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This week’s contributing author, Monica Leveckis, is a graduating senior from Northeastern University and is majoring in Accounting with a minor in Art History.

VoCA is pleased to present this blog post in conjunction with Associate Professor of Contemporary Art History, Gloria Sutton’s Spring 2019 Honors seminar, The Art of Visual Intelligence at Northeastern University. This interdisciplinary course combines the powers of observation (formal description, visual data) with techniques of interpretation to sharpen perceptual awareness allowing students to develop compelling analysis of visual phenomena.

In the 21st century, all brands—whether they are companies or people—are much more likely to succeed if they show some sense of dedication to their communities through philanthropy or consumer engagement. Customers expect their brands to offer them products and messages that reflect their own values and to support causes and organizations that are making a difference in the world.[1] Art museums, which may not normally be thought of as “brands,” can and should take advantage of this trend to find success and longevity by involving themselves with their communities and important social issues as much as possible. The recent protests at the Guggenheim Museum in New York—which rallied against the museum’s acceptance of donations from the Sackler family due to their involvement in the proliferation of the highly addictive opioid, OxyContin[2]—demonstrate an urgency for museums to be socially conscious. Museums that not only avoid controversy but also generate positive social change will be in the best position to make their mark as important cultural institutions in years to come. One museum that is making strides in this direction is the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, Florida.

The Norton Museum was founded in 1941 by Ralph Norton, a steel magnate from Chicago who retired in Palm Beach with his extensive art collection, and boasts a collection of more than 7,600 works spanning several different periods, mediums, and genres.[3] The museum has several programs, exhibitions, and awards that focus on making the museum, which is located in one of the most affluent cities in the country, more accessible and inclusive, both in its collection of artworks and in its appeals to visitors. In February of 2019, the museum reopened after a massive expansion and renovation project that added 35% more gallery space, larger classroom and exhibition spaces, an outdoor event lawn and sculpture garden, and six renovated 1920s-era cottages that will house an artists-in-residence program.[4] A month after the newly expanded museum opened, the museum welcomed a new Executive Director and CEO, Elliot Bostwick Davis, who was formerly the director of the Art of the America’s department at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston for 18 years. During Davis’s tenure at the MFA, she was involved in many efforts to make the museum more inclusive, active, and engaged with its community.[5] She focused on growing the African-American art collection to one of the top three collections in the country[6] and leading a project to create innovative exhibitions that “use understudied works from the MFA’s permanent collection to address critical themes in American art and the formation of modern American identities.”[7] Hopefully her arrival at the Norton will bring the same.

Explicit Bias, Nina Chanel Abney, 2019, at the Norton Museum of the Arts, West Palm Beach, FL. Photo by author.

The Norton already has a history of supporting lesser-known artists through programs like Recognition of Art by Women (RAW). The RAW program is an annual exhibition series that features living female artists in solo exhibitions – this year they’re showing Nina Chanel Abney, an African American artist who seeks to address major issues like racial inequality, gender discrimination, and gun violence through her bright colored and bold graphic style.[8] Abney was recently commissioned for the huge lobby wall at the ICA in Boston and was included in “30 Americans” in 2008, an exhibition of top African-American artists, alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kara Walker, and Kehinde Wiley.[9] This program demonstrates the Norton’s commitment to celebrating diverse voices in contemporary art, with past artists like Austrian Svenja Deininger, Nigerian-American Njideka Akunyili Crosby, and British Jenny Saville (the first winner in 2011)[10]. Along with the recent expansion project, the museum has been able to start offering free admission on Fridays and Saturdays.[11] Free admission is becoming increasingly rare for American museums—the Met recently decided to charge admission for out-of-state visitors after many years of only suggesting donations[12]—but it’s a critical policy in making museums accessible to visitors. By offering free admission on two of the more popular days of the week, the Norton aims to makes itself a welcoming cultural entity for those in the surrounding community.

Two of Nick Cave’s Soundsuits at the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL. Photo by author.

In its quest to better serve the growing Florida community and become one of the leading museums in the country, the Norton might look to other museums such as the Bronx Museum of the Arts or MASS MoCA. The Bronx Museum offers permanent free admission and speaks to its diverse audiences through innovative contemporary exhibitions, programs with K-12 students, and their Artists in the Marketplace program, which nurtures 36 emerging artists each year and provides professional development seminars.[13] Ingrained in MASS MoCA’s mission is the idea that a cultural institution can bring economic vibrancy and a strong sense of community identity through the arts, and they do this through extended experimental artist residencies, a wide range of participatory learning opportunities for visitors of all ages, and connections with local schools.[14] The Norton Museum is already on a path to sufficient social responsibility through their existing programs and initiatives, and by following the lead of museums like the Bronx Museum and MASS MoCA in the development of their own residency program and programming that engages with local schools, they create a space for new and groundbreaking art that is conscious of its social surroundings and community.

[1] https://www.huffpost.com/entry/why-corporate-social-resp_b_9282246

[2] https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/09/arts/protesters-guggenheim-sackler.html

[3] https://www.norton.org/about/history

[4] https://www.forbes.com/sites/chaddscott/2019/02/07/norton-museum-of-art-in-west-palm-beach-hosting-grand-opening-celebration-february-9/#28f9b441aee2

[5] http://www.artnews.com/2018/09/17/elliot-bostwick-davis-director-norton-museum/

[6] https://www.palmbeachdailynews.com/news/local/who-will-head-norton-museum-mfa-boston-star-hired-director/fuJmrU4jELtgfA7OvAaIdM/

[7] https://www.mfa.org/collections/art-americas/collecting-stories

[8] https://www.norton.org/exhibitions/nina-chanel-abney

[9] https://www.wbur.org/artery/2019/01/21/nina-chanel-abney-new-mural-ica

[10] https://www.artsy.net/show/norton-museum-of-art-svenja-deininger-second-chances-first-impressions

[11] https://www.forbes.com/sites/chaddscott/2019/02/07/norton-museum-of-art-in-west-palm-beach-hosting-grand-opening-celebration-february-9/#4fe85c17aee2

[12] http://www.artnews.com/2018/01/04/met-charge-mandatory-25-admission-fee-towners-ending-suggested-rates/

[13] http://www.bronxmuseum.org/about/

[14] https://massmoca.org/about/

The post SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF MUSEUMS IN THE 21ST CENTURY: THE NORTON MUSEUM appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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This week’s contributing blogger, Joric Barber, is a fifth year undergraduate student at Northeastern University studying Architecture.

VoCA is pleased to present this blog post in conjunction with Associate Professor of Contemporary Art History, Gloria Sutton’s Spring 2019 Honors seminar, The Art of Visual Intelligence at Northeastern University. This interdisciplinary course combines the powers of observation (formal description, visual data) with techniques of interpretation to sharpen perceptual awareness allowing students to develop compelling analysis of visual phenomena.

“Please do not touch the artwork.” Much of art clearly delineates artwork and viewer. Museum attendees are cautioned, blocked, barricaded and told to step away. Docents ask visitors to step back and stanchions create clear barriers around works of art. The museum is often a place of borders and restrictions separating museum visitors and the artwork they are there to experience. However, many contemporary artists, including William Forsythe, turn this tradition on its head. Forsythe’s piece, Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, No 3 (2015) eschews the conventional museum experience, discarding borders, and tasking the viewer with becoming an active participant in the artwork.

William Forsythe works within a larger lineage of artists who have created participatory work in the 20th and 21st century. Artists such as Yoko Ono and Ann Hamilton have incorporated the public in the full realization of an artwork, whether by asking them to repair broken ceramics or swing through the Park Avenue Armory.  Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, No. 3 was most recently exhibited as part Choreographic Objects, on view from October 31, 2018 – February 21, 2019 at the ICA Boston. The exhibition was the first large scale exhibition of William Forsythe’s work as an artist and choreographer, and included seminal works by Forsythe in a variety of media including, text, video, and interactive sculpture.

William Fosythe, “Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, No. 3,” 2015
Image Courtesy: Alana Rogers

Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, No. 3 was installed in the final room of the exhibition immediately before the ICA’s panoramic view of Boston Harbor. The piece consisted of 80 tiny silver pendulums hung from long, delicate wires attached to the ceiling that swung continuously just inches from the museum’s polished concrete floor. Each pendulum was connected to its own cylinder of compressed air some fifteen feet above the visitors’ heads. The firing of these pistons, whose hissing and popping could be heard rooms away before it was visible, swung each pendulum at a different rate which created an unpredictable and ever-changing space. Except for a 5-foot perimeter, the room was continuously divided, sliced, and carved by the graceful choreography of the pendulums. Forsythe, who often provides instruction for his works, invited visitors to walk through the room without touching any of the pendulums. As visitors moved through the space, turning and twisting, they became part of the choreography and a part of the artwork.

Forsythe reinvents the often-written museum request, “Please do not touch the artwork” by creating a participatory piece which is only complete when one does not touch the work. The separation of artwork and visitor becomes blurry and dynamic; the often hard-line delineations are no longer so clear. Like Carsten Höller’s Test Site (2006), where visitors to the Tate were invited to slide down spiraling silver slides, the experience of the installation is tantamount to—if not more important than—the physical objects within the gallery.

William Forsythe, “Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, No. 3,” 2015
Image Courtesy: Alana Rogers

Creating a space that abandons the traditional museum experience, Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, No. 3 compels visitors to become fully aware of one’s body in space, of the movement of limbs and the experience of the present. The task of moving through the unpredictable field of pendulums necessitates focus and relinquishment of control. Visitors could not walk a straight line from the room’s entrance to the view of Boston Harbor that lay in the room beyond. Instead visitors had to step into the work and dance across the room, focusing on nothing else but the movement of the pendulums. This was in fact the key to the installation. Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, No. 3 was about focusing attention towards the visceral and physical present. Life beyond the walls of the ICA was momentarily forgotten the instant one participated in the works. William Forsythe created moments of respite and pause.

Of course, Forsythe’s work does not always create such an affect. Eventually the movement of pendulums can be understood and avoided quite easily. The choreography breaks as visitors run through the space or opt out of participating altogether. Occasionally pendulums entangle and thus, no longer swing, stopping the choreography altogether. Additionally, there are risks involved in exhibiting this type of artwork within a public museum. The multitude of swinging pendulums is a field of potential hazards where visitors may become entangled or trip. Visitors may move too slow or too fast posing risk for the mechanical pieces of the work. The potential for injury was of enough concern that the ICA Boston included, within the wall text for the exhibition, a liability waiver stating that they could not be at fault for any personal injuries.

For all the logistical and legal considerations and even the potential for failure, William Forsythe in Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, No. 3 was able to set up a unique experience. Participants could create experiences, dancing, running or walking with the pendulums. In a society with an increasingly greater focus on mediated experience, William Forsythe makes the case for an experience of the present.


The post Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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Isabella Cura is a graduating senior at Northeastern University, majoring in marketing and graphic design. She has worked as a co-curator for spark, Northeastern’s contemporary art collective, and is currently working as a graphic designer for Northeastern’s Artistry Magazine while she pursues a full-time career in marketing analytics after graduation. She is passionate about bringing diverse voices to contemporary art.

VoCA is pleased to present this blog post in conjunction with Associate Professor of Contemporary Art History, Gloria Sutton’s Spring 2019 Honors seminar, The Art of Visual Intelligence at Northeastern University. This interdisciplinary course combines the powers of observation (formal description, visual data) with techniques of interpretation to sharpen perceptual awareness allowing students to develop compelling analysis of visual phenomena.

For Yuri Stone, Assistant Curator at the MIT List Visual Arts Center in Cambridge, artist intent is always at the forefront of his work. Most recently, he’s worked on a solo exhibition with artist Kapwani Kiwanga, focusing on the history of racialized surveillance in America from the colonial-era lantern laws to the Green Book to power dynamics within surveillance that black Americans still experience today. The exhibition is called “Safe Passage,” and at first glance, the space feels exactly that: a vast, high-ceilinged and white-walled space filled with sharp angles and geometric shapes, soft light from five-foot sculptures, a glass partition, a walled separation. Each piece leads you to the next. And as natural as the space feels, all the decisions were intentional. So how was Yuri Stone able to curate an exhibition with so much to say in such an impactful yet subtle way? I spoke with him to find out just how artist intent plays into his work.

Installation view, Kapwani Kiwanga: Safe Passage, MIT List Visual Art Center, Cambridge, MA, 2019. Artwork © Kapwani Kiwanga. Image courtesy MIT List Visual Arts Center. Photograph by Peter Harris Studio.

First off, Stone’s general approach is artist-centric. He’s always believed in letting the artist lead the conversation. In his own words, it’s “equal parts staying out of the way and maneuvering how best to support my artist. If the curator’s hand is visible, then they’re doing something wrong.” His work approach—the trick of making the artworks in the exhibition seem like they were made for that space and that time—appears simple, yet takes skill to perfectly execute.

Looking specifically at “Safe Passage” and working with Kiwanga, Stone truly believes it was a wholly collaborative effort: “I followed her lead because she’s so driven and thoughtful when it comes to these things.” He’s had a long history of working with artists who are working with archives, and after seeing some of her work in Chicago, Stone was immediately inspired and intrigued. “She was looking at culturally loaded moments in a very interesting way. The artists I’m attracted to make work that challenges me and forces me. It entices me to dig into it—What does it mean? Why did she do that? What is it about mounting a fluorescent light in the middle of a gallery that makes the space feel that way?”

For this exhibition, I couldn’t help but wonder if one voice had more influence than the other. This was not the case. “It’s always flexible,” Stone assured me. “There’s always some sort of conversation. You agree to do a show with the understanding that, ‘This is a person whose judgment and taste I trust, and they’re just as supportive of me as I am of them.’ I put my objectives out there as early as possible, so the artists are able to say no. If Kapwani wanted to make a different show, she would have brought it up at the beginning. My approach is putting it all on the table: this is what I like about you, this is what I like about your work, and this is what I want to accomplish.”

Stone also focuses on spatial quality. As natural as the space feels, the decisions are all intentional, methodical, and all collaborative. “Understanding the scale of the artworks and the sort of linear way that people move through the space is where I insert myself. I worked with Kapwani to see how many sculptures, where to place things, where to place the dividing wall for Green Book.” The book Kiwanga’s work refers to has recently come into the public eye with the popular movie of the same title, and has popped up in popular culture in Derrick Adams’ show at the Museum of Art and Design or by setting an auction record at Swann Galleries’ “Printed & Manuscript African America” auction. The book—formally known as “The Negro Motorist Green Book” —traditionally served as a guidebook for African Americans, listing restaurants, hotels, and other places that were considered relatively safe and friendly towards African Americans in the height of the Jim Crow laws era.

Kapwani Kiwanga, Greenbook, 2019
Installation view, Kapwani Kiwanga: Safe Passage, MIT List Visual Art Center, Cambridge, MA, 2019. Artwork © Kapwani Kiwanga. Image courtesy MIT List Visual Arts Center. Photograph by Peter Harris Studio.

Kiwanga’s Green Book installation is separated from the sculptural aspect of the exhibition by a partitioned wall. Around 25 natural wooden frames hang close to eye level on clean white walls. Inside are minimal, typographically aesthetic pages from the Green Book—extra text and advertisements have been removed, leaving only addresses and the name of the state. The frames vary in length: some house as many as eight pages, some keep only one. Little decisions would otherwise go unnoticed, but Stone says that each decision was made with purpose. “Kapwani and I sat together for a full day to figure out sequence, spacing, variations, why. And that was the fun part. It was cool to see how she thinks visually.” The decisions are impactful, from the minimalistic treatment and clean typography to the simultaneous separation and collection. Together they create a beautiful, quiet moment from the Green Book that is juxtaposed by the underlying reminder of prejudice and racism.

Installation view, Kapwani Kiwanga: Safe Passage, MIT List Visual Art Center, Cambridge, MA, 2019. Artwork © Kapwani Kiwanga. Image courtesy MIT List Visual Arts Center. Photograph by Peter Harris Studio.

Stone’s approach is important. His advocacy of artist intent allows these stories to not only be heard but lauded, and his curation has a level of grace that guides the artist without hindering them. It gives the final exhibition and artist a platform that captures the visitor and makes them think about it long after they’ve left. “I think it’s important to use our platform and resources to look at these brutal and challenging histories,” Stone said. “A thoughtful artist can do it in dynamic ways and allows a complex thing to be open enough that everyone engages with it thoughtfully, differently, and doesn’t take it lightly.”

The post Preserving Artist Intent Through Curation appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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This week’s contributing blogger, Taylor Healy, is a second-year graduate student at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center. With a background in studio art and a proclivity for technology in the arts, she is pursuing a concentration in time-based media art conservation.

VoCA is pleased to present this blog post in conjunction with the NYU/IFA Conservation Center’s Symposium “It’s About Time! Building a New Discipline: Time-Based Media Art Conservation,” held at NYU in May 2018. The program was organized by Hannelore Roemich and Christine Frohnert and was generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

A main theme revealed itself during each presentation and round table discussion during the Time-based Media Symposium: understanding and defining our own field is essential for moving forward. While facing this challenge, concerns such as establishing collaborations, redefining terminology, developing continuing education, sourcing teaching material, and determination of skill sets were raised by the speakers, moderators, and attendees. During the afternoon session on the first day, Paul Messier (Art Conservator, Pritzker Director, Lens Media Lab, Yale University) moderated the round table discussion, Consultants on Contract—Part of the Team, highlighting several of these latent themes from the perspective of consultants in private practice. Panel members included Andreas Weisser, Consultant for Analog and Digital Preservation at restaumedia in Munich, who splits his time between freelance and the Doerner Institute. Also splitting her work as a professor and consultant was Agathe Jarczyk, Studio for Video Conservation in Berne. Representing New York City private conservation practice, the duo Reinhard Bek and Christine Frohnert, Conservators of Contemporary Art, Bek & Frohnert LLC. Ben Fino-Radin, an expert in digital preservation and repositories, is providing a particular skill set that is in high demand in this field.

From left to right: Panelists Andreas Weisser, Reinhard Bek, Ben Fino-Radin, Agathe Jarczyk, Christine Frohnert, and Paul Messier

The panel discussed a range of issues many institutions—of varying sizes and target audiences—are facing after they have identified urgent needs in their collections. What resources are needed for long-term preservation and display of TBM art? What expertise is required for decision makers on various levels? The role of consulting conservators dealing with time-based media has evolved out of necessity, in response to specific needs in the field. During their presentations, and echoed in the discussion, the panelists demonstrated the flexibility required to approach time-based collections. The panel members all agreed that major efforts should be taken to raise awareness about the complexity of TBM art conservation as they take on roles as liaisons between artists, institutions, and technicians. Considering the diversity of skills required for each media category, redundancy while learning skills can be avoided when certain tasks are outsourced to the respective experts. A major concern for time-based media collectors, for both institutional and private, is storage. An inquiry was raised about recommendations for managing digital repositories. However, like many situation-based questions, the answers were anecdotal, highlighting another issue that requires more investigation.

Guest speaker Christine Frohnert, Conservator of Contemporary Art, Bek & Frohnert LLC

The issue of mentorship, especially regarding the relevant skills needed for setting up a business, was raised during the discussion. It was generally recognized that management skills are not built into many conservation programs, and such mentorships in conservation training would be valuable. Agathe and Andreas mentioned that their programs provided mentorships in this area, and additionally, addressed the obligation of faculty and colleagues to assist any emerging conservators entering a career in private practice.

Audience members clamored to question the panel. Tina Rivers Ryan, Assistant Curator at the Albright-Knox, inquired about approaching private collectors and connecting them with the right conservators. This concern for bringing external expertise to collectors and mid-size museums and building in-house relations was followed by an auditorium full of nods. The focus of this concern turned to the collector themselves rather than the needs of a specific work. Panelists identified the double-edged sword in these cases: either the collector is an individual working with an art advisor that will ideally let you just do whatever is necessary or can be really difficult when the collector doesn’t understand the basic needs of TBM works. Private collections usually have a history of their own, and the owners will have personal memories about the works, which becomes a valuable part of their collections and gives it another dimension of documentation. Thankfully, time-based media art collectors can be extremely genuine and philanthropic— the majority is passionate about the piece and sees it as a personal part of their collection rather than as an investment picked up at auction.

Guest speaker Andreas Weisser, Consultant for Analog and Digital Preservation at restaumedia in Munich

The diversity of the panel was most impressive; their backgrounds, flexibility, and experiences perfectly illustrated the unbaiting support and collaboration necessary to navigate a field that is developing as fast as the media evolve. As one of the first guinea pigs to enter NYU’s Time-Based Media conservation curriculum, I am a primary beneficiary of these conversations that shape this concentration.

The post It’s About Time! Round Table: Consultants on Contract appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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This week’s contributing author, Marshall Reese, is an artist working in new technologies, video, installations, artists books and limited editions. He has worked in collaboration with Nora Ligorano as LigoranoReese for over two decades.

This blog post is part of periodic series from contributor Marshall Reese that focuses on “outsider archivists,” people who highlight the tensions between traditional and born-digital archives and the transition between the two. Mnemosyne is the Greek goddess of memory, the mother of the nine muses. Her significance only seems to grow as we externalize more and more of information, data, and records. 

For the past few years, I’ve been thinking about how we save and organize information, about how we can ensure that new media artworks exist and function in the future. I’m especially interested in how libraries and archives will look over the next decades and the impact the internet will have on them.

So my curiosity was piqued in December 2018 when I stumbled on Bob Stein’s Facebook posts noting that he had just embarked on organizing over 300 boxes of papers, books, t-shirts, leaflets, periodicals, outmoded software and hardware and was blogging about it.

Stein was a consultant to Alan Kay, chief scientist at Atari Research Group, and founded The Criterion Collection and the Voyager Company. Both were among the first publishers of hypermedia, videodiscs, CD-ROMs, and electronic books with titles such as the CD Companion to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony and the electronic book editions of Susan Faludi’s Backlash and Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Trilogy among others.

Bob’s posts query about equipment or detail his day’s progress sorting through materials; some posts highlight objects and book covers that trigger his memories while others muse on the process he is currently undertaking, grappling with issues about permanence, memory, and the challenges of reading the past.

Intrigued by his mission, I decided to visit Bob to talk about what he was doing and why.

“After my partner Ashton had dinner with a friend whose husband passed away leaving a million slides behind, she said, ‘Bob, you have to do something with those 300 boxes of yours, because when you keel over, I’m not!’” That was the start, but the real motivation turned out to be a nightmare Bob had.

“I was in Toronto and stopped off to see [Marshall] McLuhan’s archives. They’re sitting in the basement at the University of Toronto Library, basically unattended and stripped of any history like Citizen Kane’s sled.” Two nights later Bob woke startled, having dreamed that his stuff would just lay in a basement somewhere, so he came up with a novel idea to publicly open the boxes and just give everything away. But after a minute or two he realized there probably wasn’t much that people would actually take since it was mostly digital or paper records.

For Bob, “the central issue [is] not fundamentally what to do with an archive as much as it [is] for searching for a ritual… that foregrounds the archive as a tool for contextualizing memory.”

He explained, “In the collaborative era we now live in, we’re learning that meaning is socially constructed and that memory and history are not fixed. An example is Wikipedia, where the truth of a subject isn’t only, or even mainly, in the surface article, but in the “history” of the article which preserves the back and forth editing where contributors argue over key points.”

At a TED residency, Bob set up a room with 50 of his objects, inviting people to pick them up and ask him about them. “The conversations were very interesting,” he told me. “By far the most compelling was with a young African-American guy, who asked me about a Leonard Peltier t-shirt I had. I realized during our conversation… he was actually able to ask himself some important questions about his own life. It seemed of value for him to have this conversation.”

It then struck Bob “that the ritual of telling the stories was not to send information down the chute from one generation to another, but … to find a way to put subjects out there… [because] the problems in front of all of us, are too complicated for a) anyone of us to solve or b) for any one generation.”

The way I found Bob –through his Facebook posts– was actually an experiment of his to work out what things held the most interest, to understand how people respond to different objects, and to learn how to write in a style that nurtured exchange and interaction. Stein, being the interactive media pioneer he is, was using his Facebook feed as a testbed for a new platform to build an archive with social media, so that heterogeneous media could exist and be read in parallel, along the lines of the electronic books his company Social Book (started in 2010) once designed and published.

“I realized… that we had shifted the hierarchy of the author and the reader… Suddenly we had put them in the same space and [when we embedded film in a browser] people had the same complex threaded conversations… in the margins of the film like that of a book. It’s a dramatic shift from the way we normally consume media.”

Stein seems to be approaching his archive like a 3-D game designer. “The context is the interface to the whole thing,” he said, picking his parent’s vintage ashtray off the coffee table and holding it in his hands.

“What I’m most interested in… is what happens when you pick up an object. Archives have to live. Just to dump stuff over there and have it sit there for this weird graduate student who wants to know something about the 1980’s, that’s not the purpose of the archive. The purpose… is that it’s a way for the present to understand possibilities by interrogating the past. I’m not sure if we have wisdom to impart, but we have a role to play in helping the other generations that are here… figure stuff out.”

The post Knocking on Mnemosyne’s Door: Part 1 appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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Returning contributing blogger Wided Khadraoui currently works with Art Processors, a experiential design consultancy specializing in museum spaces, in marketing and business strategy. She previously managed a commercial art space for four years. She holds a MSc in Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics, and a MA from Central Saint Martins in Arts and Cultural Enterprise. She is passionate about technology’s potential to foster the inclusion of non-traditional and historically undervalued stakeholders and audiences in the creative sector.

According to Census Bureau projections, people of color will become the majority nationwide by 2044. Yet American museums – their boards, their staff, and the people who visit them – continue to be far whiter than the American population as a whole. In 2015, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the American Association of Art Museum Directors published the first-ever study of diversity in American art museums. It found that people of color represent only 28 percent of staff at museums around the country, and mostly work as administrators, janitors, and security guards, but are notably absent in decision making capacities. So while many museums, foundations, arts councils, and other cultural spaces have publicly committed to improving inclusivity and equity in the sector, current audience demographics suggest that museums have yet to meaningfully respond to demographic and cultural shifts and the subsequent demands for change.

Despite the accelerated patterns of demands for representation, museums remain painfully inhibited. As author Aruna D’Souza notes in her recent book, Whitewalling: Art, Race, & Protest in 3 Acts, “What institutions hang on their walls or put on their pedestals is a clear articulation of who they imagine their audience to be,” emphasizing the importance of representation in the space. Museums today must be willing to explore “disruptive” ideas and hybrid forms of curating, programming, and outreach in order to improve who feels welcome attending them, and to increase their overall relevance to a discernible and competitive cultural consumer audience. Yet the sector’s evolution and progression convey almost a skepticism toward increased demands for representation and diversity in cultural spaces.

Visitors at the Brooklyn Museum’s “Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks” exhibition, 2015. Photo by EspoStudio.

When perfunctorily engaging with the idea that change is necessary for survival, museums tout technology as a savior for institutions. But technology is ineffective within the current context. As Elizabeth Merritt, the founding director of the Center for the Future of Museums, succinctly stated in a recent interview, “the focus on technology masks that the major underlying changes are social, cultural, economic and environmental. They are related to the policies we create to regulate our world.” In short, museums have to adapt internally in order to survive. Future-facing strategies for survival, growth, and relevancy mandate expanding the museum’s ideas about their audience and their demands, and by extension more accurate representation of that audience in their spaces.

Inclusivity as a Trend

While the conversation in cultural sectors promotes buzzwords like diversity, inclusivity, and equity, statistics reveal museums’ reluctance toward meaningful change that would disrupt the current status quo and introduce new diverse stakeholders into the fold. It is clear that museums are struggling to understand their public and how they relate to it—and how to be honest about who they see their public to be. The U.S. population is shifting rapidly and within four decades, the group that has historically constituted the core audience for museums — non-Hispanic whites — will be a minority of the population. Research suggests that 20-30 percent of the American public just don’t have museums on their radar; they assume museums are not places for them, so they don’t go.

A first, necessary step is acknowledging that imagining the audience as a neutral, passive viewer is problematic. Attempting to think of museum visitors as a generic audience devolves into whiteness. According to a 2009 National Research Council report, “There is no cultureless or neutral perspective, no more than a photograph or painting could be without perspective. Everything is cultured, including the layout of designed experiences, such as museums, and the practices associated with teaching science in school.” Thus, the solution to conceiving museum audiences as multiples starts with internal stakeholder make up. In the past, however, museums have attempted to deal with the issue of diversity by focusing first on audiences, then on programming. Only recently has the attention shifted to leadership.

New Museum Ecology

There has to be a new ecology within museums. There must be a shift away from placing the burden of change implementation on minorities, i.e. the targets of discrimination, and placing responsibility on organizations and individuals who have the power to maintain, or alter, the status quo. As D’Souza states in her book, “uneven representation should be seen as a systematic failure of institutions, not as individual failures, so the burden of correcting that should fall on organizations.”

The Natural History Museum in London.

Ian David Moss’s ten-year initiative, Createquity, was one of the first online publications to explore issues in arts policy, philanthropy, and research at a systemic level. Their research found that the more individuals feel reflected within the culture of a mainstream institution, the more comfortable that individual will be engaging with the institution’s programming. If diverse audiences are taking advantage, then that is the surest sign of success. Or, if that reflection is not taking place, a significant proportion of the population is being left out.

The real goal of museums is not only to improve their engagement with different people but to also convert them to regular attendees. Technology is a tool to achieve this objective, but not the silver bullet. Significant solutions require more than increased digital engagement through posting on a social media platform or launching a new donor-backed app around a particular collection. Rather, they require diversifying the make-up of exhibitions and decision-makers behind the scenes. Meaningful engagement calls for change at the infrastructural level that trickles down to the programmatic level, which can then be disseminated by digital tools.

Only by employing the power of diverse narratives can art museums utilize technology to play a formative role in generating new audiences through digital engagement.

Further Reading

D’Souza, A. (2018). Whitewalling: Art, Race & Protest in 3 Acts. Badlands Unlimited.

Horowitz, E. (2016). When will minorities be the majority? Boston Globe. [online] Available at: https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/politics/2016/02/26/when-will-minorities-majority/9v5m1Jj8hdGcXvpXtbQT5I/story.html

Merlin, L. (2018). Future-proofing museums: controversy and diversity. Elizabeth Merritt interview Pt. 2. Blooloop [online] Available at: https://blooloop.com/features/future-museums-museum-community/

National Research Council. Learning Science in Informal Environments: People, Places, and Pursuits. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2009. Available at: https://higherlogicdownload.s3.amazonaws.com/ASTC/a6c0f3de-e0b1-4198-8ab7-01cee4a55b00/UploadedImages/CCLI%20Framework%20for%20Inclusion%20Paper.pdf

Pogrebin, R. (2017). The Studio Museum Has a Vision for Its Home. And a Power Player at the Helm. New York Times. [online] Available at: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/26/arts/design/studio-museum-thelma-golden-david-adjaye.html

Schuhmacher, C., Ingersoll, K., Nzinga, F. and Moss, I. (2016). Making Sense of Cultural Equity. [online] Create Equity. Available at: http://createquity.com/2016/08/making-sense-of-cultural-equity/

The post Technology is Not the Silver Bullet for Museums appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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This week’s contributing blogger, Emmanuel Castillo, is a second year Masters of Fine Arts candidate at Pratt Institute, who experiments with hybrid mediums as part of his interdisciplinary practice. Currently, Emmanuel is investigating the role of materials in reimagining identity.

The second talk of the 2018 Creating a Living Legacy (CALL)/VoCA Talks season covered preservation of artwork and legacy. The talk, which was moderated by Kendra Roth, became the first program to highlight the perspective of CALL’s legacy specialists. Moreover, each of the three panelists – Antonia Perez, Rose Nesler, and Julia Rooney – represents a stepping stone in the chronology of CALL’s evolution.

Materials carry their own legacy, and as such artists who experiment with materials must negotiate the conservation and preservation of their work. The three panelists discussed their practice with specific emphasis on materiality and the role documentation has to play in conserving their history.

Antonia Perez, the first speaker, creates sculptures and public art with “single-use” plastic, such as plastic bags and bottles that are typically discarded after their contents have been disposed. Perez considers herself a missionary highlighting the negative impact of plastic on our planet, and looks forward to the day she may not need to use plastic. She expressed that her personal legacy exists in the social message of her work. As part of her practice, Perez recontextualizes plastic. The work will deteriorate over time; similarly, the human history remaining in the form of plastic will also deteriorate.

Rose Nestler, whose installation, Gymnasia, is currently on display at BRIC, followed Perez. Her interdisciplinary practice includes video, sculpture, and installation with fabric. Nestler shared her interest in the beginning of craftsmanship, a period without gender identification. Her most recent body of work, investigates the gender roles that items of clothing represent. Nesler also asserts that the space housing artwork contributes to its legacy. She stores her artwork mindfully, and rids of the work she feels would not benefit her legacy in the long run.

The third and final speaker, Julia Rooney, a source driven artist, finds inspiration in her life and her immediate surroundings. Rooney combats the assumption that an object or material will last forever, and challenges the preciousness of materials. She values the fluidity in the history of materials. Rooney recycles materials from one piece to create another, which transitions the legacy of a particular work into the other.

The artist individual presentations were followed by a conversation with Roth, during which the panel agreed that materials carry unique function, which shapes an artists work. However, particularly when a material chooses us, like plastic chose Perez, we must also embrace the specificity and serendipity those materials carry.

The panelists also agreed that maintaining a legacy also means self care: rest is as valuable as the time we invest in our work. To the panelists, downtime comes in different forms. Maintaining a healthy work routine while resting from working on a particular project looks like reading, working on a completely different project, taking a break from the studio or engaging with other break time activities that improve mental health.

Moreover, the panel discussed the role of websites and social media. Nesler shared that not all work needs to be visible to the general audience. Websites also serve as a crucial tool for documenting and archiving artwork. To Perez, social media is a tool to spark curiosity.

In conclusion, the panelists discussed the role of mentorship. Mentorship allows for a practice, a specific way of making, to live on. An artist’s legacy exists in their artwork, but also in the members of their community who took part in the formation of their artistic fingerprint.

All photos by Taylor Dafoe. Courtesy of Voices in Contemporary Art.

The post Your Work, Your Legacy: A CALL/VoCA Talk at Pratt appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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This week’s contributing author, Michele Rushfeldt, is a visual artist living and working in Brooklyn, NY. Her three-dimensional work focuses on materials associated with sexuality and kink, and depicts how observations of fringe eroticism feel and look. Originally from Minneapolis, MN, she obtained her BFA in painting from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, and then her MFA from Pratt Institute. Her work has been exhibited nationally, including galleries in California, Washington, D.C., and New York.

ANTONIA PEREZ, JULIA ROONEY, ROSE NESTLER, AND KENDRA ROTH Consider THEORIES OF MATERIALITY

This past December, Pratt Institute hosted Voices in Contemporary Art (VoCA) and the Joan Mitchell Foundation (JMF) for a panel discussion that focused specifically on Legacy Specialists, artists who help organize and inventory the work of older artists as part of JMF’s Creating a Living Legacy (CALL) Program. The audience heard from three artists – Antonia Perez, Rose Nestler, and Julia Rooney – who, in addition to contributing their valuable time and experience to JMF’s CALL program, have managed to thrive in their own artistic practices as well. For this, the first panel discussion of the ongoing CALL/VoCA Talks series to focus on Legacy Specialists, main topics of discussion included materiality, archival ability, and controlling how one’s art is consumed. After brief presentations by the artists, moderator Kendra Roth, a sculpture conservator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, lead a conversation about issues pertaining their work.

From left to right: Kendra Roth, Antonia Perez, Rose Nestler, and Julia Rooney

Antonia Perez’s description of her large-scale, crocheted plastic sculptures and installations prompted Roth to present questions that focused on the materials themselves. The artist described the labor-intensive process of making the work – the time, physical and emotional energy, and discipline it takes to complete each piece – and her growing commitment to saving the planet from our consumption of single-use plastics. Perez also described her commitment to not only the cultural history of her Mexican heritage, but also to future generations with artworks that are meant to be viewed as heirlooms. One of these works, entitled Estas En Tu Casa, is a large-scale, crocheted plastic mat for immigrants that read “You are In Your Home” in Spanish. Her public projects reach out into communities in order to invoke change, such as an interactive piece where the artist gave out plastic crocheted flowers to anyone who signed a written commitment to avoid using single-use plastics.

Artist Antonia Perez discusses her work

A three-time legacy specialist with a recently acquired MFA from Brooklyn College, Rose Nestler was the second artist to speak about her work. She speaks of her sculptures like friends, giving them personalities and roles, and even going so far as to give them lives through performance and film. Nestler’s interest in the body, gender, and power dynamics makes itself evident in her work from the last several years, beginning with her performance sculptures about wrestlers. The work speaks to the complicated nature of masculinity, with the sculptural body part props being torn off of the main torso one by one, like kinky, fetishized objects. Incorporating humor into her feminist message, she began making work using control-top pantyhose in an effort to take traditionally feminine, restrictive items and turn them into something absurd and out of control – in this case, in direct rejection of the male gaze. During the description of some of her more recent work, the artist’s interest turned to spaces that are historically gendered, such as corporate office culture. She began incorporating the performativity of the women’s power suit, sometimes viewed as a shield for women, or a manifestation of shame for covering the body, into sculptures and films inspired by the #MeToo movement. Since her most recent solo show in January, 2018, Nestler has started looking at the world of sports for inspiration, and how this traditionally male subculture feeds into the system of patriarchy.

Artist Rose Nestler speaks to the audience about her practice

Julia Rooney described her work as primarily “source-driven,” coming from influences that are rooted in the world. Her work can be seen to play with and reorder information in order to turn the data into something more open-ended. One of her examples was a work where she used 35 mm slides and flipped them over onto themselves, layering the slide image and changing the visible result, effectively altering the visual information. Working with found objects such as wooden drawers, window blinds, neoprene, old paint rags, and even underwear, she changes the way a viewer looks at what is the “front” and “back” of a painting, even placing the canvas upright in the center of the room to create a “screen”.  Rooney’s freestanding screen-paintings take on a form that is space, becoming an object with six sides. Her innovative use of everyday materials makes the viewer look at the objects that surround them in a new, creative light.

Panelists listen to fellow artist Julia Rooney

All three of the artists were asked about their materials, challenging ideas of preciousness and exploring the contradiction of using non-permanent materials during a panel discussion about legacy-building.  While the artists all agreed that their legacy doesn’t necessarily mean that their work and/or materials need to last through the ages, they did place different amounts of importance on how they will be regarded by the next generation of artists and thinkers. Where Perez is more concerned with the world we leave behind, Nestler feels strongly about having reputable work and promotional material that represents her well. Rooney regards the materials as “choosing her,” and believes that when the work breaks down, it becomes other work, creating a new history of the mark. One of the other key takeaways from the panel discussion was the fervent stress on taking downtime. Each of the artists described the need for outside activities to break the constant stream of making art, and leaving space for other priorities in life, be they kids, socializing, sleeping, or relaxation. And finally, in the spirit of the CALL initiative, the legacy specialists all prioritize their mentorship of other artists, and the interdisciplinary, intergenerational support of their community.

Overall, my impression of the panel discussion was that it was extremely rewarding and useful to learn about these diverse artist’s practices, their commitment to mentorship, their differing uses of materials, and their viewpoints on approaching the importance of legacy. I look forward to VoCA artist conversations hosted at Pratt Institute in the future.

All photos by Taylor Dafoe. Courtesy of Voices in Contemporary Art.

The post CALL/VoCA Talk: A Discussion with Legacy Specialists appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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This week’s returning writer, Elena Girelli, is project manager at Studio Daniel González, NY & Verona, Italy. She oversees the project planning and development of large-scale public artworks, performances, and shows of the studio. She received a masters degree in arts management at University of Bologna, which was then followed by a four-year term collaboration with Peter Brook touring activity in Europe.

Audience development is quite a hot topic among museum professionals today. And despite a widespread lack of economic and social support for public institutions, many independent institutions are exploring techniques aimed at strengthening their relationships with target communities through a variety of cultural initiatives. The Museo de arte contemporáneo de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (MAR), for example, is doing so by supporting Argentinean artist Daniel González’s research into community-based installations. Over time, the artist’s “ephemeral architectures” have evolved into a deep investigation about audience engagement. His upcoming public project, “#WhatsupArgentina Mi Casa Tu Casa,” involves Museum visitors and social media followers in the artistic creative process via the messaging app WhatsApp. Creative freedom and pro-active audience participation are the core focus of this artwork by González, which will be developed in two different ways: by virtual dissemination and a call for physical objects.

MAR Museo, front view, courtesy MAR Museum, Mar del Plata, Argentina

For the online component, the Museum and the artist are asking for an imaginative contribution answering the question “What does your dream house look like?” which might consist of text, an image, a vocal message, or a video sent to the messaging app. The institution is also setting up an operation to gather common objects which will physically become the first “community” dream house ever built. All contributors, both virtual and physical, will become co-author of the artwork as well, together with artist. Daniel González emigrated almost twenty-five years ago from his home country, and this exhibition is the first opportunity for him to access the artistic framework of his homeland through a commissioned project.

The whole production process will be the largest communication and creative operation ever built by a public Museum in Argentina. Here follows a brief insight from Museum’s Director, Micaela Saconi.

What was main reason for inviting Daniel González to exhibit in MAR Museo? How did you come to know his artistic research?

I met Daniel González through Marcelo Maran, a theatre director in Mar del Plata, where the MAR Museo is located. After this, I went through a bit of research about his work and I was impressed, not only by the final creations but also by the process and production; how he designs and creates in relation with the community where the artwork is located. So we met and Daniel presented a project for the Museum where people were meant to participate and create with him, and I found his proposal totally aligned with the major work that we are doing in MAR Museo.

How does the artistic research by Daniel González meet MAR Museo’s needs and perspectives?

Ever since I became Director, I have worked with the whole museum team to construct an identity that is both open to all and easy to reach. The museum has to be accessible, the programs have to engage, to change all the time and offer new activities constantly. This means also that the museum has to communicate in a way that the people always want to know more about it, through traditional media such as newspapers and radio, as well as via Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

Daniel González, Mi Casa Tu Casa, 2018
Manifesta 12 Palermo collaterals, Mondello Italo Belga and Fondazione Volume!, Rome
Site­ specific installation, ephemeral architecture
Photo Andrea Trimarchi, courtesy Studio Daniel González

Daniel González’s artistic project for the museum includes both variables: it is a project where you can participate from the beginning and in an easy, friendly way. Moreover, MAR Museo is a public museum owned by the Buenos Aires province, and as such aims to exhibit local artists, including those with an international career; because being part of this part of the world is our identity too.

MAR Museo opened in December 2013, which was shocking in some way for the community. Mar del Plata is a tourist city, with nice beaches where people from all over the country like to spend their summer holidays; but it is also a city of 700,000 citizen not used to seeing contemporary art. So part of the work we do is to create a bridge among general visitors and contemporary art. Our main task is to let them have a relationship with the art piece, to not just receive information, but also comprehend and participate. In this way, Daniel González’s project is opening a new door: inviting everybody to participate from the very beginning, to be part, to create, to help, to be there, either with a message or by donating objects. I think the whole process is like magic, because in Daniel hands words and things will be transformed into an art piece and this art is that magic.

What expectations does the Museum have for this project? Do you feel people appreciate these kinds of projects? If yes, why?

I think the expectation is huge and that the mystery creates more enthusiasm. I think people will be really surprised when they finally see the work. The whole process, from how people participate, what they are saying, or which object they donate, speaks to what kind of society we are. Whether someone sends a message or donates an object, the person has opened up; to give something of his/her own privacy, a wish, a secret, or a possession. It is not easy, but many people did it. The work Daniel Gonzalez is doing is artistic but social too, because he is using WhatsApp, the messaging app we constantly use to communicate among each other; so there is a lot to consider, to think over, to debate.

Daniel González, Mi Casa Tu Casa, 2018
Bricks and mixed media
98.42 x 37.4 x h 31.49 inches, ephemeral architecture
Photo Elena Girelli, courtesy Boccanera Gallery, Trento, Milan

The call for contribution by MAR Museum is open until the end of December 2018. The installation “#WhatsupArgentina Mi Casa Tu Casa” will be open for construction on site from now through the grand opening reception on January 3, 2019. The whole ephemeral architecture will be on show in the common spaces, halls, and stairs of MAR Museo throughout 2019. It will also be possible to attend laboratories, workshops, and activities inspired by Daniel González poetics and organized by the Educational Department of the museum.

The post #WhatsupArgentina Mi Casa Tu Casa appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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This week’s contributing author, Yiyang Wu, is an M.A. candidate in Museum Studies at New York University. She received a bachelor’s degree in Chinese Painting from China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, China and a master’s degree in Culture, Criticism and Curation from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London, UK. She is currently working as a Curatorial Intern at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

VoCA is pleased to present this blog post in conjunction with the NYU/IFA Conservation Center’s Symposium “It’s About Time! Building a New Discipline: Time-Based Media Art Conservation,” held at NYU in May 2018. The program was organized by Hannelore Roemich and Christine Frohnert and was generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The Symposium concluded with a round table discussion moderated by Pip Laurenson, who invited the audience to think about the future of time-based media art conservation through three case studies: the work of Tony Conrad, the Artist Initiative at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Digital Museum of Digital Art. The panelists explored how various mediums of art might inform TBM conservation and the skillset needed for TBM practice and education.

Moderator Pip Laurenson

Tina Rivers Ryan started her presentation with humorous apologies for being one of the curators who might have caused trouble for conservators. She discussed an exhibition, Introducing Tony Conrad: A Retrospective in which the works shape our experience of time and connect our past to our future by highlighting issues raised by the act of conservation. In a series of works titled “Yellow Movies,” Conrad painted a rectangle with cheap house paint on paper and framed it with a black border. The central painted rectangle will slowly fade over time in the same way film emulsion does, which creates a slow movie taking decades instead of hours to watch. Being one of the first media artists to think about what his works would look like in the distant future, Conrad pushed beyond existing boundaries.

Jill Sterrett spoke of the creative process generated by interdisciplinary research projects in The Artist Initiative at SFMOMA. To imagine the future of conservation, she suggested that we should think about the problems we face, and always refer to artists to find solutions. She introduced Futurefarmers, an international artist collective of diverse practitioners, founded by artist Amy Franceschini in 1995. One of the projects initiated by Futurefarmers is Land, Use, a multipart collaborative work that explores lifestyle and practices of shepherding as well as the environmental movement. Amy Franceschini and Madrid-based artist Fernando García-Dory hosted conversations with activists and created an installation that provided shelter for temporary gatherings and participatory events about land use. Their idea was to unfold the narrative of the shepherd and reactivate it in our present day. Sterrett pointed out what Futurefarmers had done could also inspire time-based media conservators in terms of managing the present and learning from multiple voices and stakeholders. In addition, she especially mentioned VoCA as an organization that offers a vital model for shepherding contemporary art.

Panelist Jill Sterrett

Alfredo Salazar-Caro spoke about a virtual museum dedicated to commissioning, preserving, and exhibiting works of Virtual Reality. Launched by Salazar-Caro and William Robertson in 2015, the Digital Museum of Digital Art (DiMoDA) focuses on providing tools and means for artists to experiment with new frontiers of art. As artists themselves, both founders started making audio-visual installations and chose game engines as their medium. However, they could only show their works in self-organized events and exhibitions since galleries and museums were not interested in the medium in 2015. When Virtual Reality became available for common users, they established a gallery showing their work in virtual spaces. Salazar-Caro expressed his belief that the virtual world would soon become common in everyday life.

The panel continued with further discussion around the necessary skillset that DiMoDA needed to maintain the collection. Starting the museum within the virtual space, Salazar-Caro acknowledged that they had to learn how to operate the museum in the real world, for instance, with evolving technologies, how to preserve the works of VR not only as data but also as experience for the museum. Rivers Ryan discussed Tony Conrad’s “pickled films,” reflecting on the importance of locating conservation practice in a social context. For DiMoDA, it is worthwhile to think about contextualizing its artworks in art history as well as its relationship to the new context created by technology.

Panelists Alfredo Salazar-Caro, Tina Rivers Ryan, and Jill Sterrett

As Laurenson noted at the beginning of the panel discussion, what distinguishes conservation is not only the deep disciplined, specific expertise, but also the ability to imagine the future. The cases brought up in the session enabled us to be aware of the way TBM art and TBM conservation practice influence our present day as well as our shared future.

The full program and video of this session can be found at https://www.nyu.edu/gsas/dept/fineart/events/tbmsymposium2018.htm

The post It’s About Time! Round Table: Imagined Futures appeared first on VoCA | Voices in Contemporary Art.

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