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Toshi Omigari’s definitive survey of ’70s, ’80s, and early ’90s arcade video game pixel typography. Arcade Game Typography presents readers with a fascinating new world of typography: the pixel typeface. Video game designers of the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s faced color and resolution limitations that stimulated incredible creativity. With each letter having to exist in a small pixel grid, artists began to use clever techniques to create elegant character sets within a tiny canvas.

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Commercial Classics, like Commercial Type, is a joint venture between Paul Barnes and Christian Schwartz, whose “intention is for these historical forms to escape the past and come to life again.” The classics draw heavily from resources in the St Bride collection, and for each purchase the foundry will make a donation to help support the library.

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Physically, we use our voice, facial expressions. gestures and posture to convey a wide range of emotional cues from the subtle to the dramatic. Typefaces and the way they are used provide a similarly extensive emotional range typographically.

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Typograph.Her - Blog by Nicole Phillips - 4d ago

The latest edition of Jen Farrell (aka Starshaped press)’s weekend Printer encourages us all not to be complacent with arbitrary values (& trying to speed up an inherently slow process). “I know it’s fun to throw a bunch of big, juicy wood type on a Vandercook, slap some magnets down and go to town with it. I am often asked how I turn out a lot of work in a short period of time and it’s because I DON’T do that. What seems like the fast way is anything but, and if you want to learn a few tips to do it right, read on.”

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Fontself partnered with Francis Chouquet and Daniel Hosoya to bring you super-packed creative advice to help you up-your type craftsmanship. They synthesized their top recommendations & illustrated them as part of two new articles on the fontself blog: The first entitled ‘How to draw better letters for your fonts’ and the second builds on this wisdom with tips for consistency in ‘How to design a typeface system‘. (Use these tips to develop your own typeface with Fontself like I did here)

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“Anxiety, stress, depression, loneliness and isolation – we're all at risk of suffering from these common afflictions. The more we talk about it, the more we expel any taboos on mental health and the better we all are,” this article is a must read!

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Typograph.Her - Blog by Nicole Phillips - 1w ago

Hightype is a type foundry strictly for three-dimensions, founded by Manuel Rossner in Berlin last month. At the moment, its two main purposes consist of lowpoly-models for games and websites as well as smoother versions for print and video. Manuel tells It’s Nice That: “Its possible applications are promising, ranging from VR typography games to augmented reality to interactive websites and high-resolution brand imagery.”

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Love it or hate it if you have an opinion on comic sans (or have ever worn crocs to a wedding) this medium article is a lesson in context and appropriateness for you. “if you love Comic Sans, you don’t know anything about typography. But if you hate Comic Sans, then you don’t know anything about typography either…and you should get another hobby”.

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“Our mission is to develop typefaces that push ourselves, and that push boundaries,” says Simon Bent of Melbourne-based type foundry Metis. From the heavy Dot19 to shape-tastic Geometer Regular, Metis’ typefaces blur the lines between creative expression and practicality. “You have to be creative with how you apply some of them in practice because of how far we push the limits of legibility, but that’s something we can live with,” Simon tells It’s Nice That.

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