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This month's Foundry Series, The US Military and Rebuilding after War, Cecily Zander, Ph.D. candidate, Pennsylvania State University. We reached out to get more insight into what influences her work.

 

How did you become interested in your topic and what about your work still fascinates you?

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This is a new series where we highlight educators who work with us at the Museum and help us help other teachers. Meet Nicole Stonestreet, a member of our Teacher Advisory Council and a great partner for us in Virginia.

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This month's Foundry Series event, Politics and the Supreme Court, features Timothy Huebner of Rhodes College. Dr. Huebner was kind enough to answer a couple questions before the event. Make plans to join us on the 24th.

 

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During an Instagram Q+A this summer, we were asked “What is your favorite thing to teach visitors?” We’ve been mulling over that. These are some of the staff’s favorite answers.

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This year, 2018, we commemorated the bicentennial of the house most commonly referred to as The White House of the Confederacy.  Our journey led us through 200 years of history, allowing us to use a variety of methods to explore themes and people that our regular house tours touch upon only briefly.  As I look back over the roster of programs (one the first Saturday of every month), I am grateful to the many knowledgeable and talented individuals who made our trip back in time possible. 

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Civil War prison camps were notoriously awful places to spend any time. Both governments in the conflict were ill prepared to take care of the large number of prisoners that ended up on their doorsteps. Forts, warehouses, and even islands in the middle of a river or lake were made into makeshift camps for the thousands of prisoners who survived the battlefield only to have to fight the conditions of their incarceration. Many faced inadequate shelter to protect against the blazing hot sun or winter winds, overcrowding, and lack of food and clothing.

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This is a new series where we highlight educators who work with us at the Museum and help us help other teachers. Meet Valencia Abbott, a member of our Teacher Advisory Council and a great partner for us in North Carolina.

Where do you teach? 

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Next week's Foundry Series event, Opioid Addiction After the Civil War, features Jonathan Jones of Binghamton University. Jonathan was kind enough to answer a couple questions before the event. Make plans to join us next Thursday. 

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Jefferson C. Davis is probably best remembered for two things: the similarity of his name to the President of the Confederate States (Jefferson F. Davis, twenty years his senior and not related), and for killing a fellow officer after an argument.

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We regularly hear from educators, parents, and scholars how challenging it can be to teach the Civil War era and its legacies. From gulfs between the academic scholarship and public understanding of the history, to a politicization of the history, to heated public conversations about Confederate iconography, the Civil War era can be a difficult topic to understand and discuss, let alone teach. Yet, as those who think about this period on a daily basis, the topics feel more relevant than ever.

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