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Beauty insiders Janey Hayward and Susie Prichard-Casey have just released a new book Pretty as a Peach, featuring over 75 natural beauty recipes for radiant skin, hair and nails. From foot balms to body scrubs, cleansers to hair conditions, lip tints to blushers, it contains simple homemade, eco-friendly recipes so you can make them all at home.

We’re lucky to be able to share one of the recipes from the book, so you can make your own peach, rose water and lemon face mask – enjoy:

Peach, rose water and lemon face mask for oily, blemished skin

Rich in folates, peaches replenish and boost cellular renewal, as their natural vitamin E content helps restore skin and can assist in reducing blemishes, such as acne scarring.

You will need:
½ ripe peach • ½ lemon • 1 teaspoon rose water

To prepare:
Purée the peach in a food processor to a fine paste. Place in a glass bowl and add the lemon juice and rose water. Mix well.

To use:
Apply with fingertips to the face and neck, avoiding the eye area and leave for 20 minutes. Rinse gently in warm water and pat dry. Skin will feel fresh and thoroughly clean.

Recipe from Pretty as a Peach: Over 75 Natural Beauty Recipes for Radiant Hair, Skin and Nails by Janet Hayward and Susie Prichard-Casey.

Illustrated by Arielle Gamble, published by Modern Books.

£9.99 hardback.

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By dietitian nutritionist Gretchen Vannice, head of global nutrition education for Wiley’s Finest

Most of us are familiar with cholesterol. We get cholesterol in our food and our bodies make cholesterol. In fact, our bodies make all the cholesterol we need so we don’t have to eat it, but many of us like to eat foods that contain cholesterol; it’s found in meats, dairy foods, and eggs.

We need cholesterol but not too much. Cholesterol is very important in human health. It is primarily carried through the blood stream as LDL-cholesterol (often called “bad” cholesterol) and as HDL-cholesterol (often called “good” cholesterol). We need both forms but it’s most important to have healthy levels of both. High levels of LDL-cholesterol aren’t good for your health because LDL-cholesterol can build-up plaque in your blood vessels, which restricts blood flow and circulation.

Plant sterols are proven to reduce cholesterol levels
Plant sterols come from plants. We only get plant sterols when we eat plant-based foods or take supplements. Plant sterols are sometimes called phytosterols (phyto = plant). Our bodies do not make plant sterols. Good food sources of plant sterols include wheat germ, corn oil, lentils, nuts, and sesame seeds. For dietary supplements, plant sterols can be made from seed oil (like corn or soy) or trees (such as pine trees). The most common forms of plant sterols are beta-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol.

Our ancestors who ate plant-based diets had naturally high levels of plant sterols. Today, however, Brits have much higher cholesterol levels. Not so good for our health.

The typical British diet provides around 300mg a day of plant sterols. Between 800-2,400mg of plant sterols a day can keep cholesterol levels within a healthy range.

Results from more than 60 clinical studies report:

  • Getting 800-1,000mg/day of plant sterols (from diet and supplements) can reduce LDL-cholesterol by five percent.
  • Consuming up to 2,000mg/day of plant sterols (from diet and supplements) can reduce LDL-cholesterol by 10-15 percent.
  • Consuming plant sterols is healthful and beneficial for everyone, but the greatest reductions in LDL-cholesterol are reported in people who have higher LDL-cholesterol levels.

Plant sterols work naturally
The plant sterols and cholesterol have similar chemistry and they can substitute for each other. For example, when we consume beta-sitosterol, it replaces (or “substitutes”) cholesterol and shuttles the excess cholesterol out of our body through our bowels. It is that simple and effective, naturally.

For best results, take plant sterols with meals
Beta-sitosterol works best when consumed with meals. You can take supplements containing beta-sitosterol with any meal, but it’s ideal to take them with the largest meal of the day.

About Gretchen Vannice
Gretchen Vannice has a Master’s degree in Nutrition Science and is a registered dietitian nutritionist. She specialises in omega-3 research and natural health. She is the head of global nutrition rducation for Wiley’s Finest. Gretchen has several academic publications and has authored two books: Making Sense of Omega-3s: The Good Fats and Improving Omega-3 Nutrition, A Guide for Health Professionals.

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By nutritional therapist Christine Bailey

A low carb, high protein option ideal for an energising lunch or light evening meal. Quick and simple to prepare. You can spoon into crisp lettuce leaves and drizzle over a little chilli sauce for a spicy kick.

(serves 2)

Ingredients:
200g chicken, cut into dice
1 tbsp olive oil
1 small red onion, diced
1 green pepper, deseeded and diced
1 tbsp grated root ginger
1 red chilli, deseeded and diced
Handful of coriander leaves, chopped
2 tbsp fish sauce
Juice of 1 lime
Juice of 1 lemon
1 tbsp honey
1 tbsp tamari, soy sauce
Little gem lettuce leaves, separated
Thai sweet chilli sauce to serve

Method:
Heat the oil in a frying pan or wok and stir fry the chicken until it begins to turn light brown. Add the onion, pepper, ginger, chilli and stir for a further 3-4 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the coriander leaves.

Combine the fish sauce, lime and lemon juice, honey and tamari. Pour over the chicken and season to taste.

If wished, spoon the mixture into lettuce leaves to serve and drizzle over a little sweet chilli sauce.

About Christine Bailey
Christine is an award-winning nutritionist, chef and author. With a passion for creating delicious nourishing recipes, Christine has a reputation for transforming people’s health and love of real food. As well as seeing clients and writing for national press,  Christine runs ‘Nourish’ cookery classes including popular hands-on days for children. Christine is an inspiring nutritional chef well known for her engaging style and enthusiasm.

Christine is the author of numerous health and recipe books including ebooks on paleo eating and gluten-free recipes. Her books include her popular Supercharged Juices and Smoothies, The Juice Diet Book, The Raw Food Diet Book and Eat to Get Younger. Christine has particular specialisms in paleo diets, allergy free cooking, digestive health, coeliac disease and other autoimmune conditions, allergies, healthy ageing and weight loss.

For more information visit her website www.christinebailey.co.uk or follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

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By nutritional therapist Christine Bailey

This is a beautiful light yet creamy tasting soup. The addition of pear provides a natural sweetness to this soup and plenty of additional fibre to keep you feeling fuller for longer.

(serves 2)

Ingredients:
1 tbsp olive oil
1 small onion, chopped
1 garlic clove
150g broccoli, chopped
1 fennel bulb, chopped
1 pear, cored and chopped
600ml vegetable stock
Olive oil for drizzling

Method:
Heat the olive oil in a large pan and sauté the onion and garlic for a couple of minutes.

Add the broccoli and fennel and stir to coat in the oil. Add the vegetable stock and bring to a boil. Simmer for 20-25 minutes until the vegetables are tender.

Place the soup in a blender with the pear and process until smooth and creamy.

Serve with a drizzle of olive oil.

About Christine Bailey
Christine is an award-winning nutritionist, chef and author. With a passion for creating delicious nourishing recipes, Christine has a reputation for transforming people’s health and love of real food. As well as seeing clients and writing for national press,  Christine runs ‘Nourish’ cookery classes including popular hands-on days for children. Christine is an inspiring nutritional chef well known for her engaging style and enthusiasm.

Christine is the author of numerous health and recipe books including ebooks on paleo eating and gluten-free recipes. Her books include her popular Supercharged Juices and Smoothies, The Juice Diet Book, The Raw Food Diet Book and Eat to Get Younger. Christine has particular specialisms in paleo diets, allergy free cooking, digestive health, coeliac disease and other autoimmune conditions, allergies, healthy ageing and weight loss.

For more information visit her website www.christinebailey.co.uk or follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

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