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MANTORVILLE, Minn. — The Minnesota attorney general’s office will review the case of a woman accused of killing her husband in southern Minnesota, then fleeing to Florida and killing a woman there.

Lois Riess has not been charged in the fatal shooting of her husband, 54-year-old David Riess, at the couple’s home in Blooming Prairie last March.

Lois Ann Riess

Dodge County Sheriff Scott Rose says his investigators were at a “standstill” waiting for a handgun recovered from Lois Riess’ hotel room after her arrest in Texas to be released by Florida authorities for ballistic testing in Minnesota.

Rose says testing by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension indicates the shell casings found at David Riess’ homicide matched the handgun.

Authorities say Lois Riess went to Fort Myers, Fla., met Pamela Hutchinson while there and killed her to assume her identity.

She remains jailed in Florida in Hutchinson’s death.

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Gophers football coach P.J. Fleck expressed surprise Thursday over critical comments former U coach Jerry Kill made about Fleck earlier this week.

“I got a lot of respect for Jerry Kill; I always will,” Fleck said on KTLK-AM 1130 during halftime of the Gophers men’s basketball game against Michigan. “I’ve learned so much from him, especially working for him and knowing him a lot of years. I’m really sorry he feels that way. I’m not sure where that came from.”

In an interview Tuesday on Sirius XM radio, Kill said Fleck had changed since they worked together at Northern Illinois in 2008-09.

“I just think sometimes ego gets carried away,” Kill told the show “Big Ten Today.” He added: “Do I think he’s about the players? No. He’s about himself.”

On Wednesday night, a Gophers captain and to-be senior defensive end Carter Coughlin tweeted his view on Fleck.

“Just for the record – I absolutely love playing for Coach Fleck,” he wrote. “EVERY day I see how much he cares about me and the entire team, and there are honestly few men I’ve met who I respect as much as Coach Fleck. Some people need to hear that!”

On the accusation Fleck isn’t “about” his players, Fleck responded: “That saddens me. It saddened (my wife) Heather. It saddens our entire family, but this isn’t a profession about feelings. One thing that is really, really important to me is our players. It always has been and always will be.”

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  • New York Rangers' Filip Chytil, left, and goaltender Henrik Lundqvist, right, react as as the Minnesota Wild celebrate a goal by Mikael Granlund during the second period of an NHL hockey game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • New York Rangers' Chris Kreider (20) looks to pass the puck away from Minnesota Wild's Jonas Brodin (25) during the second period of an NHL hockey game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Minnesota Wild goaltender Devan Dubnyk stops a shot on the goal during the second period of the team's NHL hockey game against the New York Rangers on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • New York Rangers' Mika Zibanejad (93) fights for control of the puck with Minnesota Wild's Ryan Suter (20) during the second period of an NHL hockey game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • New York Rangers' Jimmy Vesey (26) watches as a shot by teammate Pavel Buchnevich gets past Minnesota Wild goaltender Devan Dubnyk (40) for a goal during the second period of an NHL hockey game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • New York Rangers goaltender Henrik Lundqvist, left, gets up as the Minnesota Wild celebrate a goal by Jared Spurgeon during the first period of an NHL hockey game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • New York Rangers goaltender Henrik Lundqvist (30) gives up a goal to Minnesota Wild's Jared Spurgeon (46) as Wild's Eric Staal (12) watches during the first period of an NHL hockey game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • New York Rangers goaltender Henrik Lundqvist (30) stops a shot by Minnesota Wild's Eric Staal (12) during the first period of an NHL hockey game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

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NEW YORK — Zach Parise was certain the Wild were going to be shorthanded when Eric Staal blatantly tripped Brady Skjei as the Rangers defenseman came out of his corner late in the third period with Minnesota clinging to one-goal lead.

The hockey gods had forsaken Minnesota for the last two weeks as they lost four straight and nine out of 10 since the all-star break to fall out of the final Western Conference wild card spot.

But a funny thing happened on the way to a potentially debilitating penalty. Referee Wes McCauley either missed the play or decided to swallow his whistle. Skjei fell down and the puck squirted free to Parise in the slot.

Two quick moves deked Henrik Lundqvist out of position, and Parise went top shelf to give the Wild a two-goal lead that paved the way to a rehabilitating 4-1 victory Thursday night at Madison Square Garden.

“It was one of those too-good-to-be-true things,” Parise said of his team-leading 24th goal, “I thought for sure we were going to be short after that. Fortunately we weren’t, and we really didn’t look back. No question that just gave us a lot of life and broke the game open for us.”

Jordan Greenway added an empty-netter with 2:37 remaining.

Hat tip to Minnesota’s penalty killers, who killed off a high-sticking double-minor on newly acquired forward Ryan Donato with 7:33 left in the third period and the Rangers smelling blood.

They pumped five shots on Devan Dubnyk but came up empty as the Wild won for the first time since Feb. 9 at New Jersey.

“We really needed this one,” said Mikael Granlund, whose second-period goal was game-winner. “The feeling in the locker room, it’s totally different when you win a hockey game. Hopefully we can build on this.”

Poor special teams play and leaky goaltending plagued the Wild during their skid. They took care of business in all three categories — scoring on the power play, killing off that four-minute nail-biter and watching Dubnyk make 33 saves after he allowed a second-period bleeder to Pavel Buchnevich.

The win leapfrogged the Wild over idle Chicago and Colorado back into the playoff picture.

“Right now it’s just one win, but we had to go through a little bit of adversity just to get it,” said coach Bruce Boudreau.

It also was a fine start for Donato, who was acquired Wednesday from Boston in exchange for Charlie Coyle. He was involved throughout, jumped on for some power-play minutes early in the game and assisted on Minnesota’s first goal.

Donato sent a cross-ice pass to Jared Spurgeon, who fed Staal on the doorstep. Lundqvist stoned him, but Spurgeon pounced on the loose puck in the crease for his career-high 12th goal of the season

“They just said go out and play, and I think that’s when I’m at my best when they have the confidence in me,” said Donato as he stuffed his pads into a leftover Bruins equipment bag. “It’s been a while since I’ve had a lot of confidence when I’ve played. It was fun to see and I’m glad to be a part of it.”

Boudreau said Donato played with a swagger that made him look like he belonged.

“He played well. The one thing I liked was his skill set,” he said. “It looked like he knew what he was doing with the puck and felt confident doing what he did with the puck. It’s a good step in the right direction for him.”

Spurgeon’s tally checked off several boxes.

It was Donato’s 10th point after registering six goals and three assists for the Bruins. It also snapped the Wild’s scoreless streak at 170 minutes, four seconds following consecutive shutouts against Anaheim and St. Louis — their first goal since the second period of Friday’s 5-4 loss to New Jersey.

And it gave Minnesota’s defensemen a league-leading 39 goals and 13 power-play goals this season.

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Minutes later the Wild appeared to double their lead. Brad Hunt sailed a long shot through traffic that eluded Lundqvist. But the Rangers challenged that the sequence started offside.

After a review officials determined that Joel Eriksson Ek had crossed the blue line before Luke Kunin gained the zone.

No luck. No sweat.

The Wild regained the lead anyway midway through the second period off some nifty grunt work by Granlund.

Greg Pateryn held the zone and wristed a shot on goal. Lundqvist made the save but Granlund, as he was falling down on his rump, chipped the rebound into the top corner and Minnesota took a 2-1 margin into the third period.

The Wild did not settle for preserving a tenuous lead on the road. They went for the kill.

“I think the points were more important for our team,” Donato said, shrugging off his contribution. “Big ‘W.’ I kept asking how everybody was doing and they said we were just hoping to get a win.”

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St. Paul police are investigating a fatal shooting in the Summit-University neighborhood on Thursday night.

Officers were called to the 700 block of Carroll Avenue about 8:45 p.m., according to a police spokesman.

Police said they would be providing additional information later Thursday.

Thursday’s homicide happened in the same area where a 19-year-old man was fatally shot last year.

Wilbert E’lee Harris-McCalister was in the backseat of a car at Avon Street and Carroll Avenue on Sept. 7 when he was shot. In that case, an attempted robbery during a marijuana deal ended with a shootout, according to charges filed in the case.

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  • Edina forward Olivia Swaim (4) scores a goal against East Ridge goalie Emerald Kelley (35) in the third period of a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. Edina beat East Ridge, 7-0 to advance to the semifinals. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

  • East Ridge forward Erin Glancey (15) and Edina forward Kylie Roberts (12) chase down the airborne puck in the first period of a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

  • East Ridge defender Addi Scribner (26) skates towards the Edina goal in the first period of a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

  • A disappointed East Ridge goalie Emerald Kelley (35), right, is consoled by teammate Addi Scribner (26) after the Raptors lost to Edina, 7-0 in a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

  • East Ridge forward Erin Glancey (15)tase to the ice a the start of a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game against Edina at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

  • East Ridge forward Erin Glancey (15) can't get the puck another 12 inches for the goal as she is stopped by a host of Edina defenders and Edina goalie Elli Strittmater (30) in the second period of a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

  • East Ridge goalie Emerald Kelley (35) stops a bouncing puck against Edina in the first period of a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

  • Edina forward Jane Kuehl (17) finds the puck and pokes it past East Ridge defender Kaitlyn Lorbiecki (25) in the first period of a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

  • Edina forward CC Bowlby (13) tries to disrupt East Ridge forward Fiona Claugherty's (8) pass in the first period of a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

  • East Ridge goalie Emerald Kelley (35) and defender Addi Scribner (26) set up to defend against a shot from Edina forward Annie Kuehl (11)in the first period of a Minnesota State Girls Hockey Tournament Class AA quarterfinal game at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn, on Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

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The power-play unit has been East Ridge’s bread and butter all season. The Raptors converted chances with the player-advantage at a 31 percent clip during the regular season. Whenever they needed a goal, the power play provided it.

So there was reason for optimism when the Raptors had two power-play chances early in Thursday’s Class 2A state quarterfinal against heavily favored Edina.

But not even that unit could solve the Hornets’ stifling defense. The top seed’s penalty kill came through both times, biding time for an offense that eventually heated up en route to a 7-0 victory.

“It was huge,” Hornets coach Sami Reber said of her penalty kill unit’s performance. “East Ridge puts one in there and it’s a whole different game. Really proud of the way we contained them, didn’t really let them get any great opportunities on that kill. That’s something we take pride in every game.”

After thwarting off a couple East Ridge chances, Edina (25-4) capitalized on one of its own midway through the first period, as Jane Kuehl scored in a scrum to give the Hornets a lead they wouldn’t surrender. Edina scored four goals in the second period, and the floodgates were opened. CC Bowlby scored twice for Edina, which completed the first of three steps in its quest for a third straight state title without a hitch, even given the slow start.

“I think we were just getting used to the X and getting our nerves out, but as the game progressed we definitely played better,” Edina senior forward Annie Kuehl said. “I would say for tomorrow, we definitely have more. … Tonight, the foundation that we laid will be good for the rest of the tournament, and I’m excited to see what we have next.”

Edina is a tough first round opponent for anyone, but it had to look like a mountain for East Ridge, which was making its first state tournament appearance in program history. Still, the Raptors (19-9-1) were able to provide some resistance, at least early.

“We got the unlucky draw, but that didn’t stop us from trying our best,” East Ridge junior forward Fiona Claugherty said. “Playing at the X is obviously new for us, so we just had to get the jitters out right away. … Yeah, they’re a good team, but we still tried hard.”

And the effects of making its first state tournament will likely ripple through the program for years to come. The Raptors are the first team from District 833 — made up of Woodbury, Park and East Ridge — to advance to the X. East Ridge coach Kim McClintick noted the Raptors and Woodbury share a youth program, so the city’s hockey talent is split between two high schools, and that’s after some of the area’s top kids have decided to play for private schools such as Hill-Murray and Cretin-Derham Hall.

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“It’s huge to say that hey, we’re a public school and we can go to a state tournament without having to go to a private school or a hockey school or anything like that,” McClintick said.

As a program, East Ridge has attempted to strengthen the bridge between its high school team and the youth ranks. McClintick said a mentorship program was started this season, and there were plenty of kids in the stands holding East Ridge signs. At least a couple of those kids McClintick knows will go to Woodbury, but she thought it was cool to see the city’s entire hockey community supporting this team’s run.

This state tournament will have plenty of long-term positives for the program, but the instant effects were plenty apparent, too. McClintick said coaches are often asked why they invest their time in coaching. Between working a full-time job and coaching, she barely spends time at home.

“Then you see the girls smiling and taking pictures out on the ice and in the benches (pregame tonight), that’s why,” she said. “The smiles on their faces, the memories they’re going to have from this, this tournament, this weekend, that’s kind of what you take from it, and it just makes me so happy to see them all here smiling together. The hard work paid off. All the late nights watching film and practice planning, it’s worth it, even for those few minutes.”

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COLLEGE PARK, Md. — Kaila Charles made a buzzer-beating layup to cap a furious comeback by No. 8 Maryland, which never led until that final basket sealed a 71-69 victory over the Gophers on Thursday night.

The Terrapins trailed 54-38 in the third quarter, by 11 with 8:59 remaining and 67-60 with 1:58 to go before closing with an 11-2 run against stunned Minnesota.

Maryland (24-3, 13-3 Big Ten) began the day tied atop the conference with Iowa, which played a late game at Indiana on Thursday. After losing at Iowa on Sunday, the Terps were in danger of dropping two straight for the first time this season until storming back to end Minnesota’s six-game winning streak.

Charles finished with a season-high 29 points, including the game-tying layup with 6.6 seconds left. After Minnesota got the ball past midcourt and called a timeout, Shakira Austin deflected the inbounds pass to Charles, who drove the length of the floor for the game-winning basket.

Destiny Pitts scored 24 and Kenisha Bell added 23 for the Gophers (19-8, 8-8). Pitts, a sophomore guard, has scored at least 21 in four straight games. But she fouled out in the final minute, and Minnesota couldn’t survive without her.

After Pitts picked up her fourth foul with 7:09 remaining, Taylor Mikesell hit successive 3-pointers in a 10-4 surge for Maryland that made it 65-60. Charles then stole the ball but blew a layup, and Pitts answered with a reverse layup.

Charles made amends for the miss down the stretch.

THAT HURTS

Maryland played most of the game without senior forward Brianna Fraser, who fell to the floor under the basket with three minutes left in the first quarter. She watched the final three quarters from the end of bench with a pair of crutches and a bag of ice on her left ankle.

Fraser has played in all 27 games this season, starting twice, and ranks fifth on the team in scoring.

OLD FRIENDS

Minnesota first-year coach Lindsay Whalen played for Maryland coach Brenda Frese in 2001-02 at Minnesota. After the Gophers went 22-8 that season and Whalen was named Big Ten Player of the Year, Frese left for Maryland.

UP NEXT

Minnesota: At Rutgers next Thursday, a rematch of a game won by the Gophers 60-46 on Feb. 3.

Maryland: At Purdue on Monday. The Boilermakers are 13-3 at home.

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Timberwolves practice ran longer than expected Thursday. On their first full-team practice since returning from all-star break, Wolves players didn’t want to leave the floor.

“It actually got to a point where they wanted to play more and scrimmage more,” interim coach Ryan Saunders said.

And they were doing so at a high level. Karl-Anthony Towns said Minnesota “played with a tremendous amount of ferocity and concentration.”

“I think we did a hell of a job,” the all-star center declared.

Saunders noted upsets can be common before and after the all-star break, as teams look forward to and then ease out of the break. Minnesota can’t afford a sluggish start, not with a four-game deficit to make up on the eighth-place Clippers in the Western Conference playoff hunt with 25 games to play.

“We need it, it’s urgent, we need it,” Andrew Wiggins said of a strong post-break start. “We know we’re behind right now and we’re fighting to get back in, so we need it.”

Few people likely consider the Wolves (27-30) to be a part of the playoff chase. They are currently 11th in the 15-team West. Basketball Reference gives Minnesota a 3.8 percent chance to qualify for the postseason.

The Wolves seem to believe their chances are significantly higher.

“We’re in a good position,” Towns said. “In doesn’t matter about statistical things, individual things, stuff like that. We’re in a good position right now. With all said and done to this point, we still have a great chance to make the playoffs. We’ve just got to go out there and capitalize.”

Saunders and his players have pointed to how close Minnesota is to improving in key statistical areas and winning games. The Wolves might not have to play that much better to get on a roll. Towns is pleased with the effort level the Wolves exuded, even during recent struggles as they played with an injury-riddled roster.

“The way we play, we play hard,” Towns said. “Even games we’ve lost recently, we play really hard. Just came down to some execution, and this break can help us mentally recharge and give the coaching staff a chance to implement some things they want to implement this season and also give us a chance to tighten some screws up.”

Plus, the Wolves are getting a lot of their players back. Tyus Jones is set to return to action Friday against New York. The only names currently on the injury report are Robert Covington — who practiced on a limited basis Thursday but won’t travel with the team on the two-game road trip to New York and Milwaukee — and Gorgui Dieng, who will miss Friday’s game for personal reasons.

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Jeff Teague and Derrick Rose returned prior to the break and played a role in Minnesota winning its last two games.

Many have wondered how good this team can be when it’s at full strength. Towns thinks he knows, referencing a stretch in which the Wolves won eight of 11 games immediately following the Jimmy Butler trade that brought Dario Saric, Jerryd Bayless and Covington to Minnesota.

“We’ve shown what we can do at full strength. We had an amazing run at full strength, so I don’t think anything is out of the picture,” Towns said. “We’ve shown what we’re capable of when we’re executing and playing with a high intensity, with an edge. I saw that (Thursday), so good signs for tomorrow.”

Jones said Minnesota is in “a good place mentally.” The Wolves carried positive vibes into the all-star break and genuinely seemed excited about what they could do down the stretch once they returned. Now that time is here, and Minnesota has no choice but to perform.

“We want to come off the break and go on a run,” Jones said. “I think we’re together, and that’s what you need. … This break came at a great time, and we want to use it as something that can propel us forward. So we’re going to try to come out of the break, hit the ground running and go from there.”

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The Minnesota House has voted to eliminate a defense that prevents people who rape a spouse or domestic partner from being prosecuted for criminal sexual conduct.

Rep. Zack Stephenson, the bill’s lead author, told lawmakers before the 130-0 vote Thursday that repealing the “marital rape exception” will result in seven additional convictions per year.

The Coon Rapids Democrat paid tribute to a woman who testified in committee how her now ex-husband drugged her and made a video of himself raping her while she was unconscious, as her 4-year-old child slept nearby. Prosecutors dropped sexual assault charges after her husband raised the “voluntary relationship defense.” He served just 30 days in jail for invasion of privacy.

After the vote, lawmakers turned and applauded the woman, who was watching from the gallery.

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  • Michigan's Ignas Brazdeikis, right, tries to keep Minnesota's Jordan Murphy away from the ball in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

  • Minnesota's Daniel Oturu dunks against Michigan in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

  • Michigan's Jordan Poole, left, drives as Minnesota's Gabe Kalscheur defends in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

  • Minnesota's Jordan Murphy, left, tries to work around Michigan's Ignas Brazdeikis, center, and Jon Teske in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

  • Minnesota's Gabe Kalscheur, left, drives around Michigan's Jordan Poole in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

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Dupree McBrayer’s wide-open corner 3-pointer clanked off the rim during Thursday’s second half against Michigan. Nearby, Gophers head coach Richard Pitino slightly shook his head in disbelief and briefly stared off into the Williams Arena rafters.

Minnesota’s anemic shooting — correlated with Michigan’s top-notch defense and their own quality outside shooting — were deciding factors in the seventh-ranked Wolverines’ 69-60 win.

The Gophers were outscored 39-3 from behind the arc, which doomed any chance to procure a fourth win against teams in Quadrant 1, a key factor for NCAA tournament résumés. The Gophers’ wins against teams in the top 30 in the new NET ranking remain versus Wisconsin, Iowa and Washington.

The Gophers fell to 2-14 in games against teams ranked in the top 10 under Pitino, with the last win coming against Maryland in the 2015-16 season.

Michigan’s biggest advantage Thursday was 13 made 3-pointers to Minnesota’s one. That’s 36 more points from deep for the Wolverines (24-3, 13-3).

Amir Coffey, the U’s highest scorer, was scoreless in 19 first-half minutes, missing all 10 of his shots. He finished with six points on 2 of 15 shooting from the field.

Jordan Poole led the Wolverines with 22 points and Jon Teske had 17. They combined for eight made 3-pointers.

Daniel Oturu and Jordan Murphy were the U’s only consistent offense. Oturu and Murphy each scored 18 points.

In the opening 20 minutes, the Gophers mustered a season-low point total in any of their 53 halves this season. Minnesota had multiple dry spells and shot 22 percent from the field (8 for 36) and didn’t make a 3-pointer (0 for 5) in falling behind 28-18 at the half.

For the game, the Gophers shot 37 percent from the field and 10 percent from deep.

The Wolverines sit atop the Big Ten with this formula of stifling opponents. They have the nation’s third-best scoring defense (57.6 points per game) and hold foes to an average under 40 percent shooting.

The Gophers were ice cold and were scoreless for five minutes early in the first half as the Wolverines opened up a 17-6 lead. Nowhere was the drought more pronounced than with Coffey, who started 0 for 8 from the field.

Minnesota had another 1 for 10 stretch later in the half, but the Wolverines were also off and didn’t make the U pay. The Wolverines opened the second half with a 12-4 run to create the separation they lacked before the break.

Thursday’s game wasn’t nearly as close as the Wolverines’ narrow 59-57 win over the U on Jan. 22. Michigan guard Charles Matthews’ shot from the baseline beat the shot clock during the game’s last second to win the game.

Iggy Brazdeikis had a team-best 18 points and a career-high 11 rebounds against the U at Crisler Center. He was quiet Thursday, with 10 points and three rebounds.

The Wolverines started the season 17-0 but had shown vulnerability with three losses in the last nine games, including a 75-69 loss to last-place Penn State last week.

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With all seven St. Paul City Council posts up for grabs in November, the election season is already underway.

There will be no political primary — and no limit to the number of candidates who may appear on the ranked-choice ballot. Election Day is Nov. 5.

To date, 20 candidates have announced their intent to run for council. More are expected by the time candidate filings close in August.

Here are a few key dates to keep in mind:

  • A forum for Ward 6 candidates is set for 6:30 to 8 p.m. Feb. 27 at the East Side Freedom Library, 1105 Greenbrier St. The invited candidates are Alexander Bourne, Tony Her, Danielle Swift, Terri Thao and Nelsie Yang.
  • The St. Paul DFL will host precinct caucuses citywide at 2:30 p.m. on March 10. Delegates to the ward conventions will be chosen, and candidates will be endorsed at the conventions. Wards 2, 3 and 4 will host their ward conventions at 4:30 p.m. on the same date.Locations are: Ward 1, Capitol Hill Gifted and Talented Magnet School; Ward 2, Humboldt High School; Ward 3, Highland Park High School; Ward 4, Murray Middle School; Ward 5, Como High School; Ward 6, Hazel Park Prep Academy; and Ward 7, Harding High School.
  • The St. Paul DFL will host its Ward 6 convention at 9 a.m. April 27 at Hazel Park Prep; its Ward 1 convention at 1:30 p.m. April 28 at Capitol Hill Gifted and Talented Magnet School; its Ward 7 convention at 1:30 p.m. May 4; and its Ward 5 convention at 1:30 p.m. May 5 at Como High School.
  • The St. Paul DFL will endorse school board candidates during the party’s citywide convention, which will begin at 1:30 p.m. on June 23 at a location to be determined.
  • City Council candidates can file for office with Ramsey County Elections from July 30 to Aug. 13.
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