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Magic is at the centre of Dungeons and Dragons (D&D). Without it, adventuring in the D&D fantasy world with all its dangers would be nearly impossible. Virtually every adventuring party in Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League (DDAL) play has a powerful caster. While wizards get the limelight for powerful casters, sorcerers are living vessels of magical power in their own right. Wild magic sorcerers embrace their magical origins and leave their destiny to the dice. That’s a power that should also be feared.

Magic can get a little crazy around a wild magic sorcerer. Artwork by wizards of the Coast.

That fear lies primarily with other party members who don’t want to get fireballed by a wild magic surge from a sorcerer. The fear is a bit overblown but it does happen and did to me at Red War Calgary me last year. So… most of the time the roll on the Wild Magic Surge Table is beneficial, but not always. There is one roll that can deeply impact role play of your PC. That is changing age which happened to my Wild Magic sorcerer this week in DDAL play.

A straw poll around my Friendly Local Gaming Store (FLGS) had most players set their Player Character’s (PC) age at between 18 and 30 for a normal human. A bad roll can reduce your age by 1 to 9 years. An older character, within reason is fine, but dropping down to a pre-teen is hard on a player. It changes the dynamic of NPC interaction making it something that permanently changes a character unlike any other rule in D&D or DDAL play.

I call upon an example were changes that are seemingly permanent in game changes are reversed. The arcane Wish spell comes to mind. In DDAL play the fabric of reality repairs itself at the end of a DDAL session. This is the most powerful spell a mortal can cast in D&D. A 20th level PC wizard uses the arcane Wish spell for changing the Big Bad Evil Guy (BBEG) to be a pre-teen so that they could redeem themselves (the redemption paladin in our DDAL party would approve). At the end of the session the BBEG would return to their normal age. Is a wild magic surge MORE powerful than an arcane Wish spell?

There is some reprieve for a fate of running a pre-teen PC. DDAL administrator Travis Woodall leaves the door open a bit. If the age thing becomes an issue in game play then it should be reversed.

May your d20s roll ever in your favour.

Chris Kelly is the lead writer for Wizard’s Laboratory, and the Dungeon Master for The Heroes of Neverwinter in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. He has been a D&D player and DM for over 25 years. The bones of his first D&D character can be found at the bottom of a spiked pit trap in Keep on the Borderlands. Chris lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife Shannon, his son John, and his feline familiar Stormy. You can usually find him wasting time on Xbox One.

The post Sorcerer Wild Magic Surge and Aging in Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League appeared first on Wizard’s Laboratory.

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Few multi-class options offer as much magical prowess as the wizard class. Artwork by Wizards of the Coast.

There are few classes that offer the flexibility and power that the wizard class does in Dungeons and Dragons (D&D). Combined with another class and you have a formable Player Character (PC). Take a small dip (a level or two), or dive deep matching or even exceeding your original class selection. There are a few additional restrictions to D&D’s organized play Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League (DDAL) to multiclassing, especially the wizard class.

Spellbooks, the centre of a wizard’s existence. Artwork by Wizards of the Coast.

We’ll assume you character has at least a 13 Intelligence score to multiclass. The biggest challenge appears to be the multiclassing rule that says “You don’t, however, receive the class’s starting equipment,” (see below). A quick look at the wizard starting equipment reveals that yes, indeed, the spellbook is on the list (see below). To a DDAL multiclassing PC that could be a problem.

The multiclass rule laying out a PC doesn’t receive the class’s starting equipment. Source: DnDBeyond.com Starting equipment for the wizard class includes a spellbook. Source: DnDBeyond.com

The cost of a spellbook is 50gp, which is the entire amount a PC receives in gold for levelling in Tier 1 (levels 2 – 4) play in DDAL play. And that’s the good news! The spellbook your PC buys is blank, it doesn’t come with spells. A starting wizard starts with 6 1st level spells. You’ll need a way to get those spells. In DDAL play you’ll likely need to buy scrolls to scribe and fill your spellbook. At 75gp per scroll, six 1st level spells will set your PC back 450gp. Worse, you have to roll a successful Intelligence (Arcana) check in order to scribe the scroll into your spellbook. With 1st level spells and presuming at least a +1 Intelligence modifier the odds are 50-50 for successful scribing the spell scroll into your spellbook. So, budget another another 225gp for flub ups. Let’s add it up: spellbook 50gp, 6 1st level spells 450gp, flub ups 225gp which brings the total to 725gp!

Wow! That’s a lot of gold to multiclass to the wizard class. Now let’s break it down with DDAL rules on mundane treasure to achieve multiclassing into a wizard. To make it easy we’ll assume you save every gold piece you get because you really want to be part wizard. To do it on straight gold from levelling your need to be 7th level in your original class. But, let’s say you want to get there really fast and burn levelling gold and Treasure Checkpoints (TCPs). You could multiclass in wizard as early as 4th level. A high price to  be sure.

Good News!

A rules clarification just a few weeks ago make all the above math and anxiety a mote point. Jeremy Crawford, Lead Games Designer of Dungeons and Dragons outlines that the spellbook needed by wizards in not equipment per say, but a Spellcasting feature. Hence, your PC will get a spellbook AND 6 1st level spells for free! Now your DDAL PC can multiclass into wizard as early as character level 2. Yay!

May your d20s roll ever in you favour.

Chris Kelly is the lead writer for Wizard’s Laboratory, and the Dungeon Master for The Heroes of Neverwinter in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. He has been a D&D player and DM for over 25 years. The bones of his first D&D character can be found at the bottom of a spiked pit trap in Keep on the Borderlands. Chris lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife Shannon, his son John, and his feline familiar Stormy. You can usually find him wasting time on Xbox One.

The post D&D Adventurers League: Multiclassing into the Wizard class appeared first on Wizard’s Laboratory.

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It’s hard to tell if your fighting a natural beast a or druid in wild shape, but even Circle of the Moon druids can’t wild shape into a T-rex. Take heart brave adventurers that’s a real T-rex! Artwork by Wizards of the Coast.

I’m in the enviable position of being invited to a new Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) campaign in Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League (DDAL). I decided to branch out a bit and play a druid. Getting in touch with nature just seems right this spring. Changing into a beast to do battle with bad guys also has an appeal to change it up. Looking around, I couldn’t find a comprehensive list of beasts my newly minted druid could change into. A druid beast list would surely help…

Druids have the awesome ability to wild shape change in to beasts from nature in the fantasy world. Artwork by Wizards of the Coast.

Below I have created a list for my fellow druid players who need help. I’ve included links, where possible, to the beast available for wild shape. Each animal has unique skills (like swimming, flying, climbing, dark vision, improved senses, stealth, and multiple attacks to name a few) that may come in handy in an adventure. Remember, your PC has to have seen the creature in order to change into that creature. A bear, cat, or wolf, would be pretty easy to explain how a druid having seen but check with your DM for changing into a dinosaur. Very technically, swarms of creatures (bats, rats, insects etc.) aren’t DDAL legal as your druid would be more than a single creature. I’ve also highlighted specific sought after abilities of beasts by players such as multiattack, or poison.

This is a massive reference. Standard druid wild shapes are listed below then Circle of the Moon druid wild shapes are listed. Bookmark this page as a quick reference for ease of play. You’ll always be prepared with the best druid wild shape possible for whatever adventuring situation calls for (not always combat…).

Standard Druid Wild Shapes 2nd Level Druid: Maximum CR 1/4, no flying or swimming creatures:

Axe Beak (CR 1/4) – Large, AC 11, HP 19, Speed 50 ft., Passive Perception 10, Melee Weapons Attack +4, Beak.

Baboon (CR 0) – Small, AC 12, HP 3, Speed 30 ft., climb 30 ft., Passive Perception 11, Melee Weapon Attack +1, Bite, Pack tactics.

Badger (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 10, HP 3, Speed 30 ft., burrow 5 ft., Darkvision, Passive Perception 11, Melee Weapon Attack +2, Bite, Keen Smell.

Boar (CR 1/4) – Medium, AC 11, HP 11, Speed 40 ft., Passive Perception 9, Charge, Relentless, Melee Weapon Attack +3, Tusk.

Camel (CR 1/8) – Large, AC 9, HP 15, Speed 50 ft., Passive Perception 9, Melee Weapon Attack +5, Bite.

Cat (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 12, HP 2, Speed 40 ft., climb 30 ft., Perception +3, Stealth +4, Passive Perception 13, Melee Weapon Attack +0, Claws, Keen Smell.

Deer (CR 0) – Medium, AC 13, HP 4, Speed 50 ft., Passive Perception 12, Melee Weapon Attack +2, Bite.

Draft Horse (CR 1/4) – Large, AC 10, HP 19, Speed 50 ft., Passive Perception 10, Melee Weapon Attack +6, Hooves.

Elk (CR 1/4) – Large, AC 10, HP 13, Speed 50 ft., Passive Perception 10, Charge, Melee Weapon Attack +5, Ram, Hooves.

Giant Badger (CR 1/4) – Medium, AC 10, HP 13, Speed 30 ft. burrow 10 ft., Darkvision 30 ft., Passive Perception 11, Keen Smell, Multiattack, Melee Weapon Attack +3, Bite, Claw.

Giant Centipede (CR 1/4) – Small, AC 13, HP 4, Speed 30 ft. climb 30 ft., Blindsight 30 ft., Passive Perception 8, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite (Poison).

Giant Fire Beetle (CR 0) – Small, AC 13, HP 4, Speed 30 ft., Passive Perception 8, Melee Weapon Attack +1, Bite, Blindsight 30ft., Illumination 10ft..

Giant Goat (CR 1/4) – Large, AC 11, HP 19, Speed 40 ft., Passive Perception 11, Charge, Sure-Footed, Melee Weapon Attack +5, Ram.

Giant Lizard (CR 1/4) – Large, AC 12, HP 19, Speed 30 ft. climb 30 ft., Darkvision 30 ft., Passive Perception 10, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite.

Giant Rat (CR 1/8) – Small, AC 12, HP 7, Speed 30 ft., Darkvision 60ft., Passive Perception 10, Keen Smell, Pack Tactics, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite.

Giant Weasel (CR 1/8) – Medium, AC 13, HP 9, Speed 40 ft., Perception +3, Stealth +5, Darkvision 60 ft., Passive Perception 13, Keen Hearing and Smell, Melee Weapon Attack +5, Bite.

Giant Wolf Spider (CR 1/4) – Medium, AC 13, HP 11, Speed 40 ft., Perception +3, Stealth +7, Blindsight 10 ft., Darkvision 60 ft., Passive Perception 13, Spider Climb, Web Sense, Web Walker, Melee Weapon Attack +3 Bite (Poison).

Goat (CR 0) – Medium, AC 10, HP 4, Speed 40 ft., Passive Perception 10, Melee Weapon Attack +3, Ram, Charge, Sure-footed.

Hyena (CR 0) – Medium, AC 11, HP 5, Speed 50 ft., Perception +3, Passive Perception 13, Melee Weapon Attack +2, Bite, Pack tactics.

Jackal (CR 0) – Small, AC 12, HP 3, Speed 40 ft., Perception +3, Passive Perception 13, Melee Weapon Attack +1, Bite, Keen Hearing and Smell, Pack tactics.

Lizard (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 10, HP 2, Speed 20 ft. Climb 20 ft., Darkvision 30 ft., Passive Perception 9, Melee Weapon Attack +0, Bite.

Mastiff (CR 1/8) – Medium, AC 12, HP 5, Speed 40 ft., Perception +3, Keen Hearing and Smell, Melee Weapon Attack +3, Bite.

Mule (CR 1/8) – Medium, AC 10, HP 11, Speed 40 ft., Passive Perception 10, Beast of Burden, Sure-Footed, Melee Weapon Attack +2, Hooves.

Panther (CR 1/4) – Medium, AC 12, HP 13, Speed 50 ft. climb 40 ft., Perception +4, Stealth +6, Passive Perception 14, Keen Smell, Pounce, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite, Claw.

Pony (CR 1/8) – Medium, AC 10, HP 11, Speed 40 ft., Passive Perception 10, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Hooves.

Rat (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 10, HP 1, Speed 20 ft., Darkvision 30ft, Passive Perception 10, Melee Weapon Attack +0, Bite, Keen Smell.

Riding Horse (CR 1/4) – Large, AC 10, HP 13, Speed 60 ft., Passive Perception 10, Melee Weapon Attack +5, Hooves.

Scorpion (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 11, HP 1, Speed 10 ft., Blindsight 10 ft., Passive Perception 9, Melee Weapon Attack +2, Sting (Poison).

Spider (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 12, HP 1, Speed 20 ft. Climb 20 ft., Stealth +4, Darkvision 30 ft., Spider Climb, Web Sense, Web Walker, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite (Poison).

Weasel (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 13, HP 1, Speed 30 ft., Perception +3, Stealth +5, Passive Perception 13, Keen Hearing and Smell, Melee Weapon Attack +5, Bite.

Wolf (CR 1/4) – Medium, AC 13, HP 11, Speed 40 ft., Perception +3, Stealth +4, Keen Hearing and Smell, Pack Tactics, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite.

4th Level Druid: Maximum CR 1/2, no flying creatures:

Ape (CR 1/2) – Medium, AC 12, HP 19, Speed 30 ft. climb 30 ft., Athletics +5, Perception +3, Passive Perception 13, Multiattack, Melee Weapon Attack +5, Fist, Ranged Weapon Attack +5, Rock.

Black Bear (CR 1/2) – Medium, AC 11, HP 19, Speed 40 ft. climb 30 ft., Perception +3, Passive Perception 13, Keen Smell, Multiattack, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite, Claw.

Constrictor Snake (CR 1/4) – Large, AC 12, HP 13, Speed 30 ft. swim 30 ft., Blindsight 10 ft., Passive Perception 10, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite, Constrict (grappled, restrained).

Crab (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 11, HP 2, Speed 20 ft. swim 20 ft., Stealth +2, Blindsight 30 ft., Passive Perception 9, Amphibious, Melee Attack Weapon +0, Claw.

Crocodile (CR 1/2) – Large, AC 12, HP 19, Speed 20 ft. swim 30 ft., Stealth +2, Passive Perception 10, Hold Breath, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite (grappled) (restrained).

Frog/Toad (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 11, HP 1, Speed 20 ft. swim 20 ft., Perception +1, Stealth +3, Darkvision 30 ft., Passive Perception 11, Amphibious, Standing Leap, (no attacks).

Giant Crab (CR 1/8) – Medium, AC 15, HP 13, Speed 30 ft. swim 30 ft., Stealth +4, Blindsight 30 ft., Passive Perception 9, Amphibious, Melee Weapon Attack +3, Claw (grappled).

Giant Frog (CR 1/4) – Medium, AC 11, HP 18, Speed 30 ft. swim 30 ft., Perception +2, Stealth +3, Darkvision 30 ft., Passive Perception 12, Amphibious, Standing Leap, Melee Weapon Attack +3, Bite (grappled, restrained), Swallow (blinded, restrained).

Giant Sea Horse (CR 1/2) – Large, AC 13, HP 16, Speed 0 ft. swim 40 ft., Passive Perception 11, Change, Water Breathing, Melee Weapon Attack +3, Ram.

Giant Poisonous Snake (CR 1/4) – Medium, AC 14, HP 11, Speed 30 swim 30 ft., Perception +2, Passive Perception 12, Blindsight 10 ft., Melee Weapon Attack +6, Bite (Poison).

Poisonous Snake (CR 1/8) – Tiny, AC 13, HP 2, Speed 30 ft. swim 30 ft., Blindsight 10 ft., Passive Perception 10, Melee Weapon Attack +5, Bite (Poison)

Octopus (CR 0) – Small, AC 12, HP 3, Speed 5 ft. swim 30 ft., Perception +2, Stealth +4, Darkvision 30 ft., Passive Perception 12, Hold Breath, Underwater Camouflage, Water Breathing, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Tenticle (grappled), Ink Cloud.

Quipper (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 13, HP 1, Speed 0 ft. swim 40 ft., Darkvision 60 ft., Passive Perception 8, Blood Frenzy, Water Breathing, Melee Weapon Attack +5.

Reef Shark (CR 1/2) – Medium, AC 12, HP 22, Speed 0 ft. swim 40 ft., Perception +2, Blindsight 30 ft., Passive Perception 12, Pack Tactics, Water Breathing, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Bite.

Sea Horse (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 11, HP 1, Speed 0 ft. swim 20 ft., Passive Perception 10, Water Breathing, (no attacks).

War Horse (CR 1/2) – Large, AC 11, HP 19, Speed 60 ft., Passive Perception 11, Trampling Charge, Melee Weapon Attack +6, Hooves.

8th Level Druid: Maximum CR 1:

Bat (CR 0) – Tiny, AC 12 HP 1, Speed 5 ft. fly 30 ft., Blindsight 60 ft., Echolocation, Keen Hearing, Melee Weapon Attack +0, Bite.

Blood Hawk (CR 1/8) – Small, AC 12, HP 7, Speed 10 ft. fly 50ft., Perception +4, Passive Perception 14, Keen Sight, Pack Tactics, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Beak.

Brown Bear (CR 1) – Large, AC 11 HP 34, Speed 40 ft. climb 30 ft., Perception +3, Passive Perception 13, Keen Hearing and Smell, Multiattack, Melee Weapon Attack +6, Bite, Claws.

Dire Wolf (CR 1) – Large, AC 14 HP 37, Speed 50 ft., Perception +3, Stealth +4, Passive Perception 13, Keen Smell, Pack Tactics, Melee Weapon Attack +5, Bite.

Eagle (CR 0) – Small, AC 12, HP 3, Speed 10 ft. 60 ft., Perception +4, Passive Perception 14, Keen Sight, Melee Weapon Attack +4, Talon.

Flying Snake (CR 1/8) – Tiny, AC 13, HP 5, Speed 30 ft. fly 60ft. swim 30 ft., Blindsight 10 ft., Passive Perception 11, Flyby, Melee Weapon Attack +6, Bite (Poison).

Giant Bat (CR 1/4) – Large, AC 13, HP 22, Speed 10 ft. fly 60ft., Blindsight 60 ft.,..

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Lucky the cleric is still alive else a Potion of healing would be really handy. Artwork by Wizards of the Coast.

It was a big battle but the big evil boss battle is still yet to come. Your Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) adventuring party is scrapped and banged up but you need some healing before pressing on deeper into the dungeon to the final battle. A few Potions of healing can do the trick, but it’s a little more challenging in Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League (DDAL) play.

First, there are limits on both mundane and magical wealth in DDAL for league play balancing. Most mundane treasure (gold, jewelry, artwork, etc) found in published adventures by your Player Character (PC) are ignored. This DDAL limitation severely curtails funds to buy Potions of healing in the local market at 50gp each. The good thing is you have a stipend (allowance) when you level, however it’s quite limited:

Individual treasure earned for levels gained.

Ok, your player character (PC) isn’t rich. You can still buy a Potion of healing (Tier 1) or 3 Potions of healing (Tier 2) with your level. Let’s look at ways to heal up the party and get you off the the big bad boss fight.

Straight Forward Ways of acquiring Potions of healing in DDAL

1) Use 8 Treasure Checkpoints (TCPs) to buy a Potion of healing. I would seriously consider other options before spending 8 hard earned TCPs for a single consumable magic item. There are other options.

2) Convert a single Treasure Checkpoint to 50gp and then buy a Potion of healing. A much better use of TCPs that won’t put your PC in the hole for permanent magic items.

3) Simply use your gold earned from levelling to buy a Potion of healing as mentioned above. This is the most common use of gold in DDAL play, especially in critical low character levels.

Creative Ways of acquiring Potions of healing in DDAL

1) Trade with players at your table. If you have a potion (i.e. a Potion of climbing) from Magic Item Chart A you can trade for a Potion of healing. Or if you have a potion (i.e. a Potion of animal friendship) from Magic Item Chart B you can trade for a Potion of greater healing. As a bonus it won’t cost Downtime Days (DTs) to complete the transaction. Note: Fai Chen, the DDAL online/convention magic item market, doesn’t trade in consumable magic items.

2) Bug your Druid in the adventuring party to get brewing. All druids, no matter the Druid Circle, start with the Herbalism tool proficiency. In DDAL Potions of healing can be brewed using rules guidance outlined in Xanathar’s Guide to Everything. Using this method cuts the cost of a Potion of healing down to 25gp and 1 DT.

3) Use DDAL DT to learn how to brew. Spending 250 Downtime Days and your PC can learn the Herbalism tool proficiency and brew their own Potions of healing. I agree, by the time your PC has 250 DTs you likely won’t need a lowly Potion of healing.

4) Why learn how to brew? Start your next DDAL PC with the Herbalism tool proficiency. Check out the Folk Hero, Guild Artisan, and Hermit character backgrounds in the Dungeons and Dragons Player’s Handbook (PHB).

5) Does you PC belong to a faction? If not, then sign up now! The Harpers, Lords’ Alliance, Order of the Gauntlet, Emerald Enclave, and Zhentarim offer perks for membership right from the get go. One perk is obtaining a Potion of healing just for being a member! At the start of each DDAL module or hardcover chapter (DDHC) your character can (and should) obtain a Potion of healing. For more details check out my article on this cool topic: D&D Adventurers League: The Secret Your DM Doesn’t Want You to Know!

6) Don’t forget your DM rewards. Often overlooked by busy DMs, Potions of healing could be hiding right under your nose!

7) Adventure! The next Potion of healing could be in the next room, under the Kobold king’s chair! The best part in DDAL play is consumable magic items don’t need to be unlocked and purchased with TCPs. They can be picked up, used, saved, even taken into the next session without any cost.

The above entries about how to find Potions of healing in DDAL play is by no mean exhaustive. If you can find another DDAL legal way to acquire Potions of healing I’d love to know!

May your d20s roll ever in your favour.

Chris Kelly is the lead writer for Wizard’s Laboratory, and the Dungeon Master for The Heroes of Neverwinter in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. He has been a D&D player and DM for over 25 years. The bones of his first D&D character can be found at the bottom of a spiked pit trap in Keep on the Borderlands. Chris lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife Shannon, his son John, and his feline familiar Stormy. You can usually find him wasting time on Xbox One.

The post D&D Adventurers League: Finding Potions of Healing appeared first on Wizard’s Laboratory.

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I’ve created another easy list for Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) players who like to play organized league play in Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League (DDAL). Bookmark this page for quick and easy reference.

Magic Item Table A. DMG p144. Magic Item Table B. DMG p144.

Potion of greater healing (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs 8 TCPs or 100gp (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs) [Consider saving 6 TCPs by converting 2 TCPs to 100 gold pieces then buy the potion], DMG p187.

Potion of fire breath (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Breath fire like a dragon unto 3 times in an hour! DMG p187.

Potion of resistance (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned). Remember, it must be the same resistance type as the original potion that your PC unlocked. DMG p188.

Ammunition +1 (Weapon, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Remember, magical ammunition found during an adventure is a consumable. DMG p150.

Potion of animal friendship (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). [Consider buying the potion for 100gp and save 8 TCPs] Animals! We come in peace… DMG p187.

Potion of hill giant strength (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Boost your strength stat to 21 for an hour. Hulk smash now! DMG p187.

Potion of growth (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Become a ‘dire creature’ for 1d4 hours as per the enlarge/reduce spell. DMG p187.

Potion of water breathing (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). [Consider buying the potion for 100gp and save 8 TCPs] Breath water for an hour. Dive, Dive, Dive! DMG p188.

Spell scroll 2nd level (Scroll, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). [Consider saving 5 TCPs by converting 3 TCPs to 150 gold pieces then buy the scroll], DMG p200.

Spell scroll 3rd level (Scroll, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4) earned TCPs). [Consider saving 2 TCPs by converting 6 TCPs to 300 gold pieces then buy the scroll], DMG p200.

Bag of Holding (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs) Carry 500 pounds like its only 15 pounds! DMG p153.

Keoghtom’s ointment (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 -4 earned TCPs).  Get 2-5 dose (1d4 + 1 (rolled in front of your AL DM) worth of 2d8 +2 healing AND cure any poison or disease. The best value for healing for 8 TCPs in the game! DMG p179.

Oil of slipperiness (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Slather this oil all over in just 10 minutes and its like casting freedom of movement for 8 hours. For when your going into a tight squeeze situation. DMG p184.

Dust of disappearance (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). You and creatures with 10 feet of you become invisible for 2d4 minutes. DMG p166.

Dust of dryness (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Water elementals watch out for 10d6 per pinch of dust! DMG p166.

Dust of sneezing and choking (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Incapacitate your foe! DMG p166.

Elemental Gem (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Unleash an elemental (as per conjure elemental) on your enemies! DMG p167.

Philter of love (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Pour on the charm and fall in love with your eye’s desire! DMG p184.

Alchemy jug (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Be the adventurer that brings the portable keg to the kegger. DMG p150.

Cap of water breathing (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Stay underwater for as long as you want. DMG p157.

Cloak of the manta ray (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Breath water and have a swim speed! DMG p159.

Driftglobe (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). A floating light, to keep you hand free during combat. Just remember, the daylight spell setting doesn’t produce undead damaging sunlight. DMG p166.

Goggles of night (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Get 60′ darkvision if you don’t have it, or if you do, extend your darkvision by 60′. DMG p172.

Helm of comprehending languages (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Never spend spell slots on comprehend languages again. DMG p173. DMG p173.

Immovable rod (Rod, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Drive your DM crazy with creative uses! Tie a rope to it for more fun! DMG p175.

Lantern of revealing (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Light the lantern and never worry about invisible creatures again. DMG p179.

Mariner’s armour (Armour {light, medium, heavy}, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Get a swim speed and float to the surface when at 0 hit points. DMG p181.

Mithral armour (Armour {medium or heavy, but not hide}, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Wear under your special occasion clothing or for extra stealthy adventurers. DMG p182.

Potion of poison (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Embrace your inner assassin and poison your opponent. DMG p188.

Ring of swimming (Ring, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Never learned to swim? Now you don’t need too. Get swim speed 40 feet. DMG p193.

Robe of useful items (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). If only we had a _____ in this dungeon… with this robe you do. DMG p195.

Rope of climbing (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Use this rope in place of a rogue to climb walls. DMG p197.

Saddle of the cavalier (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs). Save a horse! Buy the saddle! DMG p199.

Wand of magic detection (Wand, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 -4 earned TCPs). Save spell slots with this wand. DMG p211.

May your d20s roll ever in your favour.

Chris Kelly is the lead writer for Wizard’s Laboratory, and the Dungeon Master for The Heroes of Neverwinter in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. He has been a D&D player and DM for over 25 years. The bones of his first D&D character can be found at the bottom of a spiked pit trap in Keep on the Borderlands. Chris lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife Shannon, his son John, and his feline familiar Stormy. You can usually find him wasting time on Xbox One.

The post D&D Adventurers League: Treasure Checkpoint Costs for ‘Table B Magic Items’ appeared first on Wizard’s Laboratory.

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Make League play record keeping easy with Adventurer’s League Log. Screen shot.

Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) is a game of the imagination as much as it is a pencil and paper based game. Since the mid-1970s, pencil and paper have faithfully followed the game. Many of the players I Dungeon Master (DM) or play alongside with, pride themselves on their erasure worn, torn, and pencil smudged Player Character (PC) sheets. New players quickly learn in D&D things on your character sheet change, either for the better or worse and it all has to be recorded, in pencil. The same record keeping enthusiasm can’t be extended to the Dungeons and Dragons Adventures League (DDAL) log sheet.

DDAL play adds another level of administration to D&D play. It’s part of the burden we DDAL players have to bear for standardized play throughout the world, but it doesn’t make it any easier. Each DDAL session requires players who participated to record the following: The adventure module/hardcover chapter, session number, Advancement Checkpoints (ACP) awarded, Treasure Checkpoints (TCPs) collected, Downtime and Renown earned, date and location of the session, the DM’s name and DCI number, gold and TCPs spent, and finally a space for notes for play/record keeping. To be honest, it’s a lot and plenty of players groan about this part of league play.

Here’s the challenge. D&D players are usually either super organized and love record keeping or their not. If your like me and don’t want to be caught up in the milieu of DDAL accounting, there is a new hope. I have been using a great website called Adventurers League Log to take care of the administration of DDAL play.

First off, its free! Your don’t need anything more than your email (username) and a clever password to use it. Second, you won’t be bombarded with spam emails from this website either, which is refreshing for sure!

The landing page once you log in displays all your DDAL character logs. Screen shot.

Creating a character log is a few keystrokes and your ready. Each session is the recorded and saved  in the cloud. It’s that easy!

DMs can also record their session with Adventurers League Log too! It’s virtually the same as a character record except you can bank the session or allocate the session to be assigned to a specific PC you have in your roaster.

An example of a character record sheet in Adventurers League Log

Adventurers League Log has many advantages. It’s cloud based so you’ll ways have all you character DDAL log sheets on your phone (you can print them if you still want paper). It tracks gold when you level, which cool because I always forget how much of a gold stipend a character gets when they level. It’s easy for a DM to check your PCs log (important in conventions and tournaments).

Sample of a character entry page to record all your PC’s DDAL log needs for the session.

If you start typing the in the ‘Adventure Title’ field , most of the it will fill it in. You also don’t have to remember, or keep asking your DM for their DCI number as the program keeps a pull down screen of all your favourite DMs. There is even an ‘Old Format’ that tracks sessions earlier that Season 8 Waterdeep: Dragon Heist (W:DH), which is great for uploading all your logs into the cloud.

The only complaint is magic items aren’t loadable like the ‘Adventure Title’ field. I’m sure it’s a lot of work and I do understand this a volunteer run website . While some items could be uploaded using parts of the Open Gaming Licence for D&D 5E, there would still be gaps in proprietary magic items. This minor complaint hardly impacts the functionality of a great website.

Here’s a link to easier DDAL player log recording and never forgetting it at home:

Adventurers League Log

I rate this website 6 on a d6.

May your d20s roll ever in your favour.

Chris Kelly is the lead writer for Wizard’s Laboratory, and the Dungeon Master for The Heroes of Neverwinter in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. He has been a D&D player and DM for over 25 years. The bones of his first D&D character can be found at the bottom of a spiked pit trap in Keep on the Borderlands. Chris lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife Shannon, his son John, and his feline familiar Stormy. You can usually find him wasting time on Xbox One.

The post Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League Log: Making it Easy! appeared first on Wizard’s Laboratory.

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Kobolds feature prominently in Travis Woodall’s A Thousand Tiny Deaths. Artwork by Wizards of the Coast

It’s often a challenge to find a Tier 1 Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) adventure that appeals to all players in Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League (DDAL). Quite often a DDAL Dungeon Master (DM) has no idea of what players, often strangers, want from a League night adventure. The answers is here. A quick start that can be dropped into any location, straight forward progression, easy clues to follow, role play opportunities, a cool dungeon, good fights, and an opening story arc to a large D&D campaign (if wanted). It’s a tall order but author Travis Woodall’s A Thousand Tiny Deaths is able to easily pull it all off in just 2 hours.

A Quick Start

Getting the action started quickly, especially after a slot 0 session, can be a challenge for the DDAL DM. Players are always excited when they have shiny new or just budding characters and want to test them out. A Thousand Tiny Deaths gets going with a great fight scene that can be anywhere in the Forgotten Realms. A printable scale map for miniatures for this encounter is included as well.

Straight Forward Progression

If the Player Characters (PCs) survive the first fight they are well reward. Your adventurers have adventure literally fall from the sky into their laps. Woodall’s imaginative plot advancer is nice to see. It can be appreciated by players new to D&D and D&D veterans alike.

Easy Clues to Follow

Sometimes they PCs don’t know what to do next. A lot of DDAL adventures seem to be going in that direction. Miss a clue or two and it frustrating for PCs because the game stalls and needs to be pushed by the DM. The DM is unburdened of constant clue dropping and just let A Thousand Tiny Deaths unfold all on its own.

A Dungeon

A Tier 1 dungeon is also a more rare bird these days. For your players who want to adventure in a dungeon DDAL06-01 A Thousand Tiny Deaths delivers. A simple nest of baddies offers adventure, twists, rewards, and fame for your Tier 1 group.

Role Play Opportunities

Not all encounters need to be battles in the dungeon. If your players, were like mine, a lot of role-play was done to overcome obstacles, by-pass dangerous encounters, or even reveal secrets that can help the PCs accomplish their goals. That shows the flexibility of Woodall’s A Thousand Tiny Deaths.

Stand Alone or Part of a Campaign

A Thousand Tiny Deaths is a great stand along adventure. The reward within can be used for all classes of PCs making it easy to move onto other adventures. Woodall also included his adventure as part as an adventure hook for DDHC Tales from the Yawning Portal (TftYP) and it’s adventure within called The Forge of Fury which can advance your PCs through all of Tier 1.

Loot is to be had in A Thousand Tiny Deaths! Artwork by Wizards of the Coast. Observations and Conclusions

OK, first off, you’ll probably need more than 2 hours to run the adventure. It’s so jammed packed with good material that to really fully experience the adventure be prepared to add another hour or two. The monsters and villains enclosed can be deadly to Tier 1 parties. Don’t scoff at their individual stats. Their lethality lies in their teamwork. A few of my players characters had ‘fainting spells’ (drop to 0 hp only to be revived) when we played the adventure. The final villain is also a refreshing departure from expectation that is really fun to role-play. I love the inclusion of printable maps (which I used) that creates an extra dimension of immersion for the players. Stand alone or as the way into The Forge of Fury, Travis Woodall’s DDAL06-01 A Thousand Tiny Deaths is sure to be a favourite with your Tier 1 adventuring party.

A special thanks to my playtest group, The Heroes of Neverwinter, Ray, Jay, Ken, and Jon. Well done!

I rate A Thousand Tiny Deaths by Travis Woodall a 6 on a d6.

DDAL06-01 A Thousand Tiny Deaths by author Travis Woodall is available as a downloadable watermarked PDF on DMsGuild.com for $2.99USD.

May your d20s roll ever in your favor.

Chris Kelly is the lead writer for Wizard’s Laboratory, and the Dungeon Master for The Heroes of Neverwinter in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. He has been a D&D player and DM for over 25 years. The bones of his first D&D character can be found at the bottom of a spiked pit trap in Keep on the Borderlands. Chris lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife Shannon, his son John, and his feline familiar Stormy. You can usually find him wasting time on Xbox One.

The post Review of DDAL06-01 A Thousand Tiny Deaths appeared first on Wizard’s Laboratory.

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These adventurers could benefit from the secret your missing out on in DDAL play! Artwork by Wizards of the Coast.

I noticed a troubling trend in Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) organized play, Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League (DDAL) play. It has to do with changes in Season 8 Waterdeep Dragon Heist (W:DH) that your Dungeon Master (DM) doesn’t want you to know. Secrets revealed!

The Five Faction of Forgotten Realms: From right, The Harpers, The Zhentarim, The Lords’ Alliance, The Emerald Enclave, The Order of the Gauntlet. Artwork by Wizards of the Coast.

In previous seasons a Player Character (PC) could join a faction in Forgotten Realms. The Harpers, Lords’ Alliance, Emerald Enclave, Order of the Gauntlet, or The Zhentarim all recruited PCs so that their political ends could influence the direction of history in the Realms. By earning ‘renown’, a PC could rise through the 5 ranks within a faction and unlocked amazing boons. Faction members could have accelerated learning (night school for language arts or skills diversification), mentorship programs (buffs), and even gain permanent magic items!

The benefits of joining these factions have since been drastically reduced in Season 8 W:DH. There are no more boosts, or permanent magic items for membership. Due to the changes implemented in Season 8, faction enrolment fell precipitously as did tracking renown.

Waterdeep: Dragon Heist (Artwork by Wizards of the Coast)

Here’s the secret:

A straw poll at both my regular DDAL games at Sentry Box and Ogre’s Den, revealed a troubling trend. Average DDAL players have always connected ‘renown’ with tracking a PC’s status/rank within a faction. Now with faction membership being Nerfed, these average DDAL players stopped tracking renown. Don’t be that player! The best players in DDAL still record their characters renown, even if they don’t belong to a faction. Here’s why!

DDAL decoupled the renown game mechanic from tracking faction status in the Fall of 2018. PCs are still eligible to earn renown, despite not being in a faction. For every 4 hours of DDAL game play (assuming your moving the plot forward) your PC earns 1 renown. Below is a chart from the Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League Player’s Guide version 8.2 effective August 30 2018:

So what are the rewards of renown in Season 8 W:DH? Well what character couldn’t use a Potion of healing or even Potion of superior healing? A new shiny piece of armour or a valued yet expensive longbow? What player didn’t wish they had some Inspiration to spend on that critical roll? Below is a chart from the Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League Renown Benefits version 1.01 for Season 8 W:DH:

How does it work? At the start of each adventure (DDAL module), or beginning of each chapter of a hardcover adventure (i.e. Waterdeep: Dragon Heist or Waterdeep: Dungeon of the Mad Mage) the player can assign their PC a benefit according to the ‘Renown Rank & Benefits’ chart. No faction membership required!

Think of it as a grateful villager who awards the PC a Potion of healing for saving the village. A caravan driver who rewards the PC with equipment for fending off an orc attack. The prince/princess of the land imparts good luck (Inspiration) to the PC. It’s up to you the player, on how your PC gets the award but it presents a pretty cool way to flesh out a story.

May your d20s roll ever in your favour.

Chris Kelly is the lead writer for Wizard’s Laboratory, and the Dungeon Master for The Heroes of Neverwinter in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. He has been a D&D player and DM for over 25 years. The bones of his first D&D character can be found at the bottom of a spiked pit trap in Keep on the Borderlands. Chris lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife Shannon, his son John, and his feline familiar Stormy. You can usually find him wasting time on Xbox One.

The post D&D Adventurers League: The Secret Your DM Doesn’t Want You to Know! appeared first on Wizard’s Laboratory.

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An arrow +1 emanates powerful magic that illuminates a fair elf druid and her bow. Artwork by Howard Lyon.

Playing Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) in Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League (DDAL) means you’ll come across two types of magic items. The first are permanent magic items and the latter are consumable magic items.

A bad day of adventuring in Chult.

Permanent magic items are the easiest to spot in an adventure. A longbow +1 wielded by the orc war chief, a Wand of magic missiles held by a fledgling wizard. Even the Ring of feather fall on the finger of an imprisoned maiden given by her lover are just a few simple examples of permanent magic items. They’re easy to use and can remain in play to be called upon at anytime. There are drawbacks to permanent magic items. They are usually quite rare, expensive to buy with Treasure Checkpoints (TCPs), often require precious attunement slots (you get 3 in all), and highly regulated in DDAL play.

Consumable magic items are the underrated version of permanent magic items. They can do many tasks that their permanent cousins can do but usually for a short duration or finite number of times. Ammunition (Arrows +1, Sling bullets +1, etc.), potions (Healing, Fire Breath), and scrolls (Magic missile, Feather fall) can all serve as replacements of permanent magic items. These consumable magic items are less regulated by DDAL play and the best players in the league take advantage of this (while still playing fair).

The Pit Fiend is in the details in DDAL play. The best league players know how to use those details to their advantage. Artwork by Wizards of the Coast.

Let’s get into the details, ’cause that’s where the Pit Fiend is. Unlike permanent magic items, consumables don’t always need TCPs. A Player Character (PC) and pick up a Potion of fire breath and use it right away. That same player can keep the Potion of fire breath and use it the next session or even keep it until they retire (do ever really PCs retire?…). No TCP cost whatsoever. Pretty simple so far, but this is where the best players rise above the average players in DDAL play. They record the finding of the Potion of fire breath on their DDAL log. Why? So they can use TCPs to buy a second Potion of fire breath. Who knows, perhaps the grand doors of a long lost Dragon temple can only be opened by a breath weapon. Having the ability to regain that potion would be immeasurable compared to convincing a Red Dragon to do it for you. Don’t be that average D&D player in league play, be a great league player and record the ‘unlocks’ of consumable magic item you acquire.

Ok, you can’t Munchkin (keep for yourself) every consumable magic item your adventuring party comes across. In DDAL play you’ll be looked down upon and likely kicked out for unsportsmanlike play if you try. That doesn’t stop the great DDAL players from acquiring much needed consumable magic items. They exploit a little know rule in DDAL that allows you to record the ‘unlock’ of a consumable on the PC DDAL log. Even if another player picks up that Potion of fire breath, great players record the find. If they need it, like for the Dragon temple above, they can use TCPs to buy it so they can have it on their PC too. You just never know.

My good friend Bill who plays Fenava in my campaign The Heroes of Neverwinter, says it’s all about the administration. Thinking about it, he’s right. The best DDAL players know how to use administration to their advantage in league play. For example, let’s look at an adventuring party with a fighter and ranger. The fighter is a melee gal who also has a longbow for the few range attacks she does (about once or twice every other level). The ranger guy is a range attacker with a longbow as well, but careful play rarely has him in melee. The ranger would opt to buy a longbow +1 but this makes little sense for his fighter sister. She could use magical ammunition (arrow +1s) for the odd time she needs it. Range attacking a Stone Construct that is only hurt by magical means is a wise course of action. While she would ‘only’ get 20 arrows +1 it’s just half the TCP cost (8 TCPs) of acquiring a longbow +1 (16 TCPs). There’s also the added benefit of sharing the arrows +1 with her ranger bother to stack the attack and damage bonuses. Great DDAL players help themselves so they can help each other.

Waterdeep: Dragon Heist (Artwork by Wizards of the Coast)

Now let’s move into a new frontier in DDAL play, spell scrolls. They can obviously be used in a pinch to be added to a spellbook. More flexibility for PCs in spell scrolls was introduced in DDAL Season 8: Waterdeep Dragon Heist. Casters can now create their own consumable magic items, spell scrolls. That means any caster from the obvious wizard class, to the more obscure Eldritch Knight class can scribe scrolls. It also means, if your PC comes across a spell scroll they can record it, even if they can’t cast it. Perhaps that arcane Knock spell scroll the fighter ‘unlocked’ and recorded in their PC DDAL log sheet could save a lot of grief. Spending 8 TCPs to open the Dragon temple doors may well be a bargain over convincing the Red dragon to open the doors.

Great DDAL players don’t scoff at consumable magic items, they embrace them as another tool in the D&D toolkit. They can fill a gap in ability, magical shortcoming, or provide timely combat buffs without the TCP cost a permanent magic item or the commitment of a precious attunement slot. Let consumable magic items fill the gap in your next DDAL game.

May your d20s roll ever in your favor.

Chris Kelly is the lead writer for Wizard’s Laboratory, and the Dungeon Master for The Heroes of Neverwinter in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. He has been a D&D player and DM for over 25 years. The bones of his first D&D character can be found at the bottom of a spiked pit trap in Keep on the Borderlands. Chris lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife Shannon, his son John, and his feline familiar Stormy. You can usually find him wasting time on Xbox One.

The post D&D Adventurers League: Secrets the Best Players use: Consumable Magic Items appeared first on Wizard’s Laboratory.

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Artwork by Wizards of the Coast

I love playing Dungeons and Dragons (D&D), and in particular, I love playing D&D’s organized play Dungeons and Dragons Adventurers League (DDAL). The new players DDAL attracts, new perspectives, and creative ideas all really get me invigorated for D&D. What doesn’t invigorate me is the cumbersome method of finding the Treasure Checkpoint (TCP) cost of magic items. Cross reference the adventure for the magic item, find the a magic item table in the Dungeon Master’s Guide (DMG), then find the TCP cost on the Forgotten Realms Players Guide table. Be it Evergreen items (see my Evergreen post), Seasonal unlocks, or unlocks in previous (and future) seasons, the method DDAL has left us excited DDAL players in a mess. Below I’ve taken to organizing looking up your favourite magic item that you found, want to unlock, or simply want to know what is does. Most importantly for my DDAL players, you’ll know the TCP cost to make an along with some guidance for you to make an informed decision.

Bold new adventurers set off to find glory. Artwork by Wizards of the Coast Table A: DMG p144.

Potion of healing (Potion, common) 8 TCPs or 50gp (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs) [best deal is to convert 1 TCP to 50gp to save 7 TCPs], DMG p187.

Cantrip Spell Scroll (Scroll, common) 8 TCPs or 25gp (available for Tiers 1 -4) [Consider saving 7 TCPs by converting 1 TCP to 50 gold pieces then buy the scroll], DMG p200.

Potion of climbing (Potion, common) 8 TCPs or 75gp (available for Tiers 1 -4) [Consider saving 6 TCPs by converting 2 TCPs to 100 gold pieces then buy the potion], DMG p187.

Level 1 Spell Scroll (Scroll, common) 8 TCPs or 75gp (available for Tiers 1 -4) [Consider saving 6 TCPs by converting 2 TCPs to 100 gold pieces then buy the scroll], DMG p200.

Level 2 Spell Scroll (Scroll, uncommon) 8 TCPs or 150gp (available for Tiers 1 -4) [Consider saving 5 TCPs by converting 3 TCPs to 150 gold pieces then buy the scroll], DMG p200.

Potion of greater healing (Potion, uncommon) 8 TCPs 8 TCPs or 100gp (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs) [Consider saving 6 TCPs by converting 2 TCPs to 100 gold pieces then buy the potion], DMG p187.

Bag of Holding (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs) Carry 500 pounds like its only 15 pounds! DMG p153.

Driftglobe (Wondrous item, uncommon) 8 TCPs (available for Tiers 1 – 4 earned TCPs) A floating flash light, to keep your hand free during combat. Just remember, the Daylight spell setting doesn’t produce undead damaging sunlight. DMG p166.

Magic Item Table B. DMG p144.

May your d20s roll ever in your favour.

Chris Kelly is the lead writer for Wizard’s Laboratory, and the Dungeon Master for The Heroes of Neverwinter in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. He has been a D&D player and DM for over 25 years. The bones of his first D&D character can be found at the bottom of a spiked pit trap in Keep on the Borderlands. Chris lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada with his wife Shannon, his son John, and his feline familiar Stormy. You can usually find him wasting time on Xbox One.

The post D&D Adventurers League: Treasure Checkpoint Costs for ‘Table A Magic Items’ appeared first on Wizard’s Laboratory.

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