Loading...

Follow Urban Organic Gardener | Urban Gardening on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Try growing these 38 beautiful edible flowers in your yard or garden. Not only will you help provide nectar for friendly pollinators in your garden, but you’ll have fragrant, and delicious blooms that you can enjoy adding to your favorite culinary dishes. They look great, and taste great, too!

Follow these tips for eating flowers safely: via TreeHugger.com

  • Eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants.
  • Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
  • Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
  • Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
  • If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
  • To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.

Uses in your kitchen: via OneMillionWomen.com.au

  • Salads
  • Garnishes
  • Rice-paper rolls
  • Cake decorating
  • Freezing in ice-cubes
  • Crepes
  • Teas, tissanes, wines, cordials
  • Jams, tarts and deserts
  • Vinegars and dressings
  • In the dough of fresh pasta
  • Stuffing, baking and tempura
SHOP THESE SEEDS and MORE!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Wayne Riedel gives us a tour of Darien's urban garden - YouTube
“Fore!

Ok, maybe a few more than four. Closer to 2,000.

But the golf clubs used by Wayne Riedel and Eric Joosten in Darien’s urban garden on Old King’s Highway aren’t for any golf game.

The pair has recycled thousands of golf clubs to use for stakes in their expansive garden now more than five years strong. They cut the ends off with a pair of cutters.”

Darien's Urban Garden - YouTube
“Genovese and Baywater acquired the land in 2007 along with other downtown properties and decided to let Joosten and Riedel use it since there were no immediate plans for it.
It continues to grow in size and popularity. Joosten named more than 10 breeds of tomatoes of all colors and sizes expected to come in — from heirlooms to cherries to grapes to yellows”

Read the FULL ARTICLE at: “DarienTimes.com”

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It’s official. As tragically revealing as the move might be, the rusty-patched bumble bee has now joined the grizzly bear, gray wolf, northern spotted owl, and some 700 others on the endangered species list — the first bee ever to garner those protections in the continental United States.

Once abundant in the grasslands and prairies in 31 states in the East and Midwest, the rusty-patched bumble bee’s population has been decimated by as much as 95 percent by some estimates, and now exists only in isolated pockets in 12 states and the province of Ontario, Canada.

“There are a few little spots where we know they are,” James Strange, a research entomologist and bumble bee ecologist with the USDA, told Forbes.”

READ THE FULL STORY: “MindFoster.co

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“DETROIT (WXYZ) – As urban gardening grows in popularity more and more people are trying their hand at a green thumb. However, those new to urban gardening should be aware of the threats caused by soil with contaminants and the need to test.

“In this situation, ignorance is not bliss,” said Michigan Urban Farm Initiative’s B.J. Franovic. “You should test your soil, you should figure all of that out.”

Franovic stressed the need to test your soil, but also noted it’s not a death sentence if you find high levels of lead or other toxic materials in your soil. The EPA offers similar advice online stating, “the possibility of contamination at a garden site should not keep you from planning an urban garden,” but it does require special attention.”

Read the FULL STORY at: “WXYZ.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“Last summer, Paul Maeillo had to clear a vacant lot in North Philadelphia, and he wasn’t happy about it. He’d done it plenty of times before, as part of the Philadelphia Horticultural Society’s LandCare program, which hires local contractors to maintain the neighborhood’s many abandoned parcels. But on this day the lot was full of wildflowers — and wildlife. In fact, it wasn’t vacant at all. He saw snakes and mice and many, many bees, gathering nectar and pollen from the untamed flora. “Just teeming,” Maeillo remembers. “It was kind of wild.”

The lot was an eyesore to humans, and a feast for pollinators. Maeillo didn’t have much of a choice: he mowed it down. But he left a small wild patch in the center. “It seemed not right to take away all their resources,” he says.”

Read the FULL Story at: NextCity.org

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

CreditJason Henry for The New York Times

CreditJason Henry for The New York Times

OAKLAND, Calif. — Even by the standards of the Bay Area, where sourcing local, organic chicken feed is seen as something of a political act, the spectacle of 30,000 fruit and nut trees being tended by formerly incarcerated orchardists is novel.

The green thumbs are there because of Planting Justice, a nine-year-old nonprofit that combines urban farming with environmental education and jobs for ex-offenders. From its headquarters in a pair of salvaged shipping containers on a dead-end street in East Oakland, Calif., Planting Justice has forged a trail in which revenue-generating businesses help subsidize the group’s core mission: hiring former inmates, many from nearby San Quentin State Prison, and giving them a “family sustaining” wage, along with health benefits and a month of paid leave annually. About half the total staff of 30 have served time in prison.”

Read the FULL ARTICLE at The New York Times

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“It feels good, putting the seed down. Watching it grow. Watching it produce fruit. It’s a beautiful thing,” said Darian Belton, owner of T&T Plant-ery.

Belton has a full-time job at a car rental place, but what really drives him, is creating a sustainable food source; especially for those who can’t do it themselves.

“We want to inspire more people to grow their own food. Put seeds in the dirt and grow your fresh organic produce,” said Belton.

“We want to give people the opportunity to do it themselves. Learn how to be more self-dependent. Growing their own food in the backyard,” said Jordan Dunn, Belton’s partner in the Urban Garden Project.

Read the FULL Article at:KWQC.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Mosquitoes can quickly ruin the enjoyment of your outdoor garden experience. Ordinary repellents are full of nasty chemicals that you probably don’t want to put onto your family, and bug zappers are annoying. It also can be debated, how effective candles or incense really is.The threat of contracting a disease from a mosquito is very real. Not only are humans being infected with dangerous illnesses, so are animals including household pets. Over one million people are said to die each year from contracting diseases from mosquitoes. In the US, the most common disease is West Nile, but they also carry diseases like malaria, dengue fever, dog heartworm, chikungunya and the recent Zika Virus, which is responsible for outbreaks in tropical areas throughout the world and was found in 2015 for the first time in the Western Hemisphere. More can be learned about the Zika Virus, here.
To help keep mosquitoes from using your yard as a breeding ground, make sure you eliminate all standing water, trim back un-needed vegetation, and consider planting these mosquito repelling plants.
1. Basil
In addition to repelling mosquitoes, it’s also quite an attractive plant to grow.

2. Catmint
While the catmint plant does repel mosquitoes that are close, you can try adding crushed leaves or oil for even stronger protection. Watch out though, if you own cats they will probably respond to you the same way they respond to the plant itself. If you’re a cat owner, you might want to try other natural ways to deter mosquitoes.

3. Garlic
“If you have a high allicin (garlic’s active anti-microbial ingredient) blood count, mosquitoes will refuse to engage with your blood. If you are infected, garlic can eliminate the virus because it is a proven anti-microbial, killing both viruses and bacteria. According to the good people of zhealthinfo.com, a friend of theirs had lost a couple of horses to WNV.”  -source “NaturalNews.com
Lavender repels mosquitoes because mosquitoes dislike the scent of the lavender plant.
For an easy homemade repellent, crush lemon balm leaves and then rub them onto your skin. Keep the plants growing near doorways where the leaves will be readily available when you need them.
Mosquitoes do not care for the fragrance of lemon grass. Grow these attractive “grasses” near walkways and near seating areas to deter them. 
The leaves and their extracted juices will help to repel mosquitoes from feeding on you.
“Potted marigolds can be positioned near entrances to your home and any common mosquito entry points, such as open windows. The smell may deter mosquitoes from going past this barrier. While marigolds can be used as border plants around the patio, we do not advise putting marigolds on the patio table since the bright blooms may attract wasps.

Besides repelling mosquitoes, marigolds repel insects which prey on tomato plants, so you may want to plant a few marigolds in your tomato bed for added protection.” -source “Learn.EarthEasy.com

“Crushed pennyroyal stems stuck in your hat and pockets really will repel gnats and mosquitoes. Dog owners often see their dogs rolling in pennyroyal patches, and dog instincts can usually be trusted.” -sourceMotherEarthNews.com

10. Rosemary
A Recipe for a Simple Rosemary Mosquito Repellent:
“A simple repellent spray is made by adding 1 cup dried rosemary to a quart of water, boiling it in a pot for 20 to 30 minutes. Pour a quart of cool water into another container (that holds at least half a gallon), then strain the rosemary water into the container. Pour small amounts of the blend into squirt bottles to apply directly to skin and outdoor pets. Store the unused portions in the refrigerator; discard it when it no longer smells strongly of rosemary.” – source “HomeGuides.SFGate.com
 
11. Tansy
Tansy is a strong herb, beautiful & yet suitable for growing around doorways to act as an mosquito deterrent.
 
Wormwood can make a lovely, unique border and the strong odor does a good job of keeping mosquitoes at bay. Note: Do not rub on skin.
 
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Try growing these 38 beautiful edible flowers in your yard or garden. Not only will you help provide nectar for friendly pollinators in your garden, but you’ll have fragrant, and delicious blooms that you can enjoy adding to your favorite culinary dishes. They look great, and taste great, too!

Follow these tips for eating flowers safely: via TreeHugger.com

  • Eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants.
  • Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
  • Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
  • Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
  • If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
  • To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.

Uses in your kitchen: via OneMillionWomen.com.au

  • Salads
  • Garnishes
  • Rice-paper rolls
  • Cake decorating
  • Freezing in ice-cubes
  • Crepes
  • Teas, tissanes, wines, cordials
  • Jams, tarts and deserts
  • Vinegars and dressings
  • In the dough of fresh pasta
  • Stuffing, baking and tempura
SHOP THESE SEEDS and MORE!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Wayne Riedel gives us a tour of Darien's urban garden - YouTube
“Fore!

Ok, maybe a few more than four. Closer to 2,000.

But the golf clubs used by Wayne Riedel and Eric Joosten in Darien’s urban garden on Old King’s Highway aren’t for any golf game.

The pair has recycled thousands of golf clubs to use for stakes in their expansive garden now more than five years strong. They cut the ends off with a pair of cutters.”

Darien's Urban Garden - YouTube
“Genovese and Baywater acquired the land in 2007 along with other downtown properties and decided to let Joosten and Riedel use it since there were no immediate plans for it.
It continues to grow in size and popularity. Joosten named more than 10 breeds of tomatoes of all colors and sizes expected to come in — from heirlooms to cherries to grapes to yellows”

Read the FULL ARTICLE at: “DarienTimes.com”

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview