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How much do vets makes a year

Veterinarian salaries have a fluctuating scale as there is a lot that goes into each individual’s pay. The obvious factors, such as experience and location, play a part, but there are many other factors that determine how much a veterinarian can expect to earn over the course of a year.

There is a rather large window that classifies veterinarian salaries and that ranges from $52,470, to more than $161,070 annually, as per the U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics. There are also veterinarians who exceed that higher amount.

The first determining factor in a veterinarian’s annual salary is the type of practice. The most common animal healthcare practitioner is a small animal veterinarian. With so many dog and cat owners, this job has a very high demand. However, that also leaves a wide array of choices for pet owners. That is also why there is such a broad range of salaries for small animal veterinarians.

It is also important to note that veterinary practices are also businesses. That means marketing plays an integral role in the yearly income of a veterinarian who operates a private practice. Those veterinarians who develop solid business strategies and execute effective marketing campaigns will earn a higher annual income, regardless of their talent level or experience. The private practice sector is about more than just treating animals.

Certain metropolitan areas have higher average salaries for veterinarians. For example, the top-end average veterinarian salary in a metropolitan area can be found in Honolulu, Hawaii. Those veterinarians earn an average salary of $216,840 annually, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Jacksonville, Florida checks in second with an average salary of $188,880 per year.

That does not mean rural veterinarians cannot find themselves making substantial yearly incomes. Large animal science is a less popular choice among most students in veterinary college, and that puts their services in higher demand. Their average base salary is more than $81,000 per year. This also applies to equine veterinarians, who cater to another growing industry.

Of the 3,000 annual veterinary college graduates, only 4% go into the equine portion of the veterinary field. That opens up a lot of opportunities and also indicates how difficult it is to arrive at a universal veterinarian salary. Practicing as an equine veterinarian right out of college could make for a higher entry-level pay while a crowded field of small animal veterinarians may for some vets to settle for lower-paying positions.

Meanwhile, zoo and aquatic veterinarians are limited in their career opportunities compared to equine veterinarians. This is mainly due to the fact that there are more than 9 million horses in the United States, many of which are privately owned.

Veterinarians who work in zoos generally start off earning a base pay in the low $70,000 range, although it is not a position that is immediately given to those fresh out of veterinary college. Because this is such a specialty area, experience is a must. That means first-year veterinarians may have to take lower-paying jobs in order to bolster their resumes with experience in this field.

Once a veterinarian is able to gain some experience, the annual salary will start to rise. Many lucrative veterinarian jobs are the ones within a private practice. Veterinarians who attain a specialty stand to make handsome salaries as well.

Veterinarians with a specialization in ophthalmology registered an annual income of $199,000, according to a survey conducted by the American Veterinary Medical Association. As part of that same survey, the results showed that vets with a specialization in lab animal medicine earned an annual income $169,000 while veterinary pathologists averaged a salary of $157,000 per year. Specializations in surgery, internal medicine, radiology and theriogenology all registered annual salaries between $121,000 and $133,000 per year.

There are a wide range of salaries for practicing veterinarians, but the one commonality lies in the high earning potential. The facility, location, type of practice and any specializations all weigh heavily into where a veterinarian fits into that pay scale.

Veterinarian salaries have a fluctuating scale as there is a lot that goes into each individual’s pay. The obvious factors, such as experience and location, play a part, but there are many other factors that determine how much a veterinarian can expect to earn over the course of a year.

There is a rather large window that classifies veterinarian salaries and that ranges from $52,470, to more than $161,070 annually, as per the U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics. There are also veterinarians who exceed that higher amount.

The first determining factor in a veterinarian’s annual salary is the type of practice. The most common animal healthcare practitioner is a small animal veterinarian. With so many dog and cat owners, this job has a very high demand. However, that also leaves a wide array of choices for pet owners. That is also why there is such a broad range of salaries for small animal veterinarians.

It is also important to note that veterinary practices are also businesses. That means marketing plays an integral role in the yearly income of a veterinarian who operates a private practice. Those veterinarians who develop solid business strategies and execute effective marketing campaigns will earn a higher annual income, regardless of their talent level or experience. The private practice sector is about more than just treating animals.

Certain metropolitan areas have higher average salaries for veterinarians. For example, the top-end average veterinarian salary in a metropolitan area can be found in Honolulu, Hawaii. Those veterinarians earn an average salary of $216,840 annually, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Jacksonville, Florida checks in second with an average salary of $188,880 per year.

That does not mean rural veterinarians cannot find themselves making substantial yearly incomes. Large animal science is a less popular choice among most students in veterinary college, and that puts their services in higher demand. Their average base salary is more than $81,000 per year. This also applies to equine veterinarians, who cater to another growing industry.

Of the 3,000 annual veterinary college graduates, only 4% go into the equine portion of the veterinary field. That opens up a lot of opportunities and also indicates how difficult it is to arrive at a universal veterinarian salary. Practicing as an equine veterinarian right out of college could make for a higher entry-level pay while a crowded field of small animal veterinarians may for some vets to settle for lower-paying positions.

Meanwhile, zoo and aquatic veterinarians are limited in their career opportunities compared to equine veterinarians. This is mainly due to the fact that there are more than 9 million horses in the United States, many of which are privately owned.

Veterinarians who work in zoos generally start off earning a base pay in the low $70,000 range, although it is not a position that is immediately given to those fresh out of veterinary college. Because this is such a specialty area, experience is a must. That means first-year veterinarians may have to take lower-paying jobs in order to bolster their resumes with experience in this field.

Once a veterinarian is able to gain some experience, the annual salary will start to rise. Many lucrative veterinarian jobs are the ones within a private practice. Veterinarians who attain a specialty stand to make handsome salaries as well.

Veterinarians with a specialization in ophthalmology registered an annual income of $199,000, according to a survey conducted by the American Veterinary Medical Association. As part of that same survey, the results showed that vets with a specialization in lab animal medicine earned an annual income $169,000 while veterinary pathologists averaged a salary of $157,000 per year. Specializations in surgery, internal medicine, radiology and theriogenology all registered annual salaries between $121,000 and $133,000 per year.

There are a wide range of salaries for practicing veterinarians, but the one commonality lies in the high earning potential. The facility, location, type of practice and any specializations all weigh heavily into where a veterinarian fits into that pay scale.

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The process of becoming a veterinarian is one that involves extensive training and practice. The sheer nature of the work demands precision, which is something that cannot be learned overnight. Here is a closer look at how long it takes to become a veterinarian.

It may come as a surprise that gaining admittance into veterinary school does not technically require a college degree. However, in such a competitive field, it is a rarity that applicants can expect to gain admission without already holding a Bachelor’s Degree, preferably in animal science. Assuming that students attend college on a full-time basis, that initial step of the process counts as four years.

Once a Bachelor’s Degree is earned, the next step is getting accepted to a veterinary college. Since there are only 30 accredited veterinary colleges in the United States, competition is fierce. Many applicants get denied right out of college, particularly those who do not have some kind of experience working in the veterinary field. That is why a lot of applicants obtain some kind of job in the veterinary field the year after they graduate from college. Some veterinary colleges even require at least 1,000 hours of work experience. That work experience pushes the running total up to five years.

Not every state is home to a veterinary college and that is of particular importance because many veterinary colleges accept the majority of their applicants from within their own state. That means if you do not live in a state with a veterinary college, you have the option of moving to another state that is home to a veterinary college. However, it typically takes two years to establish residency and qualify for in-state status. That could add another two years to the process.

Once an applicant is accepted into a veterinary college, the grind of a rigorous educational experience begins. The first three years of veterinary college are comprised of mostly classroom and laboratory work, with some clinical work mixed in as well. The fourth year is then reserved for a clinical rotation in an animal hospital or veterinary practice. Once those four years of veterinary college are completed, a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M. or V.M.D.) is awarded. That makes a total of roughly 9 years.

However, it is not a given that a job will be waiting for the majority of newly graduated veterinarians. Many graduates take on a paid internship over the course of the next year, although the pay is usually less than substantial and the hours are typically long. But what it offers is provides real-world experience working in a veterinary setting. These internships are very similar to the residencies that are taken on by doctors, who have just graduated from medical school.

Once that internship is completed, veterinarians become more appealing job candidates for open veterinarian positions. That would bring the total number of years it takes to become a veterinarian up to 10. Technically, it could be done in eight years, although that is not very common. The work experience factor holds great weight with veterinary college admissions. That experience could be attained while students are completing their undergraduate studies, although it would make for a very busy schedule. So, for college students looking to become a veterinarian, it would make a lot of sense to start working in the veterinary field while in college. That could even be as a volunteer or paid veterinary assistant.

Gaining that same experience while attending veterinary college would be rather difficult, given the rigorous demands that come with that kind of education. For most aspiring veterinarians, it is prudent to spend a year working in the veterinary field.

It is also quite common to expect a yearlong internship following graduation from a veterinary college. That makes for a 10-year journey for those who are looking to become a practicing veterinarian.

Veterinarians looking to attain a specialty in areas such as emergency care, pathology or internal medicine, are required to complete residency programs which usually last three years. For those looking to get into a specialization, the number of years could balloon up to 12.

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The field of veterinary medicine is one that is ever-changing and always evolving. The latest trends have identified plenty of reasons for why becoming a veterinarian is a lucrative career choice. Here is a closer look at some of the latest trends that are relevant to aspiring veterinarians.

The Reasons behind Job Growth

The increase in veterinary jobs are not simply due to more pet owners as the number of dog owners stands somewhere between 70 and 80 million while cat owners boast even greater statistics. The increase in demand can also be attributed to upgrades in many new types of treatments. Pet owners now have new options when it comes to treating cancer, replacing hips and blood transfusions. Even though there are more cats than dogs, the numbers of dogs who visit veterinarians are 30% greater, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Enrollment on the rise
Enrollment in veterinary college and the amount of debt accrued are both on the rise. Vet school tuition has seen a significant bump in the last decade, although attending an in-state school can cut those costs in half. Establishing residency within a state differs among those respective states. Each state has its own requirements on how long students must have lived there before being labeled as a resident, which qualifies them for in-state tuition. In terms of enrollment increases, this is also being done to compensate for a lack of veterinarians in certain areas. For example, there is a greater need for large animal vets and livestock vets than there is for companion animal healthcare. This continues to open new opportunities.

The business side of being a veterinarian
While so much involved in a veterinary practice involves animal healthcare, business strategies should not be overlooked. Multiple studies have indicated that more than half of veterinary practices do not rely on financial concepts in order to facilitate their day-to-day activities. There is also a lack of marketing that exists among practicing veterinarians. Understanding and utilizing financial and business concepts has the capability of fast tracking new veterinary practices to high levels of success in relatively short spans of time. For example, marketing to cat owners is a growing market, particularly with so many new kinds of chronic pain treatments available for felines.

The realities of an internship
One of the most common pathways following the completion of veterinary college is to take on an internship. It should be noted that these internships typically come with low pay and a lot of hours. In some instances, mentorship is very good, although there are internships where mentorship it severely lacking. It really comes down to the practice, especially since there are no established standards for interns. It is up to the discretion of the facility to work veterinary interns as much as they want. The flip side is that interns gain valuable experience. Some learn more than one year in an internship than they did through all four years of veterinary school. So it is important to do some research before accepting an internship and the best way to do that is by seeking out someone who actually went through that program and getting their feedback.

Testing capabilities expand
More testing capabilities now favor pet owners as they can identify problems earlier on. This is also advantageous to veterinarians as it means more business. Diagnostic testing has now evolved to the point where kidney testing can be done at much quicker rates. There is a new array of diagnostic testing that can be done in-house and that remains more important than ever with geographic diseases now becoming more common in various parts of the United States. Even common ailments like Lyme’s Disease is showing up in new areas where it has not been prevalent and that places a high premium on testing capabilities.

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Applying to a veterinary college is not a simple procedure and it is actually a long journey just to get to that point. That application process is only half the battle while waiting for acceptance or denial can be a painstaking time for those who aspire to be veterinarians.

Just as it is in medical school, the competition for admission to a veterinary college is very competitive. The acceptance rate is typically between 10% and 15%. Meanwhile, 50% or more of applicants who are accepted reside in the same state as that respective veterinary college. A few veterinary schools hover right around the 50% mark while some schools take more than 80% of its accepted applicants from within its own state. There seems to be an advantage when applying to a veterinary college in the same state in which the applicant resides.

Many states are left without a veterinary college, meaning that applicants have to apply to places that are not very close to home. There are 27 states that house veterinary colleges while Alabama, Tennessee and California are the only states with more than one.

Keep in mind that there are only 30 accredited veterinary colleges throughout the United States and it is not uncommon to apply to multiple schools more than once. When applicants have exhausted those opportunities, there is always the option of attending a veterinary school in the Caribbean or across the Atlantic Ocean in Europe. However, those alternatives can become costly as the added expense of moving out of the country quickly add up.

The difficulty that comes with gaining acceptance to a veterinary college is largely based on the limited availability. The number of veterinary colleges dims in comparison to the number of medical schools in the United States. There are hundreds of medical schools throughout the country and more openings for doctors every year. Now, there is no denying the rigorous demands placed on medical school applicants, although the sheer quantity of applicants accepted to medical school dwarfs the number of applicants accepted to veterinary colleges.

There may also be a common difference among vet school applicants and med school applicants. Becoming a doctor is a pathway towards elite social status and it also comes with a very hefty paycheck. Most veterinarians get into that line of work because of their genuine love of animals. That same kind of care and dedication is not always present in those individuals looking to pursue a career in medicine.

For that reason, getting denied acceptance to a veterinary college can be tough on applicants. That is why so many applicants attempt to bolster their resumes that go beyond education. This means acquiring real-world experience in veterinary medicine. In such a competitive environment, every little bit helps. It should also be noted that some schools recommend applicants acquire at least 1,000 hours of actual experience in some type of veterinary capacity.

Taking all of that information into consideration, it often takes more than good grades to gain admission to a veterinary college. Test scores and GPA are just a part of the equation.

There are also trends in the veterinary field which are helpful when applying. For example, the veterinarian profession is dominated by females as less than 30% of veterinarians are male. Another ongoing shortage applies to large animal specialties while those looking for a future in this specialization could increase their odds of acceptance.

Even then, it is difficult to gain admission which leads many aspiring vets overseas or down to the Caribbean for veterinary school. Choosing a school in Canada is also limited as there are only five accredited veterinary colleges in that entire country. Any of those paths that lead to a veterinary college outside of the United States always results in a much higher amount of debt as the cost of tuition, living expenses and relocation all see an increase.

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Veterinary clinics are receiving constant upgrades in the areas of technology. Modern veterinary medicine has now incorporated so many new technological innovations that it has changed the way treatment is administered to pets. Here is a closer look at some of the latest types of veterinary technology that are being used in veterinary clinics.

Pet Dialysis

Dogs and cats who are diagnosed with kidney failure now have options when it comes to treatment. Pets are treated in the same way humans are treated for this condition. A machine designed specifically for dogs and cats serves the same functions by removing toxins and filtering blood.

Laparoscopy

Minimally invasive procedures have advanced human health care in recent years and now that is being used in animal healthcare as well. Technology now allows for a small camera to be inserted through a body cavity in what is known as Laparoscopy. This can be used to obtain tissue samples and minimize the need for traditional surgery in some instances.

Ultrasound

While MRIs are popular among humans, the procedure is much more difficult to administer to animals. Therefore, ultrasound has proven to be an effective alternative. The latest technology allows for 4D images to be produced. Unlike the way MRIs are used on animals, the use of ultrasound does not require anesthesia.

Telemedicine

Technology has now enabled veterinarians to treat pets without having them in their actual facility. This technology allows vet facilities to send x-rays, ultrasounds and ECG studies to other specialists all over the country. Many times, this technology is used to obtain a second opinion from a specialist. Reports can then be compiled and a collaborative approach can be taken towards treatment.

Titanium tracheal stents

Small dogs can experience breathing problems as a result of a collapsed windpipe. That problem is now being addressed with an advanced device made of titanium. It is positioned inside the trachea to help the dog breath and is often referred to as a tracheal stent

Stem cell therapy

It is not uncommon for dogs and cats to become arthritic in their old age. Now, stem cell therapy is a means of soothing those aches and pains. In dogs, it is also used to treat injuries to ligaments and tendons. In cats, stem cell therapy is starting to serve as a form of treatment for oral disease. The purpose of this treatment is typically to decrease inflammation and reduce pain, although it can be rather costly.

3D Imaging

Veterinary clinics can now get a better look at problems with the use of 3D imaging. This is made possible by 3D reconstruction software. This gives veterinarians an alternative look by transforming what would normally be images that are flat. Telemedicine then allows vets to send these images to other specialists when necessary.

Laser Therapy

One of the latest innovations to take the veterinary world by storm is the use of low-powered lasers that are intended to accelerate the healing process. This can also be used as a way of lessening pain. Laser therapy was first used on human patients and now it is gradually being adapted as a valuable component of veterinary technology.

Electronic Medical Records

The medical profession is making great use of these electronic health records, although it is less problematic in the veterinary field. That is because the veterinary field does not have to contend with the privacy laws, which are such a major part of human healthcare. The use of online medical records has made things more efficient and easier to manage for veterinary practices.

Veterinary clinics that are equipped with these types of technology make for a very advanced workplace. This also raises the bar in terms of the types of treatment that are offered by veterinary practices. Pets and their owners benefit from advances in veterinary technology while the treatment administered by animal healthcare teams continues to be cutting edge.

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Dogs grow up rather quickly and are only considered puppies for a short amount of time. By the time dogs reach four and a half months of age, they are no longer classified as a puppy. A failure to begin training in those formative stages could make the entire process significantly more difficult. After all, it is hard to teach an old dog new tricks.

The process of learning for dogs begins early as there are several stages that puppies go through during their first few months of life. Training can begin when puppies are just five weeks old as that is when their brain waves are equivalent to that of a fully mature dog. It is also a time to introduce socialization with people and start positive reinforcement training.

A big part of early training is that it eliminates the potential for future aggression. Dogs exhibit aggressive behavior mostly because of fear. However, that fear can be removed when they are puppies. The first step is to introduce common things that normally induce fear in dogs. Then, it is important to couple those things with positive reinforcement, like food and praise. This teaches puppies to release their fear, thus reducing their tendency to show aggressive behavior. It is also a way to acclimate them to much of what they will see in the outside world.

Aggressive behavior is not the only product of neglecting to train a puppy. Dogs can also develop traits of shyness when early training is ignored. This stems from failing to take advantage of such an instrumental time for learning.

Puppy training does not have to be extensive, but done in increments. Some of the training will be forgotten, although the fundamentals will remain. This is also an important time to introduce socialization with other dogs. Joining a puppy training class will teach puppies how to communicate with other dogs while also showing them necessary social cues.

Socialization is key among puppies and it is the equivalent to sending children to a pre-school so that they can develop the necessary skills to successfully through childhood.

Those who welcome a puppy into their home in hopes of having an adult dog for a companion cannot overlook the importance of socialization in their early training. Puppies who are exposed to interaction with humans and other dogs learn how to adapt to their environment. Those things become customary early on and will not bring about fear or aggression later in their lives. It is all a matter of getting a puppy used to the world they will be living in.

It is also important to remember that, unlike humans, puppies do not have hands to grab things they can use for experimentation. Puppies use their mouths for experimenting and that means just about everything goes in their mouths. This is an opportune time to teach them what is not acceptable in terms of biting or nipping. This is also a pivotal time when it comes to a dog’s mouth behavior as good and bad habits are learned when they are puppies.

Dog obedience training is available for dogs of all ages, although it is better to begin the process when dogs are most impressionable. That means finding the time to train puppies when they are young.

Not all puppies live in the most learning-friendly environment as some are left alone for extended bouts of time and that can do irreparable damage to their development. Then, later on in a dog’s life, owners attribute behavioral problems to the dog when, in fact, it is the owners who are actually at fault. A failure to utilize the most instrumental learning time in a dog’s life can actually be considered a form of negligence on behalf of the dog’s owner. It creates a world where fear and aggression continually dictate a dog’s behavior.

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Veterinary teams require the assistance of numerous individuals to ensure that it runs efficiently. That goes beyond the veterinarian or vet technicians. Veterinary assistants are often the glue that holds an animal healthcare team together. Here is a closer look at all of the job duties performed by veterinary assistants.

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Vet Assistant Duties

Customer Service

Veterinary assistants are usually the first person who greets clients when they enter a facility and the last person they see before they leave. That requires vet assistants to have good people skills as they are frequently interacting with people, and not just animals. Customer service also extends to scheduling appointments, making follow-up calls and collecting payments.

Clerical duties

Strong organizational skills are emblematic in quality veterinary assistants. They are the ones entrusted with keeping updated medical records and entering billing information into the system. Vet assistants are also called upon to contact other veterinary facilities for the purpose of making records requests.

Clinical tasks

Vet assistants find themselves right in the midst of actual veterinary work. It is common for vet assistants to collect blood and tissue samples. They are also a valuable help when it comes to taking x-rays. There is a certain amount of precision involved in this process and it is integral that x-rays are done just right.

Animal Restraint

Properly restraining an animal is an integral part of veterinary work. Vet assistants are skilled in the proper techniques used to safely restrain animals. This ensures safety for everyone on an animal healthcare team as the practice of some routine techniques makes for a safe working environment.

Sanitary duties

There is a high priority on making sure equipment and examining rooms are completely free of germs. That is where veterinary assistants step in and commence with sanitizing the necessary components. Without this valuable service, infections could be acquired and also lead to other health problems in animals.

Animal Response

Once an animal receives treatment, their response often needs to be monitored. Veterinary assistants are trained to look for signs during the recovery phase that may be cause for alarm. Being able to identify any problem areas can quickly bring this to the attention of the veterinarian, who can then take the proper measures to quell the problem.

Administering medication

There is a particular method for administering medication to animals and vet assistants are often the ones performing this job duty. These instructions are very specific as a mistake can be detrimental to the health of an animal. Therefore, vet assistants are very thorough when assigned this task.

Pre and post-surgery care

The before and after duties involving surgery often fall into the capable hands of vet assistants. This requires getting everything ready prior to surgery and attending to the post-surgery details. Surgery is a serious procedure and a lot of it depends on making sure the appropriate steps are taken before and after it is completed.

Animal Care

Some animals are required to stay for a certain amount of time in a veterinary facility. While they are there, vet assistants are the ones who take care of their bathing and cleaning. This ensures that animals receive nourishment and proper grooming during their stay at an animal healthcare facility.

Emergency Care

There are plenty of instances when animals are rushed into a veterinary facility and require immediate attention. Under these circumstances, vet assistants may need to perform an array of assignments at a moment’s notice. Vet assistants are expected to remain calm and attentive in these high-pressure situations.

All of those roles make veterinary assistants critical to the success of an animal healthcare facility. The everyday operation relies on vet assistants to take care of so many moving parts and help the entire team perform like a finely-tuned machine.

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Veterinary technicians are heavily involved in a lot of the behind-the-scenes duties that are integral in the field of animal healthcare. They are often the heart and soul of a veterinary practice as they perform a wide array of duties on a daily basis. Without the service of a veterinary technician, providing healthcare for animals becomes monumentally more difficult.

The role of a vet tech is similar to that of a nurse in human medical care. That means they are entrusted with similar duties, such as inserting IVs, assisting with anesthesia and attending to wounds.

And when an animal is rushed into a veterinary hospital, vet technicians are usually the first ones to provide care and make an initial assessment. These situations are often filled with tension and pressure, which is why it is important to maintain a calm demeanor. Vet techs are known for their ability to remain calm under pressure and that could significantly impact on the outcome of an emergency situation.

There are instances when a pet is brought into an animal hospital with an obvious sense of fear. Vet techs are usually the ones who spend some time easing those fears. It may just be a gentle touch or some soothing words, but it is enough to make a difference.

Veterinarians often rave about their vet technicians. However, veterinarians are not the only ones who can attest to the value of vet techs. Pet owners also rely heavily on the services provide by vet techs. Most of the communication with pet owners is conducted by vet techs. That not only applies to communicating about the situation at hand.

Preventative care is extremely important and vet techs often take the time to explain the specifics of preventative care to pet owners. Because the majority of vet techs are animal lovers, it does not always seem like a duty to go that extra step and relay some helpful tips to pet owners. It is their genuine fondness of animals that makes a vet tech want to help pets by communicating effectively with their owners.

There are also times of despair in which pet owners have to deal with the loss of a pet right there in an animal hospital or veterinary facility. During those occasions, veterinary technicians double as grief counselors. Sometimes, the loss is even felt by vet techs, who have come to know the animal.

Many owners bring their pets to the same veterinary facility since the time they were puppies or kittens. That could leave vet techs also saddened by that loss. That kind of sympathy is appreciated by pet owners, who often benefit from the compassion shown by vet techs.

The technical skills used by veterinary technicians can be learned through a training program. Surgical skills, medical procedures and diagnostics can all be learned. However, what cannot be taught is the genuine interest and care that vet techs put into their work. That is something that has come to define veterinary technicians. They are more than just employees, but individuals who put the care in animal healthcare.

That is why it is important to have a love of animals when considering a career as a veterinary technician. That kind of care enables vet techs to take a very patient approach, which comes in very handy when performing duties like taking blood samples. Dealing with the radiology portion of the job also requires a certain level of patience. That patience and care, combined with technical and clinical skills, are what make veterinary technicians so unique.

Stop by any reputable veterinary facility and it won’t take long to take notice of its veterinary technicians. Many times, they are the glue that holds the practice together.

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Pet grooming serves a variety of purposes as it does more than just make animals look their very best. There are all kinds of health benefits that come with pet grooming and trained pet groomers know exactly what to look for during the grooming process. As a result, pets are able to lead a healthier, more comfortable life when they make regular visits to a professionally trained pet groomer.

Professional pet groomers are taught more than just techniques and methods of grooming. There is also an abundance of knowledge included in their training. Here is a look at some of the many benefits that are a result of the expertise attained by a trained pet groomer.

Reduces injuries

Nail clipping is a grooming process that is not done just for the sake of humans. Pets with nails that are too long can get them stuck in certain surfaces, which includes rugs. Keeping nails properly manicured will reduce a pet’s susceptibility to injuries.

Decreases itching

A clean pet means that the fur is not inundated with any kind of dirt, knots or matted hair that could otherwise cause itching. Once a pet leaves a grooming facility, there are usually no signs of itching, which is a way to ensure a healthy, happy lifestyle.

Identifies Disease

Some pets grow hair to the point where it can conceal problem areas. When getting your pet professionally groomed, there is the opportunity to check for any kind of lumps or injuries. Pet groomers are well-versed in detecting abnormalities. This can also include identifying small insects, such as ticks or fleas. A pet groomer might even spot a bump that may or may not be cancerous. Think of grooming as kind of an unofficial checkup on your pet’s exterior.

Improves vision

Hair can quickly grow out and get in the eyes of a pet. That can be a tremendous nuisance, but it can also have negative health effects. When hair gets too long and starts to fall into your pet’s eyes, it can cause an infection. There is no reason your pet’s eyes should not be clear and bright. Watery eyes are a sign that the excess hair is causing problems.

Dental hygiene

Dog owners should make it a point to brush their pet’s teeth on a regular basis. Without regular brushing, a dog can not only develop bad breath, but periodontal disease can also occur. Pet groomers can identify when this becomes a problem and then make the necessary suggestions as to how owners can remedy this problem.

Keeps skin healthy

Too much bathing of pets actually has an adverse effect. What happens with excess bathing is the natural oils are removed from their skin. Without those oils, skin can become dry and start to itch. That leads pets to start scratching excessively and too much scratching could even lead to an infection.

Removes excess hair

Some breeds of dogs require more extensive grooming. Collies are one type of dog that is double-coated. That means they have another coat underneath their longer layer of hair. Shedding only gets rid of so much of the excess hair and getting to a groomer is a way of not only removing excess hair, but also a way of checking for problems.

Doctor recommendations

Amidst the hustle and bustle of everyday life, pet owners could occasionally miss signs that their pet has some kind of abnormality or issue. Pet groomers can identify these signs and suggest a veterinary visit. That could wind up making a big difference if there is indeed a serious issue. Part of treating any serious pet condition is identifying it early.

Pet grooming schools prepare groomers to do more than make pets look beautiful. They are also prepared to provide a valuable health service that can detect problems and make life more comfortable for pets while giving their owners peace of mind.

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Every dog is going to need some type of home training as there are common behavioral issues that can arise. Dog owners are capable of fixing many of these issues, although it often takes patience and consistency. Here is a look at some common dog behavior issues and the ways to fix them.

Excessive Barking

There are times when dogs just keep on barking, which can be frustrating for their owners. However, the barking is typically a sign identifying the state of the dog. For example, barking is a product of dogs being startled, playful, bored or anxious. Barking can also be done in an effort to seek attention or identify themselves to other dogs. It is important to be able to read your dog and recognize the cause of the barking. Shouting at dogs and yelling “no” will usually worsen the situation. In order for dogs to stop barking, they need to be relaxed and comfortable. Positive reinforcement is recommended as owners should attempt to make their dogs feel at ease to eliminate excessive barking.

Chewing on Furniture and Household Items

Dogs who chew up furniture and other household items can cost their owners a pretty penny. When that problem occurs indoors, it is wise to invest in some chew toys which can replace the furniture. If the problem is occurring in your backyard, try putting a leash on your dog the next time he/she ventures outdoors. When dogs are set to chew on something they are not supposed to, give a tug and let them know that is not okay. It may take a few times to do this before they learn their lesson.

Begging

When you are sitting down to have a snack or meal, a begging dog can be an unwelcome sight. The first step to eliminating this issue is to not feed your dog anything from your plate. One or two crumbs is enough to keep them begging for more, even days and weeks later. Another important step is to ignore a begging dog while you eat. Doing this consistently will eventually teach the dog that those begging efforts will be to no avail. It is also important to not feel sorry for a begging dog, who is usually very well fed and does not need any scraps from your plate.

Jumping on People

Some dogs have a tendency to jump on people as soon as they set foot in a home. Remedying this issue will take some work and reinforcement. Try putting your dog on a leash and have someone knock on your door. Walk to the door and command your dog to sit. Do not open the door until your dog complies. When the door opens, have the person ask the dog to sit and reward the dog with a treat when that directive is followed. If the dog tries to jump, prevent him by tugging on the leash. This will need to be repeated until the dog learns that he will be rewarded for sitting instead of jumping when guests arrive.

Aggression

Some dogs have been known to act aggressively and that could be due to a variety of causes. Some forms of aggression may be in the form of a growl or quick nip. Aggressive behaviors range widely and include territorial, social, protective and possessive forms of aggression. The first task is to identify what is motivating your dog to behave aggressively. Behavior modification is then used as a way to treat aggressive behavior. There are several exercises owners can do with their dogs in the behavior modification process. However, patience and consistency are imperative for this to work as each approach much be tailored to the particular type of aggression.

Humping

It can be quite embarrassing when your dog starts humping every leg he can find. Some dogs will exhibit some early warning signs before beginning trying to hump someone or something. When you notice those signs, try to distract your dog by giving him a treat, chew toy or ask him to play some type of game he is familiar with. And when your dog does try to hump, use a firm voice and tell him “no” while pushing him down. If it continues, put him in another room for a time out. However, there will still be the need to go beyond discouragement as the humping will need to be replaced with a positive activity, such as sitting on cue.

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