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Exercise is an important part of losing weight and maintaining weight loss. Many people, however, struggle simply because they haven’t found the right activity. If you’re looking for one activity that serves many purposes, yoga can help you ease into an exercise routine and stick to it.

The benefits gained from yoga exercises can help you lose weight and improve every facet of daily living:

1.  Inclusivity. Anyone can do yoga because yoga comes in at least 20 different forms. Gentler sessions focus on stretches, smooth movement, balance and meditation. Hatha, Anusara, Kripalu, Kundalini, Sivananda and Viniyoga are good examples and are easily adaptable to any level.

2.  Improves Focus. Yoga’s controlled stretches, postures and measured breathing depend on concentration and mindfulness. That focus stays with practitioners long after a 30-minute session.

3.  Boosts Mood. Yoga increases GABA levels. GABA stands for gamma-aminobutyric acid, a chemical that is often low in people experiencing depression, anxiety or mood disorders. Yoga, however, gives GABA levels a boost, significantly relieving anxiety and improving exercisers’ outlook on life.

4.  Increases Mobility. Mobility incorporates balance, flexibility and awareness. Researchers have found that yoga can deliver the entire package in relatively short periods of time: two sessions a week for six months, for example.

5.  Improves Quality of Sleep. Insomnia and sleep disorders have well-established links to serious medical issues like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, chronic pain and depression. Yoga has been found to make falling asleep easier, increase the length of time spent sleeping and decrease the number of sleep interruptions.

6.  Lowers Blood Pressure. Hypertension is a concern for at least a third of the population. Stress is a primary contributor to this condition. Yoga’s conscious breathing, however, soothes the fight-or-flight response, slows the heart rate, relaxes muscles and actually helps lower blood pressure.

7.  Strengthens Immune System. Yoga has the ability to lower stress, increase blood and oxygen flow, and even stimulate the lymphatic system. The result is a reduced strain on your immune system, which helps it more efficiently respond to toxins and pathogens.

8.  Jump Starts Your Day. A large part of maintaining a healthy weight and lifestyle depends on your commitment to an exercise and diet regimen. While a yoga class may begin as only 30 minutes of focused stretches and purposeful meditation, it can quickly become a daily asset to kick off your day with positivity and energy.

Find What Works for You

The variety of people who are drawn—even addicted—to yoga speaks to the power of the practice. Whatever your fitness level, yoga exercises allow practitioners to adapt their routine to their own strengths and limitations. Take your time in exploring exercises to find what works best for you and your health goals.

The post 8 Weight Loss Benefits of Yoga appeared first on Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery.

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Despite exercise programs and diet plans, many people still struggle to maintain a healthy weight. Americans unable to lose the weight any other way are increasingly turning to weight loss surgery to finally shed the excess pounds. Is weight loss surgery for you? Here’s some information to help you decide:

Who Qualifies for Weight Loss Surgery?

Overall, candidates typically have been unable to lose weight despite serious attempts to achieve and sustain a healthy weight. More specifically, candidates either:

  • have a BMI of 40 or more or are more than 100 pounds overweight or
  • have a BMI of 35 or more and have at least one “obesity-related comorbidity”—a chronic disease or condition that is associated with excess weight.
What is BMI?

BMI is the acronym for body mass index. It is one way of determining whether your weight is appropriate for your body when compared with your height. The BMI equation translates as your weight in kilograms divided by your height squared in meters:

  • kg/m2 = BMI

To calculate BMI using English measurements, divide your weight in pounds by your height in inches squared. Multiply that figure by 703, and round to one decimal place:

  • (lb/in2) x 703 = BMI

You can also use our online BMI calculator here. This method is one of many that doctors use to determine whether or not someone is eligible for weight loss surgery. If you think you may be a good candidate, contact us to register for a seminar for more information.

Obesity-related Conditions

Excess weight is closely associated with a number of chronic diseases and medical conditions that impact quality of life, result in additional medical issues and shorten life expectancy. These conditions are considered serious enough to reduce the BMI threshold qualifying for weight loss surgery from 40 to 35. Comorbid conditions typically include:

  • type 2 diabetes
  • hypertension
  • lipid abnormalities like high cholesterol
  • heart disease or congestive heart failure
  • respiratory disorders like chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD)
  • nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
  • gastrointestinal disorders or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
Is Weight Loss Surgery Right for You?

While body mass calculations are helpful, a consultation with a weight loss doctor is the single best way to determine whether weight loss surgery is the right option for you. If you’d like to discuss your options, call Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery at 337-233-9900, or register for one of our informational seminars.

The post Do I Need Weight Loss Surgery? appeared first on Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery.

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Each year, nearly 800,000 Americans have a stroke. For 610,000 of those people, it’s their first. For 140,000 people, the stroke will prove fatal. Many of these stroke events rob victims of physical and mental capabilities and can be influenced by factors like excess weight and obesity.

Warning Signs and Symptoms of a Stroke

While the risk of stroke increases with age, more than a third of all stroke events occur in people under 65. Warning signs and symptoms can vary, depending on the area of the brain affected, but all symptoms and warning signs should be treated as an emergency. The person suffering a stroke may suddenly:

  • have trouble understanding simple words, sentences or questions;
  • have difficulty speaking, pronouncing common words or expressing simple ideas;
  • be unable to move a portion of their face or body;
  • experience numbness or tingling in a portion of their face or body;
  • lose all or a part of their vision;
  • become weak, dizzy or unsteady;
  • fall; or
  • complain of a severe, otherwise unexplained headache.

While some people may be predisposed to having a stroke, doctors agree that, in many cases, the risk of stroke can be lowered with a healthy weight and lifestyle. Typically, medical science recognizes two types of stroke:

  • Hemorrhagic. A blood vessel leading to or within the brain leaks or ruptures.
  • Ischemic. A blood vessel leading to or within the brain becomes blocked or clogged.
Effects of Obesity

The link between excess weight and an increased likelihood of stroke is unmistakable. Repeated studies estimate that each unit increase in body mass index (BMI) increases the risk of stroke by 5 percent. With a baseline BMI of 20, this means that a person with a BMI of 30, for example, increases their risk of stroke by 50 percent.

The brain relies on two pairs of arteries in the neck for its blood flow: the carotid arteries and the vertebral arteries, which branch into an intricate network that feeds all the different areas of the brain. This portion of the circulatory system is particularly susceptible to many of obesity’s secondary medical conditions and contributing factors:

  • high blood pressure—the leading cause of stroke,
  • sleep apnea and sleep disturbances,
  • diabetes,
  • enlargement of the heart and
  • metabolic disorders.

All of these medical conditions affect the circulatory system by constricting blood flow, increasing inflammation and adding stressors to blood vessel walls.

Reducing the Risk of Stroke

Shedding excess weight can reduce the risk of stroke. It can also improve many of the secondary conditions associated with obesity that are known to contribute to strokes. If you or a loved one struggle with excess weight and its associated health risks, Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery can help. Our highly trained staff is devoted to helping patients develop healthier, happier lives. Visit our website, or call 337-233-9900. 

The post How Obesity Affects Stroke Risk appeared first on Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery.

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Good nutrition fuels the body with power rather than simply filling it. Unfortunately, today’s diets abound with sugar-laden options that can sabotage your fitness goals. In order to avoid excess sugar, your diet plan will require a little strategy and preparation:

  1. Practice clean eating. The goal of clean eating is to consume natural or whole foods without drowning them in heavy sauces, dressings, doughs or other processed goods. Clean eaters balance meal and snack selections, sticking to fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, whole grains and healthy fats while avoiding sweeteners, preservatives, additives, chemicals and other artificial processing. The idea is to keep food as close to its natural state as possible.
  2. Prepare your own meals from scratch. The cook or chef decides how much sugar, salt, seasonings and other ingredients each serving contains. Not every dish has to be sugar-free, but fresh, quality ingredients often allow a cook to reduce sugar quantities without waistlines or taste being affected. Sound options are halving the sugar in baked goods, for example, or squeezing your own orange juice.
  3. Tune into natural sugars. Fruits are the sweetest of the produce group, but many vegetables have tasty sweetness that caramelizes during a slow roast in the oven. Plain dairy, for example, also contains naturally occurring milk sugars known as lactose. All of these are natural sugars that the body metabolizes more slowly than refined sugars. In addition, these food sources contribute an abundance of nutrients that our bodies need and that refined sugars lack.
  4. Read labels on ready-made foods. Food manufacturers are currently required to list the sugar content per serving. American Heart Association guidelines recommend limiting daily sugar intake to less than six teaspoons for women, nine for men and three for small children. For comparison, one level teaspoon of sugar equates to 4 grams and 16 calories. One cup of cereal or flavored oatmeal can easily contain three or four teaspoons.
  5. Recognize sugar by other names. A food label can advertise “no high-fructose corn syrup” and still be full of sugar. Sugar has more than 60 names used in food labeling. If an ingredient ends in -ose—like glucose, fructose, dextrose or galactose—it most likely is some form of sugar. However, food labels may also list sugars as types of nectar, malt, syrup, juice, crystals or solids. When in doubt, check for grams of sugar under the carbohydrates listing.
  6. Keep condiments on the side to use sparingly. Dressings, sauces, jellies and other preparations add flavor, but sugar is a primary ingredient for most. If a version is low-fat or fat-free, sugar content is often increased to compensate. Since their serving sizes are often overlooked, condiments can undo a lot of hard dieting work. One serving of salad dressing is just two tablespoons yet can easily contain more than two teaspoons of sugar. One tablespoon of stir-fry sauce—half the quantity—also contains two teaspoons.
Eliminating Sugar To Lose Weight

Life without sugar can still be sweet. With awareness, patience and practice, you can eliminate a significant portion of the sugar and empty calories you consume. If you would like to learn more about clean eating or how to increase your diet’s nutritional value, reach out to the Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery team. Visit our website, or call us at 337-233-9900.

The post 6 Diet Tips To Avoid Excess Sugar appeared first on Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery.

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Nearly twenty percent of all cancers are directly related to obesity. Researchers have been studying fat cells and have discovered that fat is far more than just inconvenient bulk. Fat tissue is alive and active, and it changes the body’s complex chemical and hormonal environments.

Many of those changes seem to nurture the growth of cancer cells. Here are five key facts about what the medical and scientific communities have learned about obesity’s role in cancer development:

1.  Increased Levels of Estrogen

Fat cells release the enzymes that tell the body to convert androgens—male hormones—into estrogens. This estrogen circulates throughout the body. When it finds estrogen-sensitive tissues, it binds to their receptors and DNA. It then encourages cells to grow and spread. While closely associated with cancers of the breast and reproductive system, estrogen receptors are present throughout the body.

2.  High Levels of Insulin Encourage Tumor Cell Growth

While insulin is produced in the pancreas, insulin growth factor (IGF-1) is produced in the liver. Both, however, are involved in the body’s ability to use energy and tell cells to grow. People who are overweight or obese typically have high levels of insulin and IGF-1 in their bloodstreams—a condition commonly known as insulin resistance or prediabetes. High levels of insulin may also complicate cancer treatment.

3.  Increased Inflammation

In obesity, the abundance of fat cells results in an overproduction of signals known as adipokines. These molecules are actually cells from the immune system that infiltrate fat cells and cause inflammation. However, they also bear startling similarities to structures found in tumors. These adipokines are thought to play a role within the immune system and influence the behavior and survival of tumor cells.

 4. Immune System Complications

Researchers have found that severely obese individuals have significantly lowered levels of natural killer cell activity. This means that their immune systems are less able to defend against precancerous or cancerous cells. 

5.  Changes in Vascular Growth Factors

Vascular growth factors determine how the cells that line blood vessels adapt between the bloodstream and the surrounding tissues. Excess fat requires extensive networks of capillaries to deliver blood and support the cells. Researchers suspect that this imbalance encourages cancer cells to spread, or metastasize. As a result, obese cancer patients often experience shorter remissions and increased risk for metastatic tumors.

Reducing the Risk of Cancer

Fat cells dramatically change far more than a body’s appearance. However, obesity’s effects are not necessarily permanent. Studies have demonstrated that weight loss significantly reduces the incidence of cancer and improves survival rates. As the ratio of fat decreases, the body returns to a natural, more balanced state.

If you would like to learn more about options for shedding excess weight and reducing your risk for disease, contact the Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery team or call us at 337-233-9900.

The post 5 Key Facts About Obesity’s Effect on Cancer appeared first on Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery.

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For more than 23 million Americans, diabetes is an everyday part of life. It affects the young, the old and those in between. It affects both men and women. For all who have it, the problem is the same: Too much sugar remains in the blood stream rather than being used or stored in the body. The cause of that problem, however, can differ and is typically classified into four basic types of diabetes:

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 is also known as juvenile-onset diabetes because it affects primarily children and young adults. It accounts for only about 5 percent of all diabetes cases and is actually an autoimmune disease. With type 1 diabetes, the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells. The damaged pancreas stops producing insulin or produces very little. The condition is not preventable, and individuals with type 1 rely on daily doses of insulin.

Gestational Diabetes

During pregnancy, some women develop a form of diabetes that has few to no symptoms but nevertheless affects their body’s ability to absorb glucose like it should. Identifiable through standard prenatal testing, it’s usually both preventable and treatable with diet and exercise. While gestational diabetes often resolves itself following the birth, women who experience the condition during pregnancy may be more prone to develop type 2 diabetes later in life.

Prediabetes

When glucose levels are higher than normal yet fall short of diabetes, the condition is known as prediabetes. The high blood sugar is often associated with insulin resistance, meaning that the body needs higher levels of insulin to be able to absorb glucose. The CDC’s most recent statistics found that more than a third of adults age 18 or older were prediabetic, and nearly half of all adults 65 or older had prediabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 is also known as diabetes mellitus or adult-onset diabetes. It’s the most prevalent type of diabetes, credited with 90 to 95 percent of all cases of diabetes. It can develop at any time in a person’s life but is most common in middle-aged and older adults. With type 2, the body may be unable to produce insulin, or it may be unable to use the insulin it has efficiently. In either case, the levels of glucose that remain in the bloodstream are too high. Type 2 diabetes is often both preventable and treatable. While some individuals may require insulin, antidiabetic medications and lifestyle changes may prove quite effective for others.

Role of Obesity

Excess weight is a leading risk factor for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017, more than 87 percent of people diagnosed with adult-onset diabetes were overweight, nearly half were obese, and nearly 18 percent were severely obese. People who are obese tend to develop both insulin resistance and the inability to properly secrete insulin sooner than individuals who maintain a healthy weight. In addition, those changes in the body make losing weight more difficult, resulting in a cycle sometimes coined as “diabesity.”

Reducing the Risk of Diabetes

Obesity increases the risk of diabetes, but in many cases, those risks can be reduced or managed by eliminating excess weight. While lifestyle changes, diet and exercise work for some, for many others, the battle to achieve and sustain a healthy weight remains a challenge. If this is your struggle, Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery is here to help. For more information about obesity and weight loss solutions, visit our website, or call 337-233-9900.

The post Understanding the Different Types of Diabetes appeared first on Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery.

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Sleep disturbances often contribute to obesity, and obesity contributes to sleep disturbances. It’s a vicious cycle leading to any number of secondary issues that make maintaining a healthy weight and getting a good night’s rest even more difficult.

How Obesity Affects The Ability To Sleep

When body mass indexes cross into the overweight and obese levels—25 to 29.9 and 30 or more, respectively—physiological changes make sleep more elusive:

  • Added weight to the body can physically alter airway structures or function. Constricted air flow leaves the body struggling for oxygen and desperate to rid itself of carbon dioxide.
  • Added fat tissue alters the level of adipokines in the body. These signaling proteins either constrict or open air passages and control air pressure.

Again, the relationship is a cyclical one. These changes decrease the body’s ability to breathe while at rest and, in turn, alter metabolism and systemic functions in the body.

Obesity, Sleep Disturbances and Secondary Issues

Over time, the changes associated with lack of sleep and excess fat can extend to other body systems and lead to secondary health issues:

  • Cardiovascular Disease. The heart may be unable to increase its rate to respond to an increased level of activity, and it may take a long time to recover from exertion. In addition, blood pressure often rises to compensate. Good cholesterol—HDL—levels may fall while bad cholesterol—LDL—climbs, leading to clogged arteries and other circulatory problems.
  • Insulin Resistance and Diabetes. Insulin resistance is closely associated with sleep deprivation, regardless of body weight. The body is unable to absorb glucose from the blood and convert it to energy. Over time, insulin resistance can develop into diabetes, leading to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, circulatory problems, inflammation, stroke, blindness and kidney failure.
  • Emotional or Mental Distress. Emotional distress is a common factor for overweight individuals suffering from insomnia. Mood swings are also a telling symptom of insulin resistance and diabetes.
  • Cancer. Researchers are exploring links between certain types of cancer and chronic, low levels of inflammation, like those associated with acid reflux and Barrett’s esophagus. Obesity may increase the risk for these conditions and, in turn, raise the chances for tissue damage and cancer development. In addition, fat tissue produces high levels of estrogen and is also associated with growth factors and growth regulators that control cell development.
Losing Weight and Gaining Sleep

Even a modest weight loss of 10 percent body weight can yield substantial improvements in sleep. When combined, the two can improve metabolism, lower inflammation and retune the immune system. Just a small loss can result in a significant improvement in quality of life and turn a vicious cycle of sleepless weight gain into a healthful lifestyle—one that includes a regular good night’s sleep.

The post Could Obesity Rob You of a Good Night’s Sleep? appeared first on Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery.

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The key to regular, effective exercise is to start with a short, light routine and build upon that. Exercise regimens vary greatly from person to person, and the cardio portion of that is no exception. Pick what works for you.

Over time, you can incorporate small weights or add repetitions as your fitness level improves. If one long session isn’t doable, opt for shorter routines multiple times a day. Movement is the perfect antidote for fatigue, boredom, restlessness or anxiety. It can also combat hunger.

Starting With Gentle, Low Impact

You may be surprised just how much you can achieve from simple movements. The key is that you keep moving smoothly from one activity to the next, with consistent sets of repetitions. It’s something you can do while watching TV or waiting on hold on the phone. Start with two sets of 5 to 10 repetitions each, and work from the top down:

A good starting point is 20 to 30 minutes of physical activity three days a week. When you first begin—especially if you’re not used to exercising—very basic movements can get your heart pumping.

Aerobic Impact

As your body heals and you feel more confident, you can try more challenging exercises that raise your heart rate and get your body moving for more extended periods of time. Some activities to try include:

  • Moderate, stationary cycling
  • Walking on a treadmill or outside
  • Lap swimming
  • Water aerobics

You can also substitute a walk around the neighborhood or a loop around the park. Is the library, school or post office a 10- or 15-minute walk away? If you have to stay for a child’s soccer practice, walk the perimeters of the fields. Exercise can happen at any time and just about anywhere, so don’t be afraid to use the time and space you have.

Adding Elements of Strength

As your endurance improves, you may find yourself contemplating ways to continue improving. Some people like adding small weights or intervals of strength training to aerobic exercise. If you opt for weights, use light, handheld ones—just a pound or so—to avoid injury. Some activities to try include:

Granted, weights don’t always appeal to everyone. Other activities that build strength could include bodyweight activities like yoga or walking up stairs.

Maintaining a Daily Regimen for Your Fitness Lifestyle

Most people who maintain their hard-won weight loss credit using a variety of exercises and incorporating vigor and movement into an active lifestyle. Inside or out, the options are endless. Set your timer for 20 minutes, and you can fit in a session of just about any activity, from jogging and dancing to kickboxing or Zumba.

Start with what you can do. The trick is to find the activity you like, set time aside to do it and enjoy the benefits of a great workout.

The post Easing into an Exercise Routine appeared first on Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery.

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Getting enough of the right nutrients can be tricky for weight loss surgery patients. Following surgery, drastically reduced calorie intakes and changes in physiology make choosing the right foods and supplements more important than ever to living a healthy life.

Additionally, many fail to realize the impact that weight loss surgery takes on the stomach. Bariatric surgeries often result in a reduction in stomach size, which means less surface area to help absorb nutrients you consume. Acknowledging this issue will help you prepare for proper nutrition after your operation.

Common Micronutrient Deficiencies Following Weight Loss Surgery

Some of the most important nutrients for our bodies are the ones most likely to be lacking. Sensitive systems still recovering from surgery may not be able to handle the qualities or recommended quantities of many highly nutritious foods in their natural forms. Some of the most crucial—and often missing—micronutrients include:

  • Iron. Iron is the most common deficiency, manifesting as anemia and fatigue. Reduced stomach capacity also reduces stomach acid, which is necessary to convert food-borne iron into its more absorbable form.
  • B Complex Vitamins. B vitamin deficiencies often coincide with iron deficiencies, as vitamin B12, thiamine, folate and B6 are essential to red blood cell production as well as neurological function.
  • Calcium and Vitamin D. Vital to calcium absorption, vitamin D is essential to maintain bone mineralization. Lack of vitamin D is linked to hypocalcemia and osteoporosis as well as increased risk for cancer, diabetes mellitus, autoimmune diseases and cardiovascular disease.
  • Fat-Soluble Vitamins—A, K and E. Like vitamin D, vitamins A, K and E must be absorbed as a lipid, or fat. Deficiencies in vitamin A can result in night blindness and vision problems. Insufficient vitamin K can result in bleeding and clotting issues. Prolonged vitamin E deficiency is associated with neurological deficits and liver disease.
  • Zinc and Copper. While less common, deficiencies in zinc and copper can also cause problems like rashes and anemia, for example.
Protein—An Important Macronutrient

Protein is a miracle macronutrient in that it is the building block for everything, from bones, muscles, cartilage, skin and blood to hair and nails. Your body needs it to build tissue, maintain lean muscle mass, support its immune system and repair itself.

When you don’t consume enough protein, you can experience swelling of the body, physical weakness, hair loss and serious side effects from hypoalbuminemia. However, consuming enough protein after a bariatric procedure can be problematic because:

  • Your body cannot store protein; it must either use it or store it as fat.
  • The small intestine absorbs proteins and their individual amino acids. Portions bypassed cannot do their job.
  • The most common proteins are meats and fats that many patients do not tolerate well.
Supplementation After Weight Loss Surgery

In short, surgical weight loss procedures limit the time and space your body has to digest and absorb the food that you eat. That’s why they work. However, both restrictive and malabsorptive techniques do it so well that all patients need to take at the very least a quality multivitamin every day.

Micronutrient Supplementation. You may need additional micronutrient supplementation for:

  • Calcium citrate supplements: 1,200 to 2,000 mg daily—often 500 to 600 mg three times daily.
  • Vitamin D: 800 to 1,000 International Units (IUs) daily—often 400 to 500 IUs twice daily.
  • Vitamin B12: 500 mcg daily, often in a form soluble under the tongue.
  • Folic Acid and Iron: Quality multivitamins should contain at least 18 mg of iron and 400 mcg of folic acid, but women—especially those considering pregnancy—may need more.
  • Minerals: Quality multivitamins should also contain magnesium, iodine, copper, zinc, manganese, chromium, potassium and selenium.

Macronutrient Supplementation. Protein supplements are widely available. Many are quite appealing in both taste and texture and can help you achieve your daily protein intake goals:

  • Liquid supplement drinks should be high in protein but low in calories. Look for labels that provide at least 20 grams of protein but less than 200 calories per serving—typically 8 to 11 ounces. Protein gram values should be at least double the carbohydrate gram values.
  • Protein bars should be similar—high in protein but low in calories. They should also be low in carbohydrates, especially sugars, and fat. Look for label values similar to those suggested for liquids, and remember that you don’t have to eat the whole thing at once. If a bar has 32 g of protein, you can break it into several smaller servings.
  • You can also add protein powders, powdered egg, egg substitute or nonfat dry milk powder to soups, hot cereals or other liquids.
Committing to a New Lifestyle

Weight loss surgery offers a new life, but it can also demand long-term lifestyle changes. Nutritional supplementation is an important one that requires daily commitment and regular check-ups and monitoring. If you’re ready to commit, call us at 337-233-9900, or visit our website today. Here at Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery, we’ll make certain that you have everything that you need.

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With or without weight loss surgery, the weight loss formula is supposed to be simple. Calories consumed minus calories burned result in either a calorie surplus, a calorie deficit or a zero balance. A surplus will make you gain weight while a deficit will make you lose weight.

However, bodies don’t always comply with these neat little formulas. Moreover, we often unknowingly sabotage ourselves when it comes to losing weight. Sometimes, we expect too much too quickly. And sometimes, we need a little help to sort it all out. Here are some quick facts about exercise and diet and why they don’t always lower the number on the scale:

1.  Muscle is denser than fat. While one pound of fat weighs the same as one pound of muscle, muscle occupies about 18 percent less space. In addition, muscle burns calories while fat stores them. So, if your weight isn’t decreasing but your clothes are starting to fit more loosely, you may be building muscle.

2.  One pound of fat equals 3,500 calories. Under normal circumstances, it takes 3,500 surplus calories to make a pound of fat. In turn, that’s how many deficit calories you have to burn to get rid of a pound of fat. To rid yourself of 10 pounds, you’d need a deficit of 35,000 calories.

3.  An hour of exercise typically uses 350 to 500 calories. Really vigorous activities like running, swimming or kickboxing may be closer to 600, but an easy stroll reduces burn to around 200. Rewarding yourself with a 16-ounce latte—190 calories—or a small, 12-ounce strawberry-banana smoothie—210 calories—and reaching a calorie deficit can be hard to achieve.

4.  Inactivity can undo activity. That’s right. Sitting or being inactive can actually negate the benefits of exercise as well as impact metabolism and your body’s ability to burn fat. Remain active and move as much as possible throughout the day to see better results.

5.  Bodies hit weight plateaus. Our bodies give up water first as they burn stored glycogen. Then, the real work begins. You lose fat, but often we lose some calorie-burning muscle, too. In addition, as we become smaller and lighter, movement becomes easier, so we burn fewer calories.

6.  Insulin resistance won’t let your body burn fat. Normally, glucose levels in the blood make the pancreas produce insulin, which triggers your body’s cells to use the glucose. Over time, cells’ insulin receptors can become desensitized, unable to recognize insulin or use glucose. On starvation mode, cells will resist releasing fat. Worse, they will store every calorie that they can grab. Diets high in carbohydrates—particularly simple carbs—exacerbate the condition.

7.  Hypothyroidism slows every body function. While women are more likely than men to experience thyroid problems, that butterfly-shaped gland can cause issues with anyone’s weight.

8.  Quality of sleep directly impacts weight. Studies have measured everything from hours spent in various stages of the sleep cycle to the body’s production of the appetite-regulating hormones leptin and ghrelin. In short, less sleep correlates to more weight as well as risks for insulin resistance. Unfortunately, excess weight is also linked to sleep apnea, which can disrupt the sleep cycle throughout the night.

9.  Stress produces cortisol. To put it simply, “Cortisol directly affects fat storage and weight gain in stressed individuals.” The enzyme that controls it resides in fat, especially human visceral fat cells, which are the ones surrounding the stomach and abdomen. In fact, high cortisol levels can even relocate fat, depositing it deep in the abdomen.

10.  Genetic predisposition may be a factor. The Human Obesity Gene Map includes traits associated with both familial obesity and polygenic obesity, with at least 22 gene associations supported by at least five positive studies. While genes are not destiny, they can be a factor.

When Diet and Exercise Are Not Enough

While persistence, dedication and behavioral changes are necessary commitments to losing weight, sometimes, they simply may not be enough. Medical conditions and genetics complicate what might otherwise be a straightforward process. If you’re faithfully exercising and dieting, but the scale refuses to budge—or, worse, tips the wrong way—call us at 337-233-9900 today.

The post 10 Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight with Diet and Exercise appeared first on Acadiana Weight Loss Surgery.

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