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‘Scientifically formulated to support a vegan diet’

Transdermal experts BetterYou recently launched the world’s very first vegan health oral spray, a specially formulated oral spray that combines the fundamental nutrients needed to support a vegan diet.

It contains four essential nutrients that are often deficient in those with a plant-based diet: vitamin D3, vitamin B12, iron and iodine. All of these nutrients play an important role in our health, so it’s important to ensure adequate levels. Iron contributes to a reduction in tiredness and fatigues, vitamin D3 supports a normal immune system, vitamin B12 contributes to normal energy metabolism and iodine supports normal cognitive function.

The Vegan Health Daily Oral Spray uses vitamin D3V, a 100 percent plant-origin Vitamin D3 – making it suitable for vegans.

It’s super easy to take and is a convenient alternative to tablets and capsules. Simply spray four sprays a day into your mouth, onto the inside of your cheek, and hold for a few seconds – that’s it! The spray has a natural mixed berries flavour so tastes lovely too.

The product is also great for those looking to reduce their environmental impact. It’s the first BetterYou product to use packaging made using Ocean Plastic – so the bottle is made from 70 percent Ocean Waste Plastic (plastic recovered from the Indian Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Philippine Sea) along with 30 percent Post-Consumer Recycling (PCR). The bottle is also 100 percent recyclable too.

The bottle is small enough to pop into your handbag and suitable for hand luggage (which I love), plus one bottle contains 48 daily doses – making it really great value for money.

The Vegan Health Daily Oral Spray is available now for £14.95.

www.betteryou.com 

The post BetterYou – Vegan Health Daily Oral Spray appeared first on True Health magazine.

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Faith in Nature recently launched two new ranges, which focus on the active ‘superfood’ ingredients of turmeric and dragon fruit.

The Turmeric & Lemon range includes shampoo, conditioner and body wash. All of the same products are available in the Dragon Fruit range, plus hand wash too. I was lucky enough to be sent bottles of the shampoo, conditioner and body wash from both ranges to try.

On first inspection, I absolutely adored the product packaging and was impressed that the two new ranges are in keeping with the rest of the Faith in Nature range in that they are free from parabens and SLS, made with 100 percent natural fragrances, made with essential oils, and are cruelty free and vegan friendly.

I first tried the Dragon Fruit range, starting with the shampoo. As soon as I poured it into my hands I was hit with a burst of fruity fragrance – the entire range smells truly amazing, fresh, fruity and exotic. The shampoo foamed and applied easily, the conditioner offered the same burst of aroma and coated my hair with ease, and the body wash was my favourite – it was truly a great way to start the day by smothering it all over and again this foamed up and applied easily, which was a surprise as many natural varieties don’t.

I was left pleased after my shower too, my hair felt soft, smooth and super shiny once dry and I was really impressed that my skin felt soft and nourished. The body wash didn’t upset my sensitive skin or dry it out (which often happens with my extremely dry skin!)

I was just as impressed with the Turmeric & Lemon range. All the products foamed and applied easily, and smell gorgeous offering a punch of spicy citrus scent, which is really awakening. I like the fact that this range includes turmeric too, it’s an ingredient that has been used on the skin in India for years and is known for its antioxidant properties.

All the products in both ranges are high quality, packed with fragrance and are made with 99% natural origin ingredients. They are also really good value, priced at £5.79 each for a huge bottle (apart from the hand wash, which is £4.39). What’s not to love?

www.faithinnature.co.uk

The post Faith in Nature’s New Dragonfruit and Turmeric & Lemon Ranges appeared first on True Health magazine.

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The importance of vitamin D for our health has been highlighted in recent years. In fact, in 2016, Public Health England (PHE) published new advice recommending everyone to take a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms of vitamin D from October to April, and for children to take one all-year round.

“Vitamin D is one of the most essential vitamins we can supplement, owing to our increasingly indoor lifestyles and the fact that food sources of the vitamin are limited,” comments Keeley Berry, new product development executive at BetterYou. “Known as the ‘sunshine vitamin’, vitamin D plays many a crucial role within the body; ensuring the immune system remains robust to protect the body from common colds and a growing list of autoimmune diseases. It also helps to regulate calcium absorption and delivery to the bones, promoting normal growth amongst children, helping to prevent fractures and keeping teeth strong.

“Vitamin D also contributes to our general wellbeing, with deficiencies commonly manifested in the form of muscle weakness, feeling fatigued and low mood.”

Nutritional therapist Rose Holmes, education and training manager at Rio Health, agrees: “Vitamin D is an essential vitamin that becomes a hormone within the body. It has important roles in skeletal health, immunity, brain function, mood regulation and blood pressure and may help protect from cancer. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to a wide variety of health problems including osteoporosis, depression, insomnia, diabetes, asthma, chronic pain, fibromyalgia, psoriasis, heart disease immune issues including cancer and autoimmune diseases.”

The most notable signs of a vitamin D deficiency can often be overlooked and attributed to other ailments, with symptoms being left under the radar. Constant coughs and colds, feeling tired all of the time, gut problems, aching bones and even low mood can all be signs that your vitamin D levels are low.

How can we ensure we are getting the recommended daily allowance of vitamin D?
The body makes around 90 percent of the vitamin D it needs, but this process can only happen when unprotected skin (bare skin, without clothing or SPF protection) is exposed to direct UV light from the sun. This means that, for those living in the UK and other parts of the northern hemisphere, it can be difficult to ensure our recommended levels are met during the darker autumn and winter months.

“Combining a healthy lifestyle with everyday supplementation provides the best chance of meeting your daily allowance,” explains Berry. “Aim to expose your skin to 10-20 minutes of sunshine each day (without protection, avoiding the midday heat) and follow a diet which includes vitamin D food sources where possible.

“Whilst the Scientific Advisory Commission on Nutrition has concluded that it’s difficult to obtain adequate levels from food sources, fatty fish such as salmon, halibut and mackerel provide good sources of vitamin D, along with fortified foods such as cereals and some yoghurts. Egg yolks also provide a great source of the nutrient – but only when sourced from hens that are fed vitamin D.”

Holmes also recommends mushrooms, such as mitake and portobello, and raw milk: “Whilst raw milk is thought to contain some natural vitamin D, synthetic vitamin D is added to some pasteurised milks including cow’s milk and soy milk.”

As it is difficult to get adequate levels of vitamin D through food sources and UV light, supplementation is recommended.

Try these:
BetterYou’s range of DLux Daily Vitamin D Oral Spays
Best Choice’s range of Vitamin D Oral Sprays
Epigenar’s Vitamin D3 & K2 Drops

The post Why you need Vitamin D appeared first on True Health magazine.

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By nutritional therapist Christine Bailey

Lemon balm is a calming herb and delicious combined with fresh or frozen berries. Using kefir as the base of this ice cream is an easy way to repopulate the gut with beneficial bacteria

(serves 4-6)

Ingredients:
60g cashews or macadamia nuts
300ml kefir or coconut kefir
200g mixed berries, fresh or frozen
30g xylitol, maple syrup or stevia to taste
Juice and zest of 1 lemon
Pinch of sea salt
20g fresh lemon balm leaves

Method:
Place all the ingredients in a high speed blender and process until smooth and creamy. Add the lemon balm and pulse to combine. If you wish leave a little green specks of the lemon balm.

Pour the mixture into an ice cream maker and process according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Once frozen eat straight away or transfer to a freezer proof container and freeze until required.

About Christine Bailey
Christine is an award-winning nutritionist, chef and author. With a passion for creating delicious nourishing recipes, Christine has a reputation for transforming people’s health and love of real food. As well as seeing clients and writing for national press, Christine runs ‘Nourish’ cookery classes including popular hands-on days for children. Christine is an inspiring nutritional chef well known for her engaging style and enthusiasm.

Christine is the author of numerous health and recipe books including ebooks on paleo eating and gluten-free recipes. Her books include her popular Supercharged Juices and Smoothies, The Juice Diet Book, The Raw Food Diet Book and Eat to Get Younger. Christine has particular specialisms in paleo diets, allergy free cooking, digestive health, coeliac disease and other autoimmune conditions, allergies, healthy ageing and weight loss.

For more information visit her website www.christinebailey.co.uk or follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

The post Lemon Balm and Berry Kefir Ice Cream appeared first on True Health magazine.

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We reveal our top tips on how you can control your blood sugar levels, naturally…

Glucose is essential for energy production throughout the body and particularly in the brain. However, it is important to keep blood sugar levels balanced opposed to highs and dips.

“After a sugary snack we may experience a rush of energy,” explains nutritional therapist Natalie Lamb, technical advisor at ADM Protexin, manufacturers of Bio-Kult and Lepicol. “Our pancreas will be working hard to produce lots of insulin to get the glucose into our cells. If not used immediately as an energy source the body will store the excess sugar in the liver, our muscles or as fat around our middle. Glucose storage worked well when we were hunter-gatherers but these days food shortage is rarely a problem. When blood sugar gets low we can experience symptoms such as tiredness, low energy, irritability, dizziness, headaches, poor concentration and subsequent sugar cravings and the cycle starts again.”

Both high and low blood sugar levels can lead to complications, so it’s important to help support blood sugar levels to stay balanced.

High blood sugar can have a negative impact on our weight, energy, mood, brain function and hormones. If blood sugar levels are too high in the short-term it can lead to type 2 diabetes, which can lead to serious health complications in the long-term, including cardiovascular disease, kidney disease and eye, nerve and muscle disorders.

Low blood sugar levels can lead to hypoglycemia, with long-term symptoms including confusion, abnormal behaviour, visual disturbances (including blurred vision), seizures and loss of consciousness.

“Over time, these peaks and troths of blood sugar and insulin production can lead to cells becoming resistant to insulin and the pancreas no longer able to keep up production, leading to a condition called ‘insulin resistance’,” advises Lamb. “We are seeing increasing rates of obesity, hypertension, the metabolic syndrome, type-2 diabetes, and kidney disease. It is thought that sugar, particularly excessive fructose intake, has a critical role to play in the epidemic. Insulin resistance is commonly observed in these conditions.”

How can we naturally control our blood sugar levels?

  • Have protein with every meal: “Be sure to consume a good quality protein source with each meal or snack helping to satisfy hunger and sustain fullness for longer and reduce subsequent sweet cravings later in the afternoon,” comments Lamb.
  • Focus on a healthy diet: “Swap processed foods high in sugar or refined carbs for ‘real foods’ such as colourful seasonal vegetables, salads and fruits supplying you with a wide range of energising nutrients the body needs to function optimally throughout the day,” advises Lamb.
  • Increase your omega-3: “Enjoy some omega-3 fats such as oily fish, flaxseeds and walnuts or saturated fat such as coconut oil, butter or ghee from grass fed cows, helping to ensure fullness after eating, reduce sugar cravings, inflammation and burn stored body fat,” explains Lamb.
  • Create a routine and stick to it: “Stick to a regular routine so your body can regulate hunger hormones and mood fluctuations,” said Lamb. “Keep focused and calm when eating to improve digestion and to notice when you’re full!”
  • Exercise regularly: “Introduce some form of gentle daily exercise such as walking, cycling, dancing or yoga and increase regular movement in your daily routine such as taking the stairs instead of the lift, parking your car further from work or getting off the train a stop early. Remember more muscle mass means more storage capacity for glucose so it won’t get stored as fat,” explains Lamb.

The post Blood Sugar Balance appeared first on True Health magazine.

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We speak to nutritional therapist Hannah Braye, technical advisor at ADM Protexin, manufacturers of the Bio-Kult and Lepicol ranges, to find out about the role that the bacteria in our gut plays and how we can help support it…

The bacteria in your gut are incredibly important for our health. When we hear the word ‘bacteria’, it generally conjures up negative connotations – but our digestive system is actually made up of hundreds of different types of bacteria, some beneficial and others pathogenic. So it’s vital we learn how to support these beneficial bacteria, to help support not just our digestive health, but our overall health too.

We’ve asked an expert, Hannah Braye, to answer all the important questions about gut bacteria, the role it plays and what we can do to ensure we have a healthy gut flora:

How important is our gut bacteria?
Latest research suggests we are home to as many bacteria as we are human cells. Although our gut bacteria are a distinct entity to us, they are so intrinsically linked to our health that they are increasingly being viewed as a real organ of the body. Our gut bacteria exert important metabolic functions, and regulate the inflammatory response via the immune system. Gut microbial imbalance (dysbiosis) has been linked to many human diseases such as allergies, metabolic diseases including obesity and diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), neurodegenerative disorders and mental health disorders (to name just a few). Many studies have shown that the gut microbiome has a fundamental role in maintaining homeostasis and balance not only in the intestines but throughout the entire human body.

What role does our gut bacteria play in terms of overall health?
Beneficial species of bacteria in the gut help to support good health in a variety of ways. For example, they help to protect us against pathogens (disease causing microbes) by competing for nutrients and space on the gut lining and secreting antimicrobial substances. They also help to lower the pH in the gut, making it more difficult for pathogens to thrive. Our gut bacteria also communicate directly with our immune system (70 percent of which is located within the gut), helping to strengthen our defences.

Our gut bacteria also provide us with extra nutrition. Certain fibres aren’t digestible by humans, and it is only when they are fermented by our gut bacteria that we can derive benefit from by-products such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Our gut bacteria also synthesise vitamins such as vitamin K (needed for blood clotting) and B vitamins (needed for energy production).

In addition, beneficial species help support detoxification processes in the body by binding to heavy metals and toxins in the gut, and reducing the workload for the liver.

The gut-brain axis, and in particular how the balance of bacteria in the gut may affect brain health and mood, is an exciting and rapidly evolving area of research. Changes in the gut microbiome, caused by diet and lifestyle factors, are being implicated in a variety of mood and cognitive related conditions.

How does it affect our digestive system?
As well as helping to protect us against pathogens in the gut, having a healthy microbiome is important to ensure regular bowel movements, as our gut bacteria help to stimulate peristalsis and regulate gut motility. Some species of beneficial bacteria also help us digest our food by producing enzymes such as lactase, which helps break down lactose (the sugar found in milk). They also support the health of the gut lining, preventing intestinal hyper-permeability (known as ‘leaky gut’), which protects against inflammation both in the digestive system and more systemically. A healthy gut lining also helps us to absorb more nutrients from our food.

Dysbiosis (an imbalance of gut bacteria) is associated with numerous digestive conditions. For example, a growing body of evidence indicates dysbiosis to be a hallmark of IBS. Bloating can be a sign of dysbiosis in the gut, as beneficial species of bacteria produce little (if any) gas when fermenting fibres, whereas pathogenic species tend to produce more gas.

How can we ensure we support our gut bacteria?
Research is indicating that having a diverse gut microbiome, with lots of different beneficial species, is a key determinant for good health. In order to encourage diversity in the gut it’s recommended to:

Eat a wide variety of different plant foods. Recent research shows the more plants foods you eat (ideally over 30 different types a week), the greater the diversity in the gut, regardless of other dietary factors.

In particular, eat plenty of foods high in prebiotic fibres, such as garlic, onions, shallots, leeks, slightly under ripe bananas, Jerusalem artichokes, asparagus and dandelion greens, as these provide a food source for beneficial species in the gut.

Introduce beneficial species to the gut by regularly consuming traditionally fermented foods such as kefir, live yoghurt, kimchi, sauerkraut, kombucha and miso. These tend to be particularly high in beneficial Lactobacilli and Streptococcus.

Increase your intake of polyphenol rich foods such as berries, green tea, raw cacao, cloves, star anise and other herbs and spices. Polyphenols are packed with antioxidants and are associated with numerous potential health benefits, including increasing beneficial species of bacteria in the gut and inhibiting pathogens.

Regularly spend time outdoors and near animals, for example by taking country walks, signing up to an exercise class in the park, visiting farms and animal sanctuaries or walking a neighbour’s dog.

Regularly take a good quality live bacteria supplement such as Bio-Kult Advanced Multi-Strain Formulation, providing 14 different strains. Bio-Kult Advanced was recently used in the largest-ever double-blind randomised controlled trial of live bacteria supplements in IBS patients ever-conducted. The study in 400 people found that Bio-Kult significantly improved overall symptom severity in IBS patients and was well tolerated.  Abdominal pain reduced by an average of 69 percent, and 34 percent of participants were completely symptom free at the end of the four month trial.

The post Improve your Gut Bacteria appeared first on True Health magazine.

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By nutritional therapist Christine Bailey

A delicious vegan gluten-free waffle topped with creamy mushrooms.

(serves 4)

Ingredients:
200g sweet potato, steamed or baked
125g gluten-free self-raising flour
1 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp sea salt
125ml soy milk
1 tbsp olive oil

For the mushrooms:
1 tbsp olive oil
1 garlic clove, crushed
½ onion, diced
250g button mushrooms, sliced
¼ tsp dijon mustard
1 tbsp nutritional yeast
1 tbsp tamari soy sauce
Sea salt and black pepper
150g coconut yoghurt

Method:
First cook the mushrooms. Heat the oil in a large frying pan and add the garlic, onion and mushrooms. Sauté over a low heat for 5 minutes until the mushrooms begin to brown and soften.

Stir in the mustard, nutritional yeast flakes and soy sauce. Season to taste. Stir in the coconut yoghurt and heat through.

Preheat waffle iron. Place all of the ingredients into a food processor, blending until smooth and fully combined. Add a little more soy milk if needed to create a thick pourable batter.

Spoon batter into your preheated waffle iron and cook according to your waffle iron’s instructions.

Serve the waffles topped with the creamy mushrooms.

About Christine Bailey
Christine is an award-winning nutritionist, chef and author. With a passion for creating delicious nourishing recipes, Christine has a reputation for transforming people’s health and love of real food. As well as seeing clients and writing for national press, Christine runs ‘Nourish’ cookery classes including popular hands-on days for children. Christine is an inspiring nutritional chef well known for her engaging style and enthusiasm.

Christine is the author of numerous health and recipe books including ebooks on paleo eating and gluten-free recipes. Her books include her popular Supercharged Juices and Smoothies, The Juice Diet Book, The Raw Food Diet Book and Eat to Get Younger. Christine has particular specialisms in paleo diets, allergy free cooking, digestive health, coeliac disease and other autoimmune conditions, allergies, healthy ageing and weight loss.

For more information visit her website www.christinebailey.co.uk or follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

The post Sweet Potato Waffles with Creamy Mushrooms appeared first on True Health magazine.

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By medical nutritionist Dr Sarah Brewer, an expert in food, herbs and supplements

Hay fever – also known as seasonal allergic rhinitis – makes life a misery for the one in five people who are sensitive to grass and tree pollens. As well as itchy eyes, a runny or stuffed-up nose, sneezing and sore throat, it can cause sinusitis, worsen eczema or asthma, and stop you sleeping.

Symptoms develop when pollen lands on the delicate mucus membranes of the nose, mouth and eyes and is wrongly identified by the immune system as at threat, resulting in the release of histamine. Histamine heightens your immune response by causing blood vessels to dilate and speeds the arrival of other immune factors into the area. The resulting irritation, inflammation and swelling produces the usual symptoms of hay fever with runny nose, stuffiness, sneezing and itchy conjunctivitis.

Corticosteroid nasal sprays that damp down inflammation, and oral antihistamines, are the mainstay of treatment. Some supplements can also complement their actions.

Vitamin C is one of the best natural antihistamines and is also an antioxidant to help damp down inflammation. Taking 2g vitamin C per day can reduce airway reactivity to histamine and lower histamine levels by over a third. Vitamin C is often combined with bioflavonoids such as quercetin which have a similar antihistamine action. Doses of 2g vitamin C per day can be used short-term to reduce allergic symptoms. The dose you can tolerate may be limited by indigestion or by bowel looseness (which is why the upper safe level is suggested as 1g per day for long-term use). If you experience these side effects, cut back the dose or switch to the ‘body-ready’ form known as ester-C which is non-acidic.

Luffa complex is a tincture containing extracts from seven tropical herbs: sponge cucumber (luffa), heartseed, American spikenard, golden thryallis, chapparal, okoubaka and toothpick weed, which can relieve hay fever symptoms in 75 percent of cases.

Pycnogenol is derived from the bark of the French maritime pine tree. Its antioxidants can block histamine release as effectively as the commonly used hay fever drug, sodium cromoglicate. It can also be used as a preventative starting seven to eight weeks before the onset of the hay fever season.

Bromelain is an enzyme extracted from pineapples that is used to reduce pain, swelling and inflammation. It also thins mucus so it’s easier to shift, to help reduce nasal congestion. In one study, four out of five people taking bromelain for hay fever enjoyed complete relief from nasal swelling and inflammation compared with only half those taking placebo.

Garlic is a powerful antioxidant that has also been used for centuries to help control the symptoms of hay fever, and for its decongestant properties.

When going out, dab petroleum jelly or nasal hay fever balms inside nostrils to trap pollen. Wear wrap-around sunglasses to protect your eyes. Keep windows and doors shut, especially in the bedroom. Use a negative ionizer indoors to settle airborne pollen.

About Dr Sarah Brewer
Dr Sarah Brewer is a medical nutritionist and an expert in food, herbs and supplements. She qualified from Cambridge University with degrees in natural sciences, medicine and surgery. After working in general practice, she gained a master’s degree in nutritional medicine. Sarah is a licensed medical doctor, a registered nutritionist and a registered nutritional therapist.

Subscribe to her newsletter to get a FREE 46-page PDF Do You Need A MultiVitamin? at nutritionupdates.subscribemenow.com.

For more information on diet and supplements, visit Dr Sarah Brewer’s websites at www.DrSarahBrewer.com, www.ExpertHealthReviews.com and www.MyLowerBloodPressure.com.

The post Supplements for Hay fever appeared first on True Health magazine.

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By nutritional therapist Christine Bailey

A fabulous anti-inflammatory pickle perfect for supporting digestion. Serve with salads, fish or meat.

(makes 1 large 1 litre kilner jar)

Ingredients:
400g daikon radish, peeled
8 red radishes, halved then sliced thinly
1 tbsp sea salt
1 tsp turmeric
1 tbsp ginger, peeled and cut into very thin matchsticks

Method:
Halve daikon lengthwise, then cut crosswise into thin slices – for very thin slices use a mandoline. Pack the two types of radish in a sterilised kilner jar and add the ginger.

Dissolve the salt and turmeric in 1 litre of water. Pour over the water making sure the vegetables are covered.

Leave just a little room at the top for gas expansion. Put the lid on, and leave at room temperature for 1-2 weeks or until it tastes slightly sour.

Once opened keep in the fridge.

About Christine Bailey
Christine is an award-winning nutritionist, chef and author. With a passion for creating delicious nourishing recipes, Christine has a reputation for transforming people’s health and love of real food. As well as seeing clients and writing for national press, Christine runs ‘Nourish’ cookery classes including popular hands-on days for children. Christine is an inspiring nutritional chef well known for her engaging style and enthusiasm.

Christine is the author of numerous health and recipe books including ebooks on paleo eating and gluten-free recipes. Her books include her popular Supercharged Juices and Smoothies, The Juice Diet Book, The Raw Food Diet Book and Eat to Get Younger. Christine has particular specialisms in paleo diets, allergy free cooking, digestive health, coeliac disease and other autoimmune conditions, allergies, healthy ageing and weight loss.

For more information visit her website www.christinebailey.co.uk or follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

The post Turmeric Infused Daikon Radish & Ginger Pickle appeared first on True Health magazine.

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By nutritional therapist Christine Bailey

Protein mug cakes are easy speedy treats made for one. All they take is a quick mix of the ingredients in a mug which you then microwave for a couple of minutes. In minutes you create a delicious fluffy, moist cake that is perfect as a sweet treat, pick me up snack or even breakfast option. If you don’t have a microwave you can simply bake them for a little longer in the oven.

(serves 1)

Ingredients:
30g vanilla protein powder
½ tsp baking powder
1 tbsp coconut flour
1 tsp maca powder
½ tsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp granulated sweetener (xylitol, erythritol or stevia to taste)
1 large egg
4 tbsp almond milk
½ tsp vanilla extract
6 fresh blueberries

To serve: Blueberries and yoghurt

Method:
Lightly grease a microwaveable proof mug with a little coconut oil. Place all the ingredients in the mug and beat well with a spoon or fork to form a thick batter.

Microwave on high for 1-2 minutes.

Serve the cake with additional berries and yoghurt.

About Christine Bailey
Christine is an award-winning nutritionist, chef and author. With a passion for creating delicious nourishing recipes, Christine has a reputation for transforming people’s health and love of real food. As well as seeing clients and writing for national press, Christine runs ‘Nourish’ cookery classes including popular hands-on days for children. Christine is an inspiring nutritional chef well known for her engaging style and enthusiasm.

Christine is the author of numerous health and recipe books including ebooks on paleo eating and gluten-free recipes. Her books include her popular Supercharged Juices and Smoothies, The Juice Diet Book, The Raw Food Diet Book and Eat to Get Younger. Christine has particular specialisms in paleo diets, allergy free cooking, digestive health, coeliac disease and other autoimmune conditions, allergies, healthy ageing and weight loss.

For more information visit her website www.christinebailey.co.uk or follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

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