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CITY COUNCIL MEMBER AT LARGE Charlie Anderson
  • Age: 38
  • What qualifies you to hold this position? I am a combat veteran and continue to serve as an intelligence officer in the MN Army National Guard. I am a St. Paul PD sergeant in the Community Engagement Unit, and hold a M.A. in public safety admin. I am the exec. director of an anti-organized crime nonprofit. I also keep civically engaged as a volunteer member with various community causes.
  • What would your top priorities be if elected? If elected, I will focus on: Reintegrating our school property with River Grove Elementary; attracting civically engaged young families; increasing multi-generational housing options; improving communications infrastructure; supporting local businesses; protecting our environment; and preserving our neighborhoods, history and quality of life.
  • What do you think is the primary role of government? To seek the common good through common ground with common sense; to protect the sanctity of human life, the necessity of social justice, care for the environment, and promotion of a more peaceful world. To safeguard individual rights and separation of government powers; to support community cohesion and the general order and welfare of society.
  • Website or contact: www.Charlie4Marine.com
Gwen Springsteen Roden
  • Age: Candidate response not available.

    Gwen Springsteen Roden

  • What qualifies you to hold this position? Ten years on MOSC Planning Commission. Twelve years managing Marine General Store. Having been to most council meetings, I know what projects are currently on the agenda. I was born and raised in MOSC and have a grasp of how we got to this stage of development.
  • What would your top priorities be if elected? Find resources to upgrade wireless communication services.
  • What do you think is the primary role of government? To maintain the vision and direction of the comprehensive plan.
  • Website or contact: groden60@gmail.com
Michael Tibbetts
  • Age: 57

    Mike Tibbetts

  • What qualifies you to hold this position? Thirty-five years of experiences and observations in Marine on St. Croix as well as interest in civic engagement.
  • What would your top priorities be if elected? Redirect spending, add affordable housing options and business opportunities.
  • What do you think is the primary role of government? Listen to the voters’ concerns and help safeguard the environment in which we live.
  • Website or contact: mike940broadway@gmail.com

For candidates in other east metro races, go to www.twincities.com/minnesota-elections.

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Our own celebrity chef Gavin Kaysen (Spoon and Stable, Bellecour) is opening his third restaurant in four years.

The new North Loop spot, which is basically out the back door of his first restaurant, Spoon and Stable, will be a 20-seat, tasting-menu-only venue called Demi.

Diners will sit at a u-shaped counter with a kitchen and pass directly in the center of the restaurant, Kaysen said.

There will be a few servers and a general manager, but the chefs will pitch in with the serving, too, for an immersive experience.

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The restaurant, which will be open Wednesday through Sunday for dinner only, will serve eight or 10 courses — Kaysen said they’re still working out the details. One thing he does know — he wants to get diners in and out in a reasonable time frame.

“For me, it’s all about timing,” Kaysen said. I just really don’t want to create an experience where it takes you four hours to eat dinner. People usually spend about 2 to 2 and a half hours eating dinner at Spoon and Stable, so we’re shooting for that.”

Chef Adam Ritter, who has been the chef de cuisine at Spoon and Stable for the past two years, will be heading Demi’s kitchen. Kaysen said that although he’s rooted in French technique, the restaurant will draw on other cultures, including Asian, for inspiration.

“Expect delicious, with a sense of place,” he said.

Target opening date is sometime in February. The restaurant’s website (demimpls.com) is up, but it’s basically just a video promoting the new venture.

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Pioneer Press by Jim Diamond / Special To The Pionee.. - 1h ago

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Alex Stalock got the start in goal for the Wild on Monday night, his first game action of the 2018-19 season. Wild coach Bruce Boudreau cited several factors in giving the South St. Paul native the start against the Predators.

“He had to start at some point,” Boudreau said. “We’ve got two back-to backs this week with a lot of travel. He’s played well in this arena in the past, so we thought we would give him this game instead of tomorrow’s.”

Monday’s game against the Predators and Tuesday’s home tilt against Arizona represent the first of 15 sets of back-to-backs the Wild will play this season. The second set comes Friday and Saturday, visiting Dallas before hosting Tampa Bay.

Stalock entered Monday with an 0-3 career record in Nashville, but he allowed just two goals against to the Predators in his past two starts, the most recent being Dec. 30, 2017, a 3-0 Wild loss.

“it’s fun,” Stalock said Monday morning. “You don’t get the chance to do it much, so go in and take advantage of it and give the team a chance to win and have fun with this building and this crowd. As a goalie, you’re the only one out there. It’s fun to go on the road and keep the building quiet.”

Boudreau also cited the early workload that has been placed on starter Devan Dubnyk with the team allowing an average of 42 shots on goal through four games.

“When we’re playing well, teams are getting under 30 shots a game against us,” Boudreau said.

FENTON’S RETURN

Before being named Wild general manager last offseason, Paul Fenton spent the previous 20 years with the Predators. He was Nashville’s director of player development for the franchise’s first eight seasons and then assistant general manager for the next 12.

Fenton was in charge of Nashville’s draft when the Predators selected Wild defenseman Ryan Suter with the seventh overall pick in the 2003 draft, a draft that also brought Shea Weber to Nashville.

The Predators planned to welcome Fenton back with a video message played on Bridgestone Arena’s scoreboard during the first media timeout of Monday’s game.

Related Articles SAME LINEUP

Forward Joel Eriksson Ek was sidelined for the second consecutive game with a lower-body injury, so the Wild used the same lineup that faced Carolina on Saturday. Boudreau said the team would evaluate the roster following Monday’s game with regard to possibly recalling a player prior to Tuesday’s game.

GET WELL SOON

Wild radio play-by-play voice Bob Kurtz did not make the trip to Nashville with the Wild. The team announced he stayed back in Minnesota to undergo a procedure for an irregular heartbeat.

Kevin Fairness stepped in to handle the play-by-play duties alongside color analyst Tom Reid. In addition to Monday’s game against the Predators, Kurtz will miss Tuesday’s home game against Arizona and Friday’s road game in Dallas. He is expected to return to the microphone for Saturday’s home game against Tampa Bay.

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The Timberwolves open the regular season on Wednesday in San Antonio, and play for the first time at home on Friday against Cleveland. Asked if he expected to be booed in his return to Target Center, all-star guard Jimmy Butler suggested fans go ahead and let loose.

“Boo me,” Butler said after Sunday’s practice at Mayo Clinic Square. “Ain’t going to change the way I play; probably going to make me smile more. Please, come on with it.”

Minnesota Timberwolves guard Jimmy Butler, right, watches from the bench during the second half in Game 5 of the team’s first-round NBA basketball playoff series against the Houston Rockets, Wednesday, April 25, 2018, in Houston. (AP Photo/Eric Christian Smith)

Friday will be the all-NBA forward’s first appearance before Timberwolves fans since his trade request became public in mid-September. The Wolves say they’ve tried to oblige him but they’ve yet to get an offer they like.

Being booed in Friday’s home opener might be all right to Butler, but the sentiment indicates neither a willingness nor expectation that he’ll stay, and a source told the Pioneer Press the team is still trying to trade the former all-star who averaged 22.1 points, 5.3 rebounds and two steals for the Wolves last season.

Speaking to local reporters for the first time since the 2017-18 season ended with a first-round playoff loss to the Houston Rockets, Butler declined to put the matter to rest.

“Why are you all so focused on this trading stuff?” he said to reporters. “We’ve got a game in, what, three days?”

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Butler was part of the Wolves’ final 16-man roster released Monday afternoon, and might play against the Spurs in Wednesday’s 7:30 p.m. tipoff. He joined the team for practice last Wednesday, with four of five exhibition games in the books, and did not play last Friday in Milwaukee.

He practiced with the team Sunday under the eye of team owner Glen Taylor.

“At the end of the day, he expects me to go out there and win some basketball games,” Butler said. “I think that’s what my team expects me to do. That’s what Minnesota, the fan base, expects me to do. The fans that are not in Minnesota expect me to go out there and compete, be the fun-loving basketball player that I am. That’s what I will be.”

BRIEFLY

The Wolves set their opening night roster Monday by waiving Canyon Barry, Darius Johnson-Odom, William Lee and Jonathan Stark. The 16-man roster is: F Keita Bates-Diop; F Jimmy Butler; F Luol Deng; C Gorgui Dieng; F Taj Gibson; G Tyus Jones; F James Nunnally; G Josh Okogie; C Justin Patton; G Derrick Rose; G Jeff Teague; G Jared Terrell; F Anthony Tolliver; F/C Karl-Anthony Towns; F Andrew Wiggins; and G C.J. Williams.

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Poetry lovers know Gary Snyder as one of the Beat Generation poets, along with Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Lawrence Ferlinghetti and others. But some might not know that this Pulitzer Prize-winner is also a Zen Buddhist and environmentalist.

Snyder will discuss his commitment to the natural world when he gives Macalester College’s 2018 Engel-Morgan-Jardetzky Distinguished Lecture at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the college’s Kagin Commons, 21 Snelling Ave., St. Paul. His lecture is titled “Minding the Wild: An Evening of Poetry and Discussion.”

Born in San Francisco in 1930, Snyder was raised on small farms in Washington state and Oregon. Poetry Foundation (poetryfoundation.org/poets/gary-snyder) reveals he lived close to nature from early childhood and was distressed even as a youngster at destruction of the Pacific Northwest’s forests. He began to study and respect Indian cultures that offered a more harmonious relationship with nature. Fascinated by wild regions, he became an expert mountain climber and learned survival skills.

A visit to the Seattle Art Museum introduced Snyder to Chinese landscape painting, and he developed an interest in the Orient. In 1952 he moved to the San Francisco Bay area to study Oriental Languages at Berkeley. Already immersed in Zen Buddhism, he had begun to write poetry about his work in the wilderness.

Literary fame of the Beat Generation was launched with a poetry reading in 1955 at San Francisco’s Six Gallery. Ginsberg’s poem “Howl” is best remembered from that evening, but Snyder also read his poem “The Berry Feast.”

In 1956, just as the Beats were gaining nationwide notoriety, Snyder moved to Japan on a scholarship and remained abroad almost continuously for the next 12 years, devoting himself part of the time to Zen study and meditation. He traveled extensively, visiting India, Indonesia and Istanbul. Returning to the United States, he built his own house along the Yuba River in the northern Sierra Nevada mountains.

Snyder is the author of more than 20 books of poetry and prose, winner of numerous literary prizes including the 1974 Pulitzer Prize for “Turtle Island.”

In his correspondence with Macalester about his appearance, Snyder wrote that he will “examine how it might be that we not only could ‘respect the wild’ but also intelligently interact with it and indeed keep learning.”

Snyder’s lecture is free and open to the public but tickets are required (two per person). They are available at the Macalester Campus Center Information desk or, for will call reservations, at JardetzkyMac2018@gmail.com.Related Articles

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Fill out a survey, get free food.

That’s the message Falcon Heights is passing out to drivers along Larpenteur and Snelling avenues this week.

The five-question survey is part of the city’s ongoing effort to make residents and guests feel safe and welcome, prompted in part by the police shooting of Philando Castile in 2016.

“Falcon Heights is kind of a tale of two cities,” said Sack Thongvanh, city administrator. “We have residents that live in the community and people who drive through.” He estimated that 50,000 people drive through this St. Paul suburb every day.

Those who fill out the survey can get one free food item from three food trucks that will be parked from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 17 and 18 at City Hall, 2077 Larpenteur Avenue West. Participating food trucks are Birchwood Café, JMJ and Brothers Gutierrez Mexican Cuisine.

Individuals can also text “Falcon” to 888-111 to take the survey and receive a coupon.

The survey asks if people feel welcome and safe in Falcon Heights, what their relation is to the city, how the city can do better, if they have suggestions and if the city can contact them to discuss those ideas.

After the shooting, residents asked the city to address safety and community in Falcon Heights. The city responded by hiring a public relations firm and has been working to promote a message of peace, safety, and a welcoming community, Thongvanh said.

The city recently surveyed residents with similar questions, asking if they felt their officials were addressing their original request. Thongvanh will present the results of the resident survey at a council meeting in November, he said.

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The Minnesota Timberwolves are the latest local sports team to trot out a new concessions menu, and in contrast to the first year after Target Center was renovated, a lot of this year’s items, created by local chef David Fhima, are available outside of the suites in the general concessions.

New general concession items include a five-cheese mac and cheese, served plain or topped with sliced, all-beef hot dogs or house-smoked brisket; pork shoulder and brisket sandwiches; street tacos; a street corn salad; a Fhima grilled cheese that features zippy shakshuka sauce; and the famous Loon Cafe chili.

You can get a side of street corn salad with your tacos at Timberwolves’ games this year. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

Fhima said the second phase of the concessions overhaul was the most important one. Local partnerships, local ingredients and a focus on quality were at the heart of the changes.

“Pretty much every item at every stand has been improved, changed or is brand new,” Fhima said.

Of course there are “premium” food offerings, too, available at the SixOneTwo Lounge and for suite holders. Those ticket holders will be treated to items like grilled jerk chicken thighs, New York strip steaks, delicata and kabocha squash, patatas bravas, PB and J cobbler and more.

Returning favorite partnerships, which were the most popular concessions last year, Fhima said, include the Parlour Burger stand, walleye sandwiches from Lord Fletchers and sushi burritos from SotaRol.

Brisket and pork shoulder will be available at Target Center during Timberwolves’ games, shown at an Oct. 15 media preview. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press) Related Articles
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As the weather turns, I find myself craving dark, rich beers. Yet a typical stout is too filling and sweet for fall.

Summit’s Dark Infusion, pictured in October 2018. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

Dark Infusion, which was a beer in Summit’s Unchained series in 2016, is back, and it’s really hitting the spot. Rich and creamy, but light enough to allow for a hearty chug, this imperial milk stout features chocolate, caramel and graham cracker flavors, but the sweetness is balanced by cold-brew Brazilian coffee from Blackeye Roasting, which gives it an earthy, bitter edge.

Although the brewery suggests drinking it in the morning, it might be a little strong for that. Instead, how about when you’re in need of an early evening pick-me-up?

  • International Bittering Units (IBU): 40
  • Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 8.5 percent
  • Summit Brewing: 910 Montreal Circle, St. Paul; 651-265-7800; summitbrewing.com
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A full fifth of the National Guard’s military construction budget was allocated to Minnesota this year – to pay for a new Red Bulls headquarters building in Arden Hills.

The 34th Infantry Division’s move from its current 100,000-square-foot building in Rosemount to a soon-to-be-built 136,000 square-foot building in Arden Hills should happen in two years, officials said.

“I look forward to digging some dirt,” said Brig. Gen. Lowell Kruse at a groundbreaking ceremony Monday. “I know the mayor of Rosemount’s probably sad.”

“Yeah, well, the mayor of Arden Hills is pretty happy,” chuckled Arden Hills mayor David Grant as he headed toward a large swath of wetland at his city’s Army Training Site to pick up a shovel.

The price tag for the new facility: $40 million, the huge majority of which comes from the federal government.

Still, the state is kicking in $300,000, via its state armory building commission, which allocates funds outside the usual legislative budget process.

Minneapolis-based Stahl Construction is the primary developer for the project, which should be completed by August 2020, company officials said.

Red Bulls officials say their current building in Rosemount is already bursting at the seams, with only 500 of its 800-member headquarters battalion able to be staffed there, and no space for expansion.

The new building will accommodate the full 800, as well as include new security upgrades that will allow the building to handle both secret and top secret data; upgrades that require both digital advancements as well as physical clean rooms that allow for oversight and segregation of staff.

Col. Sol Sukut, the division’s construction and facilities management officer, noted the Rosemount building was just 24 years old – relatively young for replacement. But he said the need for space necessitated the switch.

The Guard’s new readiness facility in Stillwater, for example, was built to replace 100-year-old structure.

“That’s kind of the norm,” Sukut said.

The Rosemount facility will still be used by the Guard as a readiness facility, Sukut noted.

The new building, with two stories as well as a full-sized basement, will be built on property already owned and managed by the Guard, just east of their existing readiness center in the 4000 block of Hamline Avenue.

The building will also include an honorary library for one of the Guard’s most renowned members — the late General John William Vessey Jr.

Vessey joined the Guard at the age of 16 in 1939, received a battlefield commission in World War II, and eventually worked his way from a private to a four-star General. He was appointed the 10th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under President Ronald Reagan, retired in 1985, and passed away in 2016.

“I know that my father would be extremely honored,” said Vessey’s daughter, Sarah Vessey, who added that she would be donating the late General’s collection of military books, notes, letters, and other paraphernalia to the library.

The Red Bull’s headquarters battalion is currently in Texas training for another deployment to Kuwait, which is slated to last nine months. They were last deployed in 2010.

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Pioneer Press by Pioneer Press Elections Team - 2h ago
MAYOR Richard Glasgow
  • Age: 73

    Richard Glasgow

  • What qualifies you to hold this position? 10 years on city council and two years currently as mayor.
  • What would your top priorities be if elected? Continue to lower property tax (10 percent in 2018 and 2.5 percent in 2019). We were in the top 5 percent in Minnesota cities in lowering property tax in 2018. Finish remodeling our historic City Hall. Continue as editor of our popular monthly newsletter. Continue upgrading our water utility.
  • What do you think is the primary role of government? Core and essential services providing fire and ambulance service, law enforcement, roads and our parks. Controlling our city budget.
  • Website or contact: rglasgow@ci.lakeland.mn.us
Andrew Leiviska
  • Age: 39
  • What qualifies you to hold this position? I have been a small business owner since 2009 and with that comes many similar responsibilities to that of a small city. Although the functions may be different, the operations are often alike. As a near lifelong resident, home owner, husband and father, I can relate to the families in the community. I am willing to listen, to learn and to serve.
  • What would your top priorities be if elected? My priorities are bringing transparency back to Lakeland and restoring dignity and integrity to the leadership of the city. Furthermore, we need to restore fiscal responsibility. Improve city services while maintaining a balanced budget. To do this we can no longer spend all reserves to cover the overspending from the general fund.
  • What do you think is the primary role of government? We now live in such a diverse society it’s essential for each government to not only seek what’s best for its own citizens but also for humanity as a whole. All we can do is our best. To take up the work of others. To advance it as far as we can to as many people as we can and then hand it off to a new generation.
  • Website or contact: Leiviskaforlakeland.com

For candidates in other east metro races, go to www.twincities.com/minnesota-elections.

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