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Weekends are time when things slow down a little. Your weekend shouldn’t be two more regular work days. That’s a sure road to burnout. Take time to refresh yourself. Take time for something different. Take time for some of that reading you can’t find time for during the week.

Here are choice articles on hot leadership topics culled from the business schools, the business press and major consulting firms. This week there are articles about recession. Can we predict when one will hit? How do we survive and thrive?

From Jeffrey Schulze: Is A Recession Coming? Or Will We Party Like It’s 1999?

“Is a recession coming? History can be a good guide. Examining the signals from the late 1990s and early 2000s, when a recession hit, can help investors evaluate the many similarities – and differences – between then and now.”

From Robert Shiller: The Trump Boom Is Making It Harder to See the Next Recession

“When big shifts like recessions are on the way, economists just aren’t very good at predicting them. The truth is that we really can’t foresee where the economy will be heading in a year or two, a limitation that is particularly troubling right now, in the midst of what may be called the Trump economic boom.”

From Tom Holland and Jeff Katzin: Smart Moves to Make Now Ahead of a Recession

“While predicting when a recession will hit is nearly impossible, it’s certainly not far-fetched that one could arrive relatively soon, given that the economic expansion is now into its second decade. For CFOs and other corporate leaders, however, the exact timing and duration of a recession matters less than their willingness and readiness to seize the moment now, when they have more options.”

From Richard Dobbs, Tomas Karakolev, and Rishi Raj: Preparing for the next downturn

“To understand how to make the most of a recessionary environment, we analyzed the performance before, during, and after the 2000–01 recession of some 1,300 US companies from a broad range of sectors[1] and identified which of these companies emerged from it having gained or maintained leadership status.[2] For these industry leaders, we analyzed which characteristics they exhibited before the recession that might help explain why they outperformed their peers.”

From Walter Frick: How to Survive a Recession and Thrive Afterward

“Recessions—defined as two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth—can be caused by economic shocks (such as a spike in oil prices), financial panics (like the one that preceded the Great Recession), rapid changes in economic expectations (the so-called ‘animal spirits’ described by John Maynard Keynes; this is what caused the dot-com bubble to burst), or some combination of the three. Most firms suffer during a recession, primarily because demand (and revenue) falls and uncertainty about the future increases. But research shows that there are ways to mitigate the damage.”

Book Suggestions

A Crisis of Beliefs: Investor Psychology and Financial Fragility by Nicola Gennaioli and Andrei Shleifer

Big Debt Crises by Ray Dalio

Recession-Proof: How to Survive and Thrive in an Economic Downturn by Jason Schenker

Irrational Exuberance: Revised and Expanded Third Edition by Robert Shiller

Every week I share some recommendations of business books that I think are worth a look. Follow this link to the most recent list.

Every Monday, I do a blog post about business reading and business books. Follow this link to my review of Loonshots.

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Everybody wants to do better. Ben Franklin was a master of many things. But he pursued “the arduous task of arriving at moral perfection.”

Moral perfection may not be your goal, but I bet there’s parts of your life you’d like to improve. There are over 100,000 books on Amazon on self-improvement. The sheer number is proof that books alone won’t do the trick.

Part of my work is coaching writers whose full-time job is something else while they write a book. To do their best work and keep things in balance, they need to be as productive as possible. Here are five tips I share with them.

What Works for Most People Will Probably Work for You

We human beings are more alike than we are different. If you want to be more fit, be more productive, sell better, or be a better parent, start with what works for most people. It’s the advice that’s most likely to work for you.

Be wary of “new” advice that flies in the face of things we’ve known for decades. Human beings have changed little in the last couple of thousand years. It’s unlikely that this new “truth” will live up to the hype. Instead of jumping on the bandwagon, stand off to the side and see what happens to the bandwagon. Then decide whether to pursue that advice.

Experiment to Find What Works for You

You’re a lot like most other human beings, but you’re also unique. When the advice that works for everybody else doesn’t work for you, experiment to find what works best.

It’s easy to over-research stuff like this. Do your due diligence, then try something. If it works, great. If not, try something else.

Keep Records

Keep records of whatever it is you’re trying to improve. Keep records of the things you try to get better. Without those records, you’ll fool yourself.

Work on One Thing at a Time

You need to know whether the changes make a difference. And you need to make sure you’re doing what you intend to do. So, work on one area of self-improvement at a time. Change just one thing at a time.

Baby Steps Win the Day

Don’t go for big, dramatic change all at once. Make small changes, small improvements. Try to get just a little better every day.

Improving this way is like watching your money grow with compound interest. Each day of improvement builds on the previous days, and big changes happen over time.

Bottom Line

If you want to get better, don’t rely on self-improvement books alone. Pay attention to the advice that works for most people. Experiment to find what works for unique you. Keep records so you don’t fool yourself. Then, change one thing at a time. Improve one baby step at a time.3

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Independent business blogs are blogs that aren’t supported by an organization like a magazine, newspaper, company, or business school. Those people provide lots of great content, but they don’t need any additional exposure. In this post, every week, I bring you posts of quality from excellent bloggers that don’t get as much publicity.

This week, I’m pointing you to posts by LaRae Quy, Tanveer Naseer, Ken Downer, Mary Jo Asmus, Karin Hurt and David Dye.

From LaRae Quy: This Is The Reason Most People Get Stuck In Mediocrity

“The reason most people get stuck in mediocrity is because they refuse to fail. The reason people refuse to fail is because they associate failure with defeat. Their fear of defeat paralyzes them to the point that they won’t move forward.”

From Tanveer Naseer: A Surprising Example Of Why You Don’t Need A Title To Effectively Lead Others

“And yet, time and again, when I speak at conferences or corporate events, a number of employees talk to me about their desire to move into leadership roles, but struggle with how to demonstrate to those higher up on the corporate ladder that they have what it takes to lead others. And more often than not, what trips these employees up is their preoccupation with their current job title, as opposed to seeking out opportunities to actually lead others.”

From Ken Downer: Making Noise: 3 Tips for Better Leading in a Noisy World

“Are we making progress, or just making noise?”

From Mary Jo Asmus: Listening to yourself

“Funny thing is, I’ve never written anything about listening to yourself. Equally as huge and life changing as listening to others, being aware of your thoughts, emotions, and sensations in your body (yes, all that stuff below your chin) can also make a difference in your leadership.”

From Karin Hurt and David Dye: How to Prevent Training From Wasting Time and Money

“Your employees go to training. Hopefully, they come back fired up and excited about what they’ve learned and what they can do with it. Two weeks later though, they’re back to their old habits. Now, all those behaviors that worked well in the role-plays are a distant memory. What happened? Assuming you’ve picked the right training and avoided these big mistakes, if the learning doesn’t stick, you might need to work on your reinforcement strategy.”

That’s it for this week’s selections from independent business blogs. If you liked this piece you may enjoy my curation posts on this blog. Every Tuesday, “Leaders and Strategies in Real Life” helps you learn about leadership by studying what real leaders do. On Fridays you can wrap up your week with “Weekend Leadership Reading” consisting of choice articles on hot leadership topics culled from the business schools, the business press and major consulting firms.

How I Select Posts for this Midweek Review

The five posts I select to share in my Midweek Review of the Independent Business Blogs are picked from a regular review of about sixty blogs I check daily and an additional twenty-five or so that I check occasionally. Here’s how I select the posts you see in this review.

They must be published within the previous week.

They must support the purpose of the blog: to help leaders at all levels do a better job and lead a better life.

They must be from an independent business blog.

As a general rule, I only select posts that stand on their own, no selections from a series.

Also as a general rule, I do not select posts that are either a book review or a book report.

I reserve the right to make exceptions to the above.

Here, on Three Star Leadership, I post things that will help a boss at any level do a better job and live a better life. At the The 360 Degree Feedback blog, I join other bloggers with posts on leadership development. And, at Wally Bock’s Writing Edge, I share tools and insights to help you write better.

The 347 tips in my ebook can help you Become a Better Boss One Tip at a Time.

Just promoted from individual contributor? Check out my ebook, Now You’re the Boss: Making the Most of the Most Important Transition in Business.

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Instead of studying leadership, why not spend some time studying leaders and strategies in the wild? You can learn a lot from leadership experts, but you always see the leader and what he or she does through the expert’s personal lens. Supplement that learning with studying real leaders in real life situations and draw your own conclusions. The posts in this series will help you.

Every week I’ll point you to articles by and about real leaders in real situations and to articles about how real companies are faring in the marketplace. Read them. Think about them. Draw your own lessons and conclusions from them. Then try to apply those lessons in your own real life.

This week I’m pointing you to articles about Douglas Murray, Ken Allen, WOW Air, Clarke Murphy, and Stephanie Houston.

From Douglas Murray: Lessons Learned In Five Years As A First-Time CEO

“I recently celebrated a personal milestone: five years as CEO at my company. When I joined the company, I was a first-time CEO. Experiences will vary across organizations and personalities, but there are key lessons I learned that I believe are transferable to any CEO.”

From Ken Allen: The Former CEO of DHL Express on Leading the Company Through an Existential Crisis

“It was November 2007, and DHL Express was facing an existential crisis. Our performance across all major markets was deteriorating, and without a fundamental overhaul, our losses were posed to threaten the profitability of the entire Deutsche Post DHL Group. Three hundred and fifty company leaders had gathered in Cincinnati to confront this challenge head-on.”

From Wharton: WOW Bows Out: Lessons from the Downfall of a Budget Airline

“The collapse of Iceland’s WOW Air, which abruptly ceased operations and stranded passengers last week, came as no surprise to experts who were watching the discount carrier’s operations and said it was on an unsustainable path.”

From Adam Mendler: One On One With Clarke Murphy, CEO of Russell Reynolds Associates

“I have spent almost my entire career at Russell Reynolds Associates, working in multiple countries, and holding ten different roles over the years. Given all that change, it has not felt like one company or one job, but a multitude.”

Thanks to Smartbrief on Leadership for pointing me to this story.

From the London Business School: In conversation with Stephanie Houston from WeWork

“At London Business School’s 2019 HR Strategy Forum, Stephanie Houston, WeWork’s director of talent acquisition for Europe, Israel and Australia, took part in a conversation with Julian Birkinshaw, professor of strategy and entrepreneurship, on the topic of leading transformation and the imperative to innovate.”

For some ideas about how to get more from this series of posts, check out “Studying Leaders in the Wild.

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Here’s what Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, And Transform Industries by Safi Bahcall is about in the author’s own words.

“I’ve always appreciated authors who explain their points simply, right up front. So, here’s the argument in brief:

1. The most important breakthroughs come from loonshots, widely dismissed ideas whose champions are often written off as crazy.

2. Large groups of people are needed to translate those breakthroughs into technologies that win wars, products that save lives, or strategies that change industries.

3. Applying the science of phase transitions to the behavior of teams, companies, or any group with a mission provides practical rules for nurturing loonshots faster and better.”

There’s a lot to like in this book, but there are also things that may inspire you to pluck something else from the bookshelf. Bahcall structured his book as three parts plus an appendix.

Part one is five stories that illustrate what it takes to nurture loonshots. The first story is about Vannevar Bush and Thomas Vail. The second is about researcher Akira Endo. In the third story, you learn how Juan Trippe and Bob Crandall each ran their airline. “The Moses Trap” is the fourth story, illustrated with the life and work of Edwin Land. Bahcall calls the fifth story “Escaping the Moses Trap,” and it’s about Steve Jobs. It’s also about Ed Catmull.

Catmull is the CEO of Pixar. His experience and practice are like a red thread running through this book. If you already know a lot about Catmull, great. If you don’t, buy a copy of his book, Creativity Inc., and read it before you read Loonshots. You’ll also get another full-scale version of a loonshot-nurturing story.

In part two, Bahcall intends to present the “science” of loonshots. He does, and he doesn’t. His use of the phase transition metaphor is excellent. He presents it clearly. The rules he derives make sense.

But there’s also some voodoo in this section. Bahcall presents some of his concepts as if they were mathematical equations. We see various factors increase and decrease in numerators and denominators. But there are no actual values, there are only concepts, and concepts don’t work in equations. You need real numbers to make real equations work.

Bahcall called part three, “The Mother of All Loonshots.” The stories here, like the rest of the book, are well-told. This part of the book was interesting, fascinating even, but not particularly helpful.

An afterword that attempts to parse the distinction between disruption and loonshots. Disruption is such an over- and misused, word today that you can get some value from the discussion.

There are also two appendices. One is a summary of the book. The summary is excellent, and you can use it to make sense of some things you may find in the main text.

The other appendix is about the equations. It does a better job of explaining what Bahcall means than the main body of the text.

Things That Bugged Me

These things bug me. They may not bug you, but if you’re irritated by some of the same things I am, it may influence whether you want to buy the book.

Bahcall tells us that ARPA, later DARPA, is a great organization. According to Bahcall, “Its alumni have led, or its management principles have inspired, many of the legendary research organizations across the United States, including nearly every example mentioned in this book.”

That’s great. But when Bahcall talks about great organizations, later in the book he doesn’t mention DARPA.

Bahcall says we want to find ways to make larger organizations capable of nurturing loonshots. He even gives us ways to do it.

But organizations such as Pixar, W. L. Gore and Associates, and DARPA, are getting along without increasing the size of the work groups. They adapt their corporate structure to allow lots of smaller groups.  I wish he discussed whether that is what he means by making large organizations capable of nurturing loonshots.

Last on the “bug me” list is the way he uses language in some places. For example, he refers to Gore Associates. The name of the company is W. L. Gore and Associates. In several places, he refers to “management span.” I’ve never heard that term. When I Googled it to see if that was my problem or his, the articles I found referred me to “span of control.” That’s the phrase that I’ve used for half a century.

In A Nutshell

Loonshots is an excellent book that makes important points and tells relevant stories well. Here are some reasons to read it.

Bahcall tells business stories you don’t normally hear and tells them well.

The insight that we often write things off to “culture” that we could deal with more effectively by considering structure and incentives is powerful. The phase transition metaphor really works.

There is a marvelous and helpful discussion of using a “system mindset” to examine your decision process and not just the outcome of your decision in an after-action critique.

Read Creativity Inc. before you read Loonshots. It is a full-scale example of Bahcall’s key points. It will also help you understand references to Ed Catmull in Loonshots.

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Regular exercise is good for you in many ways. One of them is that you’re more likely to make good decisions when you’re fit.

Good cardiovascular fitness means that your brain gets more oxygen. When that happens, you think better.

When you’re fit, you don’t get tired as easily. That’s good. Vince Lombardi said that “Fatigue makes cowards of us all.” Fatigue also makes us less disciplined and more likely to pick the easy choice even if it’s not the right choice.

This is only one of 347 tips in my ebook, Become a Better Boss One Tip at a Time.

Just promoted from individual contributor? Check out my ebook, Now You’re the Boss: Making the Most of the Most Important Transition in Business.

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Weekends are time when things slow down a little. Your weekend shouldn’t be two more regular work days. That’s a sure road to burnout. Take time to refresh yourself. Take time for something different. Take time for some of that reading you can’t find time for during the week.

Here are choice articles on hot leadership topics culled from the business schools, the business press and major consulting firms. This week there are articles about education and learning.

From Wharton: Can the Minerva Model of Learning Disrupt Higher Education?

“Traditional universities — including Ivy League schools — fail to deliver the kind of learning that ensures employability. That perspective inspired Ben Nelson, founder and CEO of the six-year-old Minerva Schools in San Francisco. His goal is to reinvent higher education and to provide students with high-quality learning opportunities at a fraction of the cost of an undergraduate degree at an elite school. While tuition at top-tier universities in the U.S. can run more than $40,000 a year, Minerva charges $12,950 a year, according to its website. In a recent test, its students showed superior results compared to traditional universities while also attracting a large number of applicants.”

From Jonathan Woodson: Decades Ago, Pilots Learned to “Fly by Instruments.” Doctors Need to Do the Same

“In a landmark 2016 study Johns Hopkins researchers estimated that more than 250,000 Americans die each year from treatment-related mistakes, making medical error the third-leading cause of death in the United States. As a former military flight surgeon trained in aviation accident investigations, I know well the hazards of misusing or mistrusting instruments.”

From Charles Handy: Educating for uncertainty

“Business schools have always been educational pioneers, but new times bring new challenges – so now they must do it all over again.”

From Russ Banham: Out-Of-The-Box Approaches To Executive Education

“No surprise, then, that many companies are taking a fresh look. Led by CEOs who are firm believers in the value of continuous education, such organizations are sponsoring a wide range of internal programs customized to specific business needs and goals. Like more traditional Exec Ed, the programs are intended to fill skills gaps, but they’re also designed to produce more tangible results.”

From Adi Gaskell: Reinventing Education For The Future Of Work

“British educationalist Ken Robinson holds the distinction of having the most viewed TED talk ever, and his widely viewed skewering of the modern education system has been further embellished upon in numerous books and presentations. He rails against an education system that was forged in the heat of the industrial revolution to create a workforce fit to perform the one task they would have to perform for the entirety of their working lives.

It’s a system that is increasingly unfit for purpose, not only in terms of meeting the widely reported skills shortages in technical disciplines, but also in skills like collaboration and problem solving that are cited as being vital for the 4th industrial revolution. With technology increasingly capable of performing routine tasks, it is beholden on us to develop those skills that are fundamentally human.”

Book Suggestions

Complications: A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science by Atul Gawande

The Second Curve: Thoughts on Reinventing Society by Charles Handy

Bedtime Stories for Managers: Farewell to Lofty Leadership. . . Welcome Engaging Management by Henry Mintzberg

The Art of Learning: An Inner Journey to Optimal Performance by Josh Waitzkin

Every week I share some recommendations of business books that I think are worth a look. Follow this link to the most recent list.

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This Sunday, professional golfers will compete for the PGA Championship in Bethpage, Long Island. Over 100 of them will walk the course. One, John Daly, will ride in a cart. PGA officials gave Daly an exemption from the walking rule because he has an arthritic knee. They also, perhaps unwittingly, gave him a competitive advantage.

Vince Lombardi said that fatigue makes cowards of us all. That’s right, but there’s more. When we’re tired, our discipline goes. Decision-making gets worse. It’s the fatigue factor. And it’s real.

When John Daly rides in his cart he won’t get as tired as others who must walk the course. Fatigue won’t affect his decision making or his ability to concentrate.

If you’re a leader, you’re responsible for your own performance and the performance of a group. The fatigue factor can hit you hard. Here are six ways to fight back.

Get Enough Sleep

This one should be a no-brainer. If your performance gets worse when you’re tired, get enough sleep and you won’t get tired as much.

Exercise

When you’re fit, it’s easier to handle the workload. Good cardio fitness means that your brain gets more oxygen. You make better decisions and handle stress better when you’re fit.

Most people don’t consider chess players as athletes. Garry Kasparov puts it this way. “Chess seems to be a very passive and quiet game where people are sitting for hours, just moving pieces across a board, and nothing is happening.”

Even so, Kasparov thinks there’s as much pressure on a chess player as there is on “any professional athlete.” That’s why he maintains a strict regimen of gym workouts, swimming, and rowing. If you need to be fit to play your best chess, how fit must you be to lead a team?

Diet

What you eat can hurt you or help you. If you eat a lighter lunch, you’ll have a more energetic afternoon. Skip the pastries on your break and go for fruit.

The folks at Harvard Health tell you to “eat small, frequent meals” and “smaller is better, especially at lunch.” The people at EveryDay Health list 10 foods that make good snacks.

Breaks

We just aren’t made to work straight through without a break. We’re more productive when we alternate effort and recovery. Take breaks. Most people need one after about 50 minutes of concentrated work. Figure out what works for you. In his book, When, Daniel Pink offers these guiding principles for good breaks.

  • Something beats nothing
  • Moving beats stationary
  • Social beats solo
  • Outside beats inside
  • Fully detached beats semi-detached
Make Important and Difficult Decisions Early

One way to defeat fatigue is to make difficult and important decisions before you get tired. That means early in your day.

Reduce the Number of Decisions You Must Make

Don’t waste your precious energy on making decisions over and over and over if you can make them once. Make routine things routine. Use checklists, reminders, and processes to do things effectively without having to decide how to do them every time.

Bottom Line

Fatigue makes less-effective leaders of us all. Beat it with sleep, diet, and exercise. Take breaks. Make important and difficult decisions early in your day. Reduce the number of decisions by doing routine things routinely.

Resources

The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal by Jim Loehr and Tony Schwartz

When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel Pink

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Independent business blogs are blogs that aren’t supported by an organization like a magazine, newspaper, company, or business school. Those people provide lots of great content, but they don’t need any additional exposure. In this post, every week, I bring you posts of quality from excellent bloggers that don’t get as much publicity.

This week, I’m pointing you to posts by LaRae Quy, Mary Jo Asmus, Ken Downer, Art Petty, and Jesse Lyn Stoner.

From LaRae Quy: 5 Reasons You Need To Dump Your Loser Friends

“Pick the people you spend time with care—they create the environment in which you will either thrive or wilt. While we need different types of personalities in our life to bring out the best in us, only share your dreams and goals only with those who value them as much as you do. Here are 5 Reasons you need to dump your loser friends so you can:”

From Mary Jo Asmus: When you need to stop leading and start following

“All leaders are also followers. Nobody is autonomous and without the need to follow others. Sometimes the ‘others’ can be your board, manager, employees, peers, or even your significant other. Your need to follow will be depend on the circumstances. It requires different behaviors from you. Its not easy if you are natural leader, but will be necessary at times.”

From Ken Downer: The Dangers of Taking the Easy Way

“Sometimes the answer to our problem seems easy. But the easy solution may not always be the right one. Today in ‘Lines for Leaders’ I’ll share what one famous person said about the dangers of taking the ‘easy way,’ along with some thoughts about how we can make sure that even if we can’t do what’s easiest, we can always do what’s best.”

From Art Petty: The Secret to Leadership and Career Success is Hiding in Plain Sight

“I’ve long suspected the entire leadership training industrial complex (OK, that’s a stretch label, but you get the point) would be rendered obsolete if someone would highlight the one big secret behavior hiding in plain sight and free for all of us to use. This secret behavior is the common thread that binds the over 70,000 books that appear in a search on ‘leadership’ at Amazon. t’s the reason behind the need for billions of dollars annually in training. And, the absence of this behavior is the root cause of many (read: most) workplace problems, countless disciplinary issues, chronic disengagement, and a solid percentage point of annual global growth. (I made that last fact up …it’s fake news, but the rest holds.)”

From Jesse Lyn Stoner: Why Men Don’t Have Friends and Why Women Should Care

“My professor, advisor and mentor, Don Carew, handed out this article at the beginning of each course while I was a grad student in Organization Behavior at University of Mass, Amherst in the mid 1980’s. What does this have to do with leadership? Why is this important for both men and women? I think the answers will be obvious as you read the article.”

That’s it for this week’s selections from independent business blogs. If you liked this piece you may enjoy my curation posts on this blog. Every Tuesday, “Leaders and Strategies in Real Life” helps you learn about leadership by studying what real leaders do. On Fridays you can wrap up your week with “Weekend Leadership Reading” consisting of choice articles on hot leadership topics culled from the business schools, the business press and major consulting firms.

How I Select Posts for this Midweek Review

The five posts I select to share in my Midweek Review of the Independent Business Blogs are picked from a regular review of about sixty blogs I check daily and an additional twenty-five or so that I check occasionally. Here’s how I select the posts you see in this review.

They must be published within the previous week.

They must support the purpose of the blog: to help leaders at all levels do a better job and lead a better life.

They must be from an independent business blog.

As a general rule, I only select posts that stand on their own, no selections from a series.

Also as a general rule, I do not select posts that are either a book review or a book report.

I reserve the right to make exceptions to the above.

Here, on Three Star Leadership, I post things that will help a boss at any level do a better job and live a better life. At the The 360 Degree Feedback blog, I join other bloggers with posts on leadership development. And, at Wally Bock’s Writing Edge, I share tools and insights to help you write better.

The 347 tips in my ebook can help you Become a Better Boss One Tip at a Time.

Just promoted from individual contributor? Check out my ebook, Now You’re the Boss: Making the Most of the Most Important Transition in Business.

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Instead of studying leadership, why not spend some time studying leaders and strategies in the wild? You can learn a lot from leadership experts, but you always see the leader and what he or she does through the expert’s personal lens. Supplement that learning with studying real leaders in real life situations and draw your own conclusions. The posts in this series will help you.

Every week I’ll point you to articles by and about real leaders in real situations and to articles about how real companies are faring in the marketplace. Read them. Think about them. Draw your own lessons and conclusions from them. Then try to apply those lessons in your own real life.

This week I’m pointing you to articles about Sharon Doherty, Bobbi Brown, Jacqueline Applegate, John Chambers, and Harry’s.

From the London Business School: Living through the shift: how to survive and thrive in the age of digital transformation

“Sharon Doherty, Global Organisation & People Development Director, Vodafone, addresses common concerns for organisations facing disruption.”

From Darrah Brustein: Bobbi Brown On Reinvention And How Talking To Strangers Was The Key To Her Success

“Long gone are the days when you choose one career path and do that for the rest of your life. Even when you’re the best at it. Enter Bobbi Brown, famed cosmetics mogul who’s now in a new act of her career after selling her brand (and namesake). Aptly named, Brown’s new company Evolution promotes ‘beauty from the inside out’.”

From Jessie Scott: Jacqueline Applegate’s Perspective on Embracing Change

“The ability to embrace change has propelled this leader through the ranks at Bayer.”

Thanks to Smartbrief on Leadership for pointing me to this story

From Gabriel Perna: Former Cisco CEO John Chambers On Startup Cultures and Vulnerability

“Not too many people get the chance to change the world once—never mind a second time. John Chambers is aiming to be among the select few.”

From Michael J. de la Merced: Shaving Start-Up Harry’s Will Be Sold to Owner of Schick for $1.37 Billion

“When they founded Harry’s as a shaving start-up nearly nine years ago, Andy Katz-Mayfield and Jeff Raider sought to shake up a decades-old business dominated by two giants in the field. Now, they’re joining forces with one of them.”

For some ideas about how to get more from this series of posts, check out “Studying Leaders in the Wild.

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