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Dietary 'no-nos' come and go, but one of the most prominently and consistently warned-against nutritional hazards of the past few decades is excessive sugar consumption. Sugar has been linked with health problems including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and tooth decay, to name a few. But sugar has also become a bit of an obsession, with myriad opinions on how harmful it is and what kinds of sugars do the most harm. Is wine’s sugar content something that drinkers should worry about?

We asked leading experts for the facts on sugar, wine and potential health concerns.

How much sugar is in wine?

Without sugar, there is no wine. Ripe grapes naturally contain sugars, and in the process of turning grape juice into wine, most of the sugars are converted into alcohol via fermentation. Any sugar that remains after the fermentation process is called residual sugar. This is the primary source of a wine's sugar content.

Though there aren't any hard-and-fast rules determining exactly how many sugars a specific type of wine will contain, and only a few wineries opt to feature nutritional information on their labels, there are still ways to get a good sense of how much sugar is in your glass of wine—the obvious one, of course, being how sweet the wine tastes. (Just don’t confuse fruitiness for sweetness.)

You can also pick up some clues without opening the bottle: Generally, if a wine is described as "dry," that means there are less than 10 grams per liter of residual sugar; a "sweet" or dessert wine has more than 30 grams per liter. Wines that fall in the middle of these limits are called "off-dry."

For Champagne and other sparkling wines, keywords to look out for are, in order from driest to sweetest: extra brut, brut, extra dry or extra sec, sec, demi-sec and doux.

The USDA also offers some guidance: According to its website, an average dry table wine has 1 to 2 grams of sugar in a standard 5-ounce serving, and sweet wines, such as Sauternes, Port and ice wine, which are usually served in smaller amounts, contain around 8 grams of sugar per 3.5-ounce pour (though this can vary).

Sugar's impact

So what do sugar levels mean for your recommended dietary intake? Experts say it depends if the sugars are naturally occurring or added.

"When we use the term 'sugar' from a metabolic or nutritional standpoint, we mean sugar that may be added into products, and we also mean naturally occurring sugar that can occur, say, in fruit, milk and even some vegetables," Kelley Bradshaw, a registered dietitian and the outpatient clinical manager of the Nutrition and Wellness Service at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, told Wine Spectator. "For natural sugars that would appear in fruit, vegetables, grains and dairy, we don’t have a restriction."

The good news is that wine, a product of fruit, almost always contains only natural sugars, which health experts do not put a limit on. But that does not mean you can go bananas with the sweet stuff! Although there is no universal limit on how much natural sugar you should consume, the federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that carbohydrates (including sugar, as well as starch and fiber) make up only 45 to 65 percent of your total daily calories. It is especially important to be mindful of your total sugar intake if you also consume a lot of soda, desserts or processed foods.

Furthermore, a handful of producers do add sugar or grape concentrate to sweeten a (usually lower-quality) wine—these are the added sugars that you need to watch out for. The American Heart Association recommends limiting daily added sugar intake to about 25 grams (or 6 teaspoons) of sugar for women, and about 36 grams (or 9 teaspoons) for men.

Want to learn more about how wine can be part of a healthy lifestyle? Sign up for Wine Spectator's free Wine & Healthy Living e-mail newsletter and get the latest health news, feel-good recipes, wellness tips and more delivered straight to your inbox every other week!

Wine, insulin and diabetes

We've reported on many scientific studies that look at the relationship between alcohol and diabetes and other blood sugar–related health concerns. Most recently, a paper from a study on wine and type 2 diabetes suggested that those with the disease might experience benefits if they switch from abstention to moderate drinking. A study from 2017 had similar findings, reporting that frequent, moderate drinking was linked with a lower chance of developing type 2 diabetes.

It does appear that wine in particular might have a stronger protective effect against this disease than other beverages. A 2016 study found that while wine, beer and spirits each were associated with a lower type 2 diabetes risk, those in the study that drank wine experienced a significantly lower risk.

It is believed that these benefits are due to alcohol's (and potentially, in particular, wine's) ability to increase insulin sensitivity, which allows the body to better process sugars and regulate blood-sugar levels.

"Articles have been published highlighting research that has demonstrated that modest consumption of wine—and even tea and cocoa—may have a protective effect in the development of diabetes," said Dr. Susan Williams, a practitioner at the Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. "Flavanols, naturally occurring polyphenolic compounds [found in these food items], have become important potential preventive agents."

However, experts warn that these findings indicate correlation, not causation. Other factors may be at play. "It does seem from studies that alcohol consumption decreases insulin levels in non-[diabetics]. However, the mechanism is poorly understood," said Dr. Caroline Apovian, a professor of medicine at Boston University and the director of the Center for Nutrition and Weight Management at Boston Medical Center. "I am skeptical of these studies because I think that moderate drinkers probably eat healthier than nondrinkers—certainly those who drink wine tend to eat healthier."

Overall, researchers and medical experts seem to agree that while we may not know exactly how alcohol affects diabetes risk and insulin functions, it's probably safe to enjoy a glass of wine. However, drinking heavily is never recommended, especially for those with diabetes and other health conditions.

"In general, it is considered beneficial to have one glass of red wine [a day], and there are studies that show that," said Joy Cornthwaite, a registered dietitian and diabetes educator at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "But … there are some drugs that promote low blood sugar, and if you take those in the presence of alcohol, it’s very dangerous, because if a person has liver-function issues, then their liver doesn’t kick in and provide them with extra glucose," which is protective against low blood sugar.

How to fit wine into a low-sugar diet

If you're concerned about your sugar intake, but don't want to give up wine, you're in luck. Wine, namely dry table wine and brut bubbly, are widely considered all-clear for low-sugar diets. In fact, the majority of wines, beers and spirits contain little to no sugar. (However, when it comes to liquor, watch out for those mixers!)

But if you like your wines with a little residual sugar, or you’re really trying to cut back on your sugar intake, there are ways to drink and still keep your nutrition goals in check. The first thing to keep in mind is how much you are drinking. The current recommendation from the USDA Dietary Guidelines is no more than one drink a day for women, and no more than two for men. And pour size matters too: "The [standard wine] serving size is 5 ounces … if you fill your glass appropriately and you don’t get a party-size glass … the sugar content is usually less than 5 grams, for sure," Cornthwaite said.

Bradshaw offers another tip: "If you want the wine, you can make a cut somewhere else, like instead of dessert, having wine." Just don't give up the healthy natural sugars found in fruits and vegetables—those are the good ones! And don't replace a whole meal with a glass of wine.

It really does come down to the choices that you make. If you’re committed to following good nutrition habits, and consulting your doctor when making health decisions, wine can be the sweetness on top of a well-balanced lifestyle.

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Dietary 'no-nos' come and go, but one of the most prominently and consistently warned-against nutritional hazards of the past few decades is excessive sugar consumption. Sugar has been linked with health problems including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and tooth decay, to name a few. But sugar has also become a bit of an obsession, with myriad opinions on how harmful it is and what kinds of sugars do the most harm. Is wine’s sugar content something that drinkers should worry about?

We asked leading experts for the facts on sugar, wine and potential health concerns.

How much sugar is in wine?

Without sugar, there is no wine. Ripe grapes naturally contain sugars, and in the process of turning grape juice into wine, most of the sugars are converted into alcohol via fermentation. Any sugar that remains after the fermentation process is called residual sugar. This is the primary source of a wine's sugar content.

Though there aren't any hard-and-fast rules determining exactly how many sugars a specific type of wine will contain, and only a few wineries opt to feature nutritional information on their labels, there are still ways to get a good sense of how much sugar is in your glass of wine—the obvious one, of course, being how sweet the wine tastes. (Just don’t confuse fruitiness for sweetness.)

You can also pick up some clues without opening the bottle: Generally, if a wine is described as "dry," that means there are less than 10 grams per liter of residual sugar; a "sweet" or dessert wine has more than 30 grams per liter. Wines that fall in the middle of these limits are called "off-dry."

For Champagne and other sparkling wines, keywords to look out for are, in order from driest to sweetest: extra brut, brut, extra dry or extra sec, sec, demi-sec and doux.

The USDA also offers some guidance: According to its website, an average dry table wine has 1 to 2 grams of sugar in a standard 5-ounce serving, and sweet wines, such as Sauternes, Port and ice wine, which are usually served in smaller amounts, contain around 8 grams of sugar per 3.5-ounce pour (though this can vary).

Sugar's impact

So what do sugar levels mean for your recommended dietary intake? Experts say it depends if the sugars are naturally occurring or added.

"When we use the term 'sugar' from a metabolic or nutritional standpoint, we mean sugar that may be added into products, and we also mean naturally occurring sugar that can occur, say, in fruit, milk and even some vegetables," Kelley Bradshaw, a registered dietitian and the outpatient clinical manager of the Nutrition and Wellness Service at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, told Wine Spectator. "For natural sugars that would appear in fruit, vegetables, grains and dairy, we don’t have a restriction."

The good news is that wine, a product of fruit, almost always contains only natural sugars, which health experts do not put a limit on. But that does not mean you can go bananas with the sweet stuff! Although there is no universal limit on how much natural sugar you should consume, the federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that carbohydrates (including sugar, as well as starch and fiber) make up only 45 to 65 percent of your total daily calories. It is especially important to be mindful of your total sugar intake if you also consume a lot of soda, desserts or processed foods.

Furthermore, a handful of producers do add sugar or grape concentrate to sweeten a (usually lower-quality) wine—these are the added sugars that you need to watch out for. The American Heart Association recommends limiting daily added sugar intake to about 25 grams (or 6 teaspoons) of sugar for women, and about 36 grams (or 9 teaspoons) for men.

Want to learn more about how wine can be part of a healthy lifestyle? Sign up for Wine Spectator's free Wine & Healthy Living e-mail newsletter and get the latest health news, feel-good recipes, wellness tips and more delivered straight to your inbox every other week!

Wine, insulin and diabetes

We've reported on many scientific studies that look at the relationship between alcohol and diabetes and other blood sugar–related health concerns. Most recently, a paper from a study on wine and type 2 diabetes suggested that those with the disease might experience benefits if they switch from abstention to moderate drinking. A study from 2017 had similar findings, reporting that frequent, moderate drinking was linked with a lower chance of developing type 2 diabetes.

It does appear that wine in particular might have a stronger protective effect against this disease than other beverages. A 2016 study found that while wine, beer and spirits each were associated with a lower type 2 diabetes risk, those in the study that drank wine experienced a significantly lower risk.

It is believed that these benefits are due to alcohol's (and potentially, in particular, wine's) ability to increase insulin sensitivity, which allows the body to better process sugars and regulate blood-sugar levels.

"Articles have been published highlighting research that has demonstrated that modest consumption of wine—and even tea and cocoa—may have a protective effect in the development of diabetes," said Dr. Susan Williams, a practitioner at the Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. "Flavanols, naturally occurring polyphenolic compounds [found in these food items], have become important potential preventive agents."

However, experts warn that these findings indicate correlation, not causation. Other factors may be at play. "It does seem from studies that alcohol consumption decreases insulin levels in non-[diabetics]. However, the mechanism is poorly understood," said Dr. Caroline Apovian, a professor of medicine at Boston University and the director of the Center for Nutrition and Weight Management at Boston Medical Center. "I am skeptical of these studies because I think that moderate drinkers probably eat healthier than nondrinkers—certainly those who drink wine tend to eat healthier."

Overall, researchers and medical experts seem to agree that while we may not know exactly how alcohol affects diabetes risk and insulin functions, it's probably safe to enjoy a glass of wine. However, drinking heavily is never recommended, especially for those with diabetes and other health conditions.

"In general, it is considered beneficial to have one glass of red wine [a day], and there are studies that show that," said Joy Cornthwaite, a registered dietitian and diabetes educator at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "But … there are some drugs that promote low blood sugar, and if you take those in the presence of alcohol, it’s very dangerous, because if a person has liver-function issues, then their liver doesn’t kick in and provide them with extra glucose," which is protective against low blood sugar.

How to fit wine into a low-sugar diet

If you're concerned about your sugar intake, but don't want to give up wine, you're in luck. Wine, namely dry table wine and brut bubbly, are widely considered all-clear for low-sugar diets. In fact, the majority of wines, beers and spirits contain little to no sugar. (However, when it comes to liquor, watch out for those mixers!)

But if you like your wines with a little residual sugar, or you’re really trying to cut back on your sugar intake, there are ways to drink and still keep your nutrition goals in check. The first thing to keep in mind is how much you are drinking. The current recommendation from the USDA Dietary Guidelines is no more than one drink a day for women, and no more than two for men. And pour size matters too: "The [standard wine] serving size is 5 ounces … if you fill your glass appropriately and you don’t get a party-size glass … the sugar content is usually less than 5 grams, for sure," Cornthwaite said.

Bradshaw offers another tip: "If you want the wine, you can make a cut somewhere else, like instead of dessert, having wine." Just don't give up the healthy natural sugars found in fruits and vegetables—those are the good ones! And don't replace a whole meal with a glass of wine.

It really does come down to the choices that you make. If you’re committed to following good nutrition habits, and consulting your doctor when making health decisions, wine can be the sweetness on top of a well-balanced lifestyle.

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Wine Country is an intimate movie, following the deep and complicated relationships of longtime friends. But behind the scenes, it was a massive production endeavor, like most feature films, accompanied by a small army of trailers for the cast, for makeup and wardrobe, for the commissary, and hundreds of crew members toting props, cameras, booms and rigs for lighting and sound. When the circus came to Napa to film, it was both exhilarating and overwhelming.

From hacking the complicated logistics to hanging out with the stars, the managers of the wineries appearing in the film—Artesa Estate, Quintessa winery and Baldacci Family Vineyards—and the mayor of the town of Calistoga recall the ups and downs of their few days in the Hollywood spotlight.

Read our exclusive feature on the new movie Wine Country in the May 31, 2019, issue of Wine Spectator, on newsstands now. Plus, check out more bonus online-only content about the film, to be released on Netflix May 10, including our interviews with director Amy Poehler, costars Maya Rudolph and Rachel Dratch, and writer Emily Spivey.

Photos courtesy of Artesa Estate, Quintessa and Baldacci Family Vineyards

On getting to "Action!"

Wine Spectator: What was it like preparing for a major film production to come to you?

Chris Canning, mayor, Calistoga, Calif.

When it was announced that they were coming, people got excited, the residents were interested. There was some trepidation on behalf of the businesses in town because they thought, "Oh, they're going to close the street, and we’re not going to be able to do business." Obviously, we’re still a living, breathing town, so it’s not like we can shut it all down. It’s a huge operation that comes in.

But between our public works, our public safety and the production company, everyone worked out a very amicable and reasonable schedule and the impact was minimal at best.

Kellie Duckhorn, general manager, Baldacci Family Vineyards (the fictional "Morgen Jorng" organic winery in the movie)

So I get this call in January of 2018 from this location scout. "Oh, we’re looking to shoot at sort of a rustic winery." And I said, "Yeah we’re not interested." [Editor’s note: The winery had just reopened and was concerned about logistics and permits.] [Eventually] I got super involved in the logistics of the whole thing [with the Netflix production company], not just for Baldacci but the whole project.

The county’s concerned about lookie-loos, they're really worried about traffic. Money doesn’t always buy simplicity or ease of operation. Sometimes no matter who you are, you're still gonna have to jump through some hoops. It was a very celebratory attitude after all the permits got approved. It was like, "Yes, thank God, we can make this happen."

Susan Sueiro, president, Artesa Estate

It was like the circus coming to town. They all just unpacked everything in 30 minutes. It was quite an impressive set of trailers. They basically turned our parking lot into a movie lot. They were here for three days, and they did a scene in the vineyard one day and then two scenes on the front lawn.

Photos courtesy of Artesa Estate, Quintessa and Baldacci Family Vineyards

On the scene …

Wine Spectator: What was it like watching the shoot and interacting with the cast and crew?

Leslie Sullivan, estates director, Quintessa

It was great to see just the pure joy that you could feel on the set. Amy [Poehler] was such a force, and it was very professional; they seemed so genuinely happy to be in wine country and to be doing this filming. And just the energy of all the characters, it was a lot of fun to be around.

They were also just really [enjoying] being in Napa, in wine country, and showing off pictures of what they were doing and where they were staying. There wasn't a lot of time for extracurricular activities, but it was great to see the pure joy and energy between those women.

Sueiro: They were extremely kind and generous with all of my staff. And that whole scene where Ana and Maya are dancing, the crew was all trying to do the dance in the background. So everyone was just laughing and having fun.

[Craig Cackowski, who plays the Artesa sommelier,] spent a little time with one of our staff pourers to talk about, "How would you do this, how would you present it? We want this to look authentic." And so he kind of walked him through the way that we would do a tasting so that he could pull it off in a way that was professional.

Being a woman who is running an estate winery here, watching Amy as a leader of her team, it was a management master class. The mood of all the people in the cast and crew and how positive they were and how thoughtful and generous they were and how much fun they had when they were doing it is a testament to her leadership. They were so professional, they were so well-organized. [Watching] somebody pull off a project of this scale so incredibly professionally and creatively was impressive. But to see a woman doing that was really inspiring.

Duckhorn: The props department came and completely beautified—I thought in a great way. They put up these fun, kinetic wrought-iron sculptures.

Prior to [filming in May], all their scouting was [in February], and we have all this mustard. It’s beautiful, so they wanted to know, “Can we replant the mustard?” No, because in May, typically the weather is warm, so all that stuff has died. But we worked with them. We did a seed mix that was wildflowers. So there were just little things that every two weeks came up: “Can we make sure the trees are still blooming?" “Hmm, I don’t know, but we can maybe put something else out there?" So it was just stuff like that that I found really fun.

They were super busy. I mean, I wouldn’t walk through a winery that was in the middle of crush and start hanging around and trying to chat with the winemaker.

On stardom …

Wine Spectator: What is exciting and meaningful to you about appearing in this high-profile film? How do you think it might affect perceptions of Napa?

Sueiro: We actually lost a block of vineyard, which was very close to where they shot the scene. So it will forever be: That used to be a spot on the property that was a scene of something really horrible that happened that has become a scene of something really hilarious and wonderful that happened. So, just on a personal level, that’s become one of my favorite spots on the property now, for that very reason. It reminds you of the good and the bad.

Canning: What we did negotiate very early on is that we would be very cooperative in exchange for them identifying Calistoga actually as Calistoga in the movie, versus "Wine Country Town XYZ" or some made-up name. Because it is a unique, real place, and it’s our backdrop, it’s our face.

We love all of our sister towns up and down the valley, but people refer to us as laid-back, relaxed, approachable, some people say funky. And this ties right into it. Because it clearly demonstrates you can have a great Napa Valley experience and not be intimidated by some of the perceptions of the Napa Valley being very rigid about their wines.

Duckhorn: Before we committed to this I said, "As industry people, we are fine making fun of ourselves. But where we do draw the line is saying the wine is terrible or flawed or something like that. I was very adamant that we didn’t care how they portrayed this mock brand as long as none of the vocabulary would ever insinuate that Napa Valley wines were inferior, Napa Valley wines were pedestrian, Napa wines weren’t well-made.

I was happy that we were the organic, kind of hippie [winery], because that’s true to our roots as a brand, and also that is part of the industry that can be chronically lampooned. We take our wines very seriously, but we don’t take anything else that seriously.

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This Year’s Theme: "Wine Wanderlust"

Where in the world has your love for wine taken you? Demonstrate this wine wanderlust in your video!

Your approach can be as wide-ranging as the world of wine itself. This “wine wanderlust” can be literal or metaphorical—you don’t need to have actually traveled to a wine destination for it to have inspired you. Maybe your love for wine has fueled the process of learning a new language, like the 2018 Honorable Mention winner “How to Speak Greek.” Perhaps, like 2018 fourth-place winner, “My First Time in France,” you haven’t actually traveled to France, but in your vivid dreams, the experience is pretty amazing! Or, you can share an actual real-life memory from a past trip, like the 2018 third-place winner “Amore Amarone,” which tells the story of a husband and wife’s romantic journey back to Tuscany, where they connected over their love of Italian wine.

For more examples and inspiration, see the free videos posted each week at WineSpectator.com or see the Finalists and Honorable Mentions from past years' video contests.

Deadline

All entries must be submitted by Monday, Aug. 19, at 11:59 p.m. ET.

Who Can Enter?

Anyone can enter—whether you’re a wine lover, work in the wine or restaurant industry, or are a student of film, culinary arts or viticulture and enology. You do not need to be a pro videographer. You do not need a pro camera set-up. (A past runner-up was shot with an iPhone.) You do need to be at least 21 years old.

Can Wineries Enter?

Videos submitted by wineries or on behalf of wineries are welcome as long as the product placement is minimal. Winery videos will not be chosen as finalists if they open and/or close with branding shots and/or if they repeatedly splash their brand on the screen. A couple low-key label or bottle shots are the limit. If you’re looking to showcase your winery in the video, don’t make it the centerpiece. Instead, tell us a story, educate us, capture our hearts and, most important, tell us how wine captured yours

For an example of a great story that was submitted by a winery, check out 2018 first-place winner “The Soul of Barolo or the second-place winner "I am Brian Benson."

Judging

Criteria: We’re looking for creativity, great storytelling and strong production quality.

Picking the Finalists: Wine Spectator editors will select the best videos, which will be posted at WineSpectator.com on Monday, Sept. 9.

Picking the Winner: Visitors to WineSpectator.com will vote for their favorite video among the Finalists during the voting period, which runs from Monday, Sept. 9, through Sunday, Sept. 15. Ballot stuffing is prohibited. Compensation may not be offered in return for votes.

Announcing the Winner: The second- and third-place videos, along with honorable mentions, will be revealed Monday, Sept. 16, at WineSpectator.com. The first-place video will be revealed on Tuesday, Sept. 17./>

Prizes

1. Grand Prize: The creator of the winning video will receive a pair of full event registrations to Wine Spectator's Wine Experience in New York City on Oct. 17–19, 2019. Plus, the winning video may be screened at the event as part of the official program. Note: The Grand Prize winner will not receive a Finalist Prize in addition to the Grand Prize.

2. Finalist Prize: The finalists, as chosen by our editors, will each receive a pair of tickets to one of the Grand Tastings at the Wine Experience in New York City on Oct. 17–19, 2019. If they are unable to make that date, finalists may attend any one of the 2020 Grand Tour tastings (dates and locations TBD). Finalists' videos will be posted at WineSpectator.com.

3. Entry Prize: Everyone who submits a video judged by our editors as a valid submission will receive a 12-month full-access membership to WineSpectator.com, which includes more than 388,000 wine reviews. Current members will receive an extension of their membership. (Only one entry prize per entrant.)

The Rules

  1. Length: Videos must be a minimum of 30 seconds long and must not exceed 2 minutes.
  2. The entrant, all persons associated with the video production, and anyone appearing in the video who interacts with wine must be 21 years of age or older. (Proof of age may be requested.)
  3. Videos must not contain any copyrighted material (including copyrighted background music) unless the entrant has the rights to the material.
  4. Videos must be the entrant's original creation.
  5. Videos cannot contain any profanity, offensive language, nudity or otherwise objectionable material, the determination of which is solely at the discretion of Wine Spectator.
  6. Wine Spectator is not responsible for any wine reviews or opinions contained in entrants' videos.
  7. Videos must be in the English language or subtitled.
  8. If your video includes persons other than yourself, you must have consent from those persons to appear in your video and in this contest.
  9. Wine Spectator reserves the right to reject, not to use or make available for public viewing, or at any time remove any video that Wine Spectator finds unsuitable for any reason at its sole discretion.
  10. Multiple entries are allowed.
  11. The Finalist who becomes the Winner will receive the Grand Prize (and not the Finalist Prize).
  12. All submitted videos may be used for promotional purposes by Wine Spectator.
Technical Specifications

The video file size must be no larger than 500MB.

We accept these video file formats: mp4 or mov.

How to Submit Your Video

It's easy. Complete the entry form and upload your video.

Got Questions?

Email us at video@winespectator.com.

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Where in the World Has Wine Taken You?

Tell us your wine wanderlust story and submit your video to Wine Spectator’s 13th Annual Video Contest. Anyone can enter—whether you’re a wine lover, work in the wine or restaurant industry, or are a student of film, culinary arts or viticulture and enology. (You just need to be age 21 or older.) Over the past decade, we’ve seen top videos submitted by wine drinkers, wineries, wine reps, sommeliers, rappers, lawyers, chefs and videographers.

How to Enter

1. Develop Your Own Take on this Year’s Topic
Our theme for 2019 is “Wine Wanderlust.”

2. Shoot
Feel free to use your iPhone, Android, GoPro, DSLR or video camera. You don’t need professional video equipment to win.

3. Have Fun!
Don’t be afraid to get creative and enjoy the process—it’ll show in your video! We’re looking for passion and great storytelling as much as production value.

4. Watch the Time and Dates
Submissions cannot exceed 2 minutes in length. Get all the rules and submit your video to us online by Monday, Aug. 19.

See Your Work Celebrated

The winning video will be screened at the 2019 New York Wine Experience in October. The other finalists’ videos will be showcased on WineSpectator.com and Wine Spectator’s social-media accounts.

Win Great Prizes!

Winner: 2 full passes to Wine Spectator’s 2019 New York Wine Experience weekend
Finalists: 2 passes to one of the two 2019 Wine Experience Grand Tasting evenings or a 2020 spring Grand Tour tasting
All qualified entrants: 1-year membership to WineSpectator.com

More Examples and Inspiration

Check out past finalists, including the 2018 winner, “The Soul Of Barolo.”

Key Contest Dates for 2019

  • Submission deadline: Monday, Aug. 19 at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • Finalists revealed and voting begins: Monday, Sept. 9
  • Voting closes: Sunday, Sept. 15
  • Runners-up and honorable mentions announced: Monday, Sept. 16
  • Winner announced: Tuesday, Sept. 17
Enter Now

See the Rules, Prizes and Entry Form for 2019

Got Questions?

Email us at video@winespectator.com

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Margaux has its stately neoclassical château. Dom Pérignon has the Hautvillers Abbey. Marqués de Riscal has its funky Frank Gehry ribbon candy/Kentucky Derby hat thing going on. Many, perhaps most, of the world's elite wines have palaces to match their pedigree. But until this year, the home of Masseto, one of the best and priciest wines of Italy, just looked like a bunch of (very, very good) vines and a dilapidated old farmhouse.

But now the svelte Merlot has stylish new digs to match its panache. Unveiled last month and first used to vinify the 2018 vintage, the new Masseto place still doesn't look like much on the surface. But burrow underneath that famed Bolgheri blue clay and there's a gleaming state-of-the-art subterranean cellar complex where the Masseto magic is happening.

Photo credit: Ornellaia e Masseto, ZitoMori

"The main thread for the design of the winery was to create the suggestion of a quarry dug deep into the very heart of Masseto’s clay terroir," estate director Axel Heinz told Unfiltered via email. "Building underground is ideal for a winery, as it allows us to benefit from regular and ideal temperatures for the wine’s aging and minimize need for air conditioning."

The 27,000-square-foot cellar was designed by Hikaru Mori of the Italian firm ZitoMori, which also counts Feudi di San Gregorio and Bisceglia among its portfolio of spiffy modern wineries. Clad throughout in polished concrete, burnished steel and glass, it houses a fermentation room with 12 6,500-liter concrete vats, fed by a gravity-flow system after crush, as well as a first-year barrel-aging room, second-year barrel room, bonus "experimental" barrel room, bottling line and a "caveau" holding library wines from every vintage of Masseto ever produced.

"Throughout the winery, the overhanging and recessed surfaces, along with the irregular shapes of the pillars and walls, all add to the feeling of being inside a quarry," Mori wrote in a description of her vision for the place. "Winery architecture should represent and reinforce the brand’s identity and embody its philosophy. It must offer a home for a very intricate mix of technical and human activities."

So it's got a good beat, and you can dance to it. But how does the new place improve the wine, which was previously vinified at the home of its Cabernet sibling, Tenuta dell'Ornellaia?

"In the winery itself everything is kept as simple as possible, but with everything required to Masseto’s needs," said Heinz. The fermentors are tulip-shaped on the inside, to promote gentle extraction. The tanks are small and numerous enough that parcels can be vinified separately, and the site-specific finessing is even more granular at the barrel level, where Heinz can compare how wines from plots with different soil management and training systems turn out. "These trials will hopefully give us precious information on how to adapt our farming to the upcoming challenges of climate change."

Oh, and up above ground, the old Masseto House got some TLC in the process as well, getting a top-to-bottom renovation and a badly needed paint job.

Birthday Caymus for Houston Astros' José Altuve?

Everyone has a friend that is impossible to shop for—either they're too picky, or they have everything already. Luckily for the Houston Astros baseball team, José Altuve is not that friend. According to the Houston Chronicle, the second baseman, who turned 29 on Monday, told his fellow players that if they insisted on getting him a birthday present, he would prefer it be wine.

His teammates seem wholly unsurprised by the six-time All-Star's request. "He loves wine," Astros shortstop Carlos Correa told the newspaper. "His house is gorgeous and has a wine cellar, and he wants us to help him fill it up."

Azael Rodriguez/Getty Images
Birthday Cabernet with peanuts and Crackerjacks!

And he likely got at least one good bottle out of the declaration. According to the Chronicle, infielder Alex Bregman said he planned to gift his teammate a bottle of Caymus Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon—a home run of a choice, at least if you're asking Mariah Carey, LeBron James or, you know, Wine Spectator's wine ratings.

It’s not just Unfiltered noticing the pattern of Caymus shout-outs among celebs and athletes; vintner Chuck Wagner agreed his Cabernet seems to be a hot commodity these days among pop culture's who's whos. "We have not engaged in [any] efforts to establish ourselves amongst celebrities and or athletes. We simply make a product that can enhance the enjoyment of life," Wagner told Unfiltered. "I want to believe that many athletes have learned that we personally oversee vineyards and winemaking and that we are authentic and a 'real wine family' engaged in all aspects." As they say, there's no "I" in "enology."

New Docu 'Harvest Season' Spotlights Trials and Triumphs of California's Immigrant Vineyard Workers

Films and documentaries about California wine country are as abundant these days as the Chardonnay clusters in August—there's chef Tyler Florence's docu Uncrushable about the 2017 wildfires and, of course, tomorrow brings the release of Amy Poehler's Napa-set Netflix scripted comedy Wine Country.

Director Bernardo Ruiz's new documentary Harvest Season is also set in North Coast wine country, but his focus is a little different: spotlighting the often-underappreciated immigrant vineyard workers who make California wine possible. "With all of the kind of negative and hostile attitudes [toward] immigrants, I was looking for a way to make a film that highlighted all of the contributions of the behind-the-scenes players in the wine industry," Ruiz told Unfiltered.

PBS
Viticulturist Vanessa Robledo battles a blaze.

The film tells the stories of three Latino immigrants, "former pickers and former farmworkers who have now built these really extraordinary wineries," explained Ruiz. "I just thought they were not getting enough attention." You might recognize one of these characters: Mexican-American veteran winemaker Gustavo Brambila owns Gustavo Wines now, but the former employee of Chateau Montelena appeared, in a way, in one movie already—as a character in the 2008 Judgment of Paris film Bottle Shock. In Harvest Season, Brambila takes the viewer on a winemaker's journey through the unpredictable conditions and other viticultural travails vintners face as the wine makes its way from bud to bottle.

Harvest Season premieres Monday, May 13 on PBS' Independent Lens series and will also be available on streaming platforms (PBS.org, Amazon Prime, Comcast and iTunes) beginning May 14.

Enjoy Unfiltered? The best of Unfiltered's round-up of drinks in pop culture can now be delivered straight to your inbox every other week! Sign up now to receive the Unfiltered e-mail newsletter, featuring the latest scoop on how wine intersects with film, TV, music, sports, politics and more.

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Updated May 9, 2019

On May 10, wine lovers will gather in Miami Beach’s Fontainebleau hotel to taste 244 top-rated wines at Wine Spectator’s Grand Tour. While that’s hard to beat, restaurants throughout the Magic City offer world-class wine experiences year-round. From fine-dining fusion to a casual pizza and pasta concept, these Wine Spectator Restaurant Award–winning eateries showcase stellar wine lists in sunny settings.

These are just some of Miami’s standout wine programs; for more options, see the full list of Magic City winners.

To check out more wine-and-food destinations around the world, see Wine Spectator’s more than 3,700 Restaurant Award–winning picks, including the 91 Grand Award recipients worldwide that hold our highest honor.

Do you have a favorite you’d like to see on this list? Send your recommendations to restaurantawards@mshanken.com. We want to hear from you!

Boulud Sud Miami

JW Marriott Marquis Miami, 255 Biscayne Blvd. Way, Miami, Fla.
Telephone (305) 421-8800
Website www.bouludsud.com/miami
Open Lunch and dinner, daily
Best of Award of Excellence

Boulud Sud Miami
With warm tones and decorative greenery, Boulud Sud Miami evokes a Mediterranean vibe that reflects the menu focus.

Chef Daniel Boulud is known for his French cuisine, but Boulud Sud Miami showcases a more inclusive Mediterranean theme through its wine list and menu. Executed by chef Clark Bowen, the dishes range from fresh starters like gazpacho and classic Greek salad to pastas, grains and entrées like seared branzino and slow-baked salmon. The 530-label wine list covers a broad range of international regions with a focus on France (especially Burgundy), Italy, California and Spain. Wine director Daniel Johnnes hopes to encourage the local bottle culture by keeping a majority of the selections under $100. Still, there’s plenty to splurge on here, like 1990s labels from Château Lafite Rothschild and Pétrus. The restaurant’s second outpost in New York City also holds a Best of Award of Excellence.

Casa Juancho

2436 S.W. Eighth St., Miami, Fla.
Telephone (305) 642-2452
Website www.casajuancho.com
Open Lunch and dinner, daily
Best of Award of Excellence

Casa Juancho has been serving Spanish cuisine, including tapas and paella, for more than 30 years, and has held its Best of Award of Excellence since 1996. Its charm comes in part from a cozy, welcoming atmosphere, and there's nightly live music; it's a popular destination for celebrating special occasions. Managed by owner José Rodriguez, the restaurant's wine list has 450 selections, with strengths in Spain and California. Chef Alfonso Perez’s paellas are the stars of the menu and come in a variety of seafood, meat and vegetarian options.

Casa Tua

1700 James Ave., Miami Beach, Fla.
Telephone (305) 673-1010
Website www.casatualifestyle.com
Open Dinner, daily
Best of Award of Excellence

Chris Carter
Casa Tua recreates the experience of dining in an Italian home.

Amidst the bustle of Miami Beach is an enchanting Mediterranean oasis known as Casa Tua, a hotel and membership club with a Best of Award of Excellence–winning restaurant. Whether you stop in for dinner or spend a weekend at the villa, a trip to Casa Tua is meant to feel like vacationing in a friend’s home on the coast of Italy. The restaurant’s authentic menu changes with the seasons, but chefs Michele Esposito and Giovanni Gargiulo maintain classics like branzino with cherry tomatoes and olives, and fettuccine with wild mushrooms and black truffle. Wine director Mattia Magnoni manages the 550 selections that show strength in Italy (especially Tuscany and Piedmont), France and California. A few pages of cellar selections offer verticals from top Italian producers such as Emidio Pepe and Tenuta San Guido. For the full Casa Tua experience, ask for a seat in the garden, which is surrounded by trees adorned with glowing lanterns.

Scarpetta

Fontainebleau Miami Beach, 4441 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Fla.
Telephone (305) 674-4660
Website www.fontainebleau.com/web/dining/scarpetta/
Open Dinner, daily
Best of Award of Excellence

Graciela Cattarossi
Scarpetta is a Best of Award of Excellence–winning Italian eatery by celebrity chef Scott Conant.

Miami Beach’s Fontainebleau hotel is home to three Best of Award of Excellence–winning restaurants: Stripsteak, Hakkasan Miami and Scarpetta. Owned by celebrity chef Scott Conant, Scarpetta serves fresh Italian appetizers like yellowtail crudo and tuna tartare, hearty entrées like honey-glazed duck and veal chop, plus house-made pastas. The wine program is managed by wine director John Riccardo and offers 775 selections with more than three dozen available by the glass. Highlights include Piedmont, Tuscany and California, plus two pages of large-format bottles, and verticals from producers such as Château Mouton-Rothschild and Château Latour.

Upland

49 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Fla.
Telephone (305) 602-9998
Website www.uplandmiami.com
Open Lunch and dinner, daily
Best of Award of Excellence

Upland
Upland brings fresh, California-inspired Italian cuisine to Miami Beach.

The Miami outpost of restaurateur Stephen Starr’s New York hot spot holds a Best of Award of Excellence for its 600 selections with strengths in California, France, Italy and Madeira. Wine director Natasha Patterer’s program at Upland complements chef Justin Smillie’s California-inspired Italian cuisine across a range of price points, from affordable to special splurges. Plenty of bottles cost under $100, and more than two dozen wines are available by the glass. Highlights include three vintages of Domaine de la Romanée-Conti Grands Echézeaux and four vintages of Bertani Amarone della Valpolicella Classico as old as 1964.

Alter

223 N.W. 23 St., Miami, Fla.
Telephone (305) 573-5996
Website www.altermiami.com
Open Dinner, Tuesday to Sunday.
Award of Excellence

Alter
Alter delivers adventurous plates and a 130-selection wine list.

Alter has earned plenty of buzz for chef Brad Kilgore’s eccentric American cuisine, and the Award of Excellence–winning wine list is one more reason to visit. Wine director Luis Martinez oversees the 130 selections, focused on France and California. There are also several bottles from regions like Australia, Chile and Spain. The by-the-glass list is brief but spans the globe, with 11 diverse wines that allow guests to mix and match pairings with Kilgore’s cutting-edge tasting menus that start at $79 for five courses, with beverage pairings starting at an additional $60.

The Bazaar by José Andrés

SLS Hotel South Beach, 1701 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Fla.
Telephone (305) 455-2999
Website www.thebazaar.com
Open Dinner, daily
Award of Excellence

Graciela Cattarossi
Mediterranean flair meets Miami glamor at the Bazaar by José Andrés.

At the Bazaar, chef José Andrés celebrates his Spanish roots in the heart of Miami Beach. The menu unites traditional staples such patatas bravas and fish en papillote with innovative, playful plates like a “foie gras PB & J” and yucca churros. Wine director Andy Myers’ 290-selection list is similarly diverse with strengths in Spain, France and California. Myers manages the wine collections at all of Andrés’ 13 Restaurant Award winners, including a Best of Award of Excellence–winning location of the Bazaar in Los Angeles.

Cibo Wine Bar

45 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, Fla.
Telephone (305) 442-4925
Website www.cibowinebar.com
Open Lunch and dinner, daily
Award of Excellence

Cibo Wine Bar
Cibo Wine Bar has five Restaurant Award–winning locations, including an outpost in Coral Gables, Fla.

In Miami’s Coral Gables suburb, Cibo Wine Bar serves approachable Italian cuisine and an Award of Excellence–winning wine list. The 235 selections are managed by sommelier Paulina Arango and strongest in Italy and California. Plenty of bottles are under $100, though there are some special labels such as Allegrini Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 1997 ($480). Pair your pick with authentic antipastos, risottos, pastas and pizzas, plus entrées like veal Milanese and Chianti-braised short ribs. The restaurant’s four other locations—one in Miami Beach and three in Toronto—also hold Restaurant Awards.

Council Oak Steaks & Seafood

Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, 1 Seminole Way, Hollywood, Fla.
Telephone (954) 327-7625
Website www.seminolehardrockhollywood.com
Open Dinner, daily
Award of Excellence

Council Oak Steaks & Seafood
The Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, Fla., is home to Award of Excellence winner Council Oak Steaks & Seafood.

Award of Excellence winner Council Oak Steaks & Seafood features a classic steak-house menu and a wine program of 440 selections in the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. To complement chef Robert Ciborowski’s dry-aged cuts, sommelier Juan Horta built a list of mostly reds that excels in California. The program includes several verticals from top international producers and plenty of Champagne options from Krug, Moët & Chandon, Perrier-Jouët and more. The property is undergoing a major expansion through 2019, but resort amenities and restaurants aren’t affected.

Komodo Miami

801 Brickell Ave., Miami, Fla.
Telephone (305) 534-2211
Website www.komodomiami.com
Open Lunch and dinner, daily
Award of Excellence

Komodo Miami
Owned by the head of a nightlife empire, Komodo Miami is a trendy hot spot with serious wines.

Local nightlife mogul David Grutman makes wine a priority at his various dining ventures, especially Komodo. The tony restaurant draws celebrities, tourists and locals alike for chef Freddy Vargas’ luxurious Asian menu and the 400-label wine list. A portion of the 6,500-bottle inventory is showcased in a glass-enclosed display cellar, a popular backdrop for guests snapping photos. Overseen by wine director Collin Bleess, the program excels in California, France and Italy.

Toro Toro

InterContinental Miami, 100 Chopin Plaza, Miami, Fla.
Telephone (305) 372-4710
Website www.torotoromiami.com
Open Lunch and dinner, daily
Award of Excellence

Aura Groupe
Toro Toro serves an Asian-Latin fusion menu and an Award of Excellence–winning wine list in Miami's InterContinental Hotel.

Award of Excellence winner Toro Toro spices up the traditional steak-house experience with a Latin- and Asian-inspired menu that encourages sharing. Chef Richard Sandoval serves steaks and chops off a wood-burning grill, as well as creative small plates like arepas with charred pork belly and a ceviche with ahi tuna and sweet potato. The 200-selection wine list emphasizes California, Italy, Spain and France. While Toro Toro is housed in the upscale InterContinental Hotel, the moderately-priced list offers more than 30 wines by the glass and dozens of bottles under $100.

Keep up with the latest restaurant news from our award winners: Subscribe to our free Private Guide to Dining newsletter, and follow us on Twitter at @WSRestoAwards and Instagram at @WSRestaurantAwards.

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In Geilo, a town in southern Norway, Wine Spectator Best of Award of Excellence winner Restaurant Halling-Stuene offers one of the country’s more traditional dining experiences. The cottage-like venue features red wood panels, a stone fireplace and a cozy living room for lounging. Co-owner and chef Frode Aga serves simple preparations of authentic Norwegian and Scandinavian specialties, meaning plenty of wild game and rich cream sauces. The menu changes four times a year, with the exception of some classic dishes offered year-round. Though the restaurant is centered on tradition, the wine collection has grown with the times and stands among Norway’s best. There’s incredible depth on wine director Frank Berge Ytterland’s list, particularly in its strongest regions of France (especially Burgundy and Bordeaux) and Italy. Inside the recently expanded cellar that now houses 6,700 bottles, guests can taste a rotating selection of wines by the glass. These include coveted pours via Coravin from producers such as Gaja and Domaine de la Romanée-Conti.

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Miami welcomes a new restaurant this month from Brad Kilgore, the chef-owner behind Wine Spectator Award of Excellence winner Alter. Ember will serve classic American fare with a focus on wood-fired cooking, with dishes like grilled lasagna and fire-roasted stone crabs with garlic sauce.

Wine director Michael Gonzalez's opening list features about 100 wines, 15 of which are available by the glass, including diverse selections from Spain, New Zealand, Austria, Napa Valley and more. Gonzalez sought wines to match the food's smoky profile, through picks with high acidity or complementing flavors. He is also aiming for value, keeping most selections under $100.

"Chef Brad has really put a lot of focus on the beverage side of the experience," Gonzalez told Wine Spectator. "I really feel like this is a very strong representation of him and of the restaurant."—J.H.

Killen's Steakhouse Unveils Second Location
Sabrina Miskelly
Killen's Steakhouse is the more upscale concept of the restaurant group.

Owners Ronnie and Deanna Killen have expanded their Houston-based empire: Best of Award of Excellence winner Killen's Steakhouse in Pearland, Texas, now has a second location in the Woodlands. The restaurateurs also own Killen's Barbecue, Killen's STQ, Killen's TMX and Killen's Burgers.

The new Steakhouse outpost serves a similar menu of steak-house staples. Deanna, the wine director, offers about 175 selections on the opening list, with 19 available by the glass, but she plans to grow that to about 500 over the next few months.

Deanna says that like the Pearland location, the list will highlight classic regions such as California, Bordeaux and Italy, but she's looking forward to including more small-production wines as the program progresses.—J.H.

First Phase of French Wine-and-Food Hub Opens in San Francisco

A multilevel French destination, One65, will debut in San Francisco over the next several weeks. The ground-floor patisserie opens May 16, followed by the remaining concepts early June. These include the Bistro at One65; a fine-dining restaurant, O' by Claude Le Tohic; and a bar and lounge, Elements.

The project is a collaboration between chef Claude Le Tohic and the team behind Alexander's Steakhouse, which has two Best of Award of Excellence–winning locations in the Bay Area.

Vincent Morrow is spearheading the wine program for the entire venue, which features two central lists for the Bistro and O' by Claude Le Tohic. The latter will offer about 900 selections exclusively from the United States and France, with a focus on California, Bordeaux, Burgundy and the Rhône, as well as picks from lesser-known French regions like Provence and Savoie. The Bistro will showcase a diverse international list of about 75 wines, with 22 available by the glass. For this program, Morrow told Wine Spectator via email that he aimed for "fun, energetic and easy-to-drink wines."

The Elements wine list will mostly include wines from the Bistro, in addition to some selections from O' by Claude Le Tohic. The fine-dining concept is the final phase of the opening, which is slated for June 6.—J.H.

San Ysidro Ranch Reopens
Courtesy of San Ysidro Ranch
The Stonehouse at San Ysidro Ranch has held a Grand Award since 2014.

San Ysidro Ranch, the historic Santa Barbara, Calif., resort and home of Grand Award winner the Stonehouse, reopened last month after a 15-month closure for renovation due to damage from the January 2018 mudslides.

"It feels great to be back," said wine director Todd Smith. "Our guests are very happy to be back to where they have been visiting us for such a long time. The support from the local community has been overwhelming."

In an effort to "retain the 'Old World' charm" of San Ysidro, Smith says the resort and restaurant were rebuilt to match how they looked before the mudslides, but the restaurant's redesigned cellar has a higher capacity, particularly for large-format wines. New offerings from Italy, France and Austria have been added to the 2,000-plus-selection wine list.—B.G.

Keep up with the latest restaurant news from our award winners: Subscribe to our free Private Guide to Dining newsletter, and follow us on Twitter at WSRestoAwards and on Instagram at wsrestaurantawards.

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Thousands of members of the wine industry will descend on the city of Bordeaux on May 13–16 for the latest iteration of Vinexpo. The wine-and-spirits trade show has reimagined its flagship Bordeaux event, organizing an ambitious symposium on climate change.

"In this highly competitive market, the Vinexpo group chose to make the flagship Vinexpo Bordeaux a more manageable size, whilst capitalizing on its high-level business positioning and strengthening both its appeal and the quality of its content," said Rodolphe Lameyse, Vinexpo's new CEO.

One of the main events of this year will be the "Act for Change" symposium. Winemakers face a multitude of challenges from climate change, which impacts the physiology of the vine and, consequently, the quality of the wines. But the industry is also at the forefront of interdisciplinary programs that combine agronomy, economics, genetics, sociology and enology to find creative solutions for those environmental challenges.

Stay on top of important wine stories with Wine Spectator's free Breaking News Alerts.

Wine Spectator's Dana Nigro will moderate a panel titled "The Impact of Climate Change on Vineyard Management and Winemaking," asking, "How can research and technologies support producers in their evolution and adaptation strategies?" Panelists include Katie Jackson of Jackson Family, Miguel Torres Maczassek of Familia Torres, and Pau Roca, director general of the International Organization of Wine and Vine (OIV).

"It's the first time we've had this kind of event," said Lameyse. "We believe it will be a great success. Climate change is not only relevant for the wine industry, but also for the public."

The symposium will also take a close look at how a declining water supply, extreme weather events and rising temperatures impact global vineyards, as well as the impact of climate change on the wine economy, with strategies for integrating climate change into a business strategy. Experts include leading economists, producers and research scientists.

Courtesy Vinexpo
Vinexpo's new CEO, Rodolphe Lameyse.

Although Vinexpo has scaled back the size of the trade show, they still expect 1,600 exhibitors from 29 countries, including first-timers Sweden, Turkey and Vietnam. Their popular WOW! (World of Organic Wines) event is back, showcasing 150 producers from nine countries. And in response to the growth of e-commerce and direct sales, there will be a talk by the CEOs of Vivino, Alibaba Tmall, Tannico, IWSR and Le Petit Ballon.

The symposium is meant to give the flagship Bordeaux show a unique identity, as it has lost attendance to other trade shows, particularly the German trade show powerhouse ProWein. "We provide business intelligence, business networking and a business-friendly environment," said Lameyse. "It's a good opportunity for doing business in a relaxed way—this isn't about elevator pitches." According to Lameyse, they will implement this kind of differentiation and reinvention worldwide. The same kind of rebranding is underway for the other Vinexpo shows in New York, Hong Kong, and soon Shanghai (October 2019) and Paris (January 2020).

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