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Smith Hardy

  

We asked Matt Register of Southern Smoke BBQ to share a few recipes from his new cookbook, Southern Smoke. Try these recipes at home with your summer farmers market haul. 

Squash and Rice Pudding

Serves 8

2 tablespoons butter
2 pounds yellow squash, cut into 1/4-inch (0.5 cm) slices
2 teaspoons salt, divided
3 cups uncooked white rice
2 cups sour cream
2 cups heavy cream
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano
1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper

The first sign that summer is around the corner is when our farmers switch from dropping off greens to dropping off squash. By May, our squash farmer is making frequent trips from his farm to drop off 20-pound boxes.

This recipe was inspired by a classic rice pudding from the Women’s Cookery Cookbook, published in 1914. Because the base for the pudding is quite soupy, I decided that it was a perfect fit for summer squash. Fresh summer squash releases all the extra cooking liquid you’ll need. This should be a dish that screams summer, despite it being a hot rice casserole.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a large saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the squash and cook for 15 minutes, or until very tender. Let the squash cool in the pan; do not drain off the liquid.

While the squash cools, start the rice. In a medium pot, bring 5 1/2 cups of water to a boil. Add 1 teaspoon of the salt and the rice. Cover the pot and return to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 18 minutes, or until the rice is tender. If the rice is not done but it’s getting dry, add more water and continue to cook until the rice is fully cooked and tender.

Pour the cooked rice into a casserole dish. Add the cooked squash and juices to the rice, then fold in the sour cream, heavy cream, basil, oregano, the remaining salt and pepper. Stir until completely mixed. Cover the baking dish with foil and bake for 20 minutes. Uncover and bake for an additional 10 minutes, or until the edges begin to brown.

Smith Hardy

Creamed Corn

Serves 4

1/2 cup (1 stick) salted butter
8 ears fresh corn
1 1/4 cups heavy cream
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper

Corn represents the official halfway point of summer to me as it tends to come into the restaurant right around the Fourth of July. It’s not only at every potluck this time of year, but we also put it up. For country folk, putting up corn—preserving it for later—is no small task. Most people pick up 15 to 20 dozen ears of corn. As a group, everyone works to shuck it, get the silk off, sash it, cream it, and then freeze it in plastic bags.

This recipe for creamed corn is different from the one I grew up on, which was very sweet. I tried instead to let the sweetness of the corn shine through and complement it with the nutty, salty flavor of brown butter. Lots of fresh basil amps up the feeling of summer.

In a 4-quart pot over medium heat, melt the butter and then brown it. The butter will go through distinct stages, foaming and turning from lemon yellow to tan. Finally, it will turn brown and give off a nutty aroma. At this point, remove it from the heat and set it aside (it’s a good idea to refrigerate it to stop the cooking process, if you can).

Cut the corn kernels from the cobs with a small paring knife and collect them in a large mixing bowl. Once the kernels have been removed, use the back of the knife blade and scrape along the cob to get the milky liquid out of the cob and into the mixing bowl. Set the bowl aside. You can discard all the cobs at this point except one. Cut the reserved cob in half to use like a soup bone.

Transfer the cob halves to a small pot and add the heavy cream. Cook over medium heat until the cream begins to slowly boil, about 4 minutes. Immediately remove the pot from the heat and set aside.

Place the pot with the brown butter back on the stove over medium heat. If the butter solidified in the fridge, melt it again, then add the garlic, cut corn, basil, sugar and pepper and stir until well combined. Cook for 1 minute.

Remove the corn cob halves from the heavy cream and slowly add the cream to the corn mixture. Stir until the mixture is uniform and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cook for 30 minutes, stirring periodically to prevent burning. The mixture will begin to thicken and become creamy as it cooks.

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Reese Moore

 

The Northern Spy Bottle Shop and Restaurant, just minutes away from Duke University, opened in May 2019—one of the latest additions to Durham’s food and drink scene. With a spacious, open floor plan and the largest variety of cider offerings in the Southeast, Northern Spy is modern and inviting. Offering cider, beer, wine and cocktails, drinks are paired with a menu full of scratch-made American fare with a Southern twist, like tomato pie and fried chicken sandwiches. 

Despite the Southern focus, Stem Ciders—the craft cidery that created the concept for and operates Northern Spy—is originally headquartered in Colorado. We talked to Courtney O’Rourke, the company’s director of marketing, to find out why the team decided on a new location in North Carolina. 

As told to Sasha Schroeder

Why did you choose Durham as the next site for a Colorado-based company?

North Carolina is a great state for craft beer and cider, and a perfect extension of our company and brand. Cider aficionado and cicerone Mattie Beason (we like to call him “the unofficial mayor of Durham”) is a longtime friend and a great ambassador in the Durham community. Beason was looking to exit the restaurant industry and enter the cider space and now leads our North Carolina Sales division.

How do you see Northern Spy fitting into the Durham community?

It has an open floor plan that naturally lends itself as a place for working professionals, families and graduate students to convene over cocktails, cider, beer, wine and items from our seasonal menu designed by chef Eric Lee, the executive chef for Acreage in Colorado. As a bottle shop, we are a great place for people to stop in on their way home from work or school and pick up a few bottles of craft beer, cider, wine or even select liquors or bitters, such as Orleans by Eden, or Raleigh-based Crude Bitters.

Reese Moore

How did you select the hundreds of different ciders featured at Northern Spy?

With over five hundred products in house, we take our sourcing very seriously and focus predominantly on high quality. We do take pride in featuring the best of local and regional selections as well—we love our relationship with Haw River Ales, Ponysaurus, Fullsteam and R&D, all local breweries that make incredible beers.

What can we expect in terms of menu items or drink specials? 

We aim to bring an elevated beer garden experience to the Durham and Triangle community with our seasonal, regionally inspired menu offering items like a fried “bologna” sandwich (it’s a mortadella sandwich with two varieties of cheddar cheese, cider caramelized onions and French’s mustard), a fried chicken biscuit with fennel slaw and apple butter and cider floats with ice cream from The Parlour. Our craft cider cocktails put fun spins on traditional drinks, such as The Spritz, which features Aperol with L’Acier cider in place of traditional Prosecco. The bar program offers local craft beers, ciders, wine and draft cocktails.

Reese Moore

Anything exciting we should look forward to?

We are in collaboration with some of our favorite local beer producers: Fullsteam Brewery and Botanist & Barrel. The Botanist & Barrel collaboration, The Banjo and the Bees, has just been released and we will be putting together events with both of those breweries, most likely in the early fall.

2812 Erwin Road, Durham. For more information, visit www.northernspync.com, or follow their Instagram @northernspync.

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[See image gallery at www.waltermagazine.com]

Click to expand photo and view slideshow. 
photography by Tim Lytveninko

Biltmore Pool: 701 Crown Crossing Lane; 919-831-6736

Buffaloe Road Aquatic Center : 5908 Buffaloe Road; 919-996-5600

Chavis Pool: 720 Chavis Way; 919-831-6565

Lake Johnson Pool: 1416 Athens Drive; 919-233-2111

Longview Pool: 321 Bertie Drive; 919-831-6343

Millbrook Pool: 1905 Spring Forest Road; 919-872-4130

Optimist Pool: 5902 Whittier Drive; 919-870-2882

Pullen Aquatic Center: 410 Ashe Avenue; 919-831-6197

Ridge Road Pool: 1709 Ridge Road; 919-420-2322

For hours and more information, click here

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Our man-about-town shares his favorite musical moments and events in this photo series.
Writing and photography by Gus Samarco

[See image gallery at www.waltermagazine.com]
 
Click on image to expand and start slideshow.
 
I got to catch up with my friends from Cosmic Superheroes and Imagine Circus at the City Market for Moore Square Market. When renovations are complete at Moore Square, the Market will transition to the park each Wednesday from 4 pm-7 pm through October 16, 2019. Check their weekly schedule to find out who you can expect to see!
 
Gus Samarco is a video engineer by day, photographer by night. Find more of his work on www.samarcophoto.com.
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Alexandre Lacombe

It’s a new dawn, it’s a new day, it’s a new life… for Nina Simone’s historic birthplace in Tryon, that is. Celebrate efforts to preserve the legendary singer and civil rights activist’s local(ish) roots August 17 with an evening of feel-good Simone classics performed by her daughter, Lisa Simone, at NCMA’s Theater in the Museum Park.

“The legacy of Nina Simone is North Carolina history,” says Tiffany Tolbert, senior field officer at the National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP), one of many groups partnering to present the concert. “We want to connect people across the state to her.”  

Connecting through music is a Simone family trait. Daughter Lisa Simone has made her own name for herself as an award-winning actress and jazz vocalist: she was on the original cast of both The Lion King and Rent on Broadway, earned a Grammy nomination as part of the band Liquid Soul, and co-produced the Oscar-nominated Netflix documentary about her mother’s life, What Happened, Miss Simone? 

This time, Lisa Simone takes the stage to support the rehabilitation of her mother’s childhood home in western North Carolina. Last year, the NTHP designated the site a National Treasure—one of only two in North Carolina and less than 100 nationwide. Since then, the N.C. African American Heritage Commission (NCAAHC) has led the charge to channel “a lot of love and effort and support offered into this legacy space in order to preserve it,” says NCAAHC director Angela Thorpe.

Restoration of the circa-1930 660-square-foot house began in April, and in May a group of visionaries and engineers met to imagine a creative next use. It might be a community art center; it might be an artist workspace. Plans are still in the works, certain to “demonstrate how art and preservation practice can combine to honor her legacy… and inspire new generations of creators and preservationists,” says Tolbert.

“Preserving and activating places like the Nina Simone child-hood home uplift stories of African American achievement and bring those stories to life.” 

Alexandre Lacombe

The concert anchors Nina Simone Weekend at NCMA, presented by the museum, the NTHP, the NCAAH, the N.C. Arts Council and Come Hear North Carolina. Proceeds from the event, which also include music master classes, other performances and a documentary screening, benefit rehabilitation of the Nina Simone childhood home. —Jessie Ammons Rumbley

For tickets and more information: ncartmuseum.org. For more ways to get involved in saving the home, follow @NationalTrustforHistoricPreservation on Facebook and @savingplaces on Instagram and Twitter

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courtesy of Centerpiece Gallery

Tucked inside a red-brick exterior, The Centerpiece Gallery is sleek and white, blessed with tons of natural light and a roomy, flexible floor plan that lets the art speak for itself. “We wanted our guests to be able to look at a single painting and focus on it, so they can connect with how it would look in their house,” says owner Katie Brown. The art changes once a month, just before First Friday; in July and August expect work from locals Kathleen Deep and Dawn Rozzo, among others.

The gallery opened in February on the Person Street corridor in the space formerly known as Nicole’s, when the previous owner, Nicole Kennedy, decided to paint full-time. It’s not just a facelift: the gallery’s focus is shifting towards contemporary art while continuing to offer custom framing and painting classes for a range of skill levels. “The workshops were so popular that we wanted to continue them,” says Brown. “Plus, they’re a great way to connect with our community.”

In July and August, look for one- and two-day workshops including “Creating Loose, Vibrant Creative Florals,” “Atmospheric Watercolors” and “Taming the Green Disease” (a class focused on getting just the right shade of green for landscapes). There are beginner and “beyond beginner” classes, too, for someone who’s just taking up the hobby or wants to return to it after time away. “Many of our students are plein air painters and have their own easels and paints, but we can give you everything you need if you’ve never picked up a paintbrush,” says Brown. Often, the gallery will display the work of an artist who is teaching a class while they’re there.

Brown is especially excited to be in this neighborhood, she says. “The community is so accepting and welcoming of the arts. We’ve had so many people pop in on morning walks or after brunch to say hello.” And the dropping in—whether you’re there to buy, browse, learn or just say hello—is what she loves most. “I’d always rather talk to people who are walking in than sit on my computer!” —Ayn-Monique Klahre

Visit thecenterpiece.com for hours and class schedules.

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courtesy of Centerpiece Gallery

Tucked inside a red-brick exterior, The Centerpiece Gallery is sleek and white, blessed with tons of natural light and a roomy, flexible floor plan that lets the art speak for itself. “We wanted our guests to be able to look at a single painting and focus on it, so they can connect with how it would look in their house,” says owner Katie Brown. The art changes once a month, just before First Friday; in July and August expect work from locals Kathleen Deep and Dawn Rozzo, among others.

The gallery opened in February on the Person Street corridor in the space formerly known as Nicole’s, when the previous owner, Nicole Kennedy, decided to paint full-time. It’s not just a facelift: the gallery’s focus is shifting towards contemporary art while continuing to offer custom framing and painting classes for a range of skill levels. “The workshops were so popular that we wanted to continue them,” says Brown. “Plus, they’re a great way to connect with our community.”

In July and August, look for one- and two-day workshops including “Creating Loose, Vibrant Creative Florals,” “Atmospheric Watercolors” and “Taming the Green Disease” (a class focused on getting just the right shade of green for landscapes). There are beginner and “beyond beginner” classes, too, for someone who’s just taking up the hobby or wants to return to it after time away. “Many of our students are plein air painters and have their own easels and paints, but we can give you everything you need if you’ve never picked up a paintbrush,” says Brown. Often, the gallery will display the work of an artist who is teaching a class while they’re there.

Brown is especially excited to be in this neighborhood, she says. “The community is so accepting and welcoming of the arts. We’ve had so many people pop in on morning walks or after brunch to say hello.” And the dropping in—whether you’re there to buy, browse, learn or just say hello—is what she loves most. “I’d always rather talk to people who are walking in than sit on my computer!” —Ayn-Monique Klahre

Visit thecenterpiece.com for hours and class schedules.

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Curtis Brown

Over 30 orphans will take the stage at Memorial Auditorium this month. Annie, presented by North Carolina Theatre, from July 23 to 28 at Duke Energy Center for Performing Arts, and the theatre’s new artistic director, Eric Woodall, is thrilled about their take on the classic. Woodall, who grew up in nearby Benson, says he wanted to approach these classic musicals by presenting them in a new, fresh way. He began at NC Theatre last November, after decades in New York as everything from an actor to director and casting director. For this show, Woodall strove to “combine top local talent with some of Broadway’s best,” including Tony-award winner Karen Ziemba as Miss Hannigan and John Eric Parker as Daddy Warbucks, who’s joining the cast on hiatus from The Book of Mormon on Broadway.

As for all those orphans? Woodall says he “was so impressed with the talent of our young folks here” that he kept adding them to the cast to get them onstage. The beloved show is the last of the 2018-19 season, and Woodall has carefully selected each show in the upcoming 2019-20 lineup, including iconic musicals like West Side Story and Kinky Boots. Woodall says he’s thrilled to return to his roots in North Carolina. “It’s a full circle moment and it feels like an honor to pass on what was given to me; the love of theatre and the love of the arts propelled me into a career in one.”

Woodall says his overall vision for the theatre has inclusion at the forefront. “After my experience of 16 years as a Broadway casting director, I’ve realized that diversity and inclusion are so important in casting today. I want to bring that into regional theatre and share that it’s important to me,” he says. “I want to tell stories that entertain by introducing new ways of thinking and to revisit older stories in a new way.” —Catherine Currin

Kayce Lamos

2019-2020 NCT SEASON

West Side Story

October 15-20

Having Our Say

November 8-17

Kinky Boots

February 11-16, 2020

Memphis

March 24-29, 2020

Edge

 May 1-10, 2020

The Sound of Music

 July 28- August 2, 2020

Kayce Lomas

For tickets and more information on NCT’s upcoming season, visit nctheatre.com

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Courtesy Dorothea Dix Park

Don’t miss the long-awaited spectacle in downtown Raleigh this summer: sunflowers at Dix Park.

by Sasha Schroeder

A crowd favorite is back at Dix Park: a sea of sunflowers. For the second time, the City of Raleigh has planted thousands of the perky plants on a five-acre field at Dix Park off of Hunt Drive, open from dawn to dusk for all to enjoy. The idea grew out of a patch of sunflowers first planted along the Neuse River Greenway Trail in 2010 as an environmental initiative by the City of Raleigh to harvest seeds to create biodiesel—the photogenic spot became so popular that last year, the City decided to go bigger, right in the heart of downtown. Catch the sunflowers while you can: peak bloom is from July 4 to July 17, and the flowers will be visible for about one week afterward. A popular time to visit is just before sunset, when the “golden hour” lighting lends itself to flattering portraits (see: the more than three million social media hits the phenomenon garnered last year). On Saturday, July 13, Dix Park will be hosting Destination SunFest to draw crowds to the field. The event will include a Ferris wheel and carousel, food trucks, craft vendors, live music and a special fireworks display at the end of the night, all for free.

For more information, visit dixpark.org.

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Chairity is The Green Chair Project’s Annual Benefit, which raises money for the organization’s mission to provide all Wake County families with essential home furnishings, specifically those who are transitioning out of homelessness, disaster or crisis. 

photography by Fran Dickenson

Jodi Kruse, Beth Murdy, Mike Murdy, Lori Constantino, Mike Constantino

Jackie Craig, Dick Taylor, Marian Taylor

Scot Wingo, Scott Hatfield, Peyton Hatfield

Ryan Appelgate, Anna Appelgate, Emily Cram, Johnny Cram

Beth Smoot, Kim Shirley, Jennifer Schaafsma

Caroline Zamadics, Michelle Silvis, Katie Gillespie, Gretchen Kowalczyk, Bonnie Fusarelli, Phil Kowalczyk, Lance Fusarelli

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