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Born 1922 in Cedarville, Ohio, American actress Eleanor Parker was signed by Warner Brothers in 1941, and had her film debut as Nurse Ryan in Soldiers in White in 1942.

Parker appeared in some 80 movies and television series. An actress of notable versatility, she was called Woman of a Thousand Faces by Doug McClelland, author of a biography of Parker by the same title.


Parker was nominated three times for the Academy Award for Best Actress in the 1950s, for Caged (1950), Detective Story (1951) and Interrupted Melody (1955). Her role in Caged also won her the Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the Venice Film Festival. One of her most memorable roles was that of "the Baroness" Elsa von Schraeder in The Sound of Music (1965).

Parker's final TV role was a small supporting role in the 1991 TV movie Dead on the Money. She died in 2013, at a medical facility in Palm Springs, California, of complications of pneumonia. She was 91.

For her contributions to the motion picture industry, Parker was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6340 Hollywood Boulevard.

Take a look at these glamorous photos to see the beauty of young Eleanor Parker in the 1940s and 1950s.






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Kingston is a city in and the county seat of Ulster County, New York, United States. It is 91 miles (146 km) north of New York City and 59 miles (95 km) south of Albany.

The city's metropolitan area is grouped with the New York metropolitan area by the United States Census Bureau, It became New York's first capital in 1777, and was burned by the British on October 13, 1777, after the Battles of Saratoga.

In the 19th century, the city became an important transport hub after the discovery of natural cement in the region, and had both railroad and canal connections. Passenger rail service has since ceased, and many of the older buildings are part of three historic districts, including the Stockade District uptown, the Midtown Neighborhood Broadway Corridor, and the Rondout-West Strand Historic District downtown.

These fascinating photos were taken by RICHIE W that show street scenes of Kingston, New York in the early 1980s.






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Throughout the 1980s, as America’s downtown districts declined in importance and the “big-box” stores began their slow march across the country, malls became increasing central to American popular culture, dominating the social life of a large swath of the population.

At the time, shopping malls had become the meeting place for America's youth, as teens of every different stripe milled about the food courts, smoked cigarettes, and went from chain store to chain store in search of temporary employment.


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Barbra Streisand is an icon in every sense of the world. The Brooklyn-born triple threat went from a NYC cabaret singer to Broadway star overnight and went on to conquer the silver screen, pop charts, and every stage she set foot on. She also established herself as a fashion icon thanks to her fearless sense of style.


Babs has had too many fabulous stage and film costumes to count. She won the hearts of audiences with her bold wardrobe choices, from her mini dresses and go-go boots in The Owl and the Pussycat to her elaborate costumes in Funny Girl to her many feathered hats in Hello, Dolly!, to her stunning concert gowns. But, fun fact: all of Streisand’s costumes in A Star is Born came straight from her own closet.

Below is a gallery of 30 fascinating vintage photographs of a young Barbra Streisand wearing hats from the past.






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The 1930s, although most often remembered for the economic hardship of the Great Depression, its fashion was characterized by its romance and elegance. Garments from this period shed the boyish frivolity of the 1920s and predate the War-imposed practicality of the 1940s.

With the growing number of films being made, Hollywood was beginning to take center stage. Many designers were inspired by the allure of the Hollywood image and created feminine pieces that accentuated the figure. Bridal wear followed close behind, mirroring the trends of the mainstream fashions of the time.

1930s style wedding dresses inspired by the era of Old Hollywood movie star glamour. Sleek silky satin gowns, long beaded dresses, backless bias cut gowns in white, ivory, jewel tones or pastels.

These cool pics from Vintage Brides that show glamorous brides in their very long wedding dresses from the 1930s.






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At 26, Collins met Hollywood newbie Warren Beatty at an L.A. restaurant in 1959.

“Warren was 22 and insanely ambitious,” Collins writes. “He was good-looking but — as he used to tell me — there were better-looking and younger guys out there, which is why he sometimes told people he was 20.”

“Although I wasn't madly in love with Warren, he and I were actually very compatible, even if he needed to have sex several times a day, which often wore me out. I once shocked my friend Joanne Woodward — who was married to Paul Newman — by saying I needed a break because the endless bonking was exhausting me. ‘Don't!’ she warned. ‘If you have a relationship with a libidinous 22-year-old, you'd better let him. Otherwise he’ll look for other avenues, as it were.’”

The couple continued seeing one another and eventually became engaged, but rumors of a string of high-profile flings on Beatty's part led to the couple's split.” (Source)

Take a look at these beautiful pics of Warren Beatty and Joan Collins during their dating days.






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There are few film costumes more iconic - or controversial - than the “slave bikini” which Carrie Fisher donned in the 1983 Star Wars film Return of the Jedi.


While for Star Wars fans around the world the fascination with the sculptural two-piece has never really gone away - it is one of the most popular guises seen at fan conventions and the original sold for $96,000 at the Profiles of History online auction in 2015.
“I remember that iron bikini I wore in Episode VI: what supermodels will eventually wear in the seventh ring of Hell,” ― Carrie Fisher
The Slave Leia costume refers to the bikini-style outfit worn by Princess Leia Organa when she was captured by Jabba the Hutt in Return of the Jedi. The costume was worn by Carrie Fisher and stuntwoman Tracy Eddon and was created by costume designers Aggie Guerard Rodgers and Nilo Rodis-Jamero, inspired by the works of fantasy artist Frank Frazetta’s Egyptian Queen. Star Wars creator George Lucas requested the costume in part based on Fisher’s complaints about the lack of interesting costumes in A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back.

The costume has gained a huge fan following since the 1983 release of Return of the Jedi. Hundreds of female fans wear home-made and store-bought versions of the costume at science fiction conventions, many of whom post pictures of themselves on the popular fansite, Leia’s Metal Bikini. Variations of the costume have been worn by characters in other Star Wars mediums, like Diva Shaliqua in The Phantom Menace, Zam Wesell in Star Wars: Jango Fett, and the Jedi Exile in Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords.

The costume has also made several pop culture appearances outside of the Star Wars universe, such as when it was worn by Jennifer Aniston in the television sitcom Friends, by Yvonne Strahovski in the TV show Chuck, and Kristen Bell in Fanboys.






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Computers in the 1980s were rather different from computers of today. They could do the fundamental things a computer of today can do, but by modern standards, they were much bigger and less powerful.

In the early 1980s computers invaded our homes for the first time, a wave of cheap and futuristic devices that allowed millions of people to discover for themselves what a computer was. They were expected to reveal the wonders of information technology to the masses, and bring about a revolution in homes, schools, and workplaces.

Below are some nostalgic photos of men at computers from the 1980s.







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Born in 1857, in Libourne near Bordeaux and raised by his uncle, Eugène Atget's youth was molded by his time as a sailor. Upon his return from the sea, Atget turned to the stage and pursued an acting career in provincial cities and later in Paris suburbs.

After minor success as an actor, Atget abandoned the stage and at the age of forty took up painting, then quickly turned to his true life's work as a photographer.

For the next thirty years, until just a few short months before his death in 1927, Atget undertook a systematic documentation of the city of Paris, creating approximately five thousand negatives and nearly ten thousand prints.

Because he refused to work with the latest advances in photographic technology, Atget's images evoke a sense of timelessness, due in part to the slower exposure times and the pre-visualization of the final image that was required.

Atget carried his large camera around Paris as he worked to document its essential elements: streets, shop windows, building facades, architectural details, and the landscape of the public gardens and parks in and around the city.

Atget's unique documentation of the French capital captured the eye of surrealist photographer Man Ray who worked to promote Atget as one of the pre-eminent photographic modernists. Later, the efforts of Berenice Abbott, who acquired Atget's negatives and prints after his death, finally situated Atget's work in the history of photography where it continues to gain in stature and influence.

George Eastman House holds approximately 500 prints by Eugène Atget, and here below is part of his work that he shot street scenes of Paris around 1900.

Hotel de Montmorency - Rue de Montmorency 5, 1900

Marchard d'abat-jour, rue Lepic, 1900

St. Lazare - Fbg. St. Denis 107, 1900

Cour de Rouen - boulevard St. Germain, circa 1900

Hotel de Charost - Pauline Borghese - Ambassade d’Angleterre 39 Fbg. St. Honore, 1901

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Gentlemen Prefer Blondes is a 1953 American musical comedy film based on the 1949 stage musical of the same name. It was directed by Howard Hawks and stars Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe, with Charles Coburn, Elliott Reid, Tommy Noonan, George Winslow, Taylor Holmes and Norma Varden in supporting roles.


The film is filled with comedic gags and musical numbers, choreographed by Jack Cole, while the music was written by Hoagy Carmichael, Harold Adamson, Jule Styne and Leo Robin. The songs by Styne and Robin are from the Broadway show, while the songs by Carmichael and Adamson were written especially for the film.

Despite the film's title, Monroe was paid her usual contract salary of $500 a week, while Russell, then the better known actress, earned $200,000.

While Russell's down-to-earth, sharp wit has been observed by most critics, it was Monroe's turn as the gold-digging Lorelei Lee for which the film is often remembered. Monroe's rendition of the song "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend" and her pink dress are considered iconic.

Here below is a set of stunning photos that captured Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell while filming this movie in 1953.






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