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3TravelBug by 3travelbug - 1w ago

During my first trip to Bali in November of 2017, I always felt like I had unfinished business there. Although I only spent 5 days in Bali, getting a big stomach bug cut what we saw short. Almost a year later, I decided that my girlfriend and I should return back to Bali to explore the areas we previously didn’t explore.

The trip already started off on a high as when we were landing we saw one of the many volcanoes that Bali has to offer from the plane. On our arrival, we planned to stay one night Kuta as we really wanted to get to Ubud as quickly as possible. We stayed at Angkul Beach Inn Hotel, which was located right in the centre of Kuta Square. However, this wasn’t the best hotel as the cleanliness could have been a lot better. Nevertheless, it was only for one night, it was cheap and had breakfast included.

The next morning we woke up early and took a grab to Ubud. We were going to rent a scooter from Kuta as we had to eventually return back here to get our flight home. However, we decided that riding for two hours with our backpacks wouldn’t have been the most comfy. (Side note: It did probably cost us around £50 more over the entire trip as we didn’t hire a bike from Kuta, but we decided we wanted comfort over budgeting).

After around a 45 minute taxi drive we arrived on the outskirts of Ubud at our Hotel, Casa D’ Sami. Although the only downside was that it didn’t have air conditioning which was surprisingly not an issue, it was a really clean and a nice hotel. As soon as we checked in, we hired a bike for 50k Indonesian Rupiah and set about exploring Ubud. First we drove about 4 km to Ubud centre where we stopped to eat. We ate at a restaurant called Buddha bowel which served phenomenal Asian food.

After eating, we drove the short trip to the Monkey Forest Sanctuary which was an incredible experience, if not terrifying. You can spend as long as you want here and the tickets are 50k each. Just be careful you don’t end up becoming one of the unlucky few where a monkey jumps on you and won’t jump back off. Saying that, the monkeys have obviously become comfortable around humans and do usually just sit around or play with themselves. It is quite incredible how close you can get to take a picture without them seeming to care. Obviously, it goes without saying, do be considerate of the sanctuaries rules.

From here, we went to Campuhan Ridge where we walked through the rice fields and the surrounding mountains. We got to witness an incredible sunset as well as some stunning scenery! What’s best about the Ridge walk is that it’s completely free!

Although we were in Bali, we had come across a Mexican restaurant (Taco Casa) which was absolutely rammed all day from the moment it opened. We decided for dinner we would eat here and wow it didn’t disappoint! After visiting Mexico earlier this year and falling in love with the food, I would never have expected for a restaurant in Bali to live up to the standard of food I had in Mexico – But it did! As you can imagine, the food is more expensive here than eating traditional Balinese food, but if you can afford to splurge a little then make this one of your places to eat.  When we eventually got back to the hotel, it was around midnight and we decided to go for a late night swim at the hotel’s pool.

After again eating our free breakfast, we checked out and headed to our new hotel in the centre of Ubud. The plan was to base ourselves here and then travel up to the north of Bali and visit its many waterfalls and volcanoes. Unfortunately, the place that we stayed (Alam Terrace) was fully booked for the day after our stay. Therefore, we could only stay one night here which meant we had to move to a new hotel again. However, I would definitely recommend this hotel as its quite simply stunning. The rooms are amazing and the pool is sublime.  

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Being able to write this post after only blogging for 16 months is a surreal moment. If the title hasn’t given it away already, 3TravelBug is now a top 100 travel blog ranking at 79!

Creating the blog in May 2017, the blog was originally just a place where we would write about our trips so we could remember them. We never expected to gain an audience of over 62,000 views by September 2018. The idea came during our Iceland trip where we started to go-pro our travels. Within a couple of months, we noticed that when we posted we were attracting high levels of traffic. But what was more exciting, was during our Asia trip where we didn’t post for 2 months but the levels of traffic were still impressive! This was probably the point where we thought that we could create a proper travel blog that can help others, instead of just a trip down memory lane for ourselves. 

During the last 16 months the blog has changed quite drastically. Originally, it gained traction with friends over social media accounts before exploding to over 120 different countries! The writing style changed to be more open and more inclusive for people who were inexperienced travellers to people who were travel nomads. We launched a new subsection, “Travel Guides”, where we explained the method behind how we travel, as well as summing up our 2017 travel adventures. In our latest posts, we created a post that showed our best pictures to date, that within the first two weeks has over 1,000 views! We have on a continuous basis been praised by other bloggers for our brute honesty when it comes to our travel experiences. We don’t try to hide something when it goes wrong – like when we were scammed in India.

Obviously, we would like to thank everyone that has supported our blog, whether that be reading our content, sharing or signing up for our email subscription. We could not have seen this quick development with the support of all of you. Since the creation, we have tried our best to listen to your feedback and create new angles on how we can show people the very best of travelling.

What we can promise for the future, is the travelling will only get bigger and better, and hopefully our blog too. Like 2017, 2018 has been an amazing year with trips still planned and some more in the planning stage. 2019 is set to be an even bigger year and hopefully we can keep you entertained with all the new material!

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3TravelBug by 3travelbug - 1M ago

2017 was an amazing year of travelling for us. Being able to travel for 40% of the year allowed us to visit some of the most incredible places around the world. With the travel, there were plenty of opportunities to capture every moment through a lens. This post will show you just some of our greatest pictures of 2017.

During our trip to Iceland we were constantly stopping to take pictures of all the amazing scenery. Seeing waterfall after waterfall, being lucky enough to see the northern lights and being able to see one of Iceland’s best glaciers, we could have uploaded most of our Iceland pictures. However, we have narrowed down to what we think are our best:

Hong Kong was our first stop in Asia, and was the first time that we had been outside of Europe. Originally, Hong Kong was just a place for us to start, as we thought that it wouldn’t be as much of a culture shock. However, we soon realised that Hong Kong was more than just a place for us to get in the swing of things. Hong Kong has so many amazing things to see and we tried doing most of them A particular favourite was the dragons back hike and seeing the Big Buddha. Here are some of our pictures:

Our second stop on our 3.5 months Asia trip was Malaysia. After spending around a week in KL, it quickly became one of our favourite cities. During our time in Malaysia we also spent time in the Cameron Highlands where we got to learn about its history, its tea plantations and how local tribes hunt food.

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3TravelBug by 3travelbug - 1M ago

After leaving Bergen relatively early in the day, we began our 7-hour journey to Geirangerfjord. Again, 7 hours might seem a long time but with the Norwegian scenery, car journeys are hardly a chore. Usually, on our trips, we don’t like sticking to a set routine, but because we still wanted to see Lofoten Island and Tromso in the next four days we had to. Our warning for anyone who wants to do a similar journey is that the roads in the winter can be very dangerous. Although gritters and snow ploughs are constantly trying to clear the roads, it only takes one snowstorm and you’re back doing 40kmph for the next 4 hours again. If you are wanting to go in the winter so you have a chance of seeing the northern lights, make sure you give yourself plenty of time as the north is spectacular. We found that the north was much better than the south and we wish we had spent more time here. Stavanger was a bit of an exception, but Bergen and Oslo didn’t really offer much that interested us. Of course, this could be different for you so make sure you do your research before visiting.

By the time we got to the Geirangerfjord, it was late at night and as you can imagine we were more than ready for bed. Again, Airbnb found us a really nice place. If you’re considering using Airbnb, you can save £25 for just sending a signup email and getting them to sign up. Therefore, if you’re travelling in a group then this is a fantastic way to save money and believe us when we say you’ll need all the money saving tricks you can find in Norway! The next morning, we started the day at 7ish, as we knew we had to take a 1.5hour ferry that goes right through the fjord. Unfortunately, due to severe bad weather, the ferry crossing was closed for the winter which really scuppered our plans. So, if you’re wanting to do this ferry crossing then it’s only open in the summer months, so maybe that is something to think about before choosing what season you want to visit Norway in. This meant that we had to head back the way we just came from for about 45 minutes to take another ferry crossing. You might wonder why we didn’t just take the one next to us in the first place, but the crossing that went through the fjord looked amazing compared to the one we eventually took.

After taking the ferry crossing, we then drove to the Ornesvingen viewpoint. Another warning here and as you will see by the picture below, the roads are beyond awful to drive on. Several times we skidded at ridiculously slow speeds. If you do make it to the viewpoint, then the views are out of this world and worth the risk. Overlooking the fjord, it gives you an amazing view of the lake and the surrounding mountains. The sun was just above the mountains which made the view all the better. From here, we visited another viewpoint, Flydalsjuvet which gives another spectacular view of the fjord. However, you are just viewing the same thing so if you are short of time then it may be worth just visiting the Ornesvingen viewpoint.

We decided that as we had around a 21-hour journey up to Lofoten Island that we should set off as soon as possible. This journey was brutal, as trying to sleep in a relatively small car was difficult. Our idea was one driver and one passenger stays awake for a shift and then when they got tired they swapped over with the people who had been sleeping. The only problem with this plan is sometimes the people in the back couldn’t sleep, which obviously makes it difficult and dangerous when the people in the front want to swap. Therefore, if you are deciding to do a similar trip give yourself more time than just 8 days. Obviously, we would have liked to have given ourselves more time, but we had to come back for the start of our university semester. Nevertheless, we powered on through and about 19 hours later we made it to our ferry crossing in the early hours of the morning. Unfortunately, we missed the ONLY ferry that day by 15 minutes! As you can imagine after driving for that long it was soul destroying as Lofoten Island was one of the places we really wanted to go and see.

After missing this ferry crossing it left us with two options, drive another 6 hours straight to Tromso or drive two more hours to another ferry crossing point to Lofoten Island. Even though by this point we were absolutely knackered, and would not have much time exploring the island, we decided to take another ferry crossing. The ferry took around 45 minutes and again as we mentioned in our previous Norway article, was incredibly expensive. However, when we got to the other side, we were so pleased that we had decided to go and check out Lofoten. Although there is so much to see in Lofoten and you could easily spend 3 or 4 days here and see puffins, whales, the northern lights etc, we decided that as we had limited time we would check out a place called Trollfjord. Trollfjord is a huge fjord with miles and miles of stunning lakes and mountain ranges. As it was winter time, there were only around 4 or 5 hours of daylight, so the skylight is amazing! The different colours bounce off the snowy mountains and lakes and it makes for an unreal experience. We spent around 3 hours just driving around the fjord as every time we wanted to leave, we would drive a little before stopping just to gawk at the view.

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After thoroughly enjoying our stay in Hong Kong, it was now time to head onto the second country of our tour of Asia. Malaysia was the next country and we didn’t really know what to expect. However, when we landed in Kuala Lumpur we instantly fell in love with the city and ended up staying for what some people might say, is way too long.

We arrived in KL late at night and took a taxi from the airport to our hostel ‘Sunshine Bedz’. Little did we know this hostel would be one of the highlights of our entire 3.5month trip. As soon as we got there we decided to go to bed so we could wake up early and start exploring. We began our day by eating at Dragon’s View Restaurant (DVR) where we tried some local cuisine and quickly left to visit the KL Forest Eco Park. The park had a walking canopy where you can walk through the forest and see an abundance of wildlife. However, the Eco Park seems more of something you would do if you prefer hiking than wildlife, as dynamic of the Park seems more built around hikers than animal lovers. After spending a couple of hours at the Eco Park, we left to go and visit the Batu Caves for the 1st time. We got to see most of the Batu Caves, which we would recommend visiting as it’s a really cool place. The caves are full of Hindu paintings and statues and it gives you an insight into some Hindu spirituality. Unfortunately, we could not visit the main attraction as one of us wasn’t wearing appropriate clothing. To enter, you can wear shorts and a T-shirt but your knees and shoulders must be covered, so keep that in mind if you’re thinking of visiting.

As our first day in KL was coming to an end we went back to the hostel to get showered before visiting the night market. Personally, the night market was my favourite place in KL. As a food lover, this market is amazing. During the course of our stay we must have eaten here most days. After eating all different kinds of weird and wonderful Malaysian cuisine, we headed back to the hostel where the hostel Rep, Kat, convinced us to come on the pub crawl tonight. The reason we needed convincing is that we had an elephant sanctuary visit at 7am the next day which we didn’t want to miss. However, even though the next day was a massive struggle, we were so glad that we decided to go out that night. Not only did we have a great time, but also met some incredible people! KL has a great night life down Bar Street and the club Sutra is awesome. KL has a policy where it’s ladies night, 5 times a week!

After being convinced that drinking 2 for 1 long Island Iced Teas all night was a good idea, it actually took the hostel receptionist to wake us up at 7am so we didn’t miss our bus to the elephant sanctuary. After what was a horribly bumpy, hungover, 3 hour journey, we arrived at the elephant sanctuary, via the Batu Caves, which we once again could not see the parts we didn’t see because we weren’t i wearing adequate clothing. However, the second time we actually did not know that we would be stopping at the Batu Caves. At the..

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After returning from Ha Long Bay to Hanoi for the night, we woke up again at 6.30am to leave to Sapa. A six-hour bus journey into the mountains takes you to a hotel for a one-night stay. However, the bus was incredibly cramped as we were stuck right at the back where its almost like mattress. If you are going to take a bus to Sapa from Hanoi make sure you are one of the first ones on so you can guarantee yourself a comfy seat in a normal sleeper seat.  The hotel we stayed at was amazing and for us very luxurious. Staying in a 6 bed room where only the three of us stayed, meant that we had lots of space to just chill out and have a good nights sleep. The hotel offered a motorbike rental scheme, which we decided to take advantage of and visit some waterfalls, as well as Sapa’s breath-taking mountain range views. Note if you are renting bikes in Vietnam (or most countries in South-East Asia), please be careful when riding as the roads are crazy and the rules most Westerners have grown up with do not apply. One of us was forced to fall off a bike when a lorry decided he didn’t want to wait any longer to pull out in front of us, but luckily escaped with no injuries. It was a shame we couldn’t say the same about the bike!

The next day a local guide came to our hotel and took us to the starting place of our two-day expedition through the mountains. The treks last most of the day but we did have some free time to swim in the river and grab a bite to eat. The trek is phenomenal and give you the opportunity to see Sapa in its true glory. Some of the sights were memorising, and quite frankly out of this world. There aren’t any hotels or hostels in the mountain ranges of Sapa, so your only chance of a bed for the night is a homestay, provided by the locals who live there. After finally reaching our home stay late in the day we got food and got to know the people we trekked with better. The locals who host you are really friendly and make you feel very welcome. They serve some western food but mainly Asian cuisine. They also offer rice wine, which if anyone has ever tasted before it is something to miss.  I would recommend getting an early night however, as you will be trekking again all day until you come back out of the mountains and get another six-hour bus journey back to Hanoi.

After trekking for 6hours, mainly up steep hills and then back down steep slopes, we eventually arrived at our tour guides home where his family served us dinner before we left for our coach back to Hanoi. The hospitality of the guide and the locals were more than we could ask for and really added to the whole experience. By the time we got back to Hanoi, it was late at night and as we had to get up early to leave for the Buffalo Run we decided to get an early night and go to bed.

View the rest of our Vietnam pictures here.

The Home of Adventure | Vietnam 2017 - YouTube
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