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Since 2009 Valoya has been committed to discovering and bringing to the market finely balanced LED light spectra that feed the plants with just the information they need and thus help growers reach their cultivation targets efficiently. The first ones to see the value in Valoya’s offering were researchers from universities, research institutes and the world’s largest AG companies due to the quality of the spectra. Over time, Valoya’s offering and customer base have grown and nowadays Valoya equips growth chambers and rooms, greenhouses and vertical farms with its LEDs. Hundreds of growers in more than 50 countries grow better with Valoya lights.

After 10 years of operations Valoya announces the launch of a re-branded image, created to celebrate this milestone and to re-enforce the position of a quality leader of the LED grow lights industry. ‘As one of the pioneers of this industry, we remain committed to creating LED solutions of high, uncompromised quality. Everything we bring to the market is a result of thorough plant biology research and proprietary, patent protected technology. Some growers need plant biomass, some need control over the flowering process and some need a particular chemical profile of the plant. After having studied more than 200 plant species / varieties in the past decade, both ourselves and in collaboration with our partners, we are confident when we recommend any one of our LED solutions to our customers’ comments Nemanja Rodic, the Marketing Director of Valoya.

Along with a re-branded image, Valoya’s white light spectra offering is expanded. Valoya’s SolrayTM spectrum is derived from the patent protected, sunlight-replicating NS1 spectrum which illuminates the greenhouses and growth chambers of the world’s largest AG companies. SolrayTM was earlier introduced as the Valoya Canna+ version of NS1 for cultivation of medicinal cannabis, as it resulted in quick growth and flowering of secondary metabolite rich plants. Through research we have learned that this spectrum is a great fit for many plant varieties cultivated globally.

SolrayTM is a general use, high noon sunlight replicating spectrum for cultivation and research purposes of a great multitude of plants. It’s a finely balanced range of wavelengths from UV-A till far red that promotes an outdoor resembling, compact phenotype, quick biomass accumulation and flowering. It boasts the highest CRI value (95/100) in the industry meaning it is a natural looking white light that is pleasant to work under.

SolrayTM is a production version of the NS1 spectrum, but with a higher µmol/W performance (up to 2,4 µmol/W). All of the research that went into producing NS1, the leading crop science spectrum globally, has helped us create SolrayTM. With it, our aim is to make research grade LED light available to as many growers and researchers as possible and at a highly competitive price point. To learn more about SolrayTM, please click here.

SolrayTM is immediately available worldwide inside Valoya’s BX120 and RX400 luminaires which are suitable for most cultivation environments and boast a high operating lifetime (50000 hours), high IP rating (up to IP67), dimmability feature, robust design and easy installation. To learn more about Valoya’s products, please click here.

Meet Valoya at GreenTech (booth #08.217) to learn about the new brand image and the SolrayTM spectrum.

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Using LED grow lights in plant production is a relatively new branch of science. In vertical farming where artificial light sources are used in closed environment it is important to collect data about the individual plant species to be able to produce the right spectrum and light intensity for vegetative and generative growth. Light spectrums can also be used to manipulate the plants growth cycle for example in plant breeding (see blog post: Light Approaches To Speed Up The Generation Turnover) or secondary metabolite contents (anthocyanins, flavonoids, antioxidants, polyphenols etc.).

Why Does Lettuce Turn Red?

When cultivating red baby leaf lettuce in closed environments like vertical farms, without natural light conditions the artificial light quality and quantity plays a key role in production of good quality vegetables. Of course, in the case of red leaf lettuce the deep red color that is caused by the higher anthocyanin content must be produced without affecting the other good qualities of the leafy green. Anthocyanin accumulation is generally linked to the abiotic stress the plant is experiencing or it’s a way for the plant to protect itself against herbivores and plant pathogens. For instance, in the case of high light conditions the anthocyanins serve the plant as an optical filter, redirecting excess light away from the saturated photosynthetic electron transport chain (Gould 2004). This means that the anthocyanins are protecting the plant leaves from harmful structural damage to their photosystems. Raising light intensity is therefore an effective way to increase the leaves anthocyanin content but it’s not a very energy efficient way to do this.

Using UV-A for Growing Lettuce

Previously this has been studied by Li and Kubota (2009) and they concluded in their study that both spectrums with enhanced blue and UV-A light increased the anthocyanin content in the leaves of lettuce ‘Red Cross’, but far-red and green light had the opposite effect decreasing the anthocyanin production. Hence, at the end of the cultivation cycle in indoors only enhancing the blue and/or UV-A light spectrum would lead the red baby leaf lettuce to produce anthocyanins which gives them the special red coloration. Using LEDs is the easy and energy efficient way to get quick results in anthocyanin formation in closed environment conditions. This could be easily implemented into the existing indoor growth systems by merely switching on the right spectrum for enhancing the coloration at the end of the growth cycle.

Valoya made internal trials where two light spectrums were used to test this light quality effect with enhanced UV-A / blue spectrum light (S46) and our standard light for vegetative growth with leafy greens (AP673L). Light intensity levels were taken into consideration and tested in a pre-trial. The amount of anthocyanin was measured at the end of the trial with optical polyphenol measuring tool (Dualex, ForceA). The experiment was done with two red baby leaf lettuce varieties: ‘Sadawi’ and ‘Diablotin’, with very similar results.

The light treatments were done with the two spectrums and in the case of AP673L spectrum with three different intensities. The data was analyzed in SPSS with two-way Anova. The homogeneity of variances was analyzed with Levene’s test and the normality of the data with Shapiro-Wilks test.

The results for anthocyanin accumulation confirmed the hypothesis that the enhanced blue and UV-A spectrum will increase the production of anthocyanins in red baby leaf lettuces’ leaves leading to a similar amount as in that of the high intensity treatment. Increasing the AP673L light intensity from 200 µmolm-2s– to 400 µmolm-2s– had linearity trend with increasing intensity (Figure 2).

Figure 1 Red baby leaf lettuce anthocyanin trial with different spectrums. The anthocyanin amount was measured three times and three measurements were taken from one plant. Anthocyanin index = Log* (Near-infrared fluo. excited red / Near-infrared fluo. excited green).

Figure 1 Red baby leaf lettuce anthocyanin trial with different intensities (in micromoles). The anthocyanin amount was measured three times and three measurements were taken from one plant. Anthocyanin index = Log* (Near-infrared fluo. excited red / Near-infrared fluo. excited green).

This accumulation of anthocyanins could also be observed visually (Figure 3). Both tested red baby leaf lettuce varieties behaved the same way under different spectrum and light treatments.

Figure 1 Red baby leaf lettuce ‘Sadawi’ grown under enhanced blue/UV-A spectrum with 200 µmolm-2s– light intensity (left), standard leafy green spectrum with 200 µmolm-2s– (middle) and standard leafy green spectrum with 400 µmolm-2s– (right).

For some lettuce growers the high nitrate accumulation to the leaves during greenhouse cultivation has caused problems and in some studies this has been linked to winter light conditions (Burns et al. 2010). European Union’s standard regulates that the nitrate content of the lettuce grown under cover cannot exceed 4500 ppm due to the implications on human health (EUR-LAX, 2006). In our experiment the nitrate content of the red baby leaf lettuce stayed well below this regulated limit varying from 1130 to 2420 ppm.

This trial is a good example how the vertical farmer can affect not only the growth rate of the leafy greens but also the quality without high inputs on energy costs. Choosing the right spectrum at the right time of the production cycle adds value to the final product and the color of the product is not the only thing that can be affected but also taste, smell and the nutrient content of the leafy greens.

REFERENCES

Burns, I. G.; Zhang, K.; Turner, M. K.; Meacham, M.; Al‐Redhiman, K.; Lynn, J.; Broadley, M. R.; Hand, P. & Pink, P. 2006. Screening for genotype and environment effects on nitrate accumulation in 24 species of young lettuce. Wiley Online Library.  Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. 91: 553-62 https://doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.4220

Li, Q & Kubota, C. 2009. Effects of supplemental light quality on growth and phytochemicals of baby leaf lettuce. Scientia Horticulturae. 179: 78-84.

EUR-LAX, Comission Regulation (EC) No. 1881/2006, 2006 Setember. Data available from: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:02006R1881-20180319&qid=1528106171286&from=EN

Gould, K. S. 2004 Nature’s Swiss Army Knife: The Diverse Protective Roles of Anthocyanins in Leaves. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal or Biomedicine and Biotechnology. 5: 314-320.

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What You Should Know About LED Grow Lights

Energy-efficient LED grow lights are the lighting of the future of agriculture. They are not only economic in their use but they produce better plants as well, in comparison to all traditional lighting options. In the texts below you can read how the LED grow lights work, how they affect plant growth and what advantages the LED lights have over the thus far most widely used artifical lighting in agriculture – HPS lamps.

What are LEDs and how do they work?

LEDs (Light Emitting Diode) are small electronic components made of two different types of semiconductor material, one having a negative charge, called electrons, and the other having a positive charge, called holes. When voltage is properly applied over an LED, electric current starts to flow through it making electrons and holes start to collide releasing energy in the form of photons, light quanta, in a process called recombination. The first LEDs had relatively low light output and limited selections of colors while modern LEDs have high brightness and come in varieties of colors in visible, infrared and ultraviolet spectral ranges.

What are LED grow lights?

As suggested by their name, LED grow lights are luminaires utilizing LED chips in a modern and efficient way to produce light for growing plants. LED grow lights come in many shapes and sizes but as the most essential units of LED grow lights LED chips have most of the effect on the quality of the light, i.e. spectrum (colors) and photon flux (“brightness”) produced. Since LED grow light manufacturers can choose the LEDs they use in their lamps, it is important to understand which kind of LED grow light best fits the specific application. One of the advantages of LED grow lights compared to traditional lighting solutions is the ability to match the light to the needs of plants.

What is the effect of LED grow lights on plants?

Color variations of the LED grow lights are directly connected to the intended purpose – various studies have shown that certain colors influence plant growth, affecting root and flower formation (blue and red light spectra) which practically means that the majority of plant sorts will complete a normal growth cycle if exposed to both blue and red grow lights. Adding other colors to the spectrum, such as green, far-red and deep-blue aids this process by giving plants more information about its environment and overall resulting in higher quality plants (quicker growth, more secondary metabolite accumulation etc). A spectrum that contains all colors is called full spectrum and mostly resembles the sunlight. If it has high proportions of green, the light will appear white to human eyes and while not a crucial factor for plant growth, it does make the work around these lights easier and makes visual inspection of the plants possible. (Read more: Why Is LED Grow Light Purple?)


White and pink LED grow lights (both are full spectrum LED grow lights). Left – Valoya NS1, Right – Valoya AP673L.

How do plants react to different light colors?

UV: PROTECTIVE MEASURES to high light conditions and stimulation of insect repelling chemicals. Enhances pigment accumulation in leaves, affects leaf and plant morphology.

Blue: Signal for lack of neighbors, no need to compete for light. Stimulates stomatal opening, stem elongation inhibition, thicker leaves, orientation to light and photoperiodic flowering.

Green, Yellow, Orange: Signal of neighbors, competition for light. Responses opposite to blue light; stomatal closure, some shade avoidance symptoms, enhanced photosynthesis in deeper cell layers.

Red: Lack of neighbors signal. Main component needed for photosynthesis, stem elongation inhibition, signal light

Far-red: signal light; Signal of neighbors, competition for light. elongation, flowering.

Through research we can determine what the optimal light for plant growth is. It is important to consider that different plants react differently to various light treatments (even different strains of the same plant). Additionally, a plant in its flowering phase may require a different light treatment as opposed to when it is in the vegetative stage. When it comes to the light itself, several parameters can be modified:

  • Light spectrum (the combination of colors used to produce the light)
  • Light intensity (typically measured in micromoles, the amount of photons projected onto the plants)
  • Photoperiod (number of hours a plant is exposed to light within a 24 hour period)
  • Light uniformity (the degree to which the light is equally distributed across the canopy)

In other words, LED grow lights users need to exercise a tailor-made approach when raising crops due to the fact that each plant species has different needs. In practical terms this means conducting trials before going to large scale production. (Read more: 8 Tips for Setting Up Successful Plant Trials with LED)

An alternative to that is purchasing the LED grow lights from companies that are dedicated to research and provide this data to their customers.

Discover Revolutionary Advantages of LED Grow Lights

In its early stages, LED technology was perceived as rather impractical and cost-inefficient. With the newest technology advances LED grow lights production has become cost-effective. Additionally, the range of available LED chip types facilitated the development of a more efficient plant cultivation industry. When set side-by-side with the traditional HPS (high-pressure-sodium) systems, LEDs win in terms of energy efficiency, the quality of plants cultivated as well as environmental friendliness.

LEDs are simple but powerful, energy-efficient plant growth lamps in comparison to the predominantly used HPS lights that are gradually being perceived as bulky yet less robust. HPS lamps have a shorter life span  which makes them more expensive in the long run. The heat emitted by HPS lamps is sometimes good and effective in greenhouse settings but makes them practically useless for vertical farms or growth chambers.   LEDs are faster switching, more compact (smaller in size), and are perceived as more beneficial for the environment. In addition, LED grow lights release less incandescent heat which affects the moisture and nutrition requirements of plants. The small amount of heat that is emitted is emitted upwards and away from plants unlike with HPS where the heat goes directly onto them increasing the leaf surface temperature and sometimes burning the plants.

In essence, the revolutionary advantages of LEDs in comparison to the conventional HPS lights are:

·       Economic electricity consumption  –  LED grow lights utilize up 50% of the energy that HPS systems use and some experts anticipate even a higher LEDs efficiency in the near future

·       Longer lifespan / lamp durability – LEDs have a longer life span in comparison to the HPS lights; for the comparison’s sake, the HPS lamps can last for 1 year while the LEDs might  last even up to 8 years (which translates into 50 000 hours of use)

·       Smaller spaces convenience – as the LED grow lamps can be set closer to the plants,  the growing space does not need to be extremely high or wide

·       Energy efficiency – with LED grow lights it is possible to optimize the spectrum by concentrating energy on wavelengths (colors) that are most beneficial for each application and plant. In addition, reduced heat production allows putting LED fixtures closer to plants ensuring less light is lost elsewhere.

·       Fire safety – as LEDs do not become very warm in comparison to the conventional HPS lamps they are safer to use

·       Dimming – while the majority of HPS lamps use the full light intensity, LED grow lights can dim even with a remote control or via an app and therefore are easier to handle, apart from consuming less power

·       Better crops – various trials have shown that LED grow lights produce better crops in terms of plants getting bigger and growing faster, compared to the HPS lights. Additionaly, LEDs can be made with a spectrum aimed at a specific goal such as anthocyanin accumulation, flowering inhibition, enhanced rooting etc.

·       More environment safety – due to the fact that less heat is emitted and that UV light can be added in LED lamps, there is less chance for bacteria and mold formation which subsequently means less pesticides and less environment pollution

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Valoya is the leading LED grow lights provider for crop science applications. Its fixtures are typically used by seed breeding companies, crop protection companies, vertical farms, research institutes and universities. This includes 8 out of 10 world’s largest agricultural companies. The wide, patented spectra are what Valoya is known for and now these will become more accessible to greenhouse growers in Valoya’s brand new luminaire for greenhouse cultivation – the RX400.

The RX400 is a dimmable 400W LED grow light that boasts a light efficiency of 2,3 µmol/W making it a suitable one-to-one replacement for a 600W HPS light. It is rated IP55 meaning it is suitable for highly humid and dusty locations and can withstand getting sprayed by water. The RX400 is passively cooled and the little heat that is created is emitted upwards and not in the direction of plants. Its compact design results in minimal shading over the canopy and its lighting angle of 120° means it covers a large area of plants. In fact it can be placed up to 4 m (13’) above the canopy, or if needed down to 0,5 m (20”).

Valoya’s spectra available in this luminaire are:

  • the sunlight spectrum NS1, favored by researchers worldwide
  • the plant biomass boosting AP673L, typically used by growers of leafy green vegetables
  • the AP67 spectrum for strong vegetative and generative growth, typically used by seed breeding companies

The RX400 was presented at GreenTech last week and is immediately available to order. To get a quote, please reach out to your local Valoya distributor. To see the full specs, please download Valoya’s Product Brochure.

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LED grow lights provide an easy opportunity for growers and scientists to conduct plant trials with simple installations and a broad range of different spectra in multiple form factors. The following tips should encourage scientists and commercial growers who are currently not familiar with studies in horticultural lighting, to find out how the different features of light are valuable for plants in their application. These tips should also help you avoid most common mistakes made which render results useless.

1.Environment

A trial can be conducted in controlled environments like growth chambers, greenhouses or plastic tunnels (the LED spectrum will be diluted by natural light in the latter two). In conditions with natural light no day is like the next, thus longer trial periods are beneficial (best to cover all seasons winter, spring, autumn and summer). Further data such as daily light integral (DLI) of outdoor light or “working hours” (switch on / off) of the supplemental LED lamps, help to analyze the result after finishing the trial.

2.Light intensity

Plants convert the energy of photons into chemical energy. Through an intensity study you investigate the plant response to different light intensity levels.

If you conduct the trial in a rack setup the lowest intensity must be placed on the top shelf and highest on the bottom shelf. This way you will avoid stray light rays increasing the light intensity of treatments where it is supposed to be low. Naturally, dark foil that encloses a shelf and prevents light from escaping will serve this purpose as well.

Select the intensity steps equally for the data analysis you will be conducting. Specify your reference intensity height, which can be the canopy or something else and keep in mind: plants grow towards the light! Therefore, use dimmable luminaries and dim down the lamps as plants grow taller. Adjust it to your target intensity during the trial period for a consistent intensity level throughout the study. Otherwise the intensity level will naturally increase, while the plant is growing.

3.Light quality

Next to the intensity, the light composition (spectrum) steers plant growth and plant development. If you feel unsure about which spectrum supports your growing target, you can find many recent published studies (Margit Olle, 2013; Demotes-Mainard et al., 2016; Bantis et al., 2018) or you contact the biologists of your lighting supplier. If a lighting supplier does not conduct research and does not have proprietary data, stay away from them! The only way to be certain a spectrum will work is if the company selling it has conducted extensive research with various plants, in various settings and with verification rounds.

Studies with different light spectra are more difficult to conduct as the individual treatments need to be separated properly (Fig.1). You can use black or white foil to separate the treatments but take care especially in closed environments that the air circulation is not blocked.

Target for the same intensity in each light treatment to obtain comparable results.

Fig.1 Trial setup to test different light spectra in a trolley.

4.Photoperiod

The development of some plant species is controlled by the photoperiod (relation of day hours to night hours). Such short-day plants or long-day plants flower only when the critical photoperiodic duration is not reached or exceeded, respectively. Already very low light intensities 2-3 µmol/m-2/s1 are sensed and mediate a plant response (Lopez, 2009). Note that in greenhouse or plastic tunnels even moonlight or streetlight transmits a signal to the plant. Hence, you need to design the test area very carefully to apply short-day conditions during summer. On the other hand, if you need to signal long-days under short-day conditions you can do it with low power LED luminaires (or dimmed down luminaires).

5.Light uniformity

If you conduct a study on a small test area it is very important to distribute the light uniformly.

Keep in mind that your results are more solid and credible if based on treated plants which obtained equal conditions.

To learn more about light planning, read a blog post titled Light Planning: 3 Steps to Ensure Efficient Plant Growth With LEDs

Light uniformity is tricky but lighting suppliers with enough many form factor variations will be able to provide something perfectly uniform. Look for suppliers whose equipment is frequently used in academic research.

6.Light measurement devices

Plants perceive light differently than humans.

Read a blog post titled: Why is LED Grow Light Purple

You can control your test setup with a measuring device and this is strongly recommended at least once during the trial period. Make sure to check the accuracy of your intensity treatments using a PAR-meter or the success of the spectrum separation using a spectrometer. The graph below shows a measurement, where the target spectrum AP67 (by Valoya) is diluted from another light source due to the separation with translucent fabric.

Fig.2 Enrichment in the green area in the purple circuit of AP67 due to mix of different spectra though translucent fabrics.

7.Plan your survey

Try to be as focused as possible and avoid testing more than one growth factor in a trial. It is better to conduct two separate trials than one in situations when you plan to investigate e.g. a spectrum combined with intensity changes or intensity changes combined with temperature treatments. Various reference parameters (measurements) such as plant growth (biomass accumulation), plant development (time to root or to flower) can be considered. Or you can think of some other parameter more suited to your growing target.

8.Luminaire power consumption

If your target is to compare the power consumption, do not forget to include the power of ballast units from traditional light sources such as fluorescent or high-pressure sodium. Make your trial design that either all light treatments have the same total power consumption (and measure resulting intensity on plant canopy) or intensity level and calculate the energy used for each treatment individually.

These tips come from Valoya’s team of plant biologists. Valoya has thus far conducted 441 plant trials on 229 plant species/varieties in 26 countries. Valoya’s luminaires are commonly used in academic research and have thus far equipped research facilities at sites such as Max Planck Institute, John Innes Centre, Rothamsted Research and more than a 100 universities around the world. Feel free to contact Valoya for assistance or if you have doubts on how to interpret your observations or results afterwards (Ms.Stefanie Linzer, Biologist – stefanie.linzer (at) valoya.com).

Bantis, F., Smirnakou, S., Ouzounis, T., Koukounaras, A., Ntagkas, N., & Radoglou, K. (2018). Current status and recent achievements in the field of horticulture with the use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Scientia Horticulturae, (February), 0–1.

Demotes-Mainard, S., Péron, T., Corot, A., Bertheloot, J., Le Gourrierec, J., Pelleschi-Travier, S., … Sakr, S. (2016). Plant responses to red and far-red lights, applications in horticulture. Environmental and Experimental Botany, 121, 4–21.

Lopez, R. (2009). Understanding The Differences Between Photoperiodic And Supplemental Lighting. Greenhouse Grower, (November), 26–30.

Margit Olle, A. V. (2013). The effect of light-emitting diode lighting on greenhouse plant growth and quality. Agricultural and Food Science, 22(April), 223–234.

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The LEDs & Innovators Conference 2018 is set to be one of the highlights of GreenTech this year. A full day conference will gather some of Europe’s leading vertical farmers, crop science researchers and cannabis cultivation specialists in one room.

The vertical farming panel will be held from 12.00 till 13.30 (Wednesday, June 13th) and the speakers line-up consist of:

Farmers Cut, a Hamburg based vertical farm has just been added to the speakers line-up and will be represented by Mr. Mark Korzilius, its Co-Founder & CEO. In addition to having some of Europe’s leading figures in the vertical farming industry on stage, this event will be an opportunity for the audience members to network and source business partners.

To learn more about the conference and sign-up click here. Seats are on a first-come-first-served basis and the number is limited.

In the video below you can learn more about Farmers Cut and Valoya, its lighting supplier and the organizer of the LEDs & Innovators Conference 2018 at GreenTech.

About Valoya Oy

Valoya is a provider of high end, energy efficient LED grow lights for use in crop science, vertical farming and medicinal plants cultivation. Valoya LED grow lights have been developed using Valoya’s proprietary LED technology and extensive plant photobiology research. Valoya’s customer base includes numerous vertical farms, greenhouses and research institutions all over the world (including 8 out of 10 world’s largest agricultural companies).

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The application of the LED technology can propel a cultivation business or a plant research project forward but can also pose challenges. Firstly, the LED offer on the market is vast, complex and confusing and secondly, LED is only one of the available lighting technologies. The best way to understand how to advance properly onto LEDs is by hearing the stories of those who have done it before. Experts from the fields of crop science, vertical farming and medical plants cultivation will gather in the LEDs & Innovators Conference 2019 to discuss the application of the LED technology and more. The conference will be held during GreenTech at the RAI premises and is free of charge for the GreenTech participants but with a very limited number of seats available.

The 3-part event consists of a Crop Science and Lightsession, a Hard Science Talk on Cannabis session and a Vertical Farming Innovators Panel.Participants can choose which one to participate in and thus hear first-hand experiences from those who have ventured into the world of LEDs already. The scope will expand beyond just lighting and additionally participants will have a chance to ask their own questions.

In the Crop Science and Light session, we will try to show what kind of light is most useful for researchers and how to successfully transition from trialed and tested protocols made with fluorescent and other, more traditional technologies onto LEDs. In the Hard Science Talk on Cannabis, Dr. Grassi, one of Europe’s most prominent Cannabis sativa researchers, with two decades in the field will discuss terpenes. The scent molecules of the cannabis plant are sought after almost as much as the cannabinoid compounds and our understanding of their value is still scarce. Finally, the Vertical Farming Innovators Panelwill gather vertical farmers as well as industry specialists who will discuss not only lighting for vertical farming, but the ins and outs of this field which is on the exponential rise. You have a chance to propose a topic you wish to be discussed by the panelists. You will have an opportunity to do so in the registration form for the event.

The participation in the event is FREE of charge, however the number of seats is very limited so it is best to register right away. To learn more about the event and register, please click here.

Conference Program

10:15 – 11:15 Crop Science and Light

Stefanie Linzer,Biologist, Valoya

High Quality White LED Light for Crop Science Applications

11:30 – 12:30 Hard Science Talk on Cannabis

Dr. Gianpaolo Grassi, Head Researcher, CREA-CI, Italy

How Does the Light Spectrum Affect the Terpene Profile of Cannabis?

13:00 – 14:30 Vertical Farming Innovators Panel

Mark Korzilius, Co-Founder & CEO, Farmers Cut,Germany

Rasmus Jakobsen,Manager,Greenlandic Greenhouse

Gus van der Feltz, Chairman, Farm Tech Society

Henry Gordon-Smith, Managing Director, Agritecture

Lars Aikala, CEO, Valoya

The post LED Conference During GreenTech appeared first on Valoya LED Grow Lights.

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Crop science researchers, whether from the corporate or the research institute and university side, are tasked with developing new plant varieties, various biocides and performing all other kinds of research with plants. To obtain reliable data, plants grown in greenhouses or growth chambers need to resemble the outdoor grown plants. Achieving the outdoor phenotype indoors is not an easy task. It is dependent on a variety of factors, most prominently on the artificial lighting used.

Due to its affordability and the quality of spectrum, fluorescent technology illuminates most research growth chambers worldwide. It is changing however in favor of LEDs rather quickly as LEDs have the possibility of producing a higher quality spectrum that could potentially be a close match to sunlight. A good sunlight replica light will guarantee that plants grown indoors will have the same characteristics of those grown outside. With that said, the quality of LED spectra offered on the market range tremendously and even though LED is all the hype, it is not by default a step up from the traditional lighting technologies. Almost none of the LED manufacturers include wavelengths beyond the PAR area (UV and Far red) which would classify the spectrum as a close match to sunlight and thus enable researchers to successfully achieve outdoor phenotypes indoors.

Valoya is hosting a free webinar titled Transitioning to White LED Light in Crop Science: What You Need to Know on May 24th. Valoya’s Biologist will discuss using white, high CRI, sunlight replicating LED light and how it can be used to successfully transition from growth protocols developed with fluoresecent, HPS, MH etc. to LED. Whether the researcher aims to reproduce outdoor phenotypes, or achieve great amount of plant biomass quickly, a finely optimized LED light can achieve that.

The webinar will be held on May 24that 14.00 CET. To learn more about it and sign up, please click here.

Additionally, Valoya will host its annual LEDs & Innovators Conferenceat GreenTech which will gather some of the leading experts in the crop science, vertical farming and medical plants cultivation fields as speakers. The conference is free of charge but with limited seating and a selection process for participation. To learn more and sign-up, please click here.

The post Achieving the Outdoor Plant Phenotype Indoors in Crop Science Research appeared first on Valoya LED Grow Lights.

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At last year’s GreenTech, Valoya hosted its first educational event titled LEDs & Innovators Conference 2018. The event gathered some of the most prominent names in crop science, vertical farming and medical plants industries as speakers. These include Richard Ballard of the infamous Growing Underground farm in London and Dr. Giovanni Minuto, the director of the esteemed agricultural research institute CeRSAA, from Italy.

Valoya announces the second edition of this event, to be held on June 12th, the second day of this year’s GreenTech. The conference is tailored to industry professionals interested in deepening their knowledge in matters of lighting for crop science, medical plants cultivation and vertical farming fields. Additionally, this is an opportunity to hear first-hand cultivation experiences from experts as well as network with industry peers.

LEDs & Innovators Conference 2019

The Program

10:15 – 11:15 Crop Science and Light

Stefanie Linzer,Biologist, Valoya

High Quality White LED Light for Crop Science Applications

11.15  –11.30 Break

11:30 – 12:30 Hard Science Talk on Medicinal Cannabis

Dr. Gianpaolo Grassi, Head Researcher, CREA-CI, Italy

How Does the Light Spectrum Affect the Terpene Profile of Cannabis?

12.30  – 13.00 Break

13:00 – 14:30 Vertical Farming Innovators Panel

Mark Korzilius, Co-Founder & CEO, Farmers Cut,Germany

Gus van der Feltz, Chairman, Farm Tech Society

Henry Gordon-Smith, Managing Director, Agritecture

Lars Aikala, CEO,Valoya

From last year’s LEDs & Innovators Conferenceat GreenTech

The conference is free of charge, however the number of seats is limited. Participants need to register on Valoya’s website after which they will go through a selection process and will be notified if they can participate in the conference. The sign-up form and more information about the event is available here.

Valoya is also to host a webinar titled Transitioning to White LED Light in Crop Science, What You Need to Know on May 24that 14.00 CET. The webinar is aimed at researchers trying to understand if and why they should to move ahead to LED technology in the coming future. It will be hosted by Valoya’s Biologist, Ms. Stefanie Linzer who has more than a decade of biology expertise and has helped Valoya develop some of its patented spectra which illuminate the chambers of the world’s largest agricultural companies, research institutes and universities. The attendance is free of charge. To sign up, please click here.

The post Valoya to Host the LEDs & Innovators Conference at GreenTech Again appeared first on Valoya LED Grow Lights.

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Fluorescent, metal halide and other traditional lighting sources have been used in crop science applications for decades. Researchers, whether from the corporate or university and research institute side need high quality light capable of taking their plants from seed to the generative stage in a way that closely mimics the outdoor lighting conditions. While not a close match to sunlight, those traditional lighting sources do manage to provide enough information to most plants cultivated and enable researchers to conduct their studies.

LED, as the new entry in this field is slowly populating more and more growth chambers worldwide. It brings along the variety of spectra available as well as the consistency of the spectrum quality over its lifespan, under different operating temperatures etc. Not all LED light is the same though. Its spectrum quality varies greatly even when it appears equally white to human eyes. Additionally, LED lights’ quality variations from manufacturer to manufacturer are greater than those of traditional lighting source providers such as fluorescent. The transition to white LEDs can be quick and painless if the lighting provider has thorough photobiological understanding.

Valoya announces a webinar titled Transitioning to White LED Light in Crop Science, What You Need to Know. In this webinar we will address the concerns researchers may have in this process. We want to demonstrate how proven growth protocols developed under fluorescent and other technologies over the years can easily be substituted with a high quality, full spectrum LEDs capable of creating the outdoor phenotype indoors. Beyond being able to painlessly transition, we will show how researchers will be able to have more consistent plant output thanks to the greater stability of light quality LED brings.

The webinar is aimed at researchers trying to understand if and why they should to move ahead to LED technology in the coming future. It will be hosted by Valoya’s Biologist, Ms. Stefanie Linzer who has more than a decade of biology expertise and has helped Valoya develop some of its patented spectra which illuminate the chambers of the world’s largest agricultural companies, research institutes and universities.

The webinar will be held on May 24that 14.00 CET. To sign up, please click here.

Additionally, Valoya will once more host its LEDs & Innovators Conferenceat GreenTech which will gather some of the leading experts in the crop science, vertical farming and medical plants cultivation fields as speakers. Watch out for the first announcement and sign-up invitation coming soon!

The post Webinar: Transitioning to White LED Light in Crop Science, What You Need to Know appeared first on Valoya LED Grow Lights.

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