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It's been awhile since I've had German wines I'm ashamed to say.  Riesling was really my first love from my trips to the upstate NY at the Finger Lakes years ago.  Then I got acquainted with German wines following that and made a couple trips over to Germany as well, but unfortunately it wasn't to the wine regions there.  I was partaking mostly in Oktoberfest activities and visiting some other towns.

Due to the climate in Germany it's best suited for white wines, which is the majority of what it produces, but reds are being produced here as well on a smaller scale.  Your most popular white grape varietals are riesling by far as well as muller thurgau and silvaner.  Today I'm sharing a couple Rieslings and pairings and will be updating this site with more German wines that I have yet to try.

The Land
Germany has 13 different wine regions and the two wines I'm sharing today come from 2 of the most popular wine regions, the Rheinhessen and Mosel.  The first Riesling from Dr. Heyden, comes from the Rheinhessen within the village of Oppenheimer.  This is the largest wine region of the 13 comprised of a variety of hills.  Wines of Germany states these wines are "soft, fragrant, medium-bodied, mild in acidity, pleasant and easy to drink".  The other Riesling from Dr. H. Thanisch hails from the Mosel with some of the steepest vineyards around at about 60-70 degrees.  Imagine the hard work that goes into taking care of the vines and harvesting grapes on slopes like that!    

The Wines
2016 Weingut Dr. Heyden Oppenheimer Riesling Kabinett
This winery was founded in 1999 by Dr. Karl Heyden and today is run by his wife and 2 sons, Frank and Harry.   This wine is sourced from 2 of their single vineyards, Kreuz and Herenberg.  Made of 100% riesling this straw colored wine has an nice bouquet of stone fruit and citrus.  Dry, crisp, clean with firm acidity and well balance with fruit.  Kabinett is a level of sweetness indicating an off-dry wine.  ABV 11.5% SRP $13
2017 Dr. H. Thanisch Feinherb Riesling
This winery's history goes back 350 years.  They are located in the prestigious Mosel valley named after the Mosel River that flows through the land and for over 150 miles.  The winery owns about 40 acres of land and exclusively produces riesling on their steep slopes.  They believe in purity and expression of their terroir and also practice sustainability by not using herbicides, pesticides or chemical fertilizers in the vineyards.  The 2017 Riesling is more of their entry level wine at an affordable price.  Straw colored with florals and lemon on the nose.  A light bodied, delicate wine with refreshing acidity.  This wine weighed heavier on the citrus than the previous where the stone fruit showed more.  ABV 11% SRP $14
Slate soils of Dr. Thanisch

The Pairing
I played around with a few pairings with these wines.  I played the easy route on a Friday night where we did chinese takeout, which is always such a great pairing.  
I also prepared a cream shrimp topped haddock dish, but this dish didn't work out as well.  It strangely overrode the sauce and made the fish taste more fishy. 
The surprising pairing that worked out really well is what I call my slow cooker Tex Mex chicken.  Being a working mom with 2 little ones  I do what I have to do to feed my family, which typically will involve one crockpot meal a week.   I prepared it with a side of spanish rice.  The sweetness in the wine complimented the spice in the dish and integrated together quite well.
  • Camilla of Culinary Adventures with Camilla will be tempting us with “Feasting for Sankt Nikolaus Tag: German Sips, Schweineschnitzel, Spätzle, and Sauerkraut”
  • Kat from Bacchus Travel & Tours will share “A German Holiday Celebration #winePW"
  • Sarah from Curious Cuisinière is pairing "Chicken Schnitzel and German Riesling"
  • Deanna of Asian Test Kitchen will discuss "German Riesling: The Default Asian Food Pairing #winePW"
  • Jade of TastingPour will tempt us with "Coq Au Riesling #winePW"
  • Jeff from FoodWineClick discusses "50 Shades of Kabinett Riesling"
  • Michelle of Rockin Red will share "German Wines: Expect The Unexpected #WinePW"
  • Jill from L’Occasion will "Outfit Your Holiday Table With German Wines"
  • Jane from Always Ravenous will share "Food Pairings with German Riesling #winepw"
  • David of Cooking Chat has prepared "Chicken Sausage and Veggie Bowl with German Riesling"
  • Gwendolyn from wine predator will enjoy "German Riesling and Fun Fondue With Friends for #WinePW"
  • Cindy of Grape Experiences has you covered with "Your Party Planning Checklist: Must-Have German Rieslings"
  • Rupal from Journeys of A Syrah Queen will share "Rieslings For The Holidays"
  • Wendy from A Day in the Life on the Farm will be “Celebrating St. Nicholas Day”
  • Nancy at Pull That Cork will share "Two Styles of German Wine and a Meal for Both #winePW"
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*All wines were provided as samples, but opinions are my own.  Most images sourced by WineSellers LTD.



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This month our Italian Food, Wine & Travel group is leading into the holidays with Italian sparkling wines. Italy doesn’t get enough recognition for the quality sparkling wines that are produced throughout the country.  Some of your main sparkling wine producing regions include: 
  • Franciacorta and Oltrepo Pavese Metodo Classico (Lombardy) 
  • Trento DOC (Trentino-Alto Adige)
  • Alta Langa, Moscato d'Asti & Brachetto d'Acqui (Piedmont)
  • Lambrusco (Emilia Romagna)
  • Prosecco (Veneto) 
The Land 
This week I dug into prosecco from the Adami winery located in the Valdobbiadene area of the Veneto.  Prosecco in my opinion can be overlooked for producing high quality wines since the market is saturated with wines that aren’t showcasing what this region can truly produce.  I always recommend to folks that if you want to see what prosecco is really all about one must seek those from the Conegliano Valdobbiadene area, two towns located just north of Treviso.   
To take it a step further there is an area that is considered the “cru” of prosecco which is the subzone of Cartizze.  When I took my Italian wine certification awhile back I was informed that Cartizze is a small production area (about 2.5 acres) and the land is estimated to be worth over a million dollars.  Yowzers!  I wish my acreage at my own home was worth that.  Maybe I need to start growing some prosecco! 
The Grape 
When one says prosecco what you might not realize is that it isn’t an actual type of wine as it is the grape prosecco, also known as glera.  Prosecco is produced via the charmat method in which the secondary fermentation is produced within stainless tanks.  This produces wines that are lighter and more delicate.  The area of Conegliano typically has a warmer climate than that of the Valdobbiadene so the wines have more structure where those of the Valdobbiadene are more delicate and elegant. 
What one may not understand is that a sparkling wine labeled dry is not dry at all.  Here are the levels of sweetness defined from driest to sweetest:  
  • Extra brut 
  • Brut
  • Secco
  • Extra Dry
  • Amabile
  • Dolce
The Winery 
The Adami winery has been around for 90 years and is now in the 3rd generation operating the winery.  It started in 1920 when the grandfather, Abel, purchased a vineyard where he worked with his son Adriano to begin producing wines.  In 1933 Abel did something that was new to the area where he broke off his vineyard from others and created the 1st single vineyard of the Valdobbiadene with his Riva Giardino Asciutto.  In the 80’s the oenologists that took over in the family were Armando and Franco.  They took the winery to the next level making them more international and developing a new facility.   

Today the winery produces about 750,000 bottles and sources their grapes from 50 hectacres where 12 of them are theirs and the others they purchase the grapes from and work closely with the owners of the land.      
The Wines 
My pick of the 3 wines was the Prosecco di Valdobbiadene Superiore Dry Vigneto Giardino Rive di Colbertaldo. DOCG.  For those that follow my blog regularly you’ll know I’m not a huge of sparkling wine, so I’ll tend to lean towards the dry level of sparkling wines, but I always appreciate a well made wine when I try them. 
Adami Prosecco Treviso Brut “Garbel” DOC 
Locally Garbel means freshness and lightness.   This was a pale straw colored wine that was crisp, with refreshing flavors of lemon and apple.  ABV 11% SRP $15 

Adami Prosecco di Valdobbiadene Superiore Brut “Bosco di Gica” DOCG NV 
The old name of the area was called Bosco di Gica, named after the Gica wood.  A pale straw colored wine with stone fruit on the nose.  On the palate notes of pears with rather creamy bubbles.  The wine finishes strong with a minerally, bright finish.  It’s hard to believe the SRP is only $19.  ABV 11%  

2015 Prosecco di Valdobbiadene Superiore Dry “Vigneto Giardino” Rive di Colbertaldo DOCG 
Rive stands for the steep hillside where the grapes are grown and are further defined by the particular site with the village name, in this case Colbertaldo.  The Giardino vineyard used to be an oak forest in the 400-500's and got replaced by vines and trees.  It was a pale straw color.  When I tried this wine I got a sense of ambrosia with some apple.  It had good body and an overall nice mouthfeel.  Rather elegant and balanced with a salty, lengthy finish.  ABV 11% SRP $22


The Pairing
I tried these wines with a spaghetti and clams dish I prepared, also know as spaghetti alle vongole.  It's one of my favorite dishes I enjoy ordering in Italy.  The saltiness of the clams and the clam sauce paired really nicely with the wines, especially the Brut style prosecco wines.  I typically don't pair sparkling wines with a dinner, but I was pleasantly surprised.  Sometimes you need to break outside the norm.
Join the rest of our Italian food and wine lovers articles and if you catch us in time you can chat live on Saturday Dec 1st at 11am EST on Twitter at #ItalianFWT.
Don't miss an Italian wine blog ~ Subscribe  


*All wines were provided by samples, but opinions are my own.


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This month our Italian Food, Wine & Travel group is leading into the holidays with Italian sparkling wines. Italy doesn’t get enough recognition for the quality sparkling wines that are produced throughout the country.  Some of your main sparkling wine producing regions include: 
  • Franciacorta and Oltrepo Pavese Metodo Classico (Lombardy) 
  • Trento DOC (Trentino-Alto Adige)
  • Alta Langa, Moscato d'Asti & Brachetto d'Acqui (Piedmont)
  • Lambrusco (Emilia Romagna)
  • Prosecco (Veneto) 
The Land 
This week I dug into prosecco from the Adami winery located in the Valdobbiadene area of the Veneto.  Prosecco in my opinion can be overlooked for producing high quality wines since the market is saturated with wines that aren’t showcasing what this region can truly produce.  I always recommend to folks that if you want to see what prosecco is really all about one must seek those from the Conegliano Valdobbiadene area, two towns located just north of Treviso.   
To take it a step further there is an area that is considered the “cru” of prosecco which is the subzone of Cartizze.  When I took my Italian wine certification awhile back I was informed that Cartizze is a small production area (about 2.5 acres) and the land is estimated to be worth over a million dollars.  Yowzers!  I wish my acreage at my own home was worth that.  Maybe I need to start growing some prosecco! 
The Grape 
When one says prosecco what you might not realize is that it isn’t an actual type of wine as it is the grape prosecco, also known as glera.  Prosecco is produced via the charmat method in which the secondary fermentation is produced within stainless tanks.  This produces wines that are lighter and more delicate.  The area of Conegliano typically has a warmer climate than that of the Valdobbiadene so the wines have more structure where those of the Valdobbiadene are more delicate and elegant. 
What one may not understand is that a sparkling wine labeled dry is not dry at all.  Here are the levels of sweetness defined from driest to sweetest:  
  • Extra brut 
  • Brut
  • Secco
  • Extra Dry
  • Amabile
  • Dolce
The Winery 
The Adami winery has been around for 90 years and is now in the 3rd generation operating the winery.  It started in 1920 when the grandfather, Abel, purchased a vineyard where he worked with his son Adriano to begin producing wines.  In 1933 Abel did something that was new to the area where he broke off his vineyard from others and created the 1st single vineyard of the Valdobbiadene with his Riva Giardino Asciutto.  In the 80’s the oenologists that took over in the family were Armando and Franco.  They took the winery to the next level making them more international and developing a new facility.   

Today the winery produces about 750,000 bottles and sources their grapes from 50 hectacres where 12 of them are theirs and the others they purchase the grapes from and work closely with the owners of the land.      
The Wines 
My pick of the 3 wines was the Prosecco di Valdobbiadene Superiore Dry Vigneto Giardino Rive di Colbertaldo. DOCG.  For those that follow my blog regularly you’ll know I’m not a huge of sparkling wine, so I’ll tend to lean towards the dry level of sparkling wines, but I always appreciate a well made wine when I try them. 
Adami Prosecco Treviso Brut “Garbel” DOC 
Locally Garbel means freshness and lightness.   This was a pale straw colored wine that was crisp, with refreshing flavors of lemon and apple.  ABV 11% SRP $15 

Adami Prosecco di Valdobbiadene Superiore Brut “Bosco di Gica” DOCG NV 
The old name of the area was called Bosco di Gica, named after the Gica wood.  A pale straw colored wine with stone fruit on the nose.  On the palate notes of pears with rather creamy bubbles.  The wine finishes strong with a minerally, bright finish.  It’s hard to believe the SRP is only $19.  ABV 11%  

2015 Prosecco di Valdobbiadene Superiore Dry “Vigneto Giardino” Rive di Colbertaldo DOCG 
Rive stands for the steep hillside where the grapes are grown and are further defined by the particular site with the village name, in this case Colbertaldo.  The Giardino vineyard used to be an oak forest in the 400-500's and got replaced by vines and trees.  It was a pale straw color.  When I tried this wine I got a sense of ambrosia with some apple.  It had good body and an overall nice mouthfeel.  Rather elegant and balanced with a salty, lengthy finish.  ABV 11% SRP $22


The Pairing
I tried these wines with a spaghetti and clams dish I prepared, also know as spaghetti alle vongole.  It's one of my favorite dishes I enjoy ordering in Italy.  The saltiness of the clams and the clam sauce paired really nicely with the wines, especially the Brut style prosecco wines.  I typically don't pair sparkling wines with a dinner, but I was pleasantly surprised.  Sometimes you need to break outside the norm.
Join the rest of our Italian food and wine lovers articles and if you catch us in time you can chat live on Saturday Dec 1st at 11am EST on Twitter at #ItalianFWT.
Don't miss an Italian wine blog ~ Subscribe  




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Jen of Vino Travels
2017 Donnachiara Greco di Tufo DOCG
There isn't just one easy choice for whenwhen it comes to the Thanksgiving meal with the large variety of accompaniments to the turkey.  I usually choose a dry, crisp white to start followed by wines from the Veneto, usually an Amarone, but if not a Valpolicella of some degree.  I recently just tried the 2017 Donnachiara Greco di Tufo and if I had a 2nd bottle I'd be having that with my Thanksgiving feast.  This wine hails from the Campania region in southern Italy within the Avellino province.  This wine was dry and delicate filled with citrus.  It was backed with good acidity along with nice salinity and minerality rounding out with a lengthy finish. SRP $20 ABV 13%
David of Cooking Chat
2016 Capanna Rosso di Montalcino
When thinking of an Italian wine pick for Thanksgiving, my first thought was a number of Italian whites could work nicely, but I already had quite a few whites waiting in the wings.  This Rosso di Montalcino might seem like a bit over the top for Thanksgiving given the high alcohol content and tannins.  But this Sangiovese-based wine has a lot of elegance, drinking well above its price point.  I tasted it yesterday at Pairings with some salame, and they were great paired together.  I plan to bring some of that salame to nibble on along with this wine and all the other food. ($27, 14.5 ABV)
Lauren of The Swirling Dervish
2016 Brunori San Nicolo Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Superiore
Thanksgiving traditions vary from one family to another, but the one thing we all have in common is that our tables are laden with a variety of dishes – some sweet, others savory. Turkey, stuffing, roasted vegetables, and (maybe) a dish of canned, jellied cranberry sauce. It’s hard to think of just one wine to accompany them all, so I’m offering up a wine that will sing with your vegetable dishes. The grape is Verdicchio and it comes from Le Marche in central Italy, along the Adriatic coast. It’s a citrusy white wine with some herbal undertones (think fennel) that makes a smashing partner with carrots, potatoes, yams, and celery root. One of my favorite dishes with Verdicchio is roast fennel and potatoes dressed in a lemon-parsley vinaigrette. And it will pair nicely with an herb-roasted turkey too! SRP $18
Katarina from Grapevine Adventures
2015 Aquila del Torre Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso
For my wine recommendation for this Thanksgiving holiday, I actually need to take a jump back to May earlier this spring. In mid-May, I was invited to a lovely lunch at the restaurant Gurdulú close to Piazza Santa Spirito right in the center of Florence. However, we were not there to taste Sangiovese wines but rather the organic and biodynamic wines of Aquila del Torre winery in Friuli Venezia Giulia. I met Michele Cianis who together with his father Claudio is running this very interesting winery in Povoletto in the province of Udine.
Biodynamic Wines from Aquila del Torre, Friuli - YouTube
The wine that caught my attention was their Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso 2015. I am always fascinated by these grape varieties that are lesser known or that in the past have been considered less suitable or fine wine production. This interesting grape that produce somewhat rustic and a bit woodsy wines yet with a certain elegance has had a come-back during the last years. This 2015 vintage has lovely rich notes of red and dark fruit, such as cherry, combined with spices, cocoa beans, a green undertone of moss. Distinct tannins that are not invasive. A mix of austere, woodsy, full-bodied, and elegant in its character.
I would say it can be paired perfectly with many of the dishes on a traditional as well as untraditional Thanksgiving table.

Jill @ L'Occassion
2017 Primitivo di Manduria 'Passo del Cardinale' Paolo Leo 
At Thanksgiving we are all about family, so this year I’m featuring a wine that my cousins brought back for me in their suitcase from a recent trip to Italy. My cousin is a chef, and while she was in Puglia for work, she visited Paolo Leo. Pop this open and drink away was the advice from the producer, so here we go. The harmony of fruit and spice, delivered on a persistent finish makes this a bold, brash red wine option. We are having a ‘help yourself’ Thanksgiving so guests can sample wine from a wide spectrum. Primitivo di Manduria ‘Passo del Cardinale’ will fit right in. Warm holiday wishes from our house to yours! SRP $10
Susannah of Avvinare
2016 Botonero Terrazze Retiche di Sondrio I.G.T. 
My Thanksgiving wine hails from the Valtellina, a part of Lombardy famous for its Nebbiolo which they call Chiavennasca and its heroic mountain viticulture. Valtellina which I have visited, is beautiful and the wines can be sublime and rival their more famous counterparts in Piedmont. There are 44 producers who are part of the Consorzio and Mamete Prevostini whose wine I am recommending is the President. Valtellina has a number of sub-zones: Sassella, Grumello, Inferno, Valgella and Maroggia,, each known for their particular differences. The Mamete Prevostini winery, was started by Mamete’s grandfather about 70 years ago. Their goal is to produce wines with elegance, finesse and power. They have a famous family restaurant called Crotasc and all of their wines are very food friendly. Mamete took over in 1988 and is a firm believer in terroir. My choice for the Thanksgiving meal is one of their entry wines, Botonero Terrazze Retiche di Sondrio I.G.T. The grapes can be sourced from the entire production area of the Sondrio Province. The wine is made from 100% Nebbiolo grapes grown on soils that are a mix of sand, silt, limestone with a high content of granite rock and little clay. The wine ferments and undergoes maceration in stainless steel tanks and then ages in the bottle before release. It sees no wood and will pair well with a number of the Thanksgiving dishes, particularly dark meat Turkey and Ham, two of my favorites. At 13% alcohol, it won’t overwhelm your palate and at a SRP $14 it won’t hurt your wallet too much either.

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The Winery ~ Gulfi
In 1995 Vito Catania inherited the land from his father and this were the early beginnings of the Gulfi winery.  His father, Raffaele, had saved the money to purchase the land from his 15 years of living in Paris where he moved after WWII in search of work.  His aim was to purchase the land that is in the family today so that his family had a place to go back to when they returned to Chiaramonte Gulfi.
The Gulfi winery is a bioorganic winery where they believe in the least amount of intervention as possible.Their oldest vineyards are located in areas of the Val di Noto and Pachino.

The Catania family labels their best wines as their "cru" wines, which are located in Pachino.  This is where they feel that nero d'avola grows best.  These areas are Neromaccarj, Nerobufaleffj, Nerobaronj and Nerosanlore.  These winegrowing areas have a variety of soils which lends to a variety of styles in the way wines are produced from each cru.

In addition to the nero d'avola and frappato that we're sharing today, Gulfi also produces a variety of other grapes including whites carricante and chardonnay and in the Etna area they grow nerello mascalese with some small experimentation with pinot noir.
The Grape
The highlight of the wines today is the nero d'avola grape.  This grape hails from the island and region of Sicily.  Originating from the town of Avola in southeastern Italy of the Syracuse province.  It has grown to become one of Sicily's most popular indigenous red grape.  It's a grape that typically produces wines fuller bodied rich in dark fruits and combined with the intense heat of Sicily it can really pack a punch. 

The Wines
2013 Gulfi Nerojbleo DOC is made up of 100% nero d'avola sourced from multiple sites.  Aged 12
months in oak and it spends 8 months in the bottle.  Deep ruby in color with hints of purple.  Lots of juicy, rich cherries and plums on the nose and up front on the palette.  This is a medium to fuller bodied, dry wine with moderate tannins with notes of vanilla and oak on the lengthy finish.  After enjoying this wine I'd be very interested to try the "cru wines".  This was my pick of the two.  ABV 13.5% SRP $20


The Val Canzeria where Nerojbleo grapes are grown
2016 Gulfi Cerasuolo di Vittoria DOCG is a blend of 50% nero d'avola and 50% frappato. A very dry, medium bodied wine with deep cherry notes.  Good acid and low on tannins.  Nicely balanced.  ABV 13.5% SRP $20

There are many styles of Nero d'Avola and I appreciated these wines as I'm not a huge fan of fruit forward wines and these had some unique qualities that I hadn't had in some previous nero d'avola that I've tried.  So get out there and try some and let me know what your favorites are.
Vigna Stidda where the Cerasuolo is grown.

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*These wines were provided as samples, but opinions are my own.  Most pictures are copyright of the Gulfi winery.

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The region of Campania in located in southern Italy at the tip of the boot.  Our Italian Food, Wine & Travel group (#ItalianFWT) is here this month to feature Calabria and its native grapes.  It's not a highly regarded region for winemaking and doesn't get much attention for the wines that it does produce.  It's most popular wine hails from the Ciro DOC, which is required to be made of at least 95% of the gaglioppo grape with up to 5% of greco bianco and trebbiano.
Copyright of Federdoc
The Winery
Today I'm featuring Azienda Agricola Scala that has been around since 1949 and is operated by its 3rd generation family. The winery is located in Ciro Marina along the Ionian Seaa.  Their focus is on producing native grapes such as gaglioppo, nerello, magliocco, greco and mantonico.  A couple of these grapes, magliocco and mantonico, are grapes that have been revived in recent times.  The goal is to refocus the quality of wines produced in Calabria and reestablish the indigenous grapes of the region. 
Left to right: Luigi Scala and Francesco Scala
The Land
Calabria's geography is mostly mountainous with some plains along the Ionian Sea.  It was a region heavily populated by Greeks that contributed greatly to the culture and winemaking within the region. There is plenty of sunshine and warm weather, but the breezes coming off the sea help contribute to making prime grapes.
The Grapes
Calabria is mostly known for producing red wines and majority are made from the gaglioppo grape.  Unfortunately a lot of the grapes of the region are shipped north and is probably part of the reason that this region hasn't gotten the attention it deserves with its native grapes as it should.

There are 12 DOC's of the region with the leader being Ciro DOC.  Its been said that the wines of Ciro were served to winners of the Olympic games in ancient times. 

The wines that I'm trying from this winery have been delayed and are on the way so I will update my post once I have the further information.

Join us this Saturday November 3rd on Twitter at 11am EST at #ItalianFWT as we chat about the wines of Calabria.  Join the rest of my fellow bloggers as they share some great Calabrian wines and foods to be enjoyed.


Camilla at Culinary Adventures with Cam will share “Braised Beef Cheeks over Garlic Gnocchi + Statti Calabria Gaglioppo 2015”
Wendy at A Day in the Life on the Farm will share “The Food and Wine of Calabria”
Lauren at The Swirling Dervish will share “Exploring Calabrian Wine: The Du Cropio Estate in Cirò”
Jeff at Food Wine Click will share “Exploring the Toe of Italy’s Boot with Ciro Rosso”
Katarina at Grapevine Adventures will share “A New Golden Age for the Gaglioppo in Calabria”
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*Pictures copyright of Azienda Agricola Scala

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A couple years back I was invited to a wine tasting in Boston fully dedicated to the white wines of Lugana.  It was quite a pleasant surprise to discover the beauty of these wines that aren’t often enough at the top of every winelover’s list.  Our Italian Food, Wine & Travel group is exploring what these wines are all about including the wide variety of styles and how ageworthy they are.

Lugana is a wine region located on the southern tip of Lake Garda.  It’s in northern Italy and borders both the Veneto and Lombardy regions.  It’s comprised of the following towns: Sirmione, Pozzolengo, Desenzano, Londato del Garda and Peschiara del Garda, with the latter being the only to reside in the Veneto.  It’s a short trip from the major cities of Brescia and Verona.  I ventured over to Peschiera del Garda for the first time on my last adventure to Italy over a year ago. 
The area of Lugana was once completely covered as a forest, known as “Selva Lucana”, probably hence where the name came form.  When the glaciers came down from the alpine region it formed Lake Garda and created the unique morainic soils.      

Wines from Lugana are primarily made from the turbiana grape also known as trebbiano di lugana.  There is a 10% allowance of other non-aromatic white grapes, but many producers are making these wines with 100% turbiana.   The regular wines of Lugana can typically only be aged about 2-3 years, but the others including the superior and riserva wines have capabilities to be aged 10+ years. 
Turbiana grapes - Copywright of Selva Capuzza


There are 5 different styles of Lugana: regular, Superiore, Riserva, Late Harvest and Sparkling.  The regular wines of Lugana make up 90% of the production of the Lugana DOC.  The wines made in the Peschiera del Garda area actually produce about 60% of the wines in the area.  I’m sharing one from the regular style Lugana and one from the late harvest, known as vendemmia tardiva.
Copyright of Selva Capuzza

Luca Formentini of Selva Capuzza - Copyright of Selva Capuzza
The wine from Lugana I’m sharing today is from Selva Capuzzain the Lombardy region.  It’s location is situated of the site of the important Italian battle, San Martino e Solferino, that took place in 1859.  The 2013 Podere Selva Capuzza Lugana DOC is their wine they make with pride and is sourced from their highest and oldest vineyard.  A wine that is fresh and rich with florals and fruit combined with mineral notes.  13% ABV SRP
Copyright of Selva Capuzza
The other wine I’m sharing is the 2011 Tenuta Roveglia Filo di Arianna Lugana Vendemmia Tardiva DOC.  This wine is harvested late October to early November allowing the grapes to fully concentrate before they are hand picked.  The wine is aged 12-14 months in oak barrels.  It’s a wine of full body with almond notes seeming silky on the palate.  13.5% ABV SRP    

Tenuta Roveglia was started by a Swiss businessman by the name of Federico Zweifel when he relocated to the area at the end of 19th century. Four generations later his family continues to carry on the production and traditions of the winery as it stands today.
Copyright of Tenuta Roveglia

Copyright of Tenuta Roveglia
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*These wines were provided as samples, but opinions are my own.

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