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It’s never too late to rediscover healthy eating habits especially healthy eating for truck drivers. Here are eight tips to help promote better nutrition and healthier eating for truck drivers.

Sure, it’s easy to swing by a truck stop and grab a few cheese-smothered chili dogs or a double cheese burger, but that offers no nutritional benefits to healthy eating for truck drivers. The goal should be to create healthy habits that manifest into a healthy lifestyle change. These habits should be deeper than just what you eat, but also when you eat, what food is doing to your system and how you should shop for your food.

1. How Often Should I Eat?

Before we talk about shopping and cooking we should talk about something extremely important: eating. Our society and the trucking culture has been organized around the idea, that people should only eat three squares a day. For healthy eating for truck drivers, this is not necessarily the best choice.

While this might be more efficient in terms of consuming maximum calories in minimum time and getting back on the road, it is not always the best plan for your health nor the best plan for driving at your optimum and full potential. Instead, aim for around five smaller meals each day. This might seem odd and foreign at first, but studies have shown that smaller meals throughout the day will help your body metabolize food more efficiently.

2. How Our Body Processes Food

Your body is designed to absorb calories, use them for energy and then burn them off. In order for your body to make use of the food, what you eat has to be broken down into a form of sugar called glucose. This is a natural process and for most, the human body does this quite well. You have probably heard people talking about their “blood sugar level”, and what they are referring to is the amount of glucose in their blood.

3. Why Should I Care About My Blood Sugar Levels?

Your body has a normal range for the amount of glucose and blood sugar (between 4.0 and 11.0) and it has a beautiful system for managing that level. Hormones like insulin keep your blood sugar from getting too high and becoming toxic, and another key compound, glucagon keeps your sugar from getting too low and causing your system to shut down. It is something like a highway with really good guard rails that keep a truck from running off the road.

It is possible to overwhelm this excellent system and cause it to crash and fail. Actually, many people are overwhelming it every day. Remaining on that course of poor eating habits and very little exercise, it will likely lead to diabetes later in life. As a society, we are seeing diabetes diagnosis on the rise and we need to take action for ourselves.

So why does this make eating only three times per day (or fewer) a bad idea?

You can end up constantly overwhelming or crashing the system with extreme blood sugar highs and lows. If you wait to eat until you are extremely hungry and have very low blood sugar, your body will send the signal that you are starving, and when you do eat it is often much easier to overeat unhealthy and convenient food. Healthy eating for truck drivers requires you to eat when you’re hungry and avoid a severe dip in blood sugar. Thus the importance of planning your meals and working towards a disciplined routine.

4. How Much Should I Be Eating?

Some people’s beliefs are to simply eat drastically less overall and there is a grain of truth to this. While dramatically reducing your caloric intake does cause the body to burn stored fat to stay alive, it can signal your body to store everything you do eat, which results in rebound weight gain when you do return to a more normal diet. Starving yourself is not the answer! It's simple math, try and not introduce more calories to your body than you're burning in a day. Typically, 2,000–2,573 daily calories are suggested; however, consulting a healthcare professional is the best way to understand what an appropriate daily caloric intake means for your individual health needs.

Thankfully there is a much safer and proven method. Simply, eat a reasonable amount of food more often in the day. Eating five or six smaller and healthier meals per day is like steering down the middle of your lane instead of bouncing your truck off the guard rails all day. This practice will help you feel more content and stop your body from deciding to store fat for hibernation. Of course, if you eat more often and end up eating more food overall you will still have trouble being healthy. The objective is to eat an appropriate amount of food, in a more sustainable way.

For a look at recommended serving sizes, check WebMD’s interactive and downloadable portion size plate

5. What Are the Benefits to Eating More Often?

There is also an enormous safety benefit to eating more often and avoiding the blood sugar spikes: You are less likely to feel drowsy or sluggish at the wheel. Most people have experienced the after dinner slump that makes it all but impossible to keep your eyes open after a big meal. That might be fine after Christmas dinner when you are lounging on the couch at home, but at work, behind the wheel of an 80,000 pound-plus rig, it can end poorly.

6. How Do I Plan My Meals?

You might be wondering: How on earth is it possible to eat five or more meals per day? Who has the time to stop for food that often? There is a way to make your meals much simpler, more healthy, easier to sustain over the long term, and much less expensive! The key is to learn to shop for your own food and cook for yourself on the road!

If you have access to an in-truck refrigerator, stock food and snacks that are healthy for you. Avoid candy bars and chips. Instead, focus on foods that will keep you fuller longer, like string cheese, pretzels, popcorn, and fresh fruits and vegetables. Additionally, look for smart choices when eating at fast food restaurants. Many restaurants now offer baked options, low-fat or low-sodium alternatives, and fresh fruits and salads. Menus often have these options marked for easy identification.

7. Eat What You Want In Moderation

Anyone who has dealt with eating healthier has heard the term portion control. Controlling what, how much, how often you eat and making sensible, sustainable choices is the path to solving many of the health risks of the trucking lifestyle. To eat healthier you don’t have to give up all of your favorite foods and consume a spinach and carrot based diet like a rabbit. Instead of going to the extreme, eating a balanced diet will keep you “between the lines” and on the road to better health. Extremes are by nature quite unsustainable and will not help you.

8. If You Have To Eat At a Restaurant

When eating at a restaurant, especially at buffets, in can be easy, and even tempting, to overeat. But in the long run, the negative effects of overeating will cost more money than you’ll ever save by overeating to “get your money’s worth.” When eating prepackaged food or at a restaurant, eat slowly and only until you are full, and focus on choosing healthier items. Do the same at buffets, and also try using smaller salad plates to ensure proper portion sizes.

Eat more: Salad, non-cream-based-soups, baked or lean meats, fresh fruits and vegetables, low-fat salad dressings, and dessert alternatives (like Jell-O, pudding, and fresh fruit)

Eat less: Mayonnaise-based salads, full-fat salad dressings (like regular ranch dressing), fried foods, foods with gravies or cream sauces, and sugary desserts.

The above are suggestions to help you change your eating habits and become a healthier person and as a healthier person, it stands to reason you become a better truck driver. Changing any habit isn't an easy task, however implementing one little positive change a day, will lead to remarkable results!

If you need any further information, please contact us at:

204 632-6600

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Driving a tractor trailer in serious Canadian winter conditions, demands a specific set of skills for all drivers, especially big rig drivers. Too many drivers on the highways do not alter their driving habits, when driving in poor weather conditions. Good maneuvering and skid control skills are essential in poor weather.

Knowledge and implementation of proper, preventative safety skills for driving in poor conditions, can truly separate the seasoned driver vs a driver who is just starting their career. They have the knowledge and experience for making good decisions and are cognisant when conditions are not safe, and when it’s time to ‘get off the road’.

Driving in bad weather, especially in snow and on ice, is risky due to more ‘stop time’ required, poor visibility, poor traction and the increased unpredictability of other drivers on the road. The job of a truck driver becomes increasingly challenging, especially when handling a tractor trailer and a full load in foul winter weather.

Safe Winter Truck Driving Safety Tips

·Slow down – Accidents during suspect conditions are mostly due to excessive speed. Driving at the speed limit may be legal, but is often too fast for snow covered or icy road conditions in our Country. Take as much time as necessary. DO NOT HURRY! Speed is dangerous. This rule should ALWAYS be at the top of any winter trucking safety tips list.

·Keep a safe following distance – Leave plenty of room between your vehicle and the vehicle in front of your truck, and beside your truck, when possible (approx. 1/4mile).

·Don’t travel as part of a pack – Traffic seems to move in ‘packs’ on the highway. Find a safe way to get away from the pack and travel alone, with the goal being to maximize the distance around your vehicle.

·Don’t follow the tail lights of the vehicle ahead – When the snow is so heavy, visibility is low, seeing the tail lights of the vehicle ahead…means following too closely.

·Keep a safe driving distance back at all times, especially in bad weather. If the leader makes an error, you will too. Trucks can leave the road, and yours could follow the lead truck off the road.

·Use good, solid judgment — If the weather is so severe that you need to get off the road….. do it. Find a place to get off the road safely and wait until conditions are safer for travel.

·Don’t stop on the shoulder of the road –– Especially in low visibility situations, when driving in winter, especially ‘blinding snow’, other vehicles can mistake your position for being on the road and as a result, may slam into the back of your rig.

·Don’t try to be a hero –– When the road conditions are severe, you need to recognize that it’s very dangerous to be out there. Hours of service rules, dispatchers etc., are extra pressures when it a difficult, dangerous position. Don’t feel that you’re letting anyone down by not meeting a scheduled appointment.

·Braking – Some drivers like to use the jake brakes in less than perfect weather conditions. Some don’t. DO NOT ENGAGE THE JAKE BRAKE ON ICY ROADS. Try to avoid overusing your foot brake, unless the entire unit is absolutely ‘straight’ on the road. Don’t over brake when the entire unit isn’t straight… the trailer can slide and spin you out of your position…..the truck slows down, and the trailer does not. This is especially true, when the trailer is empty.

·Ensure ‘all systems’ are a go — Be absolutely certain during your circle checks before you leave, that the defroster and heater are working properly. Wipers, wiper motor, lights, esp. brake and tail lights, washer fluid is topped up, drain moisture from the air tanks, all brakes are set up and windows and mirrors are completely clean before departure.

·Keep fuel tanks topped up, for extra weight over the drive tires, to aid with traction. Good quality lug tires, with the proper tire pressure, are essential for good traction for the best safe winter driving.

·Keep tractor and trailer lights clean — When you’re able to stop in a safe place, clear the lights off of snow and ice, which builds up in foul weather….they are vital, more than ever when visibility is poor. LED lights especially accumulate snow and crud. Keep everything clean, so you can BE SEEN!

If you have any safety tips to share or would like to hear more about Winter Driving.

Please contact: 204 632-6600


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National Truck Week has come and gone and the MTA always looks forward to this one week every year. We do our best to celebrate and thank drivers across Canada, not just on National Trucking Week, but all year round. Truck drivers are one of the most critical and important careers we have on the planet.

In honor of National Truck Week, please see the below for some of the reasons you should thank our Canadian Truck Drivers.

1) Tradition That Spans Generations:

In todays world, kids are occupied and focused on electronics in the back seat during a road trip vs counting cows or playing eye spy. What is the one thing that consistently gets kids to pay attention to the world around them on the highway? Looking for and asking truck drivers to blow the big horn! Todays truck drivers still watch for the familiar air horn arm pumping action and will often indulge whenever it is safe and possible to do so.

Thank a truck driver for continuing this tradition and putting smiles on the faces of your kids on a long road trip!

2) Truck Drivers draw from experiences learned driving to flourish outside the industry:

Driving a truck across our Country, Provinces or North America are bound to lead to unique views of the world and create life experiences. Many truck drivers have utilize these experiences as tools to achieve professional goals outside of the industry of trucking. Can you guess which of the below actors were truck drivers, prior to hitting the silver screen?

  • Charles Bronson
  • James Cameron
  • Chevy Chase
  • Sean Connery
  • Rock Hudson
  • Richard Pryor
  • Viggo Mortensen
  • Liam Neeson
  • Elvis Presley

I hope you guessed all of them?! This shows that there are many different personalities and the diversity available on the road. For many truck drivers it is what they do for a living, but doesn't define who they are as people. Many drivers have become incredibly successful in business, politics and the arts.

Thank a truck driver for their persistence to follow their dreams!

3) Truck Drivers are incredibly generous with their time and wallets:

The trucking community sticks together and never more so than in times of need. This type of camaraderie is vital since conventional charities are often unable to meet the unique needs of truck drivers on the road. There are many charities truck drivers donate hard earned money and or their time. During National Trucking Week, our drivers help raise over $100,000 for charities right here in our own back yard. Whether it is participating in the Provincial Truck Driving Championships, Truck Pull or the world's largest Convoy our drivers are present and happy to help others.

Thank a truck driver for being generous in the times of need!

4) Truck Drivers see us through some of our toughest storms.

From hurricanes and snow storms to floods and forest fires, all of these types of potential disasters need supplies for a relief effort. Without truck drivers delivering the majority of these supplies, these type of scenarios would be devastating. Truck drivers are willing to sacrifice themselves to ensure others are safe and well.

Thank a truck driver for helping us through the toughest storms!

5) Truck Drivers put in longer days than most.

Those of us with office jobs generally work between 8-12 hours a day on average. When you're home and playing with the kids or making dinner, a truck driver is still on the road away from their families, while ensuring that our goods are being delivered. Everything you touch has been in a truck at one time or another.

Thank a truck driver for the long hours and the time away from home!

6) Truck Drivers invest in safety day in and day out.

According to MPI statistics, there were a total of 120,355 commercial vehicles registered in Manitoba in 2016 and over 54,000 are heavy trucks. This is an increase of 12% over 2015 and a 53% increase from 2006. Despite the trucking industry's continued growth, the number of commercial vehicles involved in collisions in 2016, decreased overall by 14% compared to the previous five year (2011 to 2015) annual average. In accordance to these statistics, Heavy trucks are the safest vehicles on the roads, especially when you take in to account a trucks exposure or risk to accident over miles driven! These statics are substantiating that drivers are trending in the right direction, towards a goal of zero incidents or accidents.

Thank a truck driver for being a professional and focusing on safety!

7) Truck Drivers move our freight and contribute to the bottom line.

Canadian truck drivers move over 225 billion tonnes-kilometres of freight annually, and over 80% of all freight intra provincially. What are they moving around? Our freight! which would include anything from a toothbrush to building supplies and it is all reliant on truck drivers. Imagine going to the store and not being able to pick up your milk or bread... or you receive a phone call telling you that your holiday to Disney World is cancelled because the fuel didn't get delivered to the aircraft!? Truck drivers play a vital role in our day to day life and a world without truck drivers would be a scary place.

Thank a truck driver for delivering everything you need and for keeping our country moving!

Although kids fantasize about being Spiderman, Wonder woman or Superman, in my mind Truck Drivers are the real heroes of today! We shouldn't only recognise Truck Drivers efforts during National Trucking Week, we should be thanking them everyday!

204 632-6600












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National Truck Week has come and gone and the MTA always looks forward to this one week every year. We do our best to celebrate and thank drivers across Canada, not just on National Trucking Week, but all year round. Truck drivers are one of the most critical and important careers we have on the planet.

In honor of National Truck Week, please see the below for some of the reasons you should thank our Canadian Truck Drivers.

1) Tradition That Spans Generations:

In todays world, kids are occupied and focused on electronics in the back seat during a road trip vs counting cows or playing eye spy. What is the one thing that consistently gets kids to pay attention to the world around them on the highway? Looking for and asking truck drivers to blow the big horn! Todays truck drivers still watch for the familiar air horn arm pumping action and will often indulge whenever it is safe and possible to do so.

Thank a truck driver for continuing this tradition and putting smiles on the faces of your kids on a long road trip!

2) Truck Drivers draw from experiences learned driving to flourish outside the industry:

Driving a truck across our Country, Provinces or North America are bound to lead to unique views of the world and create life experiences. Many truck drivers have utilize these experiences as tools to achieve professional goals outside of the industry of trucking. Can you guess which of the below actors were truck drivers, prior to hitting the silver screen?

  • Charles Bronson
  • James Cameron
  • Chevy Chase
  • Sean Connery
  • Rock Hudson
  • Richard Pryor
  • Viggo Mortensen
  • Liam Neeson
  • Elvis Presley

I hope you guessed all of them?! This shows that there are many different personalities and the diversity available on the road. For many truck drivers it is what they do for a living, but doesn't define who they are as people. Many drivers have become incredibly successful in business, politics and the arts.

Thank a truck driver for their persistence to follow their dreams!

3) Truck Drivers are incredibly generous with their time and wallets:

The trucking community sticks together and never more so than in times of need. This type of camaraderie is vital since conventional charities are often unable to meet the unique needs of truck drivers on the road. There are many charities truck drivers donate hard earned money and or their time. During National Trucking Week, our drivers help raise over $100,000 for charities right here in our own back yard. Whether it is participating in the Provincial Truck Driving Championships, Truck Pull or the world's largest Convoy our drivers are present and happy to help others.

Thank a truck driver for being generous in the times of need!

4) Truck Drivers see us through some of our toughest storms.

From hurricanes and snow storms to floods and forest fires, all of these types of potential disasters need supplies for a relief effort. Without truck drivers delivering the majority of these supplies, these type of scenarios would be devastating. Truck drivers are willing to sacrifice themselves to ensure others are safe and well.

Thank a truck driver for helping us through the toughest storms!

5) Truck Drivers put in longer days than most.

Those of us with office jobs generally work between 8-12 hours a day on average. When you're home and playing with the kids or making dinner, a truck driver is still on the road away from their families, while ensuring that our goods are being delivered. Everything you touch has been in a truck at one time or another.

Thank a truck driver for the long hours and the time away from home!

6) Truck Drivers invest in safety day in and day out.

According to MPI statistics, there were a total of 120,355 commercial vehicles registered in Manitoba in 2016 and over 54,000 are heavy trucks. This is an increase of 12% over 2015 and a 53% increase from 2006. Despite the trucking industry's continued growth, the number of commercial vehicles involved in collisions in 2016, decreased overall by 14% compared to the previous five year (2011 to 2015) annual average. In accordance to these statistics, Heavy trucks are the safest vehicles on the roads, especially when you take in to account a trucks exposure or risk to accident over miles driven! These statics are substantiating that drivers are trending in the right direction, towards a goal of zero incidents or accidents.

Thank a truck driver for being a professional and focusing on safety!

7) Truck Drivers move our freight and contribute to the bottom line.

Canadian truck drivers move over 225 billion tonnes-kilometres of freight annually, and over 80% of all freight intra provincially. What are they moving around? Our freight! which would include anything from a toothbrush to building supplies and it is all reliant on truck drivers. Imagine going to the store and not being able to pick up your milk or bread... or you receive a phone call telling you that your holiday to Disney World is cancelled because the fuel didn't get delivered to the aircraft!? Truck drivers play a vital role in our day to day life and a world without truck drivers would be a scary place.

Thank a truck driver for delivering everything you need and for keeping our country moving!

Although kids fantasize about being Spiderman, Wonder woman or Superman, in my mind Truck Drivers are the real heroes of today! We shouldn't only recognise Truck Drivers efforts during National Trucking Week, we should be thanking them everyday!

204 632-6600












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Forwarded from Manitoba Infrastrucutre

Notice of ROAD CLOSURE

PTH 110 (Brandon Eastern Access)


Railway repairs at the CN railway crossing on PTH 110 (Brandon Eastern Access) between Richmond Avenue East and 17th Street East will result in lane closures for all vehicular traffic.

Both North and southbound lanes of PTH 110 (Brandon Eastern Access) are scheduled to close for two days starting at 9:00 a.m. Monday, September 10, 2018 until 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 11, 2018.

Commercial vehicles (including vehicles transporting dangerous goods) will be able to detour around the closure using Richmond Avenue East and 17th Street East. Permitted oversized/overweight vehicles will be required to use alternate routes that have been approved by Manitoba Infrastructure.

Information and updates regarding the road closure will be available on the Highway Information ((Manitoba 511 - Road and Traveler Information) website, http://www.manitoba511.ca/en/ or by calling 204-945-3704 or toll free at 1-877-627-6237.

To discuss specific permit requirements/alternate routes, Permit Services may be contacted directly at 204-945-3961 or toll free at 1-877-812-0009.

Your anticipated cooperation during the required road closure is greatly appreciated.

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