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Turning Leaf garden designs by Turning Leaf Garden Designs - 4d ago

January and February can be dreary months. With the festiveness of Christmas left behind and the charm of the lights and decorations put to rest for another year the beginning of the calendar year can feel somewhat dull and empty with no sense of sparkle or excitement.

Very often it is the grey and damp weather in particular that makes us reluctant to embrace the great outdoors, and with that some rewarding and enjoyable hands on gardening tasks may be left for another day!

But now is the chance to counteract the overindulgence of the past seasonal festivities!  Gardening guarantees good exercise, plenty of fresh air and replenishing the soul by discovering how nature is beginning to come back to life and discovering forgotten horticultural treasures around your outdoor space.

Of course, there will always be a list of essential garden jobs in preparation for the new gardening year like cleaning pots, green houses, patios, painting fences and gates, recycling your Christmas tree for mulch, etc. but why not start with a handful of gentle and enjoyable tasks to ‘ease in’ so to speak?

DISCOVER: The observant eye will quickly discover a wealth of changes in the garden since ‘putting it to bed’ in late autumn or early winter.  By now there should be a show of:

  • Hellebore
  • Tips of daffodils, crocuses, bluebells, tulips
  • Snowdrops and winter aconites starting to flower
  • Sedums showing new buds
  • Ornamental quince with leaves and flower buds
  • Ornamental cherries in flower (winter flowering)
  • Winter flowering shrubs like Viburnum carlesii, witchhazel, winter flowering jasmine, Lonicera x purpusii ‘Winter Beauty’, Camellia, catkins and of course fabulous displays of winter stems from dogwoods
Image source: Gardener’s Path

Last year’s mild weather has caused some confusion in the plant world so that plants like hazel, for example, have produced catkins in November/ December, which are now enriching the winter months turning a beautiful coppery pink as they catch the sunlight.

FREE THE SPRING TREASURES: Now is the time to cut back Hellebore foliage from the previous year to help display their beautiful spring blooms. If snowdrops or crocuses, etc. are covered by foliage of adjacent perennials or shrubs, these should be freed so their full potential can be appreciated.  Likewise, carefully rake away accumulated leaves to reveal these spring beauties.

BIRDS: Birds are also active now so listen out for their enthusiastic song and watch them relentlessly trying to attract a female for nesting.

Maintaining bird feeders clean and well stocked can be made a daily task. Feeders often clog up in damp weather causing for the seed to rot or germinate. A well-visited feeding station is a joy to watch. If there is no water feature in the garden then a bird bath is essential for attracting garden bird species. This doesn’t have to give a forced impression or needn’t look too utilitarian: an old weathered concrete or terracotta bowl/ pot covered in lichen is ideal and can create an attractive feature/ focal point within the traditional garden. Alternatively, a modern container can achieve a similar purpose in a contemporary garden.  Let your imagination take hold and re-purpose something old or new!

Image source: Pinterest

WORKOUT: For gardeners keen to engage in more sweat breaking activities there is a plot to be dug over! Vacant plots or borders that have not been dug already could now do with some work to break up the soil ready for more cultivation in spring. This could go hand-in-hand with a cup of tea afterwards whilst combing through your seeds and planning crops for the year ahead.

If the garden contains apple and/ or pear trees now is the time to see to them which can also involve some muscle strength especially if thicker branches have to be removed. Usually, and if the tree is easily accessible and not too tall, pruning will be more strategic than anything else.

Make sure all pruning equipment is sharp and in good working order to prevent damage to branches.

EARLY VEG: For the practical gardener thinking about early vegetables to grow is an exciting start to the garden year. Now is the time to start forcing rhubarb, sow leeks, onions, broad beans, hardy peas, spinach and carrots under cover.

HARVESTING: There is always an excuse to go down the garden if there are things to get for the dining table so pick up a basket and see what there is to be harvested from your range of winter vegetables, salads and herbs.

Image source: bbc.co.uk

There are also some lovely flowers and catkins to pick from the garden that are wonderfully suited for indoor display:

  • Snowdrops
  • Hellebores
  • Aconites
  • Prunus autumnalis
  • Early Camellia
  • Hamamelis
  • Sarcococca
  • Pussy Willow
  • Hazel and Alder catkins

The early months of the year offer plenty of opportunity to get active outside whilst discovering the beauty of an awaking garden, and, with a bit of luck, there might be some sunshine too!

The post The best new year exercise: GARDENING appeared first on Turning Leaf garden designs.

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Here at Turning Leaf Garden Designs we don’t confine ourselves to single private residential gardens, we also take on commercial work too, where it has a residential requirement.

Ensuring the quality of both private and communal landscape spaces is our number one priority and working to developer’s timeframes and liaising closely with other contractors ensures the new occupants enjoy a swift transition into their new homes and start enjoying their gardens from day 1.

Here is the story of our latest venture!

Setting out
All Saints Primary School

The old primary school building is a Grade II listed building, located with a conservation area. The proposal included a sensitive conversion of this charming building into 8 stunning apartments, complete with architectural features such as mullion windows, fire places and galleried upper levels.

Our skilled and professional ground team prepared for the implementation of the approved scheme and familiarised themselves with the planting plans before the first day of scheduled on site works.

Soon as the first plant delivery arrived the team dived into action and with a flurry of activity as plants were set out and planting commenced within the hour. 

Planting 100 plants a day is an average amount each member of our team aims for but with workable graded topsoil and the weather on our side, this can be easily achieved and, in some cases, surpassed.

Planted Vinca

Therefore, with a dedicated team of four, all the plants were in the ground within 3 days.

The most rewarding aspect of this job was undoubtedly the amount of interest, with nearby residents coming over to see the work that was being done and frequently making comments appreciative of how the landscape was coming along. Many of these residents remembered the building in its former glory as a school, and it was so rewarding to hear how pleased they were to see the quality of the restoration work.

Once the turf was laid and planting finished watering was the number one priority, which the Turning Leaf team undertook until practical completion and hand-over to the developer.

Now settled in the ground, along with the new residents (settled into the building) the landscape is looking healthy and happy. We are so pleased with the end result.

The post Commercial Planting appeared first on Turning Leaf garden designs.

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Following on from our articles on Early and Mid-Spring work in the garden, here are some top tips as we move into late April and the beginning of May…

Pruning
Source: gardenersworld.com

By now days and nights should be frost free which means pruning can be done without harming plants and compromising this years’ growth.

Prune spring-flowering shrubs after flowering, clip box hedges and topiary as well as evergreen shrubs and hedges. Remember to check for nesting birds before cutting any shrubs or hedges to avoid harming our regular garden visitors!

Grass growth within lawns will be well under way by now and regular cutting is required. Refrain from cutting grass too short though, if it hasn’t rained in a long time!

It is now safe to plant out half hardy annuals, for colourful displays in containers and borders during the summer and early autumn months. Keep greenhouse doors and vents open on warm days to provide plenty of ventilation for seedlings and young plants.

Dahlias can also be put into the ground now, either newly bought tubers or overwintered ones from the previous year.

With all these long lists of tasks on your mind, don’t forget to keep on top of those weeds and continue to hoe your borders regularly,  even if it seems that you have only just done it!

As springtime draws to a close those plants that have provided us with cheerful spring colour can now be put to rest for another year: lift and divide overcrowded clumps of spring bulbs and remove foliage as it dies off. Don’t be tempted to cut foliage while still green - be patient!

The weeks of spring never seem long enough to carry out those jobs aplenty around the garden.

Gardening
Break Source: shutterstock.com

The thing is: do what can be done in your own time and enjoy - gardening is supposed to be relaxing and therapeutic!

Remember, Turning Leaf is always here to help!  Contact us if you need a one off ‘Spring Tidy’ visit to put things into order (or indeed regular maintenance), a ‘Walk and Talk’ from a Member of The Society of Garden Designers to give you some real inspiration if you are planning a bit of a re-vamp, and if you think you need wholesale change, take a look at our Garden Design Services!

The post Springtime Gardening ~ Part 3 of 3 appeared first on Turning Leaf garden designs.

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Following on from our article on Early Spring work in the garden, here are some top tips as we move into April…

Mid Spring

If warmer weather persists some plants, especially climbers, may have put on a decent amount of growth already and will require tying in.

The waterlilies in your garden pond are now ready to be divided, perhaps as part of a pond tidy up. Don’t forget to start feeding your fish again.

Apply a lawn ‘Weed and Feed’ in dry weather and start cutting your lawn a few days afterwards. This will encourage new growth and develop string root systems. Repair lawn areas where required. Carry out planting works: a trip to your local plant nursery is good springtime therapy! Remember: plant herbaceous and small shrubs in single species groups to create harmony within your borders. Add some specimen plants (focal plants) that are often taller and eye-catching.

`Cutting your lawn'
Source: mightyoakgames.com

A purpose organic fertilizer should now be applied to trees, shrubs and borders in general. Fish blood and bone meal makes a good slow release fertilizer to give your garden plants a boost.

If you have sown half-hardy annuals indoors in early spring they may be ready now to be pricked out so they can establish into strong plants.

Remember, Turning Leaf is always here to help!  Contact us if you need a one off ‘Spring Tidy’ visit to put things into order (or indeed regular maintenance), a ‘Walk and Talk’ from a Member of The Society of Garden Designers to give you some real inspiration if you are planning a bit of a re-vamp, and if you think you need wholesale change, take a look at our Garden Design Services!

The post Springtime Gardening ~ Part 2 of 3 appeared first on Turning Leaf garden designs.

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With most of the cold weather hopefully passed, increased hours of daylight and the first garden ambassadors of spring showing off, it is time to give your garden a head start to the gardening year that surely promises to be full of horticultural excitement!

There never seems to be a lot to do this time of the year as the garden is just ‘waking up’ and nothing much has put on growth. However this is deceptive! Here is a collection of tasks to be done…

Early Spring

Thorough work in the garden now will pay off during the following months. Once the ground has reasonably dried up, remove leaf litter and dead plant material that has been left during the winter months for plant protection and hibernation/food sources for garden wildlife. This could include cutting down last year’s flower stems, previous years’ dead foliage and cutting back or combing through ornamental grasses. With the recent wet weather new growth emerging at ground level is likely to rot if not ‘freed’.

It is important to do your weeding now when perennial weeds are small with small roots. Pernicious weeds in particular, such as creeping buttercup, dandelion, chickweed, nettle and the like ought to be tackled as early as possible.

Now is also a good time to prune bush and climbing roses to maintain their shape and enable sufficient airflow. Milder temperatures give the opportunity to lift and divide herbaceous perennials which is an easy and cost efficient way to produce more plants to stock up your borders.

Early Garden Visitor
Source: gardeningsite.com

All dogwoods and shrubby willows can be pruned now - either down to the ground if they are particularly large or cut out 1/3 of the stems. They have now done their job of providing winter interest and you must do your bit to ensure vibrant stem colours next winter!

Summer flowering bulbs can be planted now, either within borders or in containers for colourful patio displays.

Compost as much of your garden arisings as possible, excluding perennial weeds, to produce homemade compost and mulch ready to use in your garden in a few years’ time.

When working within your borders be mindful that fresh buds or new growth are tender and may snap easily. Also, overwintering wildlife may still enjoy the cosiness of leaf cover in areas of the garden that haven’t been touched for the last few months. Garden in these areas with a gentle hand!

Applying mulch to the borders in the form of compost or well-rotted manure helps to supress weed growth, contains moisture, provides organic matter for soil organisms to work in and makes the borders look neat as well.

If you have a cutting garden or an area dedicated to growing fruit and vegetables, its still not too late to sow your seeds which would mostly be started indoors or in a heated green house.

Be reminded that is not just the plants and lawns in need of attention, patios, gardens steps, trellises, pergolas and garden furniture too require maintenance before the proper start of the growing season. Clean all paving with a pressure washer – it is not just a visual improvement but will also make patios, paths and steps less slippery. Wooden structures and garden furniture may be in need of a lick of paint or stain: they’ll soon be required to fully function - summer is not far around the corner!

  Feature image source: Pintreset.com

Remember, Turning Leaf is always here to help!  Contact us if you need a one off ‘Spring Tidy’ visit to put things into order (or indeed regular maintenance), a ‘Walk and Talk’ from a Member of The Society of Garden Designers to give you some real inspiration if you are planning a bit of a re-vamp, and if you think you need wholesale change, take a look at our Garden Design Services!

The post Springtime Gardening ~ Part 1 of 3 appeared first on Turning Leaf garden designs.

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The winter season can be particularly challenging for the wildlife visiting our gardens. Recent weather has brought with it freezing temperatures and even snow! Water sources for bathing and drinking are hard to find and food is limited, especially if the cold weather carries on for longer than expected.

So what can be done to give our garden wildlife a hand? A few simple and inexpensive actions can make a huge difference and give us plenty of joy. By the way, looking after our wildlife is certainly one of the essential ‘garden jobs to do’ during the winter months when plants as yet require very little care.

BIRDS are probably the type of wildlife we as gardeners or wildlife enthusiasts think about in the first place. Robin, blue tit, long tail tit, gold finch, blackbirds, doves & pigeons, sparrows, wrens…just to name a few of our regular feathered garden visitors. 

All they require is water to drink and topped up bird feeders. Bird feeders are available for a variety of bird seed: general garden bird seed mix, niger seed for gold finches, peanuts for woodpeckers and fat balls for a range of garden birds.

Blackbird, Source: peregrinesbirdblog@blogspot.com
Bird Feeding Station
Source: Turning Leaf Garden Designs original
.

Bird feeding stations can also consist of a wire netting raised platform so you can put out mealworms or waxworms as a great source of protein. Any leftover cheese gratings or apple bits from your breakfast or lunchtime meal? The garden birds would appreciate them and they are not wasted, just a thought! I have a bird table in the shape of a little house in my garden which, other than providing seed, also functions as a shelter whilst birds feed. Talking about shelter, any bird boxes around the garden will provide good shelter, especially if the garden is thick with snow!

Bird baths and drinking stations in the garden are fantastic but they require maintenance, in particular when it’s freezing, or they become useless. Simply defrost any ice with warm water, clear out any algae and leaves and fill up with fresh water. Repeat defrosting if icy temperatures persist.

Just think that feeding birds outside your window or birds on your garden bird bath give you the chance to watch and observe them-get out those binoculars!

A further popular guest in the garden is the SQUIRREL. Squirrels do not hibernate, instead, they cache food during autumn to eat when food is scarce. We find buried walnuts from our tree all over the place from garden pots to lawns, mostly when a walnut sapling appears! Sometimes the bushy-tailed creatures are less welcome if they help themselves to the peanuts in the bird feeders but there are other foods that can be provided to get the squirrels attention when their own stores run low: offer them nuts such as hazelnuts, walnuts and almonds, plus some chopped apple, beans, carrots or spinach and perhaps install a little platform made from wire netting to carry the foods.

Bird Feeding Station
Source: Turning Leaf Garden Designs original
Squirrel
Source: Pinterest

Some of us are lucky enough to spot foxes and badgers in our gardens. If you are able and willing to encourage them into your garden then this is the type of food they would appreciate during the winter months that are the toughest times of the year for them:

FOXES: Put out cheese, boiled potatoes, chicken carcasses, bread and fat scraps at dusk

BADGERS: provide earthworms - when the ground is frozen and lightly cooked meats, cheese, peanuts and fruit (we find they love bananas-check out our website tweets!)

Remember not to leave out large quantities of food each evening to avoid your visitors becoming dependent on your handouts! Think if wildlife will have to cross a busy road to get to the food you provide, if so, it becomes a danger for them and feeding is not advisable.

Foxes and badgers alike need water to drink and your garden pond is just the place! Your garden pond will need a hole in the ice. If it freezes over completely toxic gases can build up in the water of a frozen pond, which may kill any FISH or FROGS that are hibernating at the bottom.

Make the hole carefully melting the ice with a warm pan or similar and never break the pond ice forcefully or with boiling water, as this can harm or even kill any fish that live in it. Putting a small floating ball in the hole can help to keep it open.

Let your garden go wild during the winter months!

Undisturbed areas such as piles of leaves, brushwood or left seed heads and grasses provide perfect places and materials for nesting, hibernation, resting and hiding as well as additional food sources for animals. Just think of our garden HEDGEHOGS!  That means be prepared to leave tidying your garden until early spring. If you have space to accommodate a compost heap, that will become a welcome habitat for TOADS, and even GRASS SNAKES and SLOW-WORMS.

FINALLY: Take the cover of snow in your garden as an opportunity to spot tracks! Find out what who comes to visit while you are asleep!

 
 
If you would like help realising the full potential of your garden we provide a full range of services: ‘Design, Build, Maintain’ so don’t hesitate to contact us! Alternatively, for more professional advice on garden maintenance and design tips keep following our blog.

The post Caring for wildlife during the winter appeared first on Turning Leaf garden designs.

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Turning Leaf garden designs by Sophie Hauser - 1y ago

With February often being the coldest month of the year spring seems far away but with increasing hours of daylight and birds starting their nesting behaviours perhaps it’s time to think about early flowering plants or enjoy a few ‘garden treats’ while we wait for warmer weather. Early flowerers don’t just include the obvious spring flowering bulbs such as tulips and daffodils which are often planted in pots so that there is no long wait for their foliage to die back within borders and, primarily, so they can be enjoyed right outside the window or patio door!

There is a range of plants, including bulbs, which make the garden attractive during the early (or late) months of the year. Some of them often take you by surprise when they show before nature even seems to have woken up after the long dormant winter season.

Bulbs

Winter Aconites (Eranthis hyemalis) are native woodland plants flowering from mid to late winter bearing a bright yellow buttercup-like flower. They are efficient ground cover plants for shady or semi-shady positions, approx. 13cm tall, forming a vibrant yellow carpet often coinciding with the first snowdrop blooms. Snowdrops and Winter aconites are very effective when used as under planting for trees and shrubs.

Winter aconite and Snowdrops
Source: www.gardenia.net

 

Galanthus nivalis (Common snowdrop) is the best known and most widespread of the 20 species in the genus Galanthus. Some Snowdrops are especially ornamental and attractive such as the double G. nivalis ‘Flore Pleno’ or the broad leaved G. woronowii.

Snowdrops and Winter aconites are best bought and planted ‘in the green’ just after flowering time.

Another eye-catching plant flowering during January and February is Iris reticulata - a dwarf, bulbous perennial to 15cm in height, with narrow, stiffy erect leaves. Their fragrant flowers, approx. 8cm in width, are light blue, deep blue or dark purple and will add early interest to the front of a sunny border or an alpine garden. Bulbs are planted in late summer or early autumn.

Similarly attractive are Spring Crocuses, native to our woodlands, scrub and meadows and grown from corms. These delicate perennials flower in February and March in tones of blue, yellow and white. Crocuses can be planted within borders or directly into the lawn where they will naturalise profusely in order to create a bigger display each year as they mature.

Snowdrops, Crocus and iris reticulata alike are especially showy if scattered around the base or amongst colourful dogwood winter stems!

Iris reticulata
Source: www.gardenia.net

Trees and Shrubs

But it’s not only at ground level where early winter/spring colour appears. We must not forget the variety of beautiful shrubs and trees available. Camellias come into bloom anywhere between January and March depending on the weather. Flower colours range from white and shades of pink through to red, and their dark glossy foliage forms a wonderful contrast to the blooms and provides good winter interest.

Deciduous spring-flowering Magnolias are another superb choice for early flowering shrubs although flowers can get damaged and browned off by cold weather. There is a huge variety to choose from with medium sized Magnolia stellata being a classic. All magnolias have ornate sizable furry buds.

From early March onwards it’s the ornamental Cherries and Plums that come into their own. There are Prunus cerasifera ‘Nigra’ (Plum), Prunus ‘Accolade’ (Cherry) and Prunus sargentii (Cherry) just to name a few of the earliest. Ornamental Cherries and Plums bloom in pastel pinks or near to whites and grow into small to medium sized trees with rounded crowns or large shrubs. These plants are easy to grow and provide stunning winter interest through their often attractive bark and strong red to orange autumn colour. Many of the ornamental Plums and Cherries are also suitable as street trees.

There is an additional selection of medium to large shrubs which will give your garden the ‘wow-factor’ during the bleak winter months if planted as a specimen in a wide border so their full charm can be appreciated:

Hamamelis
Source: www.bigplant nursery.co.uk

Hamamelis x intermedia or H. mollis (yellow, orange and red flowering varieties with unusual small flowers borne on leafless branches in mid to late winter or sometimes in the autumn. Deciduous shrub, some with autumn colour)

Viburnum carlesii (deciduous shrub with round clusters of white very fragrant flowers emerging from pink buds. Black fruits for additional wildlife interest and brilliant red autumn colour to foliage)

 Daphne bholua (winter-flowering evergreen or semi-evergreen shrub, very fragrant flushed purplish-pink flowers. There is a good selection of small Daphnes available too!)

Lonicera 'Winter Beauty'
Source: www.rareplantfair.co.uk

Lonicera x purpusii ‘Winter Beauty (flowers from December through to March with very fragrant white flowers)

Last but not least there are the hardy winter- and spring-flowering heaths (species of Erica), often forgotten about or considered old-fashioned but they are invaluable if there is a suitable spot for them in the garden and their benefit to wildlife is great.  They are low growing shrubs and look fantastic mass planted to the front of a border or in a ‘Heath and Heather Garden’ with conifers and boulders and drift wood as ‘natural sculptures’. Actually, Ericas make a rather attractive display in a winter container.

Erica have evergreen fine, needle-like foliage with racemes or panicle of small, bell-shaped or tubular flowers. Flowers usually appear in white and shades of pink and purple. Erica require acidic (some will tolerate neutral to alkaline) soil and full sun to dappled shade. They image below shows a plant combination ‘natural style’ that works well: deep pink Erica and white Wood Anemone.

Erica & Anemone
Source: www.gardenia.net

If you would like help realising the full potential of your garden we provide a full range of services: ‘Design, Build, Maintain’ so don’t hesitate to contact us! Alternatively for more professional advice on garden maintenance and design tips keep following our blog.

The post Early Flowerers appeared first on Turning Leaf garden designs.

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As we take down the lights and the Christmas decorations many of us wonder what is there is to look forward to in January?

Of course, the garden, for most, wouldn’t be the first place to escape during these dull, late winter months. Surely, we must wait till spring before there’s any glimmer of life in the garden?

With frost settling in there are many plants with features that can be utilised in Garden Design to give a fantastic display in the winter. Here at Turning Leaf in Essex we choose the best combination of plants to keep a garden looking bright and magical, even after the lights have been taken down.

Here I will explore three main winter features;

Foliage

Personally, I’m a sucker for colourful foliage. Although many plants shed their leaves in the winter there is a vast variety of evergreen and semi-evergreen plants that can be put to work in a garden design. The shape and colours of evergreen leaves can create a back drop to the summer blooms and fill in gaps in a spring bed, but in the winter these plants steal the show.

 

Fatsia jarponica, growing up to around 3 meters, is a fantastic structural plant with intricate lobed leaved. As it grows best in shady places Fatsia is often used as a textural background in garden design. However, due to it’s size, it can become a focal point unaccompanied in the winter months.

Dryopteris, Asplenium & polypodium are just a select few evergreen ferns. Although often used for textural backgrounds in garden design an arrangement using a combination of ferns can fill a bed with vibrant greens throughout winter.

Fatsia jarponica Source: Turning Leaf Garden Design original
Euonymus fortunii Emerald Gaiety Source: RHS

 

Euonymus fortunii provokes interest, not with the shape and size of it’s foliage, but it’s unmistakable variegated nature.

Although there are other variegated plants (Fatsia comes in a variegated form) Euonymus is one of the most common plant for garden design due to its reliability, and the variety of sizes and colours of this shade tolerant family.

 

Although there are many evergreen/semi-evergreen plants with vibrant foliage for those winter months, Bergenias are one of the most reliable and versatile. This ground cover plant has various tints of colour in the foliage some of which transform into deep reds and purples in the winter; such as Bergenia ‘Claire Maxine’, ‘Sunningdale’ and ‘Eroica’.

Bergenia Claire Maxine Source: RHS
Stems

Stems are often covered and forgotten during spring and summer, but, it is in these winter months that we truly appreciate the colours of plants grown for their beautiful stems.

Cornus Source: Turning Leaf Garden Designs Orignial 

Cornus alba is well know for its vibrant red stem. However, in garden design we know there are many other varieties of Cornus which can be used and arranged together to create a vibrant structural display in the winter months. From the bright red of the Cornus alba to the greenish yellow of Cornus sericea Flaviramea planting design can create stunning winter focal points.

 

Rubus cockburnianus the white stemmed bramble can be used to a similar effect as Cornus in garden design. Planted together the arched stems can contrast well the ridged straight stems of Cornus.

Cornus alba & Rubus Cockburnianus Source: www.gapphotos.com

 

Corylus avellana ‘contorta’ relies on the shape of it’s stems for winter interest. Although the twisted branches have been bred and only exist in this cultivar of Corylus avellana, it still has the same ecological benefits as the original native plant.

Seed Heads

The final aspect of plants that can be utilised for their form during the winter are seed heads. Leaving seed heads in-situ during the winter also benefits wildlife, providing habitats for insects and other small creatures whilst also providing food through the scarce months of winter.

Dipsacus (Teasle) is often seen self-seeded in the country side in its more wild form Dipsacus fullonum. However, it’s cultivated version Dipsacus sativus, originally bred for it’s use in the textile industry, is now often used in garden design as an ornamental plant. The distinctive seed head can be left throughout the winter.

Not only do they provide interest for us in the garden they are an import food source for birds and can also be used in floristry. Spraying the seed heads gold or silver can liven up floral displays for the winter table. 

Teasle Floristry Source: Teasle Floristry

 

 

- Written by Sophie Hauser Landscape Assistant - MSc (Landscape Architecture)

If you would like help realising the full potential of your garden we provide a full range of services: ‘Design, Build, Maintain’ so don’t hesitate to contact us! Alternatively for more professional advice on garden maintenance and design tips keep following our blog.

The post Garden Design which accentuates the winter forms appeared first on Turning Leaf garden designs.

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