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This January I received $350.94, compared with $156.89 in January 2017. This is an increase of 124%. I also maxed out my Roth IRA this month. In an upcoming post I’ll be talking about the investments that I made with that money.

Options: See my options trading page for further details.

Symbol Dividend Amount
AMH $10.00
BAX $5.21
CSCO $34.49
CY $28.12
DIS $42.12
GE $180.84
O $12.44

Total option income for January 2018: $0.00
Total cumulative option income for 2018: $0.00

Total dividends for January 2018: $350.94
Total cumulative dividend income for 2018: $350.94
Forward 12-Month Dividends: $9,619.51

Full disclosure: Long all the above stocks

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Statistics
Beginning 2017 Account Value: $242,093.83
Ending 2017 Account Value: $429,504.78

Dividend income in 2017: $7,614.25
Forward 12-month dividends: $9,565.88
Options income in 2017: $779.86
Total lifetime dividend income: $20,046.17

Post-tax salary: $219,438

Effect of dividend increases: $570.58. This is equivalent to investing just over $19,000 at a 3% yield.

Goals for 2017:

1) Retirement Accounts – PASS
An easy pass. I maxed out my traditional IRA in early January and then converted to a Roth in late January.

2) Receive $7000 a year in dividends – PASS
I was thinking this was going to be a stretch goal, but ended up getting it without too much problem. My portfolio brought in just over $7600 in 2017.

3) Get $3000 this year in options income. – FAIL
I got distracted with work and with life and wasn’t able to devote the time or resources to meet this goal. I only brought in $780 in option income in 2017. Still better than nothing. I will be discussing my options investing in the not-too-distant future. Briefly, I have also started investing in long term puts…profits (or losses) from that may happen in 2018, the first of the puts expires in January 2019.

4) Improve Two Investing layout and content – PASS
My brother did an excellent job helping us with the new logo. I especially like how it scales for mobile use. I’ve also used the same “Two” symbol for my gravatar icon. I think I also wrote a post per month on average. There were some months where I wrote more and some less. A lot of this depends on the schedule of my day job (I’m a radiologist).

In fact, while I love the fact that more and more people seem to be using and enjoying the spreadsheets, keeping the spreadsheets up-to-date has been a challenge giving the issues that spring up when thousands of people are using them. I’m so glad that I decided not to charge for it. Sure, I could have made a lot by charging a bit for it, but that would have also obligated me to provide more timely support, which I just can’t do right now.

5) Invest at least $10,000 in smaller cap growth companies – PASS
I invested approximately $25,600 in non-dividend paying growth stocks. I’ll do a post of this soon, but the majority have been good winners for me. The best ultimate investment is the one that has the highest overall gains, be that from capital gains and/or dividends. Since I don’t rely on the dividend income to pay expenses at this point in my life, the best stocks to be in are the ones that will perform the best. Once I get to retirement, then I can always sell these stocks that have a lot of capital gains and invest in income generators at that point.

I think I did pretty well with these goals. I’ll have to write my 2018 goals soon. I can’t believe that it is already February! I also apologize for not dedicating enough time to respond to everyone else’s blog…that will be one of my 2018 goals.

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While not the most exciting of titles, I did just release version 5.1 of the dividend portfolio spreadsheet. Since the loss of the Yahoo Finance API, I had to switch to a combination of IEX and Alpha Vantage to look up stocks.

While I’m still trying to figure out all the exchanges that Alpha Vantage supports, it does appear to have some international support. (I’m going to be compiling an FAQ with a list of the known ones.)

Quite a few people have asked when I’ll be updating the international version of the spreadsheet to support the Alpha Vantage API. I could still do that if desired, but thought it would be easier to just support a single version of the spreadsheet. So, I’ve merged the currency conversion features of the international version into the dividend portfolio spreadsheet.

In cell E4 you’ll choose the currency you want the Totals converted to. In the example above, I picked US Dollars. The calculated market value of all the stocks will be converted into whatever currency you choose. If you don’t desire for any currency conversions, then just pick US Dollars in column E. The spreadsheet should otherwise work as it has always.

Know issues:
1) The Dividend Calendar and Summary page’s dividend tables default to US Dollars. I’m working on a way to remedy this, but it is not yet ready.

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Total dividend income for December 2017 was $1278.18. This is up 62.7% over the dividend income received in 2016! I had three months this year where I broke over $1000. December’s dividends also bring me up to just over $20,000 in lifetime dividends received (since 2011).

I’ll be coming out soon with my 2017 recap.

Options: See my options page for further details.

Symbol Dividend Amount
MGMXF $1.95
ADM $19.68
AFL $29.09
AMGN $103.39
AVA $61.12
BAC $49.13
BMS $16.58
BP $46.66
CVX $30.51
DBD $27.07
EMR $52.03
GILD $91.99
HRS $30.47
HSY $20.52
IBM $104.40
JNJ $127.03
KR $31.57
KO $35.09
NAVI $115.29
O $12.37
PGX $0.98
TGT $126.11
TROW $11.12
UL $6.75
V $25.46
WFC $35.82

Total dividends for December 2017: $1278.18
Total cumulative dividend income for 2017: $7,614.25

Forward 12-Month Dividends: $9,565.88
Hourly wage based on 40 hour work week (2087 hrs): $4.58/hour
Hourly wage based on non-stop work (8760 hrs): $1.09/hour

Total option income for December 2017: $0.00
Total cumulative option income for 2017: $779.86

Full disclosure: Long all the above stocks

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Here’s my November 2017 dividend income report. Better late then never. I have actually been away from the computer (and work) the last 12 days traveling with my girlfriend. As such I’ve been slow to update my blog, respond to comments, or comment on the blogs of others. I hope to use the evenings of the next few days to accomplish all of these.

I received $491.83 in dividends for November 2017. This is a 75% increase from last November. My cumulative annual dividends are also nearly $1500 higher than what I received all of last year. The major reason for the year-over-year increase this month has been due to continuing purchasing of AT&T, which pays greater than a 5% dividend.

Options: See my options tracker for more details.

Symbol Dividend Amount
AAPL $139.72
BMY $27.68
CAT $42.90
KKR $26.53
O $12.32
PGX $0.84
RY $37.94
T $203.90

Total dividends for November 2017: $491.83
Total cumulative dividend income for 2017: $6,336.07

Forward 12-Month Dividends: $9,342.06
Hourly wage based on 40 hour work week (2087 hrs): $4.48/hour
Hourly wage based on non-stop work (8760 hrs): $1.07/hour

Total option income for November 2017: $0.00
Total cumulative option income for 2017: $779.86

Full disclosure: Long all the above stocks

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As I’m sure all of you are aware, General Electric just announced some restructuring and a 50% dividend cut that has not enthused too many investors. Investors nowadays like to see immediate results. A couple of year delay to see the restructuring play out doesn’t sit well with those of us that want our Amazon delivery shipped to our door in a couple hours.

Prior to the dividend cut, GE was paying me $1206.71 per year. The dividend cut brought that down to $603.35. GE stock price has also been the worst performer in the Dow Jones over the last year. It dropped even further with Flannery’s announcement.

Rather than sell, which seems to be the mantra with many hardcore dividend only investors, I recently picked up some more shares.

On November 14th I bought an additional 150 shares at 18.082 and on November 16th purchased 100 more shares at 18.2256. Altogether, these purchases totaled $4545 and added $120 in annual dividends.

I’m now bringing in $723.35/year in dividends with GE’s new rate. Not too bad. Once I get paid this month I may even look to purchase more.

Did you guys more GE as well? Are you waiting for some more catalysts first? Or, does the dividend cut (second since 2008), completely remove GE from your investment criteria?

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For those of you that make use of the Yahoo Finance API, I’m sure you are all aware of the recent shutdown.

I have found a solution which completely replaces Yahoo Finance and provides all of the same functionality plus gives room for a ton of expansion in the future. I’ve switched over to using the free data available at IEX. If you are a user of my free dividend tracking spreadsheet on Google Sheets, this IEX integration is included in the latest version.

Here’s how to start using it yourself:

Step 1

IEX provides JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) data. I was initially scratching my head trying to integrate this raw data into the spreadsheet.  I was fortunate to find someone that had already done the hard work. The function is called IMPORTJSON. This takes a JSON feed and imports it into the spreadsheet. Watch the video on how to use it. The code is available here and is also included in my dividend tracking spreadsheet.

IMPORTJSON Function - Google Sheets Tutorial - How to Import JSON feed to Spreadsheets - YouTube

Step 2

After copying the IMPORTJSON code into your script editor, here’s how you use it:

Latest stock price: =IMPORTJSON("https://api.iextrading.com/1.0/stock/AAPL/quote","latestPrice")

Dividend amount:
=IMPORTJSON("https://api.iextrading.com/1.0/stock/AAPL/stats?filter=dividendRate","dividendRate")

Dividend pay date:
=IMPORTJSON("https://api.iextrading.com/1.0/stock/AAPL/dividends/3m","0/paymentDate")

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October brought in $491.47 in dividends. This is a massive increase of nearly 175% increase over the $179 that I earned in dividends last October. This increase is largely due to significant investments into GE over the past year. I will continue to accumulate GE at these depressed levels. The risk is that they might have to cut their dividend if they drop any lower. If they do, I’ll just purchase more.

Cumulative dividends for the year are $5843.36, up $1000 from what I received in all of 2016.

Options: I don’t have any options currently open. For more information, please visit my Option’s Page.

I also made some purchases of GE, NAVI, and T over the past month. I’ll be writing about those purchases soon. Needless to say, these purchases bring my forward 12-months dividends to over $9700. I’m quickly approaching the $10k milestone. I’ll hopefully reach this in the next month or two.

And, in case you missed it, I also released a large update to my dividend stock tracking spreadsheet. It fixes the loading errors with Yahoo Finance.

Symbol Dividend Amount
BAX $5.20
CSCO $34.20
CY $27.93
DEO $130.51
GE $227.13
KO $34.81
O $12.28
PGX $0.88
SHPG $0.61
SOUHY $17.92

Total dividends for October 2017: $491.47
Total cumulative dividend income for 2017: $5,843.36

Forward 12-Month Dividends: $9,739.40
Hourly wage based on 40 hour work week (2087 hrs): $4.67/hour
Hourly wage based on non-stop work (8760 hrs): $1.11/hour

Total option income for October 2017: $0.00
Total cumulative option income for 2017: $779.86

Full disclosure: Long all the above stocks

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Over about the past week I’ve been working on a few big updates to my dividend stock tracking spreadsheet. It is now up to version 5. It is more automated and faster than ever. No more waiting for N/A’s or Loading…

Update #1

The major feature of this update is that it uses javascript as part of the Google Script editor to provide the lookup features to retrieve a stock’s last price, dividend amount, ex-dividend date, essentially anything that is available on the Yahoo Finance API.

I used the amazing resources available on Kyith’s website, Investment Moats, to learn how to do this.

To add these features to your own spreadsheet, add these functions to your script editor within your Google Sheets spreadsheet (Tools > Script editor). You can also grab a copy of my latest spreadsheet and start using it yourself. If you are a current user of an older version of my spreadsheet, getting started with the new version is as simple as copying the stock name and symbols from the Portfolio sheet and copying over the Transaction data.

Here are the javascript functions that I used to grab the latest Yahoo Finance data:

function getYahooLastPrice(symbol) {
var value = UrlFetchApp.fetch("https://download.finance.yahoo.com/d/quotes.csv?s=" + symbol + '&f=l1&p=.csv').getContentText();
return parseFloat(value);
}

function getYahooDiv(symbol) {
var value = UrlFetchApp.fetch("https://download.finance.yahoo.com/d/quotes.csv?s=" + symbol + '&f=d&p=.csv').getContentText();
return parseFloat(value);
}

You then use these functions similar to how you would use the googlefinance() function.

If anyone has questions about implementing this feature into through spreadsheet, please let me know in the comments below and I’ll try to help.

Update #2

I also completely revamped my page explaining how to set up your own dividend portfolio spreadsheet. I was getting a lot of the same questions. This should provide a great walk through on the best way to get started.

Click here to read about the new and improved Dividend Stock Portfolio Spreadsheet for Google Sheets
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Welcome! Thanks for wanting to learn more about my Dividend Stock Portfolio Tracker on Google Sheets.

Advantages:

  1. Simple and easy to use
  2. Lives on Google Sheets, allowing your portfolio to be saved automatically and available on any of your devices
  3. Majority of functions are automated
  4. Includes a transaction sheet to record stock purchases, sales, dividends, and splits.
  5. Automatically looks up stock information including latest price, dividend amount, and dividend pay dates from Yahoo Finance. It uses the scripting language available on Sheets for the lookups so the Yahoo Finance calls actually work (for now!). No more waiting for “Loading…”
  6. Dividend focused with information dense Summary Page and Dividend Calendar showing your yearly dividend history as well as the next dividend pay date. Both these pages are automatically filled in for you.
  7. Under active development (as my time permits!). First version released way back in 2013.

Cons:

  1. Google Sheets only. This is both a pro and a con. If Google Sheets is down or Yahoo Finance is no longer working, the sheet will lose some of its automation. Also, the spreadsheet uses Google Sheets-specific functions and will not work in Microsoft Excel.
  2. If things break and you aren’t good at using Google Sheets, you’ll require me to fix things. I try to stay on top of this but my job (I’m a doctor) does limit my time.
Click here to access the Dividend Stock Portfolio Spreadsheet

151xbHsMKpNBtHPb1tsacGWzoaCKYG9QH6   

The spreadsheet is free and will always be available for free. However, if you find this spreadsheet useful, please consider donating to support my coffee fund and hosting costs. Thanks!

Step 1a: Get the spreadsheet

Before you can begin editing the spreadsheet and adding your own accounts, you have to make a copy of it for yourself. After clicking on the link above choose File and then either “Make a copy…” or “Add to My Drive”. You will not be able to add your own stocks to the spreadsheet until you do this.

Step 1b: Authorize the Google Script

This spreadsheet uses the Google scripting language to refresh the latest price and dividend information from Yahoo Finance. I’ve found that using the standard =importhtml and/or =importxml codes are limited in a few ways. There’s a finite number that can be used per spreadsheet and they are frustratingly slow. Don’t you hate getting the “Loading…” notification in the cells trying to look up your stock price or dividend amount? The script that is attached to this spreadsheet should fix those issues.

  1. Go Tools > Script Editor
  2. Get authorization for your spreadsheet to use the script
  3. Click on the drop down and select getYahooLastPrice
  4. Click on the Run button

You will then be prompted that “Authorization is required.” This allows the script to edit your spreadsheet and retrieve data from Yahoo Finance.

Click Review Permissions and then Allow on the next screen. Depending on your browser, you may get a warning that looks like this:

Click Go to PortfolioTracker (unsafe) to continue. (The script does nothing else but allow Yahoo Finance data on your stocks to be updated.)

Step 2: Learn the basics

Orange-ish cells – These are the cells that you will be editing.

Light green cells – These contain formulas and are automatically calculated by the spreadsheet. If you enter data into these cells you are overwriting formulas. Edit these cells only at your own risk.

Red and dark green cells – These are a subset of the light green cells and reflect losses and gains.

Drop down selections – These allow you to pick from a predefined list. Picking a sector type is an example. You can change the validation for these drop down selections by choose Data > Data Validation… when selecting the desired cell or column of cells.

Step 3: Begin entering your stocks

Start first on the “Portfolio” sheet. This is the main page where you will enter the stocks you own. The orange-ish colored cells in rows 5 and 6 are my data. Delete that information and type in your stocks row by row. The company name can be whatever you want, but the symbols should match how they show up on Yahoo Finance. Remember not to edit the light green cells on the right side of the page. This will be populated once you enter data on the Transactions sheet.

For detailed information on each column please visit the Appendix.

Step 4: Entering transaction data

Transaction data is entered in the order that it happens on the Transactions sheet.  This page is where you’ll enter all your stock buys, sells, dividends received, dividends reinvested, and stock splits. If you have a lot of historical data, you have a couple of choices. You can either 1) take the time to enter each and every purchase, sale, and received dividend with the dates they happened, or 2) figure out your current cost basis and make a single purchase for that amount in the year you originally purchased the stock.

If I had years and years of data to enter, I’d likely take the aggregate approach myself. I then would calculate the amount of dividends I received each year for each stock, if this information is available, and enter those as aggregate individual yearly transactions. This way I’d at least have the total dividend information for each stock per year.

For information on how to add dividends that you receive and how dividend reinvestment works for this spreadsheet, please visit the FAQ (still underdevelopment).

Step 5: Visit the ReferenceData sheet

This page lists all your stocks in the order that they appear on the Portfolio sheet. Using the script that I discussed above, the last price, dividend per share, ex-dividend date, and the dividend pay date are all retrieved from Yahoo Finance. These functions will automatically be refreshed when you open the spreadsheet or change the ticker symbols on the Portfolio sheet.

You’ll see that most of this sheet is the light green do-not-touch color. If you are entering a stock, ETF, mutual fund, etc you have the option of manually entering a price and dividend amount per share (per year). Anything typed into those fields will overwrite the Yahoo Finance retrieved values.

In general, you should not have to edit this sheet much, especially if just purchasing equities traded on the US market.

Step 6: Update the DivPayoutCalc sheet

This sheet is used to calculate the estimated monthly dividends. You’ll have to type in the company name or pick it from the drop down selection (matching what is on the Portfolio sheet exactly) and then type in the months that the stock pays. You’ll only have to come to this sheet when you buy a new dividend paying stock.

A more detailed explanation of this is available here: Automatic Estimation of Monthly Dividends for Google Sheets

Step 7: Visit the DivCalendar sheet

DivCalendar automatically keeps track of the dividends that you receive for each stock and tells you when you can expect the next dividend pay payment. It relies on entering the dividend transactions into the Transactions sheet. Please see the FAQ for further details.

What I’ve done on my own personal DivCalendar is to pre-highlight the months in orange that I expect each stock to pay and then to have conditional formatting change the highlight to a dark green as it gets automatically filled in. The conditional formatting for that is already in place.

For further details, see the blog post discussing the release of this feature here: Automated Dividend Calendar

I got this inspiration from Hello Sucker’s Calendar page. At a glance it gives me a head’s up on the months and days that the companies I own payout. It also allows me to record the dividends as they come in.

Appendix Portfolio sheet:

Sector: Drop-down menu allows you to pick the appropriate sector. The drop down choices come from the Lists sheet.
Account: Use this drop-down menu to choose the type of account that the stock is held in. Brokerage, Roth IRA, etc. The choices can be updated on the Lists sheet. The account information is currently used to help the Summary sheet tabulate information for each separate account.
Company name: The name of the company. This data will be used in the Transactions sheet.
Ticker: The stock’s ticker symbol as used on Yahoo Finance.
Cost Basis: Cost basis information is calculated from purchases minus net sales and includes reinvested dividends.
Unrealized Gain/Loss & %: These two columns show the current unrealized gain/loss in dollar value and percentage. Conditional formatting gives a green background for gains and a red background for losses.
XIRR: The XIRR function gives a dollar-weighted annualized return that takes into account the timing and amounts of cash flows into and out of your investment accounts. Please see Calculating Your Annualized Return – XIRR Function
Realized Gain/Loss: Money loss or gained in stock sales.
Dividends Collected: Total dividends collected throughout the entire period stock is held.
Total Gain/Loss: Unrealized gain/loss + Realized gain/loss + dividends collected
Annual Dividend: Forward 12-month dividends for the stock calculated by taking the current annual yield * the market value of the position
Dividend Yield: current dividend yield
YOC: yield-on-cost

Summary sheet:

At the top of this sheet is a portfolio summary section. This provides a breakdown of the performance of each separate account. It is dependent on picking an account for each stock from the drop-down menu on the Portfolio page.

This sheet also records the amount of dividends received each month and allows me at a glance to see how that has (hopefully) increased from year to year. The numbers on this page are based on the entries on the transactions page so make sure you enter and date those correctly. If you desire to update past years by hand, just replace the formula with whatever value you want.

The Summary sheet also calculates annual dividends as well as total realized gain/losses.

By default it displays monthly dividends for the past three years. There is a drop down selection for the year in the first column allowing you to quickly choose any year and have the monthly dividends displayed.

DivCalendar – Div Increases column:

This column is used to track the effect of an increased dividend each time the dividend is raised. It needs to be manually updated and is based on the current amount of shares held at the time you updated it. You can think of it like the amount extra each year that you will be receiving even if you did not add additional capital or reinvest the dividends. To calculate Div Increases I just make note of how much the annual dividend changes after a company increases its dividend.

This field is completely optional and so far this data is not used anywhere else.

Transactions:

Each stock purchase or sale, dividend, and split are recorded on this sheet. It is from this sheet that all the data on the Portfolio page is generated. As long as you keep the transaction sheet up-to-date, nearly everything else is automated.

The inspiration and the general formulas came from the wonderful spreadsheet created here. (Thanks, Kyith!) The formulas and layout have been fine-tuned to fit within my dividend focused Google Sheets portfolio.

Note: Do note delete Row 2. This row contains the formulas, which are pre-populated for the first 100 entries. Thereafter, for any additional rows behind the first 100, the formulas will have to be dragged down from the earlier formulas.

Manually edited cells are again highlighted in orange. The light green cells contain formulas and should not be edited. If these are edited accidentally, just drag the formulas down again from row 2.

Step 1: Enter the date.

Step 2: Choose the type of transaction: Buy, Sell, Div, or Split.

Step 3: Choose the stock. This drop down menu is created from the companies entered into the Portfolio sheet. The data is obtained from the ReferenceData sheet’s list of companies. If you don’t see your company listed, you probably entered a lot of companies on the Portfolio sheet. You’ll have to update the Validation, as below.

To update the drop down menu, first choose Validation from the Data menu:

Then update the range to include all the companies listed on the Portfolio sheet:

“Buy” transaction: Enter the # of shares, the per share price you paid, and any fees. Stock split ratio should be 1.0.

“Sell” transaction: Enter the # of shares, the per share price you sold the shares at, and any fees. Stock split ratio should be 1.0.

“Div” transaction: There are a number of ways to record dividends. You basically just want the “gain/loss from sale” column to reflect the amount of the dividend. What is easiest is to just enter 1 as transacted shares and then the dividend amount in the “transacted price/share” column.

Note: With dividend reinvestment you technically receive cash and then buy additional shares. So, if you are reinvesting dividends, an additional transaction must be entered with the partial shares purchased. This allows the cost basis to be calculated correctly. If entered correctly, the dividend amount should be at positive cash flow while the subsequent dividend reinvestment will be the same amount only at a negative cash flow.

“Split” transaction: Just enter the split ratio. Ensure that “transacted shares,” “transacted price,” and “fees” are either 0.0 or blank. Apple’s recent 1 to 7 split would be entered as 7/1 = 7.0.

Notes: Enter any notes that you may want to keep for a particular transaction

Lists:

This sheet provides the drop down boxes for the sector and account type information in the Portfolio sheet. If you want to add or update the sectors or add new brokerage accounts/types, this is the place to do it.

Please do not hesitate to ask me any questions or offer suggestions about this template either via the comments section below or the Contact Us link. I’ll try to answer them as quickly as I can.

*** These spreadsheets are solely for entertainment purposes. Please don’t rely on them for any official/ tax-related functions. ***

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