride to get out of the airport, which is huge. Then a long slow drive target to our granddaughter’s house, partly because it was raining.  Bumper to bumper. Slow. Trip back was similar in reverse, but less so. Now to get to the point. We’d flown from Santa Fe because it’s more convenient. It saves the hour’s drive to Albuquerque to get Southwestern and fly into Love Field, which is close to our granddaughter’s house. And the hour back to Santa Fe. As it turned out, it probably took us over two hours extra doing it this way, and a lot more frustration. Long trip, long post. Strategies:
1. Always count all of your bags at every transition.
2. Always research your travel plans and see that they make sense, that you have chosen the best options.
3. Consider trying to avoid flying in the first place. With all the hassles, with security and lines, it’s clear that bin Laden won. 4. Oh, and make sure your bags have a tag with your name legible. Doug Link: What Living with ADHD is Like

Yes, that’s ADHD.

Addadultstrategies.wordpress.com @addstrategies  #adhd  #add  @dougmkpdp

ADHD decisions.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
It’s Always Something – Especially with ADHD
I made today’s today to do list last night:
Breakfast. Quiet time. Walk dog. Gym. Shower. Lunch. Library. Work on 365 book. This blog. Fill in December calendar. Practice guitar. Refresh aquarium. Figure out what two thumb drives are.
I knew that was more than possible, but thought I could probably do most of it, and I was determined not to push myself, pressure myself, or get in a hurry.
Slogan: You can only do what you can do.
Then my wife bumped a post in the parking space and showed me a hand sized piece of black plastic off her car. She didn’t know where from.
Nothing on the piece looked broken, so we thought maybe I could fix it (Me? “Thumbs” Puryear?) So I bundled up and went out to the car.
Of course, I couldn’t find where it came from. Everything looked intact. Both sides looked the same. Got down on my hands and knees and checked everywhere with my flashlight.  All intact. But finally I found it, on the underside of the big right hand outside rearview mirror.
I took a couple of minutes to see how it fit in there. I took a lot more minutes to finally get this son of a gun to click into place. It took a little bit of brute force, but more finesse, not one of my strong points. But I got it. I was pleased and even my wife was pleased. Saved a trip to the shop. Sometimes I am so good I surprise myself.
But of course, my list is shot to hell.
Strategies (some of which I did not use.)
1. Keep the to-do list short and not more than you can reasonably expect to do.
2. If you don’t follow number one, accept that you’re not going to get it all done and don’t worry about it.
3. When you’re making your to-do list or schedule, figure in time for the unexpected. You can expect it.
This all worked out OK. I’m getting the blog done, as we speak. I scored points with my wife and I was pleased with myself for being able to fix the car.
It’s always something.
doug
Follow-up Note O the Day:
 While I was in the middle of this blog, my wife urgently called me to the living room. She said it couldn’t wait. Found she needed help with the crossword puzzle. It was a hard one, but we got it done. Again, I was pleased with myself. But my coffee was cold when I got back.
Quote O the Day:
“It’s always something.”
Rosanna Rosanna Danna

Which one is ADHD?

It would sure help.

@addstrategies  #adhd  #add  @dougmkpdp Link O the Day: To do list
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview