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IKEA has recently added AR to their marketing toolkit, and people can’t seem to get enough! So, the most legitimate question is: is AR the future of architecture and interior design?

Experts in real estate, architecture and interior design say that yes, this is the future. Although AR is mainly associated with the game development and entertainment industry, its applications expand today in our day-to-day life. They are here to make our lives more practical, accurate and, why not, safe. Besides, AR is empowering for both architects and interior designers to collaborate closer, from the incipient stages of a project. It’s a common practice – although not a productive one – for architects and interior designers to forget about collaboration and to create spaces that are less than a pleasure to furnish. But on to more details, in the following paragraphs.

Giving Architects a Well-Deserved Virtual Help

AR has found its place even in the earliest development stages. In this point, a close collaboration between the real estate investor, a team of architects, plumbers, electricians, but also interior designers can come together and bring their knowledgeand come up with the best plan for the client’s needs.

Previously, it would have been almost impossible to gather a comprehensive and complex team like this.

For architects, one of the biggest challenges of the pre-AR era was to visualize and get a plan from paper into real-world coordinates.

What makes AR a valuable asset for architects all over the world is its ability to create a 3D model from the ground, by using a simple blueprint of the building. The pop-up model, with the help of some extraordinary digital methods, can create a realistic simulation of how the structure will look in real life, but also more than this. It can bring the construction site up to life. This will offer both the construction team and the architect a better idea of how workers and equipment will fit into the whole situation, to ensure proper safety levels.

According to architects and contractors, technologies like augmented reality will help them reduce costly mistakes and have an easier time working on their projects.

Real Estate – The Secondary Beneficiary

Better plans and drawings and 3D models are not only incredibly useful for architects. They can help realtors to market, advertise and sell properties in their portfolios more efficiently.

AR is especially useful when developers want to advertise properties before the project is completed. And for this they entrust their vision to skilful teams of software developers. By using rapid application development, these teams are able to create incredibly complex apps that help all real estate contractors, architects, and interior designers market their projects.The applications developed for such purposes can offer realistic visualizations of how properties are going to look like, once the project is accomplished.

Many developers seem unable to switch from aesthetics to functionality in their presentations. This is where AR can help them present properties in all aspects: from how they will look once they’re completed, to how functional will they be.

Obviously, the most effective way to use AR for similar purposes is to engage all the parties involved in the project lifecycle, including interior designers.

Potential buyers will now be able to have accurate depictions of the final project, without it being completed, or without ever leaving their homes. And, realtors can forget about the costly and time-consuming staging part. Today, this is a huge part of their activity, so the future holds huge simplification potential.

 

Meeting Consumer Demands More Successfully

Consumer needs and demands evolve continuously. Today, consumers don’t feel the need to physically visit a potential future residence. According to this study, one in three real estate purchases is blind buys.

Many consumers prefer blind buys because of a series of reasons. Two of the most frequently mentioned are the time saving and money-saving aspects. For many buyers, AR makes the process more accessible and approachable, but also more realistic.

Because of these reasons, many companies, including interior designers and architects who have already adopted AR, are optimistic about the returns on investment. Now, leading design and architecture agencies rely more and more on the opportunities offered by augmented reality.

Interactive solutions

Interior designers are also helped a lot in their work, by this new technology. Not only they can make architects more aware of their space and design needs, but they can collaborate closely with the final client.

Until recently, designers presented their propositions through design idea boards. Today, with the help of AR and 3D models, they can appeal to a bigger customer base. Asking your client to imagine who the property will look like in the end, only by offering them sets of pictures is inefficient. Not everybody has the same ability to do this. But an AR 3D model, able to replicate in detail interior designer’s propositions is a valuable asset. Once AR becomes a standard tool in the industry, the designer-final client collaboration possibilities will be endless.

Engaged and present clients

Once AR becomes a widely-embraced tool by interior designers, clients will have more to say in terms of furniture, accessories, finishing touches, and colours used to create the final design of their properties. The market is already packed with similar applications. They allow designers to completely transform spaces right under their client’s eyes. Apart from offering clients the opportunity to create the perfect design, AR can also help clients and designers avoid costly mistakes and misunderstandings.

Besides, AR can help interior designers and architects manage clients in unprecedented ways. AR tools can now offer spotless customer service. Although they won’t replace the personal touch of a professional, they can replace them until these are available. Interactive tools can guide prospects through different design proposals, even when the designer can’t be reached to offer the necessary details.

AR has so many applications today. Some of the sectors which have enjoyed its incredible potential are the real estate, architecture, and interior design. Notable breakthroughs have already been made and a series of smart apps and tools are already used by professionals in the field.

The post How Is AR Helping Architects And Interior Designers? appeared first on urdesignmag.

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Buying an engagement ring on a budget does not mean your lovely woman is low class! However, a budgeted purchase deepens your pocket to splurge for your honeymoon. Yes, splurge on your honeymoon because it’s time for the newlyweds to enjoy that dream destination! Honeymoon is a great moment to stay in a five-star hotel and go to the best restaurants.

Preparing a budget for an engagement ring helps you to save a lot of money for your honeymoon. Financial freedom helps you to choose what to eat comfortably as you enjoy lovely moment together with your partner. The following are five ways to save on your engagement ring so that you can splurge your honeymoon.

1. Be flexible on Carat, Clarity, and Color

The size and weight of the carat seems to obsess many people. There is an illusion that the bigger the ring the more stunning or beautiful it appears. Apparently, size makes the ring more expensive rather than beautiful.

Are you thinking of developing affordable engagement rings? Coming up with affordable rings needs you to be a little bit flexibility on clarity and color. The more perfect diamond is the more expensive it cost. You can still have a beautiful ring with a smaller size diamond which is classy and beautiful. The one thing you should not compromise on is the cut. The cut is the shape of the diamond this will affect how the diamond sparkles.

You should ensure that you get a ring which has an excellent cut because unique cuts make a ring beautiful.

2. Buy Gold instead of Platinum

Platinum rings are expensive compared to gold. Instead of spending money on expensive metal like platinum for your ring, you can opt for a less expensive metal like gold. Gold is still beautiful; you can choose white gold which has a stunning appearance and save your hundreds of bucks.

 

3. Go for Custom Made engagement ring

It sounds good to publicize your custom made ring. You can have your unique ring made by a jeweler to save a few bucks. Custom made rings allow you to have the power to propose your design based on your budget. Additionally, you can propose a design which best suits your wife and makes you happy at the same time.

When you work closely with a jeweler, you may design a unique ring from his experience, expertise and connection in jewelries. Jewelers have great experiences in engagement rings that are not only friendly but also affordable.

4. Choose Gemstone instead of Diamond

Most girls desire to have diamond for the engagement rings.  Apart from diamond, you can go for the colored gemstones. There are beautiful ranges of colored gemstone to choose from purple Tanzanite, Ruby or a Sapphire. Although it’s hard to compare the quality of these gemstones with a diamond, well, you can save money and still have a stunning and beautiful ring.

 One thing you shouldn’t compromise is the quality of the gemstone. You need to ensure that you go for the game stone that is best in quality.

 

5. Suitable Timing to Purchase the Ring

Many people plan their engagements during the festive seasons around November to February.  Although, there is no perfect time to buy these engagement rings, but, you should try and order a ring sizer online for these engagement rings three to two months before the due date.

Timing allows you to have enough time to do research and shop around. In case you’re making a custom made ring you will have enough time to design and come up with the best choice for your lover.

Final Verdict

Engagement rings mean a lot in most people’s lives. However, the ring should not make you to spend all your savings in trying to obtain the best ring from a retailer. Always look for alternatives and have an idea of what triggers you to spend on that specific ring. Well, the more you save on an engagement ring the more resources you create to splurge on your honeymoon.

The best thing about an engagement ring is that you can always upgrade the ring. If you bought something simple you can swap it for a fancy ring for your lovely wife to wear it proudly. Honeymoon comes once in a lifetime! Therefore you need to make it hilarious with a favorable engagement ring which saves some of your bucks to spend during the honeymoon.

The post 5 Ways You Can Save on Your Engagement Ring so You Can Splurge on Your Honeymoon appeared first on urdesignmag.

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In the architecture and design industries, waterproofing is a critical consideration. A leaky roof or other roofing waterproofing issues can lower the value of a home by an average of 5 to 7 percent, according to Allstate Roofing. A wet basement can lower a home value as much as 10 to 25 percent, while taking the time to waterproof a basement can yield a return on investment of 400 percent, says Basement Systems.

Home builders count on architects and designers to help ensure that a building design is waterproof. Unfortunately, some common design errors can compromise the waterproofing of a building even before it gets built. Here are four of the most common waterproofing enclosure design errors, along with some tips on how to avoid them.

Failing to Consult a Waterproofing Expert

One of the most basic and common waterproofing design errors is failing to seek the services of a qualified expert. A registered waterproofing consultant (RWC) is a professional who has been certified by the International Institute of Building Enclosure Consultants, which specializes in waterproofing. RWC consultants have at least four years of experience as a waterproofing consultant and must pass an exam demonstrating detailed knowledge of waterproofing, or must already hold an equivalent certification as a roof or exterior wall consultant. They must also attend continuing education seminars and submit five references for certification approval. An experienced consultant can help you pre-empt potential problems by reviewing your designs and project specifications and providing annotations and sketches identifying issues and solutions.

Misunderstanding Owner Expectations

In addition to consulting a waterproofing design expert, it’s also important to adequately discuss the building owner’s expectations. The term “waterproofing” has a range of meanings and can encompass anything from water resistance to damp proofing to requirements for how often waterproofing must be maintained. A building owner who is not a specialist may not have a clear conception of this range of meanings when they request waterproofing, which can lead to miscommunication and labor and cost issues. The owner may prefer the cheapest waterproofing solution, which may not be adequate for the job; conversely, the builder may prefer the most expensive solution, which may also not be the right solution. It’s important to solicit information from building owners on issues such as how dry they want their basement to be, for instance.

 

Failing to Consider all Products and Options

Another frequent mistake is failing to do due diligence when considering possible products, materials and solutions. Building contractors will tend to recommend the product lines they’re most familiar with, while manufacturer representatives will naturally recommend the solutions sold by their employer. However, this fails to take into account the full range of possible solutions. Taking the time to work with a waterproofing consultant to explore all available solutions can result in a significant better result. For instance, if you’re choosing a gasket seal, it can be worthwhile to review a seal design guide for a deeper understanding of which materials are available and how to select the best one for a particular job.

Overlooking Unusual Design Issues

The best waterproofing designs are the simplest ones, but unusual circumstances can lead to design omissions that fail to take into account unique requirements. For instance, unusual intersections of walls and floors may call for more intricate detailing than a normal project. Similarly, differential pressures or multiple penetrations can require extra attention. When an architectural team encounters an unfamiliar situation that calls for unusual design, it’s especially important to review details carefully with input from a certified expert.

Consulting a registered waterproofing consultant is one of the most fundamental keys to avoiding problems with your design. Getting input from the building owner can help ensure that your design meets their expectations. When selecting products and materials, taking the time to review all available options will help make sure you pick the best solution for the job. When exceptional design issues such as unusual joint intersections arise, extra review is required to avoid potential problems. Following these guidelines will help you design optimal waterproofing solutions that keep your clients satisfied.

The post 4 Common Waterproof Enclosure Design Errors to Avoid appeared first on urdesignmag.

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If you’ve ever walked into your bathroom and thought it looked a little drab, you’re not alone. You try to look up ways to refresh a room in your home, and you often find that it can be expensive, or out of reach for you at this moment. The truth is, you can bring your washroom back to life with a few steps and update fixtures, paint floors, create extra storage or have a creative window, wall, or mirror treatments at an affordable price.

Wallpaper an Accent Wall

Wallpaper is generally pretty expensive, so why don’t you try covering only one wall in your bathroom? Pick the smallest one, preferably one with no windows for easy application. If you can’t afford wallpaper, try taking out a few pages from a book or a magazine and pasting it on the wall. If you already have these books, you’ll only have to put out the cost for adhesive.

Add Candles and Other Accessories

Candles that are lying around the house and not being used could add a lot of style and substance to a dull space. You may be uncomfortable lighting said candles in your bathroom, and if that’s the case invest in some decorative or fake candles. If you have paneling with a ledge, you could add some cute lettering that spell “Bath” that rest as decorative accents to transform your home. My-home-zen-spa.com also provides plenty of creative ideas to create that spa feeling.

Dress your Windows with Shades or Panelling

Not everyone has a window in their bathroom, but if you do, there are a lot of ways to dress these up. If your window rests in your shower, install plantation-style shutters. They provide privacy and block direct sunlight. Vinyl ones are also mold and warp-resistant – which is much needed in a bathroom. If your window isn’t within your shower, you could dress it up with Roman shades with an eye-catching pattern.

 

Painting your Walls and Floors

Painting an accent color underneath a chair rail can add much-needed pop in a white bathroom. Brushing your old boards or tiling with a glossy porch paint to match your color scheme is also another great option. If you’re creative, you could paint a square checkered pattern or circles throughout the floor and ceiling.

Tiling, Tiling, and more Tiling

Buying tiles in bulk can be very cost-effective, especially if you’re planning on doing a small section of your bathroom. Tiling your countertops or adding a stone slab is an easy DIY project. Caulking is also cost-effective! If you’re not too jazzed about tiling your countertop, you could try tiling around your bathroom as a separator between two accent colors on your walls.

Shower Curtains

One of the biggest fixtures in your washroom is the tub and or bathtub. If you’re looking for a low-cost upgrade to your space, adding an interesting or different colored shower curtain can bring a lot of warmth to a cold space. Add interesting looking shower curtain hooks that match the look of your bathroom as well.

The Magic of Mirrors

Mirrors, when used correctly, can make a space feel bigger. Used, vintage mirrors can be found in almost any antique store or garage sale and can be refurbished to look amazing. Or, if you already have a mirror, you could find something to surround it, for example, a Victorian-era cast-iron fireplace frame, tiles, or wood.

 

Pick a Different Colour Palette

Maybe you’re getting bored of seeing the same old colors every time you enter your bathroom. Why not try blue and white, or yellow and white? Why not try something classic or modern? If you do like your color scheme, you could change it up throughout your bathroom. Make your floor the same color as your walls, or your flour the same color as your accessories.

Use Different Lighting

When done right, you can turn your ceiling into the focal point of the washroom. Installing a medallion and a handsome hanging fixture, like a small crystal chandelier or an oval light, can make others draw their eyes up. Just make sure that if you’re installing this yourself to turn off electricity to that part of your house before messing with wires.

Add Storage Throughout the Space

There are a lot of creative ways to add more storage to your bathroom. Add a towel rack, a wall-mounted cabinet, a DIY shelving unit, or carve out a wall niche. If you can’t add any more storage in your bathroom, see if you can add a little nook under your sink or in your shower by adding a hanging shelf off of the showerhead.

The post 10 Ideas To Refresh Your Bathroom appeared first on urdesignmag.

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Syndicate Architects has opened the Garage Screen, a summer cinema located in Gorky Park in Moscow opposite the Museum of Modern Art Garage, designed by Rem Koolhaas and opened in 2015. The design reinterprets the process of watching a movie and offers a new way of experiencing cinema.

The key concept of the pavilion is an ‘open cinema’. The openness means that instead of trying to create a controlled and enclosed environment, devoid of connection with context and distraction from the outside we embrace and modulate the ambient factors. Doing so allows us to avoid creating a space of exclusion in a lively public square. Not only do ambient factors participate in the functioning of the cinema, but the cinema can also spill out onto the square. It adds a performative aspect to the pavilion, ‘to see and to be seen’. Retractable curtains around the cinema hall allow to achieve the complete openness and let visitors of the cinema who watch a movie to also see people on the square while the latter simultaneously observe the former.

 

The challenges presented by ambient conditions are addressed by choosing proper materials, systems, and geometry. Curtains, when raised, allow for complete transparency, yet acoustic properties of velvet greatly improve acoustic quality inside the cinema and when curtains are down a cozy, quiet and secluded space is created, where movie-goers can relax and immerse themselves in the plot.

 

One of the features that allow us to fully enjoy the experience of open cinema in the center of Moscow is the transformable roof, which protects from bad weather and once opened allows viewers to enjoy a movie under the stars. Ultimately the entire geometry of pavilion was computationally optimized in order to create a zone of permanent shade within in the cinema hall.

 

The design was also inspired by the physical processes at the core of the cinema. The shape of the pavilion resembles the diverging beam of light from the projector, and the shell reminds of the processes of reflection and refraction of light on the cinema film. Apart from that, entry titles of Star Wars which go into infinite perspective and the neon palette of Blade Runner set the mood for our design.

 

The pavilion is a temporary structure and also has a goal of attracting and entertaining people. To serve as a radiant landmark it was chosen to use dichroic PVC which changes its color depending on the view angle, time of the day and weather. That means that each visitor sees their own cinema, the image of the pavilion is dynamic. During the day sun caustics from dichroic PVC change surrounding completely with green to yellow reflections. At night the neon sign serves as a lighting source for the whole square and has a purple reflection in OMA museum.

 

Since the pavilion is a temporary structure that is built on the current for a single summer season, environmental responsibility was paramount for the project. The structure can be completely disassembled and either reassembled again elsewhere or materials can be re-used either for new construction (e.g. metal parts) or to produce merchandise for the museum (e.g. PVC and fabric).

The post Syndicate Builds Reflective Pyramid For Garage Screen Cinema In Moscow appeared first on urdesignmag.

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Design brand Menu and Norm Architects have teamed up yet again to bring life to The Audo, a hotel in Copenhagen where cozy, earth-toned guest suites double up as show spaces for new furniture and homeware. The Audo encompasses Menu’s headquarters, along with 10 guest suites that are all dressed with the brand’s range of furniture, lighting and home accessories.

 

At The Audo, Menu’s portfolio of furniture, lighting and accessories will be presented and experienced in new and authentic ways, redefining how we use design, space and, ultimately, how we connect to one another. Headed by former CEO and founder, Bjarne Hansen, and conceived in partnership with Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen of Norm Architects, The Audo is a testimony to the future of design.

 

Creating a renewed sense of belonging shaped by the spirit of collaboration, the new space occupies a building in Copenhagen’s Nordhavn district that dates back to 1918, originally built to house the headquarters of the Russian Trading Co. Ltd. The Neo-Baroque residence features an inspiring mix of original features and thoughtful new accompaniments from an eclectic mix of premium brands—not least Menu’s comprehensive range of furniture, lighting and accessories, together with a curated selection of products from premium global brands.

The name, The Audo, comes from the Latin Ab Uno Disce Omnes, meaning: From one, learn all.

 

“The exterior of the building has historical references to a period of time when buildings in Copenhagen were inspired by Greek and Roman architecture, entering the early dawn of modernism, while the inside was a rational and industrial concrete structure that allowed us to transform the building rather freely. It is always a challenge to refurbish such a building, as the demands of services needed are completely different from the original purpose and period of time in which the building came to be. Working to create a combined showroom, shop, restaurant, office space and boutique hotel required different kinds of circulation, acoustics, ventilation and so on. Fitting all these functions and mechanical services into a historic building of 2500sqm was probably the biggest challenge,”  explains Peter Eland, Architect MAA and Partner of Norm Architects.

 

“The building stands as a holistic house where the visitor will find that all functions are connected throughout the spaces and material palettes,” adds Eland. “Working on the identity of the space and concept, we’ve been drawing on traditional norms of good design in order to connect the refined, modern interiors with the history of the building.” – Peter Eland

The post Menu And Norm Architects Teamed Up To Design A Hotel In Copenhagen That Doubles As A Showroom appeared first on urdesignmag.

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Located in one of the first high-rise buildings in Barcelona, on a busy road at the entrance to the city, this house recently refurbished by Nook Architects conceals something very surprising. Its partitioned interior leads to a luscious apple-green oasis, full of sunlight. However, this outdoor space was all but imperceptible from the apartment itself. Therefore, from the outset of this project, strengthening the visual and spatial connection between these two spaces would be key.

 

The owners were looking for a home for their family of three, in which the common space would be the main focus. With this in mind, it was decided to give the bedrooms and other spaces secondary importance, while ensuring their functional and storage needs were still met. This important step allowed the design team to modify the existing layout and create a wide, open day-time area: an all-in-one living room, dining room and kitchen.

 

This space, fully connected to the outdoor area via the large glass gallery, is where most everyday activities take place. Integrating the mixed gallery space allowed us to create a single area. The gallery would become the main room of the apartment, both in terms of space and functionality, with multiple uses, as a dining room, lounge and laundry area.

 

In addition, the bespoke sofa can be transformed into a bed for guests, or simply a place to read or have a siesta. The bedrooms were downsized to a bare minimum, leaving enough space for the beds and wardrobes. In order to achieve the required storage space, a utility room was included, for general household items, and a dressing room was installed in the bedroom to extend its size.

 

As for the materials used in the project, every effort was made to stick to those used in the original building, emphasizing all its characteristic elements. The original woodwork was recovered and the ceramic vaults and metal beam structures were left exposed. The materials used in this project were limited to those previously present: wood, marble and ceramics. This combination is present throughout the apartment and serves as a common thread that connects all the rooms. The general color scheme used is neutral, so as to enhance the original features. As a result, the wood and terracotta tones of the vaults stand out.

 

This project can be defined by its attention to the recovery of materials and choice of finishes, both of which are loyal to the original concept. The intervention provides the apartment with an optimal level of thermo-acoustic and functional comfort, which will enable the owners to make the most of the everyday moments of their modern lives while enjoying a luscious, verdant oasis in the heart of the city.

The post Renovated Barcelona Apartment Features Vaulted Brick Ceilings And Luscious Apple-Green Oasis appeared first on urdesignmag.

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In the heart of the most vibrant and well-known park in Amsterdam: the Vondelpark, Brouwerij ‘t IJ has adapted a unique monument as its latest taproom. An instantly recognizable former tearoom – Blauwe Theehuis – was carefully redesigned by Studio Modijefsky, who has mastered the tricky art of playing homage to a historic property while keeping it contemporary and fresh.

Those familiar with the Brouwerij ‘t IJ concept will not be surprised by their choice of location. After making quality craft beers since 1985 in a unique space called ‘The Molen’ – an old municipal bath house with the biggest wooden windmill in the Netherlands, the company chose Blauwe Theehuis for their second tasting room.

 

Built in 1937 under the influence of the Nieuwe Bouwen movement, the building resembles a flying saucer which has landed inside the lush greenery of the park. Since Nieuwe Bouwen was the Dutch answer to the architecture of Bauhaus, it is understandable that the teahouse favours functionality, lack of ornament and modern materials. Its geometrical form and raw finishes create a striking effect juxtaposed against mature trees and large ponds.

 

The original bones of the building – steel glass frames, zinc details, granite flooring- all feature strongly in the interior design. The white and blue original colour palette dictated by the monument status of the building remains the same, reused in a more daring way. Classic modernist materials beloved by the Nieuwe Bouwen movement, such as: concrete, glass and steel, are used to create interior elements including the back bar, glass rack, railings and furniture. Collectively, they all form a handsome backdrop for the light modern interventions of warmer brass details, specially sourced furniture and a bronze sculpture made by Studio Molen.

 

The spatial concept of the building is based around the unique, dodecagonal shape of the floorplan, with three sharp-angled entrances placed in each one out of the four corners. On the ground floor the wooden front bar follows the symmetrical lines of the façade, facing all entrances simultaneously, welcoming customers arriving from all directions. Above the bar, a refined textured glass rack with hand painted beer names connects three solid supporting columns, the rack’s subtle steel details come together to create a folding ostrich egg- the iconic symbol of Brouwerij ’t IJ.

 

Behind it all, the irregular, mirror-clad back bar wraps around the core staircase to the upper floor, once again following the geometrical façade, reflecting the surrounding trees and displaying a variety of well- known Brouwerij ‘t IJ’s labels. The border between the dark blue ceiling and the mirror finish of the bar is adorned with round wall lights, bringing this playful detail inside from the outdoor space, emphasising the curved shape of the plan. Altogether, the mixture of original cold and hard finishes is balanced out by warm wood and aged brass accents of the bar, effortlessly forming the dynamic heart of this small space.

 

Upstairs there is a small restaurant room with a rooftop terrace. The space is fully glazed, allowing customers to enjoy panoramic views of the surrounding trees and ponds, turning this tiny venue into a calming green oasis. The bar is made of the materials that appear downstairs, applied in a different way: terrazzo previously used as floor finish forms the bar top, aged zinc plates and blue square tiles clad the bar front. The shape of the bar this time follows the lines of the back wall of the building, giving up more space to the interior.

The dynamic effect is even more noticeable when placed on a perfectly symmetrical, concentric wooden floor, with pattern resembling a spider web. All furniture in this space consists of wooden vintage chairs, custom- made tables and wooden bar stools. The glass rack and mirror accents are repeated from the ground floor. Both inside and outside, the circular shape of the upper terrace is accented by round wall lights, adding a playful merry-go-round feeling which can be observed from far away corners of the park.

 

The small-scale Blauwe Theehuis building is surrounded by an over 1000m2 terrace. All aspects of this enormous space have been designed to foster playfulness, with various seating arrangements creating a versatile environment which can be used throughout all seasons. Custom-made windscreens and striped parasols in various shades of blue keep customers protected from the elements, while petanque courts allow them to spend endless hours playing with friends. For those who prefer to be closer to nature, there are custom seats wrapped around trees, as well as high tables placed underneath low tree branches – both with spherical luminaires fixed above using bespoke steel structures. Long lines of string lights are mounted around custom made blue poles, referencing the original structural elements holding up the teahouse’s upper terrace. Altogether, a multitude of lighting types links up this large outdoor space, creating a cosy amusement park vibe.

 

The new owner of the Blauwe Theehuis is referenced throughout both inside and outside spaces, while keeping the building monumental. The 3-dimensional logo of an ostrich egg appears in various shapes as a bar detail, with a special bronze sculpture made by Frederik Molenschot proudly displayed on the bar top downstairs. This spectacular piece of art – a heavy replica of the Blauwe Theehuis supporting a large ostrich egg placed on top of it – is an homage to both the architecture of the building and the famous microbrewery.

 

To enforce the unique character of the location, Studio Modijefsky also sourced a special type of outdoor steel chair and lounger, never before used in Amsterdam. The monumental inky shade of blue, so characteristic for Blauwe Theehuis is combined with a small, white Brouwerij ‘t IJ logo of an ostrich, forming a new identity reminiscent of Parisian parks.

This unique venue will be your new favourite location for enjoying drinks or a game of petanque on hot summer nights. Studio Modijefsky once again breathed new life into a long-lasting Amsterdam’s monument – the contemporary design maintains the buildings iconic status, yet the final sophisticated result is far more seductive than its predecessor.

The post Studio Modijefsky Transforms Amsterdam Tearoom Into Brouwerij ‘t IJ’s Latest Taproom appeared first on urdesignmag.

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In this seaside house recently refurbished by French firm Martins Afonso, the living space reveals itself through a varied range of sequences and views changing with seasons and the passing of time. This project comes to life when these moments are captured, where each new architectural fragment enters and dances in its context.

Rooted in the seaside and surrounded by a beautiful garden north of “Île de Ré”, France, this house opens up on every side and multiply perspectives. With a strong background, the challenge of the renovation was to create a new living environment, based on the previous one, and bring it a warm atmosphere.

 

The owners wished to renovate the house in order to make it more adapted to their lifestyle, more comfortable and above all in accordance with their tastes. The renovation is based on a reflection of the inside and a redefinition of the openings to the outside.

Interior accommodations have been carefully thought in order to create new links between rooms, but also to establish new relations with the outside. It is about realizing sequencing work defined and highlighted by the execution of solid wood. This material established a common denominator within each room of the house.

 

The central area is here to connect two living rooms and a dining room/kitchen, through a solid oak strip, in which we can find the doors and storage units. This central space also helps to create the sequences and framings, which highlight the exterior context while succeeding to bring it indoor.

From these areas, we can take a minute to appreciate the very warm surrounding, inviting us to rest. Many details can be found in these spaces, whether it is by the choice of materials such as terracotta, or by the minute work on the solid oak, such as the making of hidden doors, and all the shadow gaps allowing for a finer dialogue with the existing space.

Everything was conceived in details so that each architectural element finds its way and where each sequencing and framing is both highlighting what previously existed and also gives it the stamp of united togetherness.

 

The post Martins Afonso Looks To Outdoors To Redesign A Seaside House On Ré Island In France appeared first on urdesignmag.

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In the heart of the most vibrant and well-known park in Amsterdam: the Vondelpark, Brouwerij ‘t IJ has adapted a unique monument as its latest taproom. An instantly recognizable former tearoom – Blauwe Theehuis – was carefully redesigned by Studio Modijefsky, who has mastered the tricky art of playing homage to a historic property while keeping it contemporary and fresh.

Those familiar with the Brouwerij ‘t IJ concept will not be surprised by their choice of location. After making quality craft beers since 1985 in a unique space called ‘The Molen’ – an old municipal bath house with the biggest wooden windmill in the Netherlands, the company chose Blauwe Theehuis for their second tasting room.

 

Built in 1937 under the influence of the Nieuwe Bouwen movement, the building resembles a flying saucer which has landed inside the lush greenery of the park. Since Nieuwe Bouwen was the Dutch answer to the architecture of Bauhaus, it is understandable that the teahouse favours functionality, lack of ornament and modern materials. Its geometrical form and raw finishes create a striking effect juxtaposed against mature trees and large ponds.

 

The original bones of the building – steel glass frames, zinc details, granite flooring- all feature strongly in the interior design. The white and blue original colour palette dictated by the monument status of the building remains the same, reused in a more daring way. Classic modernist materials beloved by the Nieuwe Bouwen movement, such as: concrete, glass and steel, are used to create interior elements including the back bar, glass rack, railings and furniture. Collectively, they all form a handsome backdrop for the light modern interventions of warmer brass details, specially sourced furniture and a bronze sculpture made by Studio Molen.

 

The spatial concept of the building is based around the unique, dodecagonal shape of the floorplan, with three sharp-angled entrances placed in each one out of the four corners. On the ground floor the wooden front bar follows the symmetrical lines of the façade, facing all entrances simultaneously, welcoming customers arriving from all directions. Above the bar, a refined textured glass rack with hand painted beer names connects three solid supporting columns, the rack’s subtle steel details come together to create a folding ostrich egg- the iconic symbol of Brouwerij ’t IJ.

 

Behind it all, the irregular, mirror-clad back bar wraps around the core staircase to the upper floor, once again following the geometrical façade, reflecting the surrounding trees and displaying a variety of well- known Brouwerij ‘t IJ’s labels. The border between the dark blue ceiling and the mirror finish of the bar is adorned with round wall lights, bringing this playful detail inside from the outdoor space, emphasising the curved shape of the plan. Altogether, the mixture of original cold and hard finishes is balanced out by warm wood and aged brass accents of the bar, effortlessly forming the dynamic heart of this small space.

 

Upstairs there is a small restaurant room with a rooftop terrace. The space is fully glazed, allowing customers to enjoy panoramic views of the surrounding trees and ponds, turning this tiny venue into a calming green oasis. The bar is made of the materials that appear downstairs, applied in a different way: terrazzo previously used as floor finish forms the bar top, aged zinc plates and blue square tiles clad the bar front. The shape of the bar this time follows the lines of the back wall of the building, giving up more space to the interior.

The dynamic effect is even more noticeable when placed on a perfectly symmetrical, concentric wooden floor, with pattern resembling a spider web. All furniture in this space consists of wooden vintage chairs, custom- made tables and wooden bar stools. The glass rack and mirror accents are repeated from the ground floor. Both inside and outside, the circular shape of the upper terrace is accented by round wall lights, adding a playful merry-go-round feeling which can be observed from far away corners of the park.

 

The small-scale Blauwe Theehuis building is surrounded by an over 1000m2 terrace. All aspects of this enormous space have been designed to foster playfulness, with various seating arrangements creating a versatile environment which can be used throughout all seasons. Custom-made windscreens and striped parasols in various shades of blue keep customers protected from the elements, while petanque courts allow them to spend endless hours playing with friends. For those who prefer to be closer to nature, there are custom seats wrapped around trees, as well as high tables placed underneath low tree branches – both with spherical luminaires fixed above using bespoke steel structures. Long lines of string lights are mounted around custom made blue poles, referencing the original structural elements holding up the teahouse’s upper terrace. Altogether, a multitude of lighting types links up this large outdoor space, creating a cosy amusement park vibe.

 

The new owner of the Blauwe Theehuis is referenced throughout both inside and outside spaces, while keeping the building monumental. The 3-dimensional logo of an ostrich egg appears in various shapes as a bar detail, with a special bronze sculpture made by Frederik Molenschot proudly displayed on the bar top downstairs. This spectacular piece of art – a heavy replica of the Blauwe Theehuis supporting a large ostrich egg placed on top of it – is an homage to both the architecture of the building and the famous microbrewery.

 

To enforce the unique character of the location, Studio Modijefsky also sourced a special type of outdoor steel chair and lounger, never before used in Amsterdam. The monumental inky shade of blue, so characteristic for Blauwe Theehuis is combined with a small, white Brouwerij ‘t IJ logo of an ostrich, forming a new identity reminiscent of Parisian parks.

This unique venue will be your new favourite location for enjoying drinks or a game of petanque on hot summer nights. Studio Modijefsky once again breathed new life into a long-lasting Amsterdam’s monument – the contemporary design maintains the buildings iconic status, yet the final sophisticated result is far more seductive than its predecessor.

The post Studio Modijefsky Transforms Amsterdam Tearoom Into Brouwerij ‘t IJ’s Latest Taproom appeared first on urdesignmag.

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