Loading...

Follow Welcome To The Woods on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

I have done a lot of painting. I have also read a lot of tutorial on painting. After many years and rooms of trial and error, I have found the absolute proper way to paint a wall. There is a method to the madness and the order you do things makes a difference! Read on and be sure to watch the video tutorial at the end!

Step 1: Wash the Trim and Wall

Before you start, make sure cobwebs are gone from where the wall meets the ceiling, baseboards have been dusted, and everything is clean. Wash the trim and wall with warm, soapy water and a washcloth.

Step 2: Remove Obstacles

I have seen people paint around outlet covers and I always think, what’s the point? Remove any easy obstacle like outlet covers, air vents, curtain rods, etc. Move furniture and take down wall art.

Step 3: Caulk

**If you do not have painted trim, you can skip this step.**

This step has to come next because of you do it after painting, the caulk will collect dirt and dust like you would not believe. I’ve been there. Whenever you apply latex caulk, you should always paint it. I prefer latex caulk because it cleans up with water. Silicone caulk requires acetone to smooth over and clean up.

When applying caulk, cut the tube at a 45 degree angle and load it in your caulk gun. Facing the cut hole down, squeeze a bead of caulk across the crevice between the trim and the wall. If you have existing caulk in the space, simply touch up caulk where it has cracked or deteriorated.

Next use a gloved finger or rag and dip it in warm water. Smooth over the bead of caulk to push it into the crevice and get a smooth finish.

Step 4: Paint Trim

**If you do not have painted trim, you can skip this step.**

When the caulk has dried, paint all the trim in the room. I have mine painted a high gloss enamel latex white paint. High gloss is a good choice for durability. When painting, protect the floor with a flat piece of cardboard or a large drywall knife if you have one. This tool is fabulous for pushing down high pile carpet in order to paint the trim.

It is important to over-paint the top of the trim. Just slap paint on sloppily and over extend the line where trim meets wall. You want to get all that caulk covered. The time to get a straight line will come next.

Whenever you paint a room with painted trim, don’t skip the trim. Spending the extra steps to caulk and throw one coat of paint on the trim will make your paint job look way more professional.

Step 5: Edge the Wall

Use an angled brush (this is my fav) to edge against the trim. I put a lot of paint on my brush and apply it to the wall close to the line where the trim meet the wall. Then I “cut in” by pushing my brush down to make a precise edge with the bristles. I slide the edge of the bristles with paint on it against the line where the wall meets the trim.

This step is where you need to make a straight line. I prefer not to use “special tools” for this task, but if you would like you could try Frogtape. If you are going to tape a straight line, remember to buy one-coat coverage paint so that you can remove the tape before the paint dries for a cleaner line. Also – run a wet washcloth over the tape after application to “seal” the adhesive edge. This results in a cleaner line as well.

I prefer to just use my angled Wooster brush without tape. It is important to look at the line straight on. When painting baseboards, I usually rest my head on the floor so my eyes are straight on with where I am painting.

Another tip: It may seem counter-intuitive, but I actually think it is easier to get a straight line painting fast. Going too slow can prevent my arm motion from following the natural paint line.

**Important** The biggest mistake people make when edging the wall paint against trim is making big brush marks. This is because “cutting in” creates a circular motion with the brush and uneven distribution of the paint. After I am finished cutting a straight line, I always run my brush flat across the area to apply even coverage near the trim.

Step 6: Roll The Wall

Use a 1/2″ nap roller if you are hoping for one-coat coverage. Just watch for drips! If you are planning to do two coats of paint, use a 3/8″ nap roller.

Larger areas will go fast with a 9″ roller on a short handle for control. I avoid using long handled rollers unless I am painting a floor or ceiling. Use a 4″ roller for hard to reach or smaller areas like below and above windows, above doorways, and on skinny walls. The right tool makes all the difference.

Tip: Paint in a “W” motion to prevent streaks or drips and increase coverage.

Another Tip: It doesn’t matter if you edge first or roll first. However, you should try to prevent the paint from drying before meeting the edging with the rolling area. Having one person edging and one rolling helps achieve this.

The Proper Way to Paint a Wall Video

How to Paint A Wall Properly With Painted Trim - YouTube

A lot of people get confused when a room has painted trim about what order to paint the wall. Following this step by step tutorial will help you navigate painting a room like a professional! I hope you enjoyed the proper way to paint a wall tutorial.

For your convenience, this post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosures and policies here.

The post The Proper Way to Paint a Wall appeared first on Welcome to the Woods.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

One of my most popular posts ever was my modern stair baluster makeover back in 2016. My friend Savanna was aware of this transformation in my home and subsequently asked me to help her revamp her stair railing as well. Our DIY stair railing safety redo was more about bringing her balustrade up to code and making it safe for her little children. I felt compelled to help her so Savanna could feel confident this fix was a DIY opportunity instead of something she needed to spend hundreds hiring out.

You can see that her spindles are 6 inches apart and so she used a plastic sheet behind the railing to prevent her kids and animals from going between them. This protection was not sturdy nor attractive! Many people have this issue with the stair railing in their home. Building code used to require a 6 inch space between spindles, but has since been reduced to a 4 inch requirement. This DIY stair railing safety redo will show you exactly how to remedy this problem.

The first step in the process is to remove the spindles and top rail from the newel posts. This railing was secured with screws drilled at 45 degree angles through the top rail into the newel posts. Savanna dissolved the wood filler that hid those screws using mineral spirits. Then I removed the screws with a drill and popped the spindles out of their holes.

Clearly I was happy with how easy it was to remove the railing!

Next, together we removed every other spindle by twisting and wiggling until it was loose. Each one had remnant wood glue and a finishing nail in it. Since we were changing 6 inch spaced spindles to 4 inch spaced spindles, we were able to keep every other spindle in tact. The measurement between them was 12 inches (of course) so we are just adding two spindles between each we kept.

We took the railing outside and flipped it upside down to drill holes for the new spindles. Savanna used a drill and spade bit to make the holes measuring every 4 inches apart. Since her spindles are tapered, the top hole needed a 5/8 inch spade bit and the bottom hole that went into the floor needed to be a 3/4 inch spade bit.

Here are the newly drilled holes! The one between the newly-drilled holes will get filled with wood putty.

Savanna was feeling pretty proud of herself at this point!

Now it was time to address the bottom of the railing…

I used the 3/4 inch spade bit to drill holes every 4 inches into the floor board just the same as the top rail. Then we started inserting our spindles!

The shorter stretch of the railing got all new spindles. Savanna found matching spindles at Home Depot and then stained them to match prior to assembly. The larger stretch of the railing has spaces where the initial spindles we left in tact would be inserted.

Before installing the top rail, I filled in holes with wood putty using a 5-in-1 tool.

The next step was to put in the top rail and pound it down into the holes with a rubber mallet. We did add wood glue to the holes at the top and bottom of the railing. In this picture, Savanna is holding the top rail in place as I drill the 45 degree angle screws back into newel posts.

We had lots of holes to fill with wood putty! We did this over the span of a couple days because in order to fill a hole this deep, we had to add the wood putty in sections letting it completely dry between. When the holes were completely filled and dry, Savanna sanded by hand with 60 grit sandpaper.

Be careful to go with the grain of the wood so the sanding marks are not noticeable. The last step is to stain the wood putty so it blends in!

Together Savanna and I completely this project in one afternoon and a few spare hours on other days staining spindles and filling wood putty.

DIY Stair Railing Safety Redo

Here is the stair railing all complete!

The before and after is fun to see not because there is a dramatic change, but because I think we did a great job making it look like the stair railing was never modified. Now that there are added spindles to make the railing up to code and safe, Savanna can get rid of the plastic and rest easy!

This problem is so common! Be sure to pin and share with someone you know who could use this advice!

Thanks for reading my DIY stair railing safety redo!
For your convenience, this post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosures and policies here.

The post DIY Stair Railing Safety Redo appeared first on Welcome to the Woods.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Welcome To The Woods by Melissa Woods - 2M ago

Last week my husband solidified plans for us to host his coworkers at our house for a fire and grill-out this coming weekend. I love to host, but I immediately got a little nervous. Our fire pit is not big enough for the whole company to come over! The little metal stand style fire bowl just wouldn’t do. Of course instead I decided to upgrade. Learn how to build your own fire pit like I did…

See my old metal fire bowl in the background?

Begin by measuring at least 10 feet from any structure or building. The edge of my fire pit measured 11 feet away from the garage. You don’t want any accidental fires!

Dig a round circle with your shovel measuring the diameter of your pit. For my fire pit, the interior diameter was about 3 feet so I just laid down a yard stick.

When you’re completely done digging and removing sod, it is time to level the area. You can work with the dirt, or you can pour sand as a base like I did. The fine grains of the sand helped me get a level surface. I smoothed over the whole thing using a 4″ x 4″ piece of lumber.

Getting the first layer of cement blocks level is extremely important. All the other layers will be based off the first one.

Lay your cement blocks the correct distance apart to create a circle. I did not level each block, I just checked at the end across the whole first layer and adjusted as needed.

Now that you are done with the first layer, it is time to start building up the next ones!

I went 3 layers high and staggered the cement blocks for a beautiful look. You can apply heavy duty construction or cement adhesive at this point to make your fire pit very permanent.

I cannot wait to host the grill out and fire now! I think my husband’s coworkers will really enjoy sitting around our beautiful new fire pit.

Build Your Own Fire Pit Video

Watch the video of how I made it here:

Build Your Own Fire Pit - YouTube

Let me know if you build your own fire pit based on my tutorial!

Thanks for reading! Don’t forget to pin and share this video!

For your convenience, this post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosures and policies here.

The post Build Your Own Fire Pit appeared first on Welcome to the Woods.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The past month I have been completely absorbed in helping my sister open a maternity store in central Minnesota. As she renovated, the space she wanted my help the most with was the kids play area. I was tasked with changing a doorway that did not serve a purpose within the new layout. We decided a doorway to bookshelf transformation would be a clever solution!

This is the space amidst renovation. The doorway you see here leads to the utility room. Clearly we wanted this enclosed since there was a different utility room entrance my sister could use. We started by painting all the wainscoting and trim gloss white. We cleaned and primed it first, then applied two coats of paint.

When we were done with hours of painting, this is what the space looked like.

Installing Plywood

Next we cut our wood, starting with a large sheet of plywood to fit the back. We nailed this into the door casing from behind.

I had help from my sister’s friends that were already working on other construction projects in the store. They graciously cut all the wood for me so I didn’t even have to use my table saw!

To attach shelves inside the doorway, I was planning to drill pocket holes with my Kreg jig and make them floating. However, in cutting the shelves we discerned the doorway was not square nor parallel. This made it more feasible to create a shelving method that would allow for wiggle room. Enter slats.

Installing Slats As Shelf Supports

We cut 1 inch wide slats and screwed them into the wood door casing with two screws. Each shelf measured 16″ apart.

This method is actually how I installed shelves to organize closets in my home, too.

Next we set the shelves on top. We added little nails down through the shelf into the slats so that the shelf wouldn’t slide off or move. After touching up paint we were ready to style them!

Doorway to Bookshelf Transformation

The bookshelves look so great! I love this built-in look and how useful the storage space is now. As a whole the playroom rocks!

Don’t forget to pin this idea!

Be sure to check out my sister’s maternity store online where they sell clothes and products for moms. Thanks for reading my doorway to bookshelf transformation and I will be back soon to show you what I’m building for my house!

For your convenience, this post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosures and policies here.

The post Doorway to Bookshelf Transformation appeared first on Welcome to the Woods.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We got a NEW KITCHEN FLOOR! I cannot contain my excitement! My husband and I hardly ever spend money to update our home, but I convinced him the new floor would be worth the investment. Our old laminate was buckling and dented in multiple places. Since I was willing to do the installation myself, the whole floor cost us less than $400! Today I am going to share with you the knowledge I gained from my DIY luxury vinyl plank installation.

The old floor…

Why I Chose LVP Flooring

I did a lot of research when it came to flooring. My number one criteria was that the floor was 100% waterproof. There are so many spills with my three little kids! I found the luxury vinyl plank was one of the only types of flooring that was completely waterproof, not just “water resistant.” The other criteria that LVP met for me were as follows:

  • Click together, floating floor installation so I could do it myself
  • Textured, realistic feel to prevent slips and falls
  • Inexpensive (I got ours on sale for only $1.59/sq foot)
  • No harsh chemical smell (it didn’t smell at all actually!)
  • Durable/scratch resistant
  • 100% waterproof (as I already said)

These reasons made LVP the clear choice over other flooring options. The hardest part was picking out a color. I eventually decided on a gray because my wonderful followers on Facebook overwhelmingly voted that as the color of choice. I picked out Tarkett Ingenuity brand “Weathered Gray” at Menards. I love how the flooring matches my countertops!

DIY Luxury Vinyl Plank Installation

I definitely learned a lot during this process. I watched several Youtube videos on how to install a floating floor like a pro and compiled the best practices I came up with. Hopefully I can save you the time watching through several Youtube videos the way I did by offering the most comprehensive guide I can think of. Watch my video tutorial for the whole story.

Luxury Vinyl Plank Flooring Installation Tips Tutorial - YouTube

It is crazy to think of where my kitchen was at when we bought the house and where it is today.

I’ve made very minor changes over time, but to me, they make a big impact! Switching out the floors and cabinet hardware this season has made me like the space more than ever.

Thanks for reading, don’t forget to share and pin!

The post DIY Luxury Vinyl Plank Installation appeared first on Welcome to the Woods.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The title of this blog post is a little surprising if you have never heard of this genius method to print on fabric. Freezer paper? Design homemade hat? I recently learned how to do this technique I’m calling freezer paper fabric design and am totally hooked! I want to decorate all my shirts and accessories. Here’s how you can do it, too!

Start by using freezer paper. Be sure to buy freezer paper that has a wax finish on only one side. Do not mistake freezer paper for wax or parchment paper. You will be using this paper to make your template.

Design whatever you want whatever size you want using canva.com. I love this website for graphics and font combinations. I put together a little design I wanted to print on a baseball hat.


Then hold your freezer paper up to the computer screen and trace your design on the plain (not waxy) side. You could also print this design onto the freezer paper or use a die-cut machine. I’m cheap you guys; I don’t even have a printer, let alone a Cricut.

After you have traced your design, use a precision knife to cut it out. Be sure to carefully keep track of the little pieces inside letters like “e” and “a.”

Now use the hottest setting on your iron and press the freezer paper template onto your fabric, wax side down. It works best if you have a flat surface. It was tricky for me to do the baseball hat because it was rounded. I alternated between ironing a section, painting, then ironing another section and painting. It is also wise to put a flat piece of cardboard behind the fabric you are ironing.

You can see that I could not get the template to iron flat against the rounded hat no matter what I did. It is not this hard if you just iron flat like on a shirt.

The next step is to paint using a fabric paint or adding fabric medium to any craft paint. I used this fancy metallic set I bought on Amazon – love this stuff!

The last step is to carefully peel away the freezer paper template. If you peel very carefully, you can reuse the same template more than once. You will see down below I made two matching shirts with the same template for my husband and I not too long ago.

If your paint suggests so, you might want to iron the design to set the paint and make it durable through the wash. Be sure to iron when the paint is completely dry, though.

Freezer Paper Fabric Design

I love how the hat turned out! You might notice that I decided against the heart inside the state of Minnesota shape. I like it better without it I think.

You could personalize any fabric; the options are endless! Design shirts for a birthday, decorate a napkin set, make seasonal pillow covers, etc.

Be sure to pin this fun and easy craft! I also made t-shirts with my blog name in a live video on my Facebook page using the freezer paper fabric design method.

So far I’ve also made a shirt for my daughter, Lily, and plan to make another hat that says “mama bear.” It is so much fun; you’ll have to tell me if you give this craft a try!
This post contains affiliate links for your convenience, please read my full disclosure and policies here.

The post Freezer Paper Fabric Design Homemade Hat appeared first on Welcome to the Woods.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

You might remember my DIY lamp shades and repainted lamp base I completed two years ago. I’ve been contemplating a different style lamp for a few months and am excited today to show you what I came up with! In this DIY glass table lamp tutorial you will learn how to drill through glass, how to deconstruct a hanging light cord to be used for lamp wiring, and how to attach an IKEA lamp shade onto any lamp using the bulb!

To get started drilling through glass, you need the right kind of drill bit. I purchased a set of diamond crusted drill bits from Ebay for only $5 (free shipping)! The catch was that I had to wait 5 weeks for delivery…

Drilling Through Glass

While I did create a video tutorial you can see below, the basic concept here is to drill slow and steady while keeping your drill from getting overheated. The trick is to drill in water. I created a circle with play-doh and poured water into it, switching the water frequently as I drilled.

After a lot of back and forth, I finally broke through the glass and had a hole for my lamp cord! The lamp hardware I am using for this lamp is HEMMA from Ikea. They are meant to be for hanging ceiling lamps, but I found this tutorial for deconstructing them on Youtube. I actually bought two of these for $5 off Craigslist a couple years ago. They have been waiting for the right project…

DIY Glass Table Lamp Tutorial

DIY Glass Table Lamp Tutorial - YouTube

To attach the shade, I bought two of these light bulb clamps from Bed, Bath, and Beyond. This was the best price I could find anywhere online for this adapter. You could also just buy a uno-fit lamp shade if you were doing this project. However, I had Ikea drum lamp shades I had picked up at my local Habitat for Humanity (for $2!) a year ago that I planned to use. Since the lamp shades have a typical metal assembly on top that is meant for a finial and harp, I needed the light bulb adapter to save the day!

Costs + Materials

Since I already acquired many of these items for cheap in the past, my materials for this DIY were overall inexpensive.

Two glass barrel jars from Anchor Hocking (purchased in the food storage section of Walmart) = $23
Two LED lightbulbs from Ikea = $2
Two HEMMA light cords originally from Ikea, found for cheap on Craigslist = $5
Two drum lamp shades originally from Ikea, found for cheap at Habitat for Humanity = $4
Diamond crusted drill bits, bought on Ebay for cheap = $5
Two light bulb adapters for shades from Bed, Bath, and Beyond = $6

I have two new lamps for my living room that cost me a total of only $45!
Compared to this similar set on Amazon, I got a steal of a deal!

I hope you enjoyed my DIY glass table lamp tutorial! Please share the love and pin!

One more BIG favor to ask – if you haven’t already PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL. Youtube is going to take away many of my channel privileges this week unless I reach 1,000 subscribers. Even if you don’t use Youtube much, you can subscribe with just your email and it would really help me out! Thank you!

The post DIY Glass Table Lamp Tutorial appeared first on Welcome to the Woods.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I’m back today with a really easy solution for blanket storage in your living room space! This metal and wood DIY blanket ladder is modern and sleek. I used leftover conduit from my stair railing rebuild (yes, it has been sitting in the garage for a year and a half) and old pallet 2 x 4’s to construct this project.

First, I used a 3/4″ spade bit to drill holes 10″ apart in the wood 2 x 4’s. After sanding and staining the wood, it was time to assemble! I filled the holes with Loctite PL 375 construction adhesive and fit the 1/2″ steel conduit poles in between the wood, letting them dry overnight. I had previously spray painted the metal poles with Rustoleum’s oil-rubbed bronze spray paint.

Watch this video tutorial to get the whole idea.

Modern Blanket Ladder Tutorial - YouTube

I did not make this blanket ladder very tall because I did not have a free wall to lean it against. If you made your’s taller, you would have even more rungs to hang blankets, throws, rugs, or whatever. This project is very versatile: use it for hanging towels in the bathroom or attach wire baskets to the poles with S-hooks and create a vertical organizer!

If you are a long time reader of my blog, you will also notice I repainted the words on my pallet wood sign. I still love that piece; it is a great reminder to be kind every day!

Now that we have a space for our blankets and throws, the living room is more peaceful and stylish! If you have not yet followed my Facebook page, go do so now! I will be showing on Wednesday another way to use ladder storage in your bathroom LIVE with Hometalk at 2 pm CST.

Lastly, do not forget to PIN that perfect image of my metal and wood DIY blanket ladder. Until next time!

For your convenience, this post contains affiliate links. Read my full disclosures and policies here.

The post Metal and Wood DIY Blanket Ladder appeared first on Welcome to the Woods.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Last week I went “live” in the new Welcome to the Woods Facebook group to showcase a trick I sometimes use to make signs. Perfect hand-lettering on wood signs can be achieved by simply employing a projector to display the text on your sign as you trace. I made this sign using the projector method…

I put together a quick 3-minute video tutorial for readers to understand the process.

Projector Sign Making Trick for Perfect Hand Lettering - YouTube

I like to use canva.com for designing text layout and font selection. You should check it out if you do not already know about it!

I also really prefer Sharpie paint pens for hand lettering signs because you get way more control than using a paintbrush and paint. This 5-pack of oil-based Sharpies is cheaper per pen than any you will find in the store and has all the best colors.

You have seen examples of my freehand lettering with my pallet sign for discipline and decor, my wedding gift sign, my housewarming sign, and many more. Now you know the way to “cheat” and get professional looking letters without having to practice hours on your freehanding skills like me.

To be honest, I only recently discovered this trick myself so I am excited to share it with you and continue using a projector to make signs in the future. Maybe I will even start selling them?!

Please pin this image to share this fun idea with the world!

Thanks for stopping by to read how to achieve perfect hand-lettering on wood signs. You might be interested in learning the DIY wood stain recipe I used on this sign which I posted about earlier this week.

Also, if you are a fan of video tutorials, subscribe to my Youtube channel!
This post contains affiliate links. Read my full income policies and disclosures here.

The post Perfect Hand-Lettering on Wood Signs appeared first on Welcome to the Woods.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview