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As 2018 draws to a close, the Australian Book Designers Association’s committee wishes a safe and festive holiday season to you, your families and friends. Thank you all for your wonderful support in 2018 and may the new year bring you exciting design briefs and lenient client feedback!

The post Seasons Greetings appeared first on Australian Book Designers Association.

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In our final instalment of The Hot Desk for the year, we check in with Nada, a freelance designer based in Sydney and Adam, an in-house designer in Melbourne about their morning routines.

Nada Backovic
Freelance designer, Sydney

My mornings take advantage of the freelance life with a leisurely walk around Iron Cove Bay (but not before a good long black). A short, music-pumped drive gets me to my new office space in Stanmore. After a long stretch of working from home, I’m now in a shared space, but still have my very own office to do what I will (it’s a work in progress). My desk faces the door for good Feng Shui and to take advantage of chatting with the neighbours as they walk by! My working morning starts with organising the day ahead with a fresh to do list; I like to keep on top of things by prioritising. There is usually a bit of “important” stuff to do, like checking to see if Sydney to London flight prices are any good! But before long, I’ll be in the creative zone, actually getting work done.

Adam Laszczuk
Executive Designer, Penguin Random House, Melbourne

I get into the office pretty early. It’s really quiet which allows me to get a lot done before most others turn up. I arrive, I start up the beast (my computer) and then duck out to grab a coffee (a must) while it starts up. This is followed by doing whatever small tasks I remembered on the train ride to work or just checking in on a few design pages to get switched on. Then I get stuck into my bigger tasks. I usually have a good idea of what needs to be done, picking up where I left off the day before or consulting my to do list. Lists are great. Nothing better than crossing something off when completed; it’s very satisfying. I try to not check emails until later in the morning. Not sure why… it’s just become a habit.

The post The Hot Desk #5: morning routines of book designers appeared first on Australian Book Designers Association.

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Christa Moffitt (Christabella Designs) shares the journey behind the cover of ‘The Inaugural Meeting of the Fairvale Ladies Book Club’. Joint winner of the Best Designed Commercial Fiction Cover category at the 2018 ABDA Awards, Christa details the trials of designing a cover with a particularly long title and breaking the mould in a well-trodden genre.

I had the pleasure of reading the manuscript and fell in love with the characters and the individual stories. This novel is set in the Northern Territory in the 1980’s where a group of isolated, rural women of varying ages and backgrounds come together through a book club. The book needed to sit in a sweet spot in terms of demographic — it was aimed at rural-story lovers and needed to be a book club-read for women aged 25–100, like an Aussie Guernesy Literary and Potato Peel Society.

I wanted to explore concepts that had a strong use of type (which was in some ways unavoidable seeing that the title is so long). I was trying to avoid the well trodden path of rural landscape scenes. It was my aim to create something that had more of a personal feel, a nod to beautiful Australiana themes without the cheesy undertones. Enter pens and paper, scribbles and swearing.

Sometimes the more you love a book, the more pressure you place on yourself to get the clothes to fit just right.

After the first round of concepts, we were not there. The publisher wanted to see a few concepts that read more like an invitation, inviting the reader into the book club. The phrases ‘You are invited to‘, ‘You are welcome to‘ were added to the design.

We tried a few in the 80s type vein as that is the time period of the book. Despite these being eye-catching, they didn’t strike the right balance. I trawled through pages upon pages of vintage botanical illustrations to get the right mix of flowers and native elements. From the start I loved the idea of a cheeky bird on the cover, and the galah landed perfectly in the letter D.

 

For the chosen concept, I filled in an engraved style typeface to create the main title block. I love how bold it is, and how it references a sign  entering a farm. By allowing me to have the blurb on the inside cover, the back cover continues the invite theme and incorporates a mud map to the farm.

While this cover may not be as edgy as some, I love it when a classic approach to a cover fits a story so well and looks like it was conceived effortlessly. I’m so delighted that this cover was recognised at the ABDAs, and sharing an award with the über-talented Alissa Dinallo was a treat!

Select imagery used in draft cover concepts is shown here for the purpose of education and review only.

The post Designing ‘The Inaugural Meeting of the Fairvale Ladies Book Club’ appeared first on Australian Book Designers Association.

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Featuring the work of over 100 artists and designers from 32 countries, the NGV Triennial exhibit surveyed the world of art and design, across cultures, scales, geographies and perspectives. The accompanying publication, ‘NGV Triennial 2017’, designed by Dirk Hiscock, captures the magnitude of the exhibition while offering an incredible piece of design in itself. Awarded as both the Best Designed Fully Illustrated Book Over $50 and the Designer’s Choice Book of the Year Award at the 2018 ABDA Awards, designer Dirk Hiscock shares the journey of designing this tome.

The Triennial

A free exhibition, the NGV Triennial was a celebration of contemporary art and design practice that traversed all four levels of NGV International, as well as offering a rich array of programs.

Unique across the world, NGV Triennial presented globally significant projects from across the creative disciplines. It was a multifaceted exhibition with a significant physical footprint. Its array of large-scale presentations immersed audiences in a sensorial, provocative and entertaining world of art and design.

The Brief

When first briefed on the NGV Triennial publication there were only a handful of elements that were relatively bedded down – the format, stock – and judging from the schema it was likely to be a lengthy offering. The briefing was an exciting prospect; both exhibition and publication were larger and more ambitious than previously offered by the NGV. Although the publication would accompany the exhibition, it was not in the conventional sense an exhibition catalogue, with the selection of contributors in the publication as carefully considered as the artists. With both visual and textual contributors at the forefront of their practice, there was a definite desire for the publication to share the same ambition. Early on, I began to consider the physicality of the publication as an object in itself, and as a result, I felt that a significance should be conveyed in the sturdiness of the final physical object.

Text

Structurally the text commissioned for the publication varied immensely. From interviews and reflections to shorter texts and major essays, it was equal parts exciting and daunting to respond to graphically. With a substantial page extent and varied contents I wanted the layout to be loose and adaptive, anything too structured would become monotonous, and too repetitive. I chose a brother/sister combination of serif/sans serif fonts from the Swiss foundry – Suisse Int’l and Suisse Works. The rationale behind these typefaces was to position them in a way in which they are responding to the content and yet remain fluid in much the same way as the grid. I also began to introduce the ‘T’ motif to the layout to establish a conduit to the exhibition campaign.

Covers

We were still working with a handful of titles for the publication at this stage so a decision was made to concentrate on the cover treatment. It soon became apparent that a single image on the cover would never be able to convey all the themes and artists encapsulated within the exhibition. I looked at options where I used multiple typefaces, illustrating the diversity of the content. I felt this was somewhat successful, however I wanted to distill this idea further and something began to click when I started to shift to using the motif on its own.

Feedback

The thinking was the layout needed to be pushed further, the genuine consensus was that the illustrated cover options, although aesthetically pleasing, were possibly not the right direction for this title. I was steering towards a minimal cover utilising the ‘T’ motif, however this would definitely be a departure for the NGV. Perhaps for that very reason it made sense in this instance.

Second concepts 

During this period content began flowing in, and it was encouraging to start playing around with actual imagery and text. The ‘T’ motif developed and translated effectively into the layout, with pages beginning to take on a rhythm. I focused on developing a colour palette that could be used to navigate the publication and work as an identifier for each of the chapters; Movement, Change, Virtual, Body and Time. These relatively minor contributions gave me the confidence that within the 700 pages a sense of structure would be maintained while keeping the layout fluid. The cover concept was further distilled and I introduced an idea of releasing five colour ways for the cover. A relatively intensive period of testing would follow.

Final concept

The finished product was an experiment in addition and subtraction. The cover was stripped back to bare essentials, while the interior pages expanded and contracted in direct response to the content. We eventually chose to proceed with the cream cover, and while I was still reasonably attached to the idea of five options, some of the combinations were not translating when screen printed onto linen. The black and cream serendipitously tied into the marketing campaign and I especially liked the way it highlighted the coloured tabbing on the foredge. When I look back and consider the amount of work done in the best part of six weeks it makes me grateful for the trust instilled in myself and the publications team.

Select imagery used in draft cover concepts is shown here for the purpose of education and review only.

The post Designing ‘NGV Triennial 2017’ appeared first on Australian Book Designers Association.

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An educational activity book to help manage anxiety won the Best Designed Educational Primary / Secondary Book award at the 2018 ABDA Awards. A collaborative effort, Leonardo Rocker and Lisa Diebold take us through this three year project.

Basecamp® – A fun-filled adventure about managing anxiety –  is the result of three years of collaborative work between Lisa Diebold, Kathryn Berry and myself, Leonardo Rocker. It features a gobsmacking 182 pages of activities, tools and text, all carefully created to assist children and their parents (yes you, anxious parents!) to manage anxiety.

Three years gestation – yes, a very long time. But for us to create this publication to the standard we dreamed, there was simply no other way. We launched into the making of Basecamp® with such care that the concept, design and content required each and every minute of this timeline.

Basecamp® is the third major publication to come out of Quirky Kid. The first two ‘experiments’, so to speak, were The Best of Friends® and Power Up. I am not sure how things roll at other publishing houses, but here we always aim to make our new projects bigger and better. Although the first two books still make us swell with pride, we were really keen to push ourselves to the next level with Basecamp®. Being a very small team, we were able to learn from past mistakes and change up our processes completely in order to maximise our creativity time, polishing each and every page to exactly how we imagined.

Breakthrough

Choosing the national park concept was the defining moment (thank you, Kathryn!). Once we had a theme, the project rolled naturally. The national park made sense – kids love adventure; we could illustrate nature and cute animals; and create games for the outdoors. When you explore Basecamp, you spend time at the Campfire, help animals at the Sanctuary and relax with turtles in the waterfall, all in the name of fun and learning.

The next major break came when we defined our map locations. This is how we were able to flow from one lesson to another without boring chapters and worksheets. From that point, it was all about fleshing out the fun details: creating characters, illustrating the scenery and turning activities about anxiety from those dreaded dry clinical worksheets into something bursting with colour. While still being approachable for kids as well as their parents.

Budget, what budget?

To be completely honest, we still don’t know how much Basecamp® has cost us in dollars (finance guys please don’t read this) and this feels so nice to write. We are in a unique position as our publishing work occurs in parallel with our clinical work. The day to day looks something like this: four hours of clients, two hours of publishing and creation, two more hours of clients. While we could use the two free hours to do other important work, everyone enjoyed prioritising Basecamp®.

The approval process was very collaborative between Lisa, Kathryn and I. At times, Lisa and I had to reassure Kathryn that our design and concepts would deliver on the outcomes required and still steer away from traditional educational designs (a.k.a boxes and texts).

Each spread had to be tested with young participants to ensure we hit the mark. As you can imagine, this was incredibly rewarding but time-consuming. We created various reiterations of many activities and, at times, we really got stuck and had to move on until a fresh idea came to mind. Overall we had three preliminary versions of the entire product with many more of some of the chapters.

Looking Back

We still get goosebumps when we look at what we achieved (winning the design awards was a long dream of ours). We felt so privileged to have had the time to participate in a project like Basecamp® as it meets all our criteria when it comes to job satisfaction: to do good, work with amazing people, solve complex challenges and use graphic design to communicate information.

If we could go back, we don’t believe we would have changed anything really.

Oh, one thing … we would have travelled to the printers to check production first hand. We had some faulty copies and this was disappointing as we really wanted a clear production. But alas, the process of creating an amazing publication will always have its ups and downs and luckily we avoided major complications.

– Leonardo Rocker and Lisa Diebold

The post Designing ‘Basecamp’ appeared first on Australian Book Designers Association.

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Connecting to a manuscript and channeling that emotion into a cover design, Astred Hicks of Design Cherry shares how the dazzling and dark cover for ‘In the Dark Spaces’ came to be. It went on to win Best Young Adult Cover at the 2018 ABDA Awards.

RTFB

At a book design talk a quite few years ago, I heard Sandy Cull talk about her process during which she stressed that she read every manuscript for each book she designed. ‘Who has time for that?’ I scoffed. I was working for a small design studio and designing mainly commercial fiction covers, the briefs from publishers came with a blurb and a few extracts. The covers served their purpose and everyone was happy with them. Sandy no doubt continued to make time to read manuscripts, and continued to win every award possible (well done, Sandy).

My process

Some years later, and now with my own freelance business, I started to shift my creative process. Instead of illustrating specific scenes in a book I wanted to go deeper, I wanted the audience to feel a personal connection to the cover, to identify something within themselves and share a moment. So I started asking for the manuscripts.

As I expected, reading manuscripts dramatically increased the time it took me to create concepts. But it turned out that it was not just the reading that lengthened the process. Instead, 60 per cent of my time producing concepts is now taken up with thinking.

Finding that emotional connection within myself, and translating that into a bridge between audience and cover takes a lot of time and the first set of concepts don’t always work. I want covers to be emotive, lightning bolts that jolt the viewer. The message should be strong and focused, or abstract with a deeper meaning, but always that jolt.

The brief

When the brief and the manuscript for In The Dark Spaces came through I chased concepts down a rabbit hole and emerged completely lost.

This Ampersand Prize-winning book needed an impressive cover, one that would represent the many facets of the story: aliens, humans living in space colonies, kidnapping, war, horror, family, hope, bonds of love … rabbit hole.  So many directions, so many dead ends.

Initially the editor and I headed down the sci-fi route, trying to capture the crow-like nature of the alien race or the texture of their uniforms or the infinite loneliness felt by the protagonist.

Back and forth we went, and while I felt I was delivering gold each time (‘Yessss! This is it! Stick a fork in me I am done!’) the editor and publisher were unsure. It was a tricky book to place in the market and they were experimenting as much as I was.

So I stopped, reset and once again reassured myself that the cover didn’t need to tell the story, it needed to make people FEEL the story.

I packed my sketch books and my little family and took off to the Art Gallery of NSW. I stood in front of huge abstract paintings and let them wash over me. I chatted to my kid about colours and shapes and their dynamics. We spoke about how the size of the painting affected us, how the paint strokes and textures made us feel something in our stomach, and about the energy of some colours and the oppressive nature of others. And in the background my brain started ticking over…

This time I sent the editor rough concepts that tried to capture the essence of the book in a purely abstract form. Energy, conflict, life and heart. From there the final cover design was developed.

I hand wrote the title. I like uneven flawed type, to me it always represents humanity. We are not perfect. On this cover, the title represents the protagonist, a young stow-away trapped between two opposing sides, both of which are at times violent and nurturing. So the patterns swarm around the title, pressing against it, creating conflict as opposing forces squeeze the seemingly fragile, broken text. Gold is scratched into the patterns, glimmers of hope that shimmer on book shelves.

The final cover is cryptic, allowing readers to make their own interpretations. Sometimes they will only make the connection after they have experienced the story.  When they finally close the book they can appreciate the design once more with new eyes.

The post Designing ‘In the Dark Spaces’ appeared first on Australian Book Designers Association.

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A winning combination of collage, paint and hand lettering resulted in this year’s design for Best Literary Fiction Cover at the 2018 ABDA Awards. Designer Emily O’Neill talks us through her process and shares some designs that didn’t make the cut.

The brief I received for the cover design of Anna Spargo-Ryan’s The Gulf was exciting, but also daunting. The novel is quite grim at times and as the Publisher cautioned me, deals with some heavy topics: domestic violence, family breakdown, drug abuse and poverty. It’s a family living on the margins of society and at the centre of it all is 16-year-old Skye and her 10-year-old brother. But the novel also has so much warmth, especially between the siblings, and a great deal of wit. I knew right away it was going to be tricky balancing these elements. I hopped on the usual roller coaster of emotions as soon as I agreed to the job, only as time was very tight for first concepts, this rollercoaster was suddenly condensed into “Oooh how exciting, great brief, this is going to be fun!” “OhmygodwhatamIevengoingtoputonthecoverrrrrrr”.

Thankfully along with a general outline of the book the Publisher had sent the manuscript and a list of symbols referenced in the text which might lend themselves to the cover. The brief had suggested: a tortoise, train tracks, a hills hoist. The book is set in Adelaide and a fictional town in the Gulf of St Vincent, and the Publisher certainly wanted to communicate this location specificity somehow on the cover.

It’s also worth mentioning that the Publisher gave me a great deal of confidence in that first email after all the necessary information when he wrote: “Please feel free to follow your own nose – I trust your instincts!” That certainly saved me during a few wobbly moments of doubt!

I started to read as much as I could of Anna’s writing to see what else I could glean, and ended up happily reading the whole book. As I read, I made notes on concepts I could start to see working in my head and techniques on how visually I could flesh these out. Usually I might sketch these up in thumbnails but this time I didn’t stop to do that, but unromantically made notes on my phone.

I always try and present a range of approaches in the first round on concepts, hoping even if there isn’t a clear winner in there initially, there’s a direction that we could work with. There is a touching image in the book of Skye comforting her brother over some corner store hot chips and I really wanted to see if I could make that work somehow.

I quickly mocked up the hot chips on some greasy butcher’s paper using stock imagery, with the intention that if we went ahead with this cover I could photograph some hot chips myself to get those chips working much better around the type. Now with the benefit of hindsight, what was I even thinking with that thick, ink brush type?! Way too heavy. I did quite a few variations of hand lettering as I felt it needed that individual, naive feel to help communicate Skye’s voice, rather than a stuffy, neat typeface. Shout out to my daughter’s crayons for the final title type.

Third concept I sent was the eventual cover, the coastline held together by haphazard tape with two very isolated figures, and pretty much remained unchanged which is very rare, and very lovely! The only major change was the figures walking along the beach. I used a stock image to mock-up the concept but ended up painting them for the final cover. I also tweaked the type slightly as I can’t help myself.

Rough (left) and final (right)

I also sent these concepts which is veering down the YA road and probably way too abstract. I guess there’s a mood here but not much else.

Ah and that symbolism I spoke about earlier? I’ll give you symbolism! Hills hoist? Check! Turtle? Check! Movie ticket stub? Macbeth passage? Kids at the pier? Check, check, check! Here’s where I obviously struggled to get those other elements working and when in doubt – collage!

I still have a soft spot for this last concept I sent of the cracked plate which was a composite of about 1000 stock images (plate, table, crack, stains…). I had a lot of fun ageing and dirtying up that plate.

For the final full cover I carried the paper sand over the spine and onto the back cover, and painted the dog (which I promise is relevant to the story) onto the back cover. The only other change was to the tear at the bottom back cover, with the Publisher having the inspired idea to introduce a river of blue underneath the crack. And off to print!

Select imagery used in draft cover concepts is shown here for the purpose of education and review only.

The post Designing ‘The Gulf’ appeared first on Australian Book Designers Association.

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ABDA member and vice-president Alissa Dinallo takes us through the design of her award winning cover for ‘The Student’,  joint winner of the Booktopia Best Designed Commercial Fiction Cover at the 2018 ABDA awards.

The process of designing The Student was incredibly smooth sailing. When I came to write this blog post and looked back at the concept stages for this cover, I was shocked to realise we only went through one round of cover concepts, and the final cover was in that pile.

Just magical. And pretty rare!

Originally, this book was titled Black Days, and we switched between the two titles during the design process, until The Student was decided on to be the final title. The book was described by the editor to me as ‘James Ellroy meets Donna Tartt’. It covers some incredibly dark and gritty subject matter. Set in 1994 Queensland, the novel is masculine, dusty, gritty crime. There are drugs, drug dealers and exploitation. A lot of boredom and nothingness. There’s a missing girl on a videotape and a character spiralling out of control.

The author, Iain Reid, summarised into a bullet-point list what he thought the book was about – which was insanely helpful to my design process. The list given to me was:

  • The train
  • The suitcase full of video tapes
  • Student cards
  • Caravans
  • His hatchback
  • Iris  / seeing (Iris is the only person who correctly sees everyone for who they really are)
  • Homemade bongs

This gave me an excellent framework for my concepts (expect I was pretty sure a homemade bong wasn’t going to make it very far on the cover in the approval process).

The two main feelings I wanted to evoke from my designs were:

  1. The feeling of nothingness (a vibe I feel is perfectly captured and I get whenever I look at the cover for Columbine designed by Henry Sene Yee), as well as
  2. a sense of loss of self or loss of identity associated with drug use and drug dealing

I explored all the points listed by Iain (except the bong), but what really got me excited was the idea of using student cards. Originally I thought it would be great if the book cover could be an actual student card, with the face of the student completely scratched out. I started picture researching student cards, and that’s when I stumbled across the black and white school portrait that is on the final cover. I loved the grainy, authentic quality to the image, and thought it really fit the ‘nothingness’ mood I was trying to evoke.

This was the first round of concepts, which explored the use of both potential titles:

The covers were well received by the editor and author, and were narrowed down to the following:

And eventually, the final cover was chosen by the publisher, Echo. I was thrilled as it was definitely my favourite in the bunch. The only change I made before it went off to marketing, was to change the author name from a font to hand written text. And just like that, the final cover for The Student went out into the world.

Select imagery used in draft cover concepts is shown here for the purpose of education and review only.

The post Designing ‘The Student’ appeared first on Australian Book Designers Association.

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Frank Stillitano is the Creative Director at Flux Visual Communication, an Adelaide based graphic design studio that has been working collaboratively with marketing professionals to develop creative and effective communication projects since 2003. His work also ventures into publication and book design, and today we find out more about this side of his practice.

Did you mean to end up as a book designer? What was your trajectory?

After a high school I studied Architecture for four years — this was my first introduction to design principles and the creative process. In my final year I realised my passion was for design and presentation and not construction methods and building materials. In subsequent years I traded in those materials for communication materials — imagery, typography and words — thereby discovering my true passion for graphic design.

Does art — gallery, museum art — inspire you? Or film, tv etc? If so, what do you like?

Architecture still inspires me a lot. The works of Frank Lloyd Wright, Carlo Scarpa and Frank Gehry are a big influence on my aesthetic. Film is also a source of external inspiration. Stanley Kubrick has probably had the most influence of me as a designer.

What do you listen to when you work?

Normally just the sounds of a noisy open plan studio/ office. When the timing is right we usually play Triple J on the radio. At home or in the car (I’m usually still working) my musical tastes vary greatly — from classical to modern pop and everywhere in between. I think music genres are just pigeon holes and great music (and bad) exists in all of them.

What question do you least enjoy from people when they discover you design books?

I am strong believer in the Socratic method, so I don’t think a bad question exists, only bad answers. Plus I have no reason to feel anything but flattery should anyone ask me a question.

What is your favourite tool on the computer?

The shut down function! Right now I also have a strange fascination with SEO analysis software.

How do you know when a project is done?

To me any design project is only complete when either physical or budgeted time runs out. Otherwise there’s always improvements to be made.

Walk us through your design process.

My design process is always some permutation of the following stages: Diagnosis, Strategy, Creative, Review, Development and Roll out. These stages are not necessarily in a linear order, but form a circular process which is influenced by many external forces and compiled through the use of human filters like experience and gut instinct.

Which book would you like to design the cover for?

Harry Potter—because my daughters would think I am the coolest Dad.

Who is one of your favourite book designers and why?

I am going to cheat with this one a little bit and say Saul Bass. I don’t think he actually did many book covers but I think the way his movie posters communicated complex story themes in such simple ways would have worked for book covers too.

Your favourite place (store, library, blog etc) to look at books?

Today I have to say it’s probably UniSA’s art and design library, because it has a huge collection of design related titles. However in the past there was a tiny little shop on Rundle Street in Adelaide called Mary Martin bookstore. For a small store it had an enormous range of creative books. I spent way too much time and money there, yet to this day I still lament its closure.

The post Q & A with Frank Stillitano appeared first on Australian Book Designers Association.

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