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Back when I was reviewing films full time, I would sometimes pull a movie quote from a particular film, brush it off, polish it and toss it into use. Not often mind you, only when it was really necessary.

Said quote comes from the 1981 camp classic, Mommie Dearest. In a scene of the film, Joan Crawford (as portrayed by the inimitable Faye Dunaway) throws a recently read script (one she’s been asked to star in) down to a table on her glorious patio, in total disgust, with a divine delivery of the dialogue, “It’s not good!”

Well, after seeing Jordan Peele’s sophomore feature film, Us, I’ve no choice but to put “It’s not good!” into rotation once more.

Really, Us is not a good film. Now, let’s examine why.

Family of four: Adelaide Wilson (Oscar-winner Lupita Nyong’o), her husband Gabe (Winston Duke), their daughter Zora (Shahadi Wright Joseph of the forthcoming The Lion King) and son Jason (Evan Alex) take a summer vacation to a family getaway south of San Francisco. Years ago, in the beach/boardwalk community of Santa Cruz, Adelaide had a strange experience in a carnival hall of mirrors. This trauma keeps her from wanting to return to this area, but she does so to appease her husband (against her better judgment). And when a creepy family of four appears in their driveway one night, looking strangely like the Wilson clan, things turn weird and violent.

Visually, I thought the film looked great. Lighting and particularly camerawork (that overhead shot of the family walking on the beach was beautiful) are top-notch. And the slow lighting reveal, via the fireplace, of the family’s doppelgangers was fantastic! And speaking of that initial “doubles” reveal, that sequence was wonderfully memorable and borderline hypnotic (thanks mostly to Nyong’o’s performance in the scene).

The humor present throughout falls flat all but a handful of times. As filmmakers and filmgoers the worldwide know – mixing horror and humor is rarely an attainable goal. Peele didn’t accomplish it here.

I found the film’s tone to be deadly serious. And while bits of humor are always welcome in something so dark (comic relief eases the pressure of horror), the jokes have to be organic to the tone and flow of the film as a whole. It’s simply not the case in Us. One particular “joke” stands out as totally inappropriate, based on the situation in which the characters find themselves. There were plenty of these, but the moment when Jason picks up an object meant for defense, and his sister Zora gives him a “you’ve gotta be kidding” look – no. It doesn’t work. And the Home Alone reference (s) – awful.

These humorous misfires lead me to a bigger problem in the film overall. I never thought I’d live to see the day where I’d have to compare the idiocy, moronic actions and wholly incoherent character choices in a film (since I tore apart last year’s A Quiet Place), but here I am. Choices by any number of characters in Us, and in any number of tense moments – were totally nonsensical.

Look. The film didn’t set out to be an over-the-top fantasy. It’s grounded in reality. These people live real lives – conversations about Zora’s track-n-field aspirations, beach time with friends and talk about dead grandparents. If this is the world established, then these are folks we as the audience know and recognize. So the inopportune humor and ridiculous (and many times dangerous) moves taken by the characters – it never adds up.

Actions by the characters were constantly making me shake my head with a silent “no!” And that is simply a distraction. Yes. Horror films are known to highlight dumb actions by dumb characters. Such things are expected in something like Friday the 13th – but not here.

Other than Lupita Nyong’o, I was completely unimpressed with the performances from the ensemble. No one was completely horrible, of course, but I wasn’t buying much of what the actors brought to the game – but again, a lot of the blame lies at the feet of Peele. The wishy-washy tone couldn’t have been easy for the actors to navigate, no matter how good they are.

Nyong’o – despite the handicapped storytelling working against her – is magnificent in her dual roles. I’ve said it before in numerous venues (in person and online), if you can cry like that – at the drop of a hat, then I will automatically fall in love with you. And both of her characters require such impressive feats. And the fact that Nyong’o and the majority of the other cast members were very frequently playing opposite “themselves” (i.e. some talented stand-ins) – certainly makes their performances impressive, if (aside from Nyong’o) they didn’t come out complete winners.

I do want to call out the film’s exposition scenes. Setting up the easy relationships of this family of four, was a genuine delight. I do so enjoy seeing “real people” come to life on the screen (until they don’t, as is the case here). But at the film’s outset, I liked these people. Too bad this carefully laid groundwork came crumbling down as the film continued.

I didn’t care much for the film’s final revelation. By that point, I was already so bored, any possibility of impressing me was basically out the door. Interesting, but ultimately uneventful. Too little, too late. And it all felt a little convoluted and unfocused.

While the social issues tackled in Get Out were interesting, deliciously served the story and never felt heavy-handed to me, the attempt at a social message of “immigration” in Us was too much for me. The dual version of Adelaide (Red) says at one point, “We’re Americans.” I get where you’re coming from, Mr. Peele. Loud and clear. There’s no subtlety here.

The film had flashes of Signs, The Strangers and even Poltergeist III – notably in the use of mirrors, reflections and dual images in every other shot.

And if you missed the call-out to 1987’s The Lost Boys – you missed a genuine treat. I’m not talking about the Santa Cruz boardwalk location itself (which is of course, where the fictional Santa Carla of The Lost Boys existed) – just the mention of “a film being shot there” in the 1986 sections of Us – absolutely tickled me. Film nerd.

I’ll just add this. I watched the first two episodes of The Twilight Zone reboot (executive produced by Mr. Peele). While he didn’t direct “Nightmare at 30,000 Feet” or “The Comedian”, the entire project is guided by his hand. And I found both of those premiere episodes severely lacking.

The point is: I was a big fan of Get Out. I thought it was fantastically conceived, executed, acted. Yes, Us is only his second feature, but frankly Get Out is starting to look like something of a fluke.

There, I said it.

As I left the theatre, I was pretty down. Other than some initial excitement over the trailer, I was able to stay in the dark about the various goings-on in the film. Thus, my expectations were right in the middle. Sure, I enjoyed Get Out heaps, but…

The fact that – what amounts to – an apocalyptic thriller (even one with a somewhat unique take on the idea) was overlong and boring – says it all. How can you make massive death, civil unrest and a breakdown of society at the hands of a foreign faction – boring? Can’t be easy.

Us is now playing in theatres everywhere.

1.5 stars out of a possible 5.


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The Handmaid’s Tale star Elisabeth Moss has come aboard Universal & Blumhouse’s ‘The Invisible Man’ set to be directed by Leigh Whannell who also penned the script.

The film will be shot in Australia and will be the first part of Universal’s monster-verse relaunch in partnership with Blumhouse who has had an amazing few years success with their slate of horror films.

Moss, a two-time Emmy winner for The Handmaid’s Tale, stars in the upcoming film Her Smell which hits theaters today.

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SHAZAM! Review

The DCEU has been on uncertain ground for quite some time. Fans and critics have been divisive, and nothing is certain for the future of these iconic properties. The good news is, it seems like Warner Brothers/DC has removed the shackles of a mainline universe and has put more focus on making quality superhero films. This was apparent with the box office juggernaut Aquaman and even more so with the latest film SHAZAM!

SHAZAM! is loosely connected with the DCEU but it benefits from not carrying the weight of the previous films. Instead it gets to be an incredibly fun movie about family, responsibility, and what it means to be a hero. It has the benefit of being a smaller scale story that isn’t trying to tie together bigger overarching plots. At times the stakes are high, but the story is focused, and the characters are relatable throughout.

The movie follows streetwise foster kid Billy Batson. He inherits powers from an ancient wizard and is tasked with protecting the world against evil. When he shouts the name Shazam he instantly transforms into a ripped adult with numerous powers and a ridiculous costume. Shenanigans ensue as he tries to master his powers. Eventually he is forced to step up when he faces a real supernatural threat.

The film was directed by David F. Sandberg. I knew him from his previous film Annabelle: Creation which I really enjoyed. It was obvious right away Sandberg knew what kind of movie he wanted SHAZAM! to be. It’s best described as a cross between Big and Superman. It is established very quickly that this film isn’t going to be dark and gritty, which was a nice change of pace. There were a couple of brief moments when I was worried that it was getting too goofy, but the film always seemed to balance those moments out with heartfelt moments or immense danger. The pacing in this film was nearly perfect.

The cast was fantastic. I loved the dynamic between Asher Angel (Billy Batson) and his newly acquired foster family. It was a believable living situation and all the kids in the household had unique and interesting personalities. I was worried early on that Mark Strong would just be another generic bald evil villain guy, but he was also interesting. His backstory was unique and almost sympathetic at times. I thought it was a mistake not coming out strong with Black Adam for the first film. After seeing Shazam! I think they made the right choice using Dr. Sivana for Billy Batson’s coming of age story. Finally, I must mention Zachary Levi as Shazam. He showed up in the film much later than I expected but he was instantly a joy to watch on screen. He did an incredible job playing Billy Batson in his adult superhero form. There were several moments in the film when Billy was going back and forth between his kid and adult form. If either of the actors weren’t perfect for the role it could have been a mess. Instead it was a seamless transition that felt as believable as this ridiculous premise could be. The cast brought so much heart to this film that it made SHAZAM! an unforgettable journey.

SHAZAM! has just about everything you could want out of a comic book film. The action is top notch, the suit looks great on film, the villain is threatening, and the hero is actually heroic! Billy is very flawed and misguided at times, but he is a good person that wants to do the right thing. If you have been waiting for a fun movie about a Golden Age hero, you won’t be disappointed. SHAZAM! was a refreshing take on a genre that is crowded to say the least.

I give SHAZAM! a 9 out of 10.

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I first saw Rustlers at last year’s FilmQuest Film Festival in Provo, Utah.

And when I did a wrap-up article, it ranked highly in my “Best of Fest” short film offerings.

But I wanted to further explore what it was that so intrigued me when I first took a look.

Rustlers follows two desperate cowboys, Blake (Brandon Lee Olive) and John (Travis Farris), as they take the opportunity – in light of old man rancher Silas’ (Cory Dangerfield) absence – to steal a few head of cattle. Thing is, Silas returns earlier than anticipated, and these two “good ol’ boys” have to deal with the fallout of their botched theft and their bad timing.

Written, produced and directed by Utah filmmaker Rob York, Rustlers reminded me (in atmosphere, not necessarily in content) of 2016’s Oscar-nominated Hell or High Water. Quite a comparison, for a film (Hell or High Water) which I secretly wanted to win most of the big awards that year.

The cinematography in Rustlers is stunning. The rural Utah vistas photographed so lovingly, will absolutely delight the viewer.

I also greatly appreciated the editing (and remarkable continuity) – notably as Silas makes his leisurely nreturn up the dirt road in his battered old truck – slowly approaching the film’s inevitable confrontation.

And to continue on the editing topic – it’s always a marvel to watch a film, whose editor totally understands timing. All throughout, every single shot was held just the right amount to provide just the right amount of information. The film never feels slow, or overdone. It’s just right.

All three of the lead performances are solid, but given the history of Blake’s character (and the reason for this seemingly unlikely crime) – well, we’re given only a taste of what he’s dealing with – and with that, Brandon Lee Olive delivers the biggest wallop, performance-wise. At the film’s conclusion, one line of dialogue spells it all out, and the hurt in Blake’s eyes – easily provides the film’s best acting moment.

As John, Farris is a sort of stereotypical, loud-mouth bad boy, and he pulls it off remarkably well. He’s a handsome guy – so the filmmaking team made a wise choice in casting him. It’s always a smart move to put a good-looking actor – to sort of play against type – and make their character something of a cocky douche-bag… a love-to-hate character, if you will.

I’ve often suggested that there are two types of short films. There’s what I call a “punchline” short – something which is perfectly suited for a 5-minute, 10-minute run-time or just beyond those specifications.

Then there are the proof-of-concept pieces (whether intended as a larger piece or not). York told me that there is a feature version of this film in development at present, and Rustlers is something which I’d definitely like to see more of.

In fact, in my FilmQuest wrap-up, I placed Rustlers on my list of “Top Ten Short Films I’d Like to See in a Feature Version”. I guess there’s hardly a recommendation stronger than that, eh?

For a 14-minute film, there are a few minor revelations at the film’s tail-end, and these tantalizing (barely hinted-at) tidbits only make me want to know more about these characters, their motives and their world.

York has created an interesting universe, engaging and mysterious characters – and most importantly, a situation which requires further examination.

At FilmQuest, Rustlers was nominated for Best Utah Short Film.

A 4.5 out of 5 star rating.

RUSTLERS - Trailer - Vimeo

RUSTLERS – Trailer from Rob York on Vimeo.

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Warning. Be careful when messing with your teachers. They’re smarter then you. Sometimes.

The new comedy-horror short from filmmaker Nathan Allen Bunker takes the teacher revenge story to another level that I’m sure many teachers wish they could. That’s one of many reasons the medium of film is the perfect place to act out those fantasies. Can’t get arrested for imagination. One of our friends here at Terror Time and awesome actress to boot, Sarah Nicklin, was one of the producers on this short film and brought it to our attention. It stars Ben Begley as Paul, Brendan Jennings as Milton, Jerry Marr as Professor Henson and Allene Prince as “Margaret”. Check it out below and let us know what sick and twisted way you would get revenge. It’s made the ‘Staff Pick’ selection on Vimeo. More comedy then horror but we thought our readers would get a kick out of it. Enjoy ya RUBES!

RUBES - Vimeo

RUBES from Bunker Films on Vimeo.

Two disgruntled teachers use a Rube Goldberg machine to exact revenge on the people who have wronged them.

RUBES
Written and Directed by: Nathan Alan Bunker
Producers: Andrea Bunker / Nathan Alan Bunker
Co-Producer: Ryan Frost
Director of Photography: Justin Duval

Casting Director: Andrea Bunker
Unit Production Manager: Ruby Cantu
Associate Producers: Stephen V. Johnson / Sarah Nicklin / Richard Turke
Rube Goldberg Machine Built By: Stephen V. Johnson
Composer: Iván Ruiz Serrano
Gaffer: Donnie Hobbie
First Assistant Camera: Tyler Bradberry
Production Sound Mixer: Thomas Corkran
Sound Design & ReRecording Mixer: Howard Karp
Foley Artist & Voice Actor: Meghan McGuinness
Make-Up Artist: Courtney Witherspoon-Balkov
Music Supervisor: Sarah Ponder
Special Thanks: Bryan Johnson / Sarah Vargas / Chell Stephen / Carolyn Richards / Sean Decker

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Three succinct and telling words.

It feels right.

It’s been 40 years since Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) had to find her best and strongest self, and take on the seemingly indestructible Michael Myers.  In that time, she’s prepared, installing herself in a well-equipped, secure home (think apocalypse-preppers).  She’s now estranged from her family, including her grown daughter Karen (Judy Greer), twice divorced and agoraphobic.  When podcast team/investigative reporters Dana Haines and Aaron Korey (Rhian Rees and Jefferson Hall; respectively) visit Michael Myers at the Smith’s Grove Hospital – looking to get the anniversary scoop from Michael directly – it sets into motion the Laurie/Michael showdown Laurie’s been expecting for the past 40 years – all of it on Halloween night.

With an endless array of fabulous inside jokes – clearly meant for the hardcore Halloween fan-base, I found call-outs to the original Halloween (of course), Halloween II, Halloween III: Season of the Witch and even a wink to the climax of Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers.  Why, there was even a similar bathroom stall sequence – calling out to a scene in Halloween H20: 20 Years Later.

And I just now noticed on the film’s IMDb page, that P.J. Soles (the original’s Lynda) “totally” appears as a high school teacher.  Fabulous!

But the film goes beyond the nostalgia which most will expect, and creates an interesting character study via a now-aged Laurie Strode and that is the film’s dynamic central focus.

The snappy editing is perfectly paired with the snappy dialogue.  It all looks and sounds fantastic – with the “$3,000” payment/exchange being a perfect example of both.  There’s plenty of humor – and even in such a serious film, it always works.  You’ll like these characters.  You’ll like their back and forth – notably the babysitter/ward relationship between secondary characters Vicky (Virginia Gardner) and Julian (Jibrail Nantambu).

Visually, the film looks fantastic.  There’s plenty of atmosphere – and nowhere is that more frightening than in the foggy “prison-bus” sequence – where you’ll flash back to the opening moments of the original.  There’s nothing creepier than a bunch of white-robed mental patients wandering aimlessly on a hazy rural road.

Make-up effects and gore are top-notch.  And while it’s always been a big deal that the original was basically bloodless, the kills in this one are definitely gross-out, but never go over-the-top by lingering on the gore, thus keeping in line with the original’s more suggestive methods.  Not that gore-hounds will be disappointed, of course.

There is a turn of events – which won’t be discussed in detail here – which was a bit of a stumble somewhere in the second act.  It’s an interesting twist, but I felt as if it came out of nowhere.  Even a slight clue-in – earlier in the story – would have done wonders to make this plot turn more effective and less conspicuous.

Jamie Lee Curtis is in top form as a very prepared and very bad-ass Laurie Strode.  Seeing her inhabit this character again makes me want to borrow and remix a quote from Dr. Loomis in the original, “She came home.”

While I am indeed a fan of H20, the return of this timeline’s Laurie feels more true to the character we first came to love in 1978.  Curtis brings a fearlessness to Laurie this time around.  And it makes sense that the original’s wallflower Laurie, would retreat into herself (physically and mentally) in the face of all she’s endured.

I loved the choice for Laurie to have an almost business-like reaction to the news of Michael’s escape.  She realizes that the time has come and does nothing to hide her concern for her family’s well-being.  The almost embarrassing matter-of-factness she shows in every scene – loudly proclaiming that “this is gonna happen”, and then later letting Laurie offer up – in attitude alone – a bittersweet “I told you so” – made me fall in love with Curtis anew.  Curtis and the filmmakers bring to life a very real extension of who we would expect Laurie to be – and it’s brilliant.

Nick Castle returns as Michael Myers (along with James Jude Courtney) to don the Shatner mask.  No one ever quite mastered the gait and attitude of the original Myers in the many sequels or re-imaginings, so having Castle back on the horse… yes, it felt right.  And seeing Michael really think before acting – in so many scenes – was simply glorious.

The score from John Carpenter (who also executive produced here) and his son Cody Carpenter, along with Daniel A. Davies – never overuses the iconic theme.  Don’t get me wrong, it’s certainly present in many new forms, but overall, the new score is its very own wonderful beast.  And let me just say this – I’m picking up a physical copy of the soundtrack just as soon as I can.  Is there any better recommendation than that?

It’s not really a complaint, per se – more of an observation, but… despite the presence of ample “boo” moments to keep you on edge, and some delicious suspense – the new film doesn’t reach the heights (depths?) of absolute terror which the original film embodied.

Perhaps it’s my personal experience of 40 years of Halloween sequels, knock-off slasher films and enough horror cliches to fill up an entire sanitarium, but this installment (while powerful) couldn’t dig up the more primal “fight or flight” feeling I experienced when I first screened the original.  But of course – I was only 13 years old.  It’s all about perspective, folks.

Then again – there were a couple of moments in this new film, where I found myself teetering on the edge of my seat, so…

As most of you know, the entire universe – all of the sequels, including 1981’s direct continuation, Halloween II – no longer exist in this world.  I was apprehensive when I first learned of this course, but after seeing the new film – I can’t imagine a better alternate path.  Say it with me now – it felt right.

I went into this with very level-headed expectations.  Sure, I was excited, but the palpable excitement was laced with caution.  There will no doubt be naysayers about this new installment, but I can hardly imagine any true fans of the original, not taking to this new tale.

I’ve never feigned some sort of strength or the ability to squelch emotions when falling into any particular movie-world.  I’m a notorious softee, so perhaps you can take this next bit of information with a grain of salt.

The moment the opening credits started, and that iconic title design graced the screen – I began to cry.  It’s an impressive and smart update of the original’s credit sequence.  As I sat there – for goodness sake – actually crying during a Halloween movie – internally I hoped that this initial and intense emotion I was feeling, would not be let down by the rest of the film.  It’s a mirror reaction to my emotions when seeing Star Wars: The Force Awakens – revisiting beloved characters and situations after a decades-long absence – how could you not get choked up?  Just confirms that although I may be jaded, I’m not totally dead inside.

I’m happy (and frankly relieved) to say that the filmmakers managed to give me everything I wanted (needed) out of a continuation of this story.

And seeing in the opening credits, the name of the late Debra Hill – warmed my heart.

I’ve never had the opportunity to officially review a film in the Halloween franchise.  And so it gives me great pleasure to do so now, and to offer up this smiling jack-o-lantern of a write-up complete with a sparkling 4.5-star score.

Whether you have the long history with this franchise as I do, or if you’re a newbie to the vast world of Michael Myers and company – there’s ample enjoyment to be had here.  I do recommend that you sit down for a quick re-watch of the 1978 original – or if you’ve never seen said original, certainly do so before taking this one in.  It’ll only make for a richer screening experience.

This new Halloween is a love letter to the legions of fans.  It’s a perfect balance of authentically continuing a story and the lives of familiar and beloved characters (thus making for a solid film in its own right) – taking us on a new and interesting journey, while being keenly cognizant of where it all began.

When examining the rest of the franchise’s films, I would say that Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers has always been my second favorite – right behind the Carpenter original.

That being said, I will go on record here and happily proclaim this:  Halloween 2018 is second only to the original.

It’s a nostalgic film.  It’s a fun film.  It’s a smart film.  It’s a great film.

It feels right.

Yes.  The new Halloween got it right.  It’s now playing in theatres everywhere.

Halloween - New Trailer [HD] - YouTube

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The Gemr.com produced docu-series “Collection Complete” (which takes an in-depth look into the lives of filmmakers and artists and the collections that fuel their work) has returned, and the third episode of 2019 takes a deep dive into “Horror’s Hallowed Grounds”’ filmmaker Sean Clark’s life-long fascination with terror, including his acquisiton of the screen-used saw from 1986’s “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”!

You can watch the episode below.

Where Is It Now? The Saw from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 - COLLECTION COMPLETE 2.3 - YouTube

Presented by Gemr.com(an app and platform for collectors worldwide to display, discuss, buy and sell the pop culture objects of their fascination), past episodes of “Collection Complete” include looks into the private collections of filmakers Mike Mendez (“Tales of Halloween”) and “The Hills Run Red” producer Robert Meyer Burnett, with more guests to come.

For more, subscribe to the series’ Youtube channel HERE, ‘like’ them on Facebook HERE, and follow them on Instagram at Collection Complete, and on Twitter @CollectionComp.

And finally, wanna’ win a “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2” Prize Pack, which features one personally signed copy of “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2” Collector’s Edition Blu-ray from Shout! Factory, and one personally signed 8×10 (both by Caroline Williams, the star of the film), as well as one officially licensed “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” tee of your choice from those awesome folks at Fright-Rags?

Simply create a free account at Gemr.com’s horror club HERE in order to win.

Already have a Gemr account? “Just click through the link and you’ll be entered instantly”!

The post Collection Complete Returns With The Saw from Texas Chainsaw 2! appeared first on Tom Hollands Terror Time.

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I first saw Rustlers at last year’s FilmQuest Film Festival in Provo, Utah.

And when I did a wrap-up article, it ranked highly in my “Best of Fest” short film offerings.

But I wanted to further explore what it was that so intrigued me when I first took a look.

Rustlers follows two desperate cowboys, Blake (Brandon Lee Olive) and John (Travis Farris), as they take the opportunity – in light of old man rancher Silas’ (Cory Dangerfield) absence – to steal a few head of cattle. Thing is, Silas returns earlier than anticipated, and these two “good ol’ boys” have to deal with the fallout of their botched theft and their bad timing.

Written, produced and directed by Utah filmmaker Rob York, Rustlers reminded me (in atmosphere, not necessarily in content) of 2016’s Oscar-nominated Hell or High Water. Quite a comparison, for a film (Hell or High Water) which I secretly wanted to win most of the big awards that year.

The cinematography in Rustlers is stunning. The rural Utah vistas photographed so lovingly, will absolutely delight the viewer.

I also greatly appreciated the editing (and remarkable continuity) – notably as Silas makes his leisurely nreturn up the dirt road in his battered old truck – slowly approaching the film’s inevitable confrontation.

And to continue on the editing topic – it’s always a marvel to watch a film, whose editor totally understands timing. All throughout, every single shot was held just the right amount to provide just the right amount of information. The film never feels slow, or overdone. It’s just right.

All three of the lead performances are solid, but given the history of Blake’s character (and the reason for this seemingly unlikely crime) – well, we’re given only a taste of what he’s dealing with – and with that, Brandon Lee Olive delivers the biggest wallop, performance-wise. At the film’s conclusion, one line of dialogue spells it all out, and the hurt in Blake’s eyes – easily provides the film’s best acting moment.

As John, Farris is a sort of stereotypical, loud-mouth bad boy, and he pulls it off remarkably well. He’s a handsome guy – so the filmmaking team made a wise choice in casting him. It’s always a smart move to put a good-looking actor – to sort of play against type – and make their character something of a cocky douche-bag… a love-to-hate character, if you will.

I’ve often suggested that there are two types of short films. There’s what I call a “punchline” short – something which is perfectly suited for a 5-minute, 10-minute run-time or just beyond those specifications.

Then there are the proof-of-concept pieces (whether intended as a larger piece or not). York told me that there is a feature version of this film in development at present, and Rustlers is something which I’d definitely like to see more of.

In fact, in my FilmQuest wrap-up, I placed Rustlers on my list of “Top Ten Short Films I’d Like to See in a Feature Version”. I guess there’s hardly a recommendation stronger than that, eh?

For a 14-minute film, there are a few minor revelations at the film’s tail-end, and these tantalizing (barely hinted-at) tidbits only make me want to know more about these characters, their motives and their world.

York has created an interesting universe, engaging and mysterious characters – and most importantly, a situation which requires further examination.

At FilmQuest, Rustlers was nominated for Best Utah Short Film.

A 4.5 out of 5 star rating.

RUSTLERS - Trailer - Vimeo

RUSTLERS – Trailer from Rob York on Vimeo.

The post ‘Rustlers’ Short Film Review appeared first on Tom Hollands Terror Time.

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It’s the one year anniversary of the slasher fan film that got the attention of the entire horror genre.  The original three part saga had combined views of 476,000 with part three (the finale) totaling 391,000 views by itself.

In celebration, the filmmakers responsible have re-edited footage from the ground up with new scenes and scores to optimize the flow.  Nearly 40 minutes in length.

Callmejeff86 Film in collaboration with Art Before Comfort is proud to bring you the World Premiere Special Extended Cut of MICHAEL MYERS VS JASON VOORHEES, The Ultimate Slasher Fan Film! 

Michael Myers Versus Jason Voorhees - The Complete Saga - YouTube

The post Michael Myers Versus Jason Voorhees – The Complete Saga appeared first on Tom Hollands Terror Time.

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The Gemr.com produced docu-series “Collection Complete” (which takes an in-depth look into the lives of filmmakers and artists and the collections that fuel their work) has returned for 2019, and the first episode of the new year takes a deep dive into “Horror’s Hallowed Grounds”’ filmmaker Sean Clark’s life-long fascination with terror.


From his childhood introduction to Fangoria magazine and their famous Weekend of Horrors conventions to his jaw-dropping collection of screen-used props (notably here a screen-used clown from the classic 1982 film “Poltergeist”), the episode offers a rare look into Clark’s personal collection of artifacts from scary cinema, of which he offers, “Something about being a horror fan, and being a collector, is that you want to embrace the things that terrified you.”


You can watch the fascinating episode below.

Fangoria, Halloween & That Clown from Poltergeist – COLLECTION COMPLETE 2.1 - YouTube

Presented by Gemr.com (a platform for collectors worldwide to display, discuss, buy and sell the pop culture objects of their fascination), past episodes of “Collection Complete” include looks into the private collections of filmakers Mike Mendez (“Tales of Halloween”) and “The Hills Run Red” producer Robert Meyer Burnett.

For more, subscribe to the series’ “Youtube channel here“, ‘like’ them on ”Facebook here” and follow them on ”Instagram at CollectionComplete” and on ”Twitter at @CollectionComp“.

And finally, wanna’ copy of the ultra rare issue of Fangoria #9? Clark’s grade school teacher took his away, but for the next two weeks, those who create a free account at Gemr.com’s horror club “HERE” will have a chance to WIN THEIR OWN! “

The post Collection Complete Returns With The Clown from Poltergeist! appeared first on Tom Hollands Terror Time.

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