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Here is our latest update on the stock trading technique called ‘Buying Dividends,’ also commonly referred to as ‘Dividend Capture.’ This is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend.
This technique generally works only in bull markets, and can work in flat or choppy markets, but you need to avoid the technique during bear markets. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can’t sell the stock until after the ex date.
The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork.com has compiled a downloadable and sortable list of the stocks going ex dividend in the near future. The list contains many dividend paying companies, lots with market caps over $500 million, and yields over 2%. Here are a few examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date, the quarterly dividend amount, and annual yield.




American Express Company (AXP)7/6/20220.351.39%
Barnes & Noble, Inc. (BKS)7/6/20220.159.68%
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (BMY)7/6/20220.402.89%
Cisco Systems, Inc. (CSCO)7/6/20220.332.84%
Ethan Allen Interiors Inc. (ETH)7/10/20220.193.15%
Intuit Inc. (INTU)7/10/20220.390.75%
Hormel Foods Corporation (HRL)7/14/20220.191.95%
Colgate-Palmolive Company (CL)7/18/20220.422.49%
Caterpillar, Inc. (CAT)7/20/20220.862.28%
Foot Locker, Inc. (FL)7/20/20220.352.40%
Lowe's Companies, Inc. (LOW)7/25/20220.481.69%
Clorox Company (The) (CLX)8/1/20220.962.63%
Hasbro, Inc. (HAS)8/1/20220.632.57%

The additional ex-dividend stocks can be found here at wstnn.com. (If you have been to the website before, and the latest link doesn’t show up, you may have to empty your cache.) If you like dividend stocks, you should check out some of the other high yield stock lists at HERE or WStNN.com. Most of the lists are free.
Dividend definitions: Declaration date: the day that the company declares that there is going to be an upcoming dividend.
Ex-dividend date: the day on which if you buy the stock, you would not be entitled to that particular dividend; or the first day on which a shareholder can sell the shares and still be entitled to the dividend.
Record date: the day when you must be on the company’s books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The ex-dividend date is normally set for stocks at two business days before the record date.
Payment date: the day on which the dividend payment is actually made, which can be as long at two months after the ex date.
Don’t forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.
Disclosure: Author did not own any of the above at the time the article was written.
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by Fred Fuld III
It was only about ten months ago, on August 2, 2017, that I wrote the article, Why Twitter is a Screaming Buy. I discussed several reasons, including Twitter’s biggest asset (Donald Trump). Also, an extensive coverage of earnings and the lack thereof. I also came up with some suggestions about how Twitter could improve its revenues.
At the time that I wrote the article, the stock was trading for less than $16 a share. It closed at the end of the day at 16.07.  What’s it trading for now? Currently, the stock is up 3%, so far today, trading at 40.94.
What’s the return if you had bought the stock back on August 2? A very respectable 155%! Not bad for a holding period of less than a year.
The bird is flying!!!

Disclosure: Author owns TWTR.

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Here is our latest update on the stock trading technique called ‘Buying Dividends,’ also commonly referred to as ‘Dividend Capture.’ This is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend.
This technique generally works only in bull markets, and can work in flat or choppy markets, but you need to avoid the technique during bear markets. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can’t sell the stock until after the ex date.
The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork.com has compiled a downloadable and sortable list of the stocks going ex dividend in the near future. The list contains many dividend paying companies, lots with market caps over $500 million, and yields over 2%. Here are a few examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date, the quarterly dividend amount, and annual yield.
Southwest Airlines Company (LUV)6/5/20180.16  0.93%
Abercrombie & Fitch Company (ANF)6/7/20180.203.67%
Ross Stores, Inc. (ROST)6/11/2018  0.2250.87%
HP Inc. (HPQ)6/12/20180.1392.40%
Best Buy Co., Inc. (BBY)6/13/20180.452.14%
Coca-Cola Company (KO)6/14/20180.393.48%
Merck & Company, Inc. (MRK)6/14/20180.483.14%
Las Vegas Sands Corp. (LVS)6/19/20180.753.65%
Tiffany & Co. (TIF)6/19/20180.551.51%
Yamana Gold Inc. (AUY)6/28/20180.0050.70%
Xerox Corporation (XRX)6/28/20180.252.97%
Wolverine World Wide, Inc. (WWW)6/29/20180.080.76%

The additional ex-dividend stocks can be found here at wstnn.com. (If you have been to the website before, and the latest link doesn’t show up, you may have to empty your cache.) If you like dividend stocks, you should check out some of the other high yield stock lists at HERE or WStNN.com. Most of the lists are free.
Dividend definitions: Declaration date: the day that the company declares that there is going to be an upcoming dividend.
Ex-dividend date: the day on which if you buy the stock, you would not be entitled to that particular dividend; or the first day on which a shareholder can sell the shares and still be entitled to the dividend.
Record date: the day when you must be on the company’s books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The ex-dividend date is normally set for stocks at two business days before the record date.
Payment date: the day on which the dividend payment is actually made, which can be as long at two months after the ex date.
Don’t forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.
Disclosure: Author did not own any of the above at the time the article was written.
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Do you think a return of 40% over a period of less than three years is pretty good? How about 157%? Those are the actual returns of stocks that you could have bought less than three years ago that were selling for less than the cash per share.
What is cash per share?
In simple terms, cash per share is the amount of cash the company has sitting in the banks divided by the number of shares. So if the company has little or no debt, and you can buy the stock below the amount of cash per share, you are getting a bargain. If the company went out of business today and all the inventory and equipment and all other assets were totally worthless, you would still make a profit because the cash you would receive for each share would exceed the price you paid.
Real Life Examples of Stocks that were Selling Below Cash
Let’s get back to those real life examples mentioned in the first paragraph of this article. MEI Pharma (MEIP) is an oncology company focused on the clinical development of therapeutics to treat cancer. Back in November of 2015, the stock was selling for 1.64, yet it had cash per share of 1.70, providing a discount to investors of 3.5% to the cash. Since that time, the stock has risen to 2.31, a gain of 40.85%. Not a bad investment for less than three years. Then there is Support.com (SPRT), a provider of cloud-based software and services. In November 2015, it was trading at 1.09, with cash per share of 1.25, a 12.8% discount to cash. The stock has now shot up to 2.81, a spectacular gain of 157.8%.
But what about companies that have a reverse split?
This is a great question. Let’s look at bebe (BEBE), the women’s clothing company, over the same time frame as the previously mentioned stocks. It was trading at a 22.6% discount to cash. Back then, the stock was trading at 0.41 per share, but the company had a 10 for 1 reverse split in December of 2016. What this meant was that for every 10 shares that you own prior to the split, you would now only have one share. So the effective cost basis of the original purchase price would be 4.10. The stock just closed last Friday at 7.00 per share, giving investors a 70.7% return. (To clarify this, assume you buy 1,000 shares at 41 cents, for a total cost of $410. The reverse split takes place, you now only have 100 shares at 7.00 or $7.00 total value, a gain of over 70%.)
Does the stock need to trade at a huge discount to make money?
Absolutely not. Here is a great example. GenCorp Industries (GENC) traded at a 0.1% discount to cash back then, actually one penny below the cash per share. The stock has gone from 10.18 to 15.50 a share, a very decent gain. But that’s not all. The stock declared a 3 for 2 stock split (what I call a “good stock split”) in July of 2016, which was effectively a 50% stock dividend. In other words, one and a half shares for every one share that you own. So the true gain on this stock from November 2015 is an incredible 128.3%.
Risks of Buying Below Cash Stocks
  • Possibility that the company is what we used to call the “walking dead” and what we now call “zombies”. These are companies that will continue to stumble along, never really grow but never go out of business, and they’ll just hold on to all their cash
  • Possibility that management may spend the company’s cash like a drunken sailor.
  • For biotech companies, the possibility that they will burn all their cash before they come out with an FDA approved drug
Advantages of Buying Below Cash Stocks
  • Provides a downside cushion for the stock price
  • In the event of bankruptcy or liquidation, excellent chance of getting back more money than your investment
  • Provides the company with a solid balance sheet – they can easily make payroll, buy new equipment, make acquisitions, without having to borrow
But the stock market is trading at lofty levels
Are there still stocks that can be purchased for less than cash per share? Yes, there are actually over a dozen different companies with stock prices below cash per share with little or no debt.
So what are some other companies selling below cash?
WStNN.com has come up with a list of over a dozen companies that are currently trading below their cash per share, and have little or no debt. If you are interested in getting this list, just subscribe to our newsletter. We will be emailing the list in an Excel format to all subscribers who have subscribed by 11:59 pm on Tuesday, May 8. The list, which will be sent out the following day, will provide the following:
  • Company name
  • Stock ticker symbol
  • Country where the company is based
  • Price per share
  • Cash per share
  • Percentage discount to cash
  • Debt to Equity
However, you must subscribe by May 8 in order to get this free list. The reason why we have this short timeframe is that the information may become stale a week from now, and we want you to get timely information.
What’s the Cost to Subscribe? Nothing!!!
We charge nothing for our WStNN/Stockerblog newsletter. It is sent out between two to four times a month, so we won’t spam you, we won’t overload your mailbox every day, and we don’t sell or give away our list. (Some clown actually called me about a revenue split for selling newsletters, and he said all I had to do was give him my email list and they would take care of everything. Yeah right!)
How to Get the Below Cash Stock List for Free
Just fill in the box below. We don’t ask for a credit card number, we don’t need your phone number, and you don’t have to give us your street address.  Once you submit, you will need to check your email account for a confirmation. You may need to click on the link confirming that you want to subscribe.
By the way, if you are already a subscriber, you don’t need to re-subscribe. Just remember, new subscribers need to subscribe by 11:59 pm on Tuesday, May 8. The list will be sent out the following day.
Sign Up Now
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Thanks for subscribing and happy investing!
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Here is our latest update on the stock trading technique called ‘Buying Dividends,’ also commonly referred to as ‘Dividend Capture.’ This is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend.
This technique generally works only in bull markets, and can work in flat or choppy markets, but you need to avoid the technique during bear markets. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can’t sell the stock until after the ex date.
The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork.com has compiled a downloadable and sortable list of the stocks going ex dividend in the near future. The list contains many dividend paying companies, lots with market caps over $500 million, and yields over 2%. Here are a few examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date, the quarterly dividend amount, and annual yield.
Wells Fargo & Company (WFC)5/3/20180.39
Citigroup Inc. (C)5/4/20180.32
Intel Corporation (INTC)5/4/20180.3
The Cheesecake Factory Incorporated (CAKE)5/9/20180.29
International Business Machines (IBM)5/9/20181.57
GlaxoSmithKline PLC (GSK)5/10/20180.525
Exxon Mobil Corporation (XOM)5/11/20180.82
Target Corporation (TGT)5/15/20180.62
Amgen Inc. (AMGN)5/16/20181.32
Visa Inc. (V)5/17/20180.21
Aflac Incorporated (AFL)5/22/20180.26
Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. (GS)5/30/20180.8
Bank of America Corporation (BAC)5/31/20180.12
Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMT)5/31/20182
The additional ex-dividend stocks can be found here at wstnn.com. (If you have been to the website before, and the latest link doesn’t show up, you may have to empty your cache.) If you like dividend stocks, you should check out some of the other high yield stock lists at HEREor WStNN.com. Most of the lists are free.
Dividend definitions: Declaration date: the day that the company declares that there is going to be an upcoming dividend.
Ex-dividend date: the day on which if you buy the stock, you would not be entitled to that particular dividend; or the first day on which a shareholder can sell the shares and still be entitled to the dividend.
Record date: the day when you must be on the company’s books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The ex-dividend date is normally set for stocks at two business days before the record date.
Payment date: the day on which the dividend payment is actually made, which can be as long at two months after the ex date.
Don’t forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.
Disclosure: Author did not own any of the above at the time the article was written.

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Do you want to be a billionaire? If so, maybe you should invest in the companies that made the billionaires so rich.

Forbes Magazine has just come out with its latest billionaires list. Seven out of the top ten billionaires have founded and/or are the head of companies that are publicly traded, providing investors with a selection of stocks to invest in.

The following is a list of the billionaires and their stocks.
RankNameNet WorthCompanySymbol
#1Jeff Bezos$112 BAmazonAMZN
#2Bill Gates$90 BMicrosoftMSFT
#3Warren Buffett$84 BBerkshire HathawayBRKA
#4Bernard Arnault$72 BLVMHLVMH
#5Mark Zuckerberg$71 BFacebookFB
#7Carlos Slim Helu$67.1 BAmérica MóvilAMX
#10Larry Ellison$58.5 BOracleORCL
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Trading Goddess by Stockerblog - 5M ago
Here is our latest update on the stock trading technique called ‘Buying Dividends,’ also commonly referred to as ‘Dividend Capture.’ This is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend.
This technique generally works only in bull markets, and can work in flat or choppy markets, but you need to avoid the technique during bear markets. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can’t sell the stock until after the ex date.
The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork.com has compiled a downloadable and sortable list of the stocks going ex dividend in the near future. The list contains many dividend paying companies, lots with market caps over $500 million, and yields over 2%. Here are a few examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date, the quarterly dividend amount, and annual yield.


Bank of America Corporation (BAC)3/1/20180.12
Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc. (HLT)3/1/20180.15
Pepsico, Inc. (PEP)3/1/20180.805
Jack In The Box Inc. (JACK)3/2/20180.4
Kellogg Company (K)3/2/20180.54
Rocky Mountain Chocolate Fact (RMCF)3/5/20180.12
Home Depot, Inc. (HD)3/7/20181.03
Coca-Cola Company (KO)3/14/20180.39
Nasdaq, Inc. (NDAQ)3/15/20180.38
The additional ex-dividend stocks can be found here at wstnn.com. (If you have been to the website before, and the latest link doesn’t show up, you may have to empty your cache.) If you like dividend stocks, you should check out some of the other high yield stock lists at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WStNN.com. Most of the lists are free.
Dividend definitions: Declaration date: the day that the company declares that there is going to be an upcoming dividend.
Ex-dividend date: the day on which if you buy the stock, you would not be entitled to that particular dividend; or the first day on which a shareholder can sell the shares and still be entitled to the dividend.
Record date: the day when you must be on the company’s books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The ex-dividend date is normally set for stocks at two business days before the record date.
Payment date: the day on which the dividend payment is actually made, which can be as long at two months after the ex date.
Don’t forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.
Disclosure: Author did not own any of the above at the time the article was written.


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Some of you may know nothing about bitcoin and blockchain. Some of you may have already invested in the cryptocurrencies. In either case, learning more is always beneficial.
The Crypto Invest Summit is a great opportunity to learn more. The Crypto Invest Summit will present the top speakers in the cryptocurrency and blockchain space on two stages and will be the largest crypto expo space in the world. The presentations, pitches, educational panels and fireside chats will run for two days with top industry leaders.
The event will be held at the Los Angeles Convention Center at 1201 S. Figueroa Street in Los Angeles from Monday, April 30, 2018, 6:00 PM to Wednesday, May 2, 2018, 6:00 PM.
Currently, you can get tickets at a discount price if you order before February 28. Get tickets soon, because they are expected to sell out fast. You can get tickets HERE. Remember, order before the end of this month.

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Today, the stock market, as measured by the Dow Jones Industrial Average, was down over 250 points. The Standard & Poor’s 500 was down almost 15 points, and the NASDAQ was down over five points. Walmart (WMT), a stock that has performed well over the past year, tanked by more than 10%today.
Is this a sign of things to come? If so, there are many ways to profit from a stock market crash without having to incur the unlimited risk or shorting stocks, and without having to buy puts with their own set of limitations.
Another way to play the short side of the stock market is to buy the triple leveraged bearish exchange traded funds. These ETFs provide triple the inverse return of indices. They are available for general market indices,  specific industries, and countries.
There are over two dozen triple leveraged bearish ETFs. They have significant volatility, and may have wide bid and asked spreads, and low volume. Plus, the losses can be quick and substantial. They ETFs are designed for short term trading, not long term holds.
Of course, the advantage of these trading vehicles is that they are a way of shorting various indexes without actually shorting an ETF, plus there is a limit on the downside.
One of the more actively traded triple bearish ETFs is the ProShares UltraPro Short Dow30 (SDOW). The average daily volume is 1.3  million shares and the ETF was up 3.16% for the day.
In terms of industries, you have such 3X bear ETFs as the Direxion Daily Semiconductor Bear 3X ETF (SOXS) and the Direxion Daily Energy Bear 3X ETF (ERY).
To access a free list of over two dozen of these investments, go to triple leveraged bearish ETFs.

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Here is our latest update on the stock trading technique called ‘Buying Dividends,’ also commonly referred to as ‘Dividend Capture.’ This is the process of buying stocks before the ex dividend date and selling the stock shortly after the ex date at about the same price, yet still being entitled to the dividend.
This technique generally works only in bull markets, and can work in flat or choppy markets, but you need to avoid the technique during bear markets. In order to be entitled to the dividend, you have to buy the stock before the ex-dividend date, and you can’t sell the stock until after the ex date.
The actual dividend may not be paid for another few weeks. WallStreetNewsNetwork.com has compiled a downloadable and sortable list of the stocks going ex dividend in the near future. The list contains many dividend paying companies, lots with market caps over $500 million, and yields over 2%. Here are a few examples showing the stock symbol, the ex-dividend date, the quarterly dividend amount, and annual yield.
Pfizer, Inc. (PFE)2/1/20180.34
Signet Jewelers Limited (SIG)2/1/20180.31
Wells Fargo & Company (WFC)2/1/20180.39
Citigroup Inc. (C)2/2/20180.32
PetMed Express, Inc. (PETS)2/2/20180.25
Intel Corporation (INTC)2/6/20180.3
Starbucks Corporation (SBUX)2/7/20180.3
Boeing Company (The) (BA)2/8/20181.71
The Charles Schwab Corporation (SCHW)2/8/20180.1
Consolidated Edison Inc (ED)2/13/20180.715
Amgen Inc. (AMGN)2/14/20181.32
Eli Lilly and Company (LLY)2/14/20180.563
Microsoft Corporation (MSFT)2/14/20180.42
Alaska Air Group, Inc. (ALK)2/16/20180.32
Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. (The) (GS)2/28/20180.75
The additional ex-dividend stocks can be found here at wstnn.com. (If you have been to the website before, and the latest link doesn’t show up, you may have to empty your cache.) If you like dividend stocks, you should check out some of the other high yield stock lists at WallStreetNewsNetwork.com or WStNN.com. Most of the lists are free.
Dividend definitions: Declaration date: the day that the company declares that there is going to be an upcoming dividend.
Ex-dividend date: the day on which if you buy the stock, you would not be entitled to that particular dividend; or the first day on which a shareholder can sell the shares and still be entitled to the dividend.
Record date: the day when you must be on the company’s books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The ex-dividend date is normally set for stocks at two business days before the record date.
Payment date: the day on which the dividend payment is actually made, which can be as long at two months after the ex date.
Don’t forget to reconfirm the ex-dividend date with the company before implementing this technique.
Disclosure: Author did not own any of the above at the time the article was written.


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